Last minute choice…

Last minute choice…

After being screwed by BA when they cancelled our Abu Dhabi flights less than 12 hours before departure, we were left with little time to find alternative flights and a hotel, which was a bust in Abu Dhabi so we started looking at Dubai. After Virgin sorted us out flights, we then spent a good 5 hours trawling the interweb for hotels and found Dukes. We read reviews, compared prices and decided that on balance we liked what we saw and it was within budget. We settled on an Executive Studio which was fabulous- big bedroom with super comfy bed (having a bad back I can attest to their comfort!) lovely bathroom with Elemis toiletries in plentiful supply, loads of towels, bathrobes and good lighting. The shower is great, a rainfall head and a standard shower head both powerful and plentiful hot water. There are two wardrobes in the dressing area along with a safe but oddly little drawer space….but we managed just fine. The lounge area had a three seat sofa bed and a small kitchenette with Nespresso machine, kettle, toaster, fridge/freezer, induction hob, crockery and cutlery, pans etc…the only thing that might have been useful was a tea towel but a linen napkin sufficed. There is a breakfast bar with two stools which was useful for food prep, eating and generally dumping bits and bobs on to.Two huge smart TVs and free Wi-fi was most welcome. We had two balconies, both with table and chairs, one was slightly quieter than the other and partially looked over the marina and the other looked out at the mall still under construction. The double glazing is excellent, barely a sound can be heard when the balcony doors are shut. We didn’t use the air con as the room temps were fine, but it seemed to be very effective. The lights took a bit of working out….maybe it’s just my aging eyes!!! The rooms were serviced exceptionally well and when we had an issue with a melting kettle plug it was sorted within minutes with a new kettle. Bottled water is left for you daily and anything requiring replenishment was done so. Most days we were at the beach which was quiet, plenty sunbeds and umbrellas, waiter service attentive, water not too warm but not North Sea either!! The pool is the standout feature with its infinity views over Dubai and was more popular than the beach, but we enjoyed the relative peace until the last day when there was a children’s party and a certain shark song on a constant loop got a bit annoying. I also noticed that there is a kids club here but can’t comment on that or what ages it caters for. There is West 14th St for food which is very good, Khyber which is Indian cuisine and also very very good with a lovely view out over the Palm and marina. Breakfast is at GBR….standard fare but hot, plentiful and didn’t seem to be rushed….coffee is very good as long as you don’t ask for cappuccino as that was way too sweet, Americano with cold milk did us fine and it was very nice. The hotel interior is stunning….the foyer has a magnificent chandelier and lovely fresh flowers dotted about, staff are attentive and professional and very responsive. Whilst we were checking in, as this was for my husbands birthday, he got a lovely little gift from the reception staff, totally out of the blue and very thoughtful, as well as returning to the room one afternoon to find a card, cake and chocolates to say Happy Birthday!! We arrived around 11am not expecting our room to be available but half an hour later we were in it…impressive. Everywhere is a taxi trip…the malls, Dubai marina etc but the pay off is that it’s away from the more frenetic Dubai, certainly on the beach, it was relaxing and relatively peaceful, although there are building works to the front and left side of the hotel, but this is Dubai after all. As holidays go, we don’t tend to stay in hotels but we’d make an exception and return here, it’s got everything we wanted and needed for a relaxing break away from the UK weather. It’s spacious rooms, great staff, quiet beach and good food make it a winner for us for a winter sunshine break and I’d recommend it highly.

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Delhi, India: Chandni Chowk, Rickshaws & Paharganj…

My final day in Delhi was thankfully at my own pace, the whole week had been so intense but I won’t be bitter as I look back at my time spent in India’s capital. Making the most of Chandni Chowk Market had to be done, the craft shops were amazing, perfect for tasteful Christmas presents and for gifts to myself! Those chilled yet crazy evenings spent in Paharganj were great! Taking my first rickshaw in Delhi from my Prime Balaji Deluxe Hotel had to be done, I wasn’t going to leave India without riding dangerously through the streets, no! Ready to spend up my final thousands before flying home for my surprise Christmas visit, it was my mission to find a full tailored suit! Finding a place that looked less than a fortune was a task but I learnt that Chandni Chowk is a wedding favourite, those prime jewelled garments were selling for a grand old price! One tailor’s that looked practically British caught my eye, it wasn’t a wise decision to buy an Indo-Western suit because I wouldn’t have many opportunities to wear it, whereas a Western suit would serve me well during my upcoming trip to North Korea. It wasn’t just a suit that I was looking to spend my money up, I wanted incense sticks galore, in one of the best countries for them I wanted my suitcase to be impossible to carry! It was a money morning!
Getting my measurements all sorted, the tailor told me it would be two hours before I would be able to collect my purchases. I asked the guy if he knew where I could find some incense sticks, he wrote down one place for me, to find it was an absolute experience as I went through many different alleys that took me almost next to the Jama Masjid. Sidetracked by some divine wooden carvings, I bought an elephant carving for my Sister-in-law and for myself I bought a lovely wooden incense burner come holder. Those incense sticks got me berserk, buying about twenty boxes or so definitely had me rearranging my suitcase for the gods! Chandni Chowk was insane with people going about their shopping business, tourists were at a minimum, keeping it that way was appreciated! Going back to the tailor’s was easy enough, Chandni Chowk had one Main Street that looked like a building site, remembering where the chaos lay I was fine. Through the madness Chandni Chowk served it was all to me!
Delhi was selling ‘Bodega Market’ Realness after I found a roadside shop just around the corner from my hotel, selling anything and everything I bought the entire stock of Dabur Red toothpaste! I loved the cosy look of that Paharganj store, next to it serving some seriously delicious Indian sweets was ‘Aggrawal Sweets’, buying the store out of its sweetest treats I devoured them with much enjoyment! I have loved Indian sweets since finding them in England within my hometown of Bilston and during my day trip to Leicester because Britain is proud of its British Asian culture and foods! Going hungry on a daily was a no, no! I didn’t need to be bitter because Paharganj served me some insanely good Butter Chicken, roti and sweet chai tea. Eating at places where foreigners weren’t advised to had my hearing fail because I still went ahead but when I saw a rat slink into the kitchen I pushed that sight out of my head! India challenged me!
It wasn’t going to be a hostel trip during my Delhi stay, not a chance! Staying at the Prime Balaji Deluxe Hotel like my parents, aunt and uncle did during their stay in Delhi had to be the one! The rooms were clean and the quiet feel of the hotel gave me a welcomed sanctuary that shielded me away from the crazy atmosphere on the streets outside of the hotel. The hotel staff were friendly and helpful, assisting me with money transfer from Chinese Yuan to Indian Rupees without any fuss. The breakfast was the best, hot chai in the mornings could be enjoyed with beans and cheese on toast, living in China meant I hadn’t eaten beans for what felt like an eternity! Stepping out of the hotel was fine, but having your wits about you is necessary because as a white foreigner I stuck out like a sore thumb! Paharganj served me a vibe that was down to earth, some places charged tourist prices but I scratched beneath the surface to find a local flavour. Yes, giving props to Paharganj!
Rewinding back to the evening that I arrived in Delhi, the airport was already crazy but as my transfer passed by New Delhi Railway Station I was bowled over by the sheer pandemonium that was occurring, the sights and lights almost blinded me! I lived in a very questionable part of New Jersey, gathering that experience I ventured down to the Main Street outside the Railway Station after my taxi tour on the first full day of my Indian holiday, I was beyond curious! Seeing the sights and then some wasn’t difficult, my senses were on high alert during that moment! Trying the local cuisine was the first thing, going for a very local looking place was the right thing to do, I was hyper aware of my belongings and self because it was madness! The food was good, the place where I ate was on another level for its local feel, no tourists in-sight during that Delhi moment. Going for a cut-throat shave afterwards freshened me up!
Captured above to the left was the view from the place that I ate at, it was so busy down on street level, during the first night there was some kind of celebration that brought a colourful and loud procession through. Buses barged past and rickshaws dangerously weaved through the traffic, it was pure madness and I loved every second being a part of the that crazy! Staying inside ones comfort zone makes an individual very boring, I can be predictable sometimes but during such moments its key to that risk because goodness knows my Newark and Birmingham days got me out of my bubble into the Realness! Chandni Chowk gave me life because my purchases were exactly what I had wanted, better still I still had money to spare! Rickshaw rides had me holding on for my life and bartering in a rather salty fashion, I wasn’t playing with those prices offered, jog on friend! Even though I caught the stomach bug from hell I had an amazing time in Delhi! Delhi, I was so fragile!
Chandni Chowk! Take My Money!
Joseph Harrison

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Cabernet Sauvignon Napa Valley: Maxville Winery

Cabernet Sauvignon Napa Valley: Maxville Winery By Maxville George Bursick Do you love Cabernet Sauvignon From the Napa Valley? Cabernet Sauvignon winemaker George Bursick of Maxville Winery Speaks “We focus on the Cabernet Sauvignon grape variety,” says George Bursick , executive winemaker at Maxville Winery in the Chiles Valley AVA.
Chiles Valley is in the Napa Valley, just 20 minutes from bustling St. Helena with its shops and restaurants down the Silvarado trail.
Maxville Winery and its excellent Cabernet Sauvignon based and other wines has been around for decades. But it’s only in the last year – especially the last four months under the guardianship of George Bursick – that the wines and gorgeous grounds are being recognized.
Maxville winery is known for its high end Cabernet Sauvignon and Bordeaux varietal wines, along with top Sauvignon Blanc (which I enjoyed with crab at the Waterfront restaurant in San Francisco. Though I met George Bursick earlier in New York, today I meet him on his own turf – the gorgeous Maxville winery. The Maxville Winery in Napa Valley’s Chiles Valley The Maxville winery is located in the Chiles Valley AVA of the Napa Valley. It is just 15 short minutes from quaint St. Helena with its world class restaurants and hotels. You feel you are in a more rustic Napa wine country as soon as you turn off Highway 29.
If you are a passenger (especially a passenger from a big busy city) you will gawk with every twist and turn.
If you are the driver, you better keep your eyes on the road and watch out for bicyclists.
The scenic drive includes glimpses of a lake, incredible looking trees, and landscapes so stunning you will want to pull over to take a picture.
I did not see any or other vines. The vineyards for these “money grapes” are safely tucked away from the main road.
The drive reminds me a bit of my visit to the Vineyard 7 & 8 Winery Napa Cabernet Sauvignon Wine Tasting As I enter the Maxville winery I am greeted by George Bursick.
I call him George, yet it is also possible to call him “ Mr. Mouthfeel .”
This is especially true when the silky texture of Cabernet Sauvignon is concerned. George received this nickname because he wrote his thesis on mouthfeel when he attended at UC Davis.
George is one of the famous UC Davis class of 1978 , a year that produced many of the most celebrated winemakers in California today.
While others wrote their thesis on things like aroma and yeast, George describes himself as a “texture guy.” This is why his thesis is on mouthfeel.
To start the tasting, he pours Sauvignon Blanc 2016. And as we taste the Sauvignon Blanc 2016, I sense fresh, floral aromas and vibrant acidity.
And yes, a silky texture. California Napa Valley History George takes me into a small room. Inside the room are photographs from the men who helped build the Napa area. These include George Yount, for which “Yountville” was named. The Maxville Winery Tour Outside of the vineyard, a great deal of the 40 million dollar renovation went into this Napa Valley reception room as well as the winery itself. Gone , says George, are the gigantic murals of American Indians cooking food.
In their place are lovely reception rooms and ( coming soon ) a new state-of-the-art kitchen that will feature celebrity chefs like Martin Yan.
The plan is to have chef demonstrations and tasting dinners. Plans for the Maxville Winery Entertainment Center
The Maxville winery has an actual lake, and 1000 acres of gorgeous grounds.
The lake is presently used for irrigation, yet some exciting upcoming plans include a concert series featuring famous local musicians like neighbor Boz Scaggs remote control sailing regatta picnic events for wine club members and VIPs Maxville is one of the few Napa Valley wineries that has an actual lake. Another is Quintessa Winery Other Maxville Winery Activities The winery has several motorized, all terrain vehicles for VIPs to explore the 1000 acres of territory and vineyards here.
There are also several ATV (all terrain vehicles) and a new Humvee so visitors can tour the the 1000 acres efficiently …
On my last visit, I heard there was a sixty foot waterfall not too far out.
Coming soon to the Maxville Winery is also a Buddha themed garden with warm springs. The Napa Valley Maxville Winery Grand Plan George and the Maxville team are putting together a grand plan to draw attention to the Maxville winery.
The plan focuses on the excellent quality of the Cabernet Sauvignon Napa Valley and other variety wines.
Yet the plan will also highlight the many exciting experiences that visitors can have at the Maxville winery.
This goes beyond the tasting room. Programs will highlight the association between wine and cuisine. And wine and fun.

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WEEKLY MENU PLAN (#186)

Share 9 Shares WEEKLY MENU PLAN (#186) – A delicious collection of dinner, side dish and dessert recipes to help you plan your weekly menu and make life easier for you!
In these menu plans, we will be sharing some of our favorite recipe ideas for you to use as you are planning out your meals for the week. Just click any of the recipe titles or pictures to get the recipe.
A little about how we plan our week and our menu plan:
Mondays are soup and salad. Tuesdays we are bringing you delicious Mexican cuisine. Wednesdays are a taste of Italy. Thursdays are designed around yummy sandwiches, burgers, and wraps. Fridays are a no cook day around here. Going out with friends and loved ones is something that we think is important. It’s your night off from cooking- enjoy! Saturdays are an exotic food night, it’s a great night to try something new, from cooking with seafood, to trying Indian or Thai dishes. Sundays are a traditional old fashioned all American family dinner- think meat and potatoes.
There will also always be a couple of delectable desserts to use any day you wish. A new weekly menu plan will be posted every SUNDAY morning so be sure to check back each week! CLICK ON THE LINKED RECIPE TITLES OR PHOTOS TO GET THE FULL RECIPE WEEK #186

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Hong Kong gifts Pakistan a culinary star

By Jerome Taylor & David Stout
HONG KONG/ ISLAMABAD — A pair of his father’s old tandoor ovens helped Hong Kong restaurateur Asim Hussain achieve a dream — the world’s first Michelin star for a Pakistani restaurant, an accolade he hopes will fire interest in the country’s often overlooked cuisine.
Like many of Hong Kong’s 85,000 strong South Asian population, Hussain’s family trace their lineage in the bustling financial hub back generations, when the city was a British colonial outpost.
His great-grandfather arrived during World War One, overseeing mess halls for British soldiers while his Cantonese speaking father owned restaurants in the eighties and nineties.
Hussain, 33, already had some twenty eateries in his group when he decided to embark on his what he described as his most personal and risky project yet, a restaurant serving dishes from Pakistan’s Punjab region, the family’s ancestral homeland and where he was packed off to boarding school aged six.
His father, a serial entrepreneur and even once Pakistan’s ambassador to South Korea, suggested he restore two old tandoors from his now shuttered restaurant collecting dust in storage.
“He comes from a generation that doesn’t throw things away,” laughs Hussain, dressed in a traditional knee-length tunic and sitting in a restaurant decked with paintings by Pakistani artists. “Actually the results are better than if we had new ovens because these things improve with age.”
Those tandoors, frequent trips to Lahore to perfect recipes and a kitchen overseen by head chef Palash Mitra, earned the New Punjab Club a Michelin star just 18 months after it opened its doors.
The success made headlines in Pakistan, a country that is unlikely to see a Michelin guide any time soon and whose chefs have long felt overshadowed by the wider global recognition gained from neighboring India’s regional cuisines.
“It makes us proud, it makes us very happy,” Waqar Chattha, who runs one of Islamabad’s best-known restaurants, told AFP. “In the restaurant fraternity it’s a great achievement. It sort of sets a benchmark for others to achieve as well.”
Hussain is keen to note that his restaurant only represents one of Pakistan’s many cuisines, the often meat-heavy, piquant food of the Punjab. At it doesn’t come cheap — as much as $100 per head.
“I’m not arrogant or ignorant to say this is the best Pakistani restaurant in the world. There are better Pakistani restaurants than this in Pakistan.”
But he says the accolade has still been a “great source of pride” for Hong Kong’s 18,000-strong Pakistani community.
“It’s bringing a very niche personal story back to life, this culture, this cuisine is sort of unknown outside of Pakistan, outside of Punjab, so in a very small way I think we’ve shed a positive light on the work, on who we are and where we come from,” he explains.
It was the second star achieved by Black Sheep, the restaurant group which was founded six years ago by Hussain and his business partner, veteran Canadian chef Christopher Mark, and has seen rapid success.But the expansion of Michelin and other Western food guides into Asia has not been without controversy.
Critics have often said reviewers tended to over-emphasize Western culinary standards, service and tastes.
Daisann McLane is one of those detractors. She describes the Michelin guide’s arrival in Bangkok last year as “completely changing the culinary scene there — and not in a good way.”
She runs culinary tours to some of the Hong Kong’s less glitzy eateries — to hole in the wall “dai pai dong” food stalls, African and South Asian canteens hidden inside the famously labyrinthine Chungking Mansions and to “cha chan teng” tea shops famous for their sweet brews and thick slabs of toast.
While she’s “delighted” New Punjab Club has been recognized, she has her reservations: “There is a lot of world cuisine operating way under the radar in Hong Kong and it doesn’t get noticed by Michelin or the big award groups.”
For some, any recognition of Pakistan’s overlooked cuisine is a success story.
Sumayya Usmani said she spent years trying to showcase the distinct flavors of Pakistani cuisine, so heavily influenced by the tumultuous and violent migration sparked by the 1947 partition of India.
When the British-Pakistani chef first pitched her cookbook to publishers on her country’s cuisine, many initially balked.
But in recent years, she says, attitudes have changed. Pakistani-run restaurants in the West that once might have described themselves as Indian are more proudly proclaiming their real culinary heritage, she says.
“I think it’s really good that people are coming out of that fear of calling themselves specifically Pakistani,” she told AFP.
“It’s nice that Pakistanis have started to take ownership of what belongs to them.”
Back in Hong Kong, Hussain remarks the hard work has only just begun.
“I joke with the boys and I say that ‘It’s the first Pakistani Punjabi restaurant in the world to win a star, let’s not be the first one to lose a star’”. — AFP

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Good place to stay

Freindly staff and great food served with lot of personal care. The property is also ideally located in the town area. Break fast was simply superb with good spread of Indian and continental cuisines.

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04 February 2019 – Hong Kong gifts Pakistan a culinary star – Features – SHOWCASE – My Sinchew

Hong Kong gifts Pakistan a culinary star 2019-02-04 15:26 A selection of dishes at the New Punjab Club restaurant in Hong Kong. Photo courtesy: AFP A dish of spiced chicken at the New Punjab Club restaurant in Hong Kong. Photo courtesy: AFP Spiced fish, naan bread and other dishes at the New Punjab Club restaurant in Hong Kong. Photo courtesy: AFP Asim Hussain posing at his restaurant, the New Punjab Club, in Hong Kong. Photo courtesy: AFP
By Jerome TAYLOR / with David STOUT in Islamabad
Hong Kong (AFP) — A pair of his father’s old tandoor ovens helped Hong Kong restaurateur Asim Hussain achieve a dream — the world’s first Michelin star for a Pakistani restaurant, an accolade he hopes will fire interest in the country’s often overlooked cuisine.
Like many of Hong Kong’s 85,000 strong South Asian population, Hussein’s family trace their lineage in the bustling financial hub back generations, when the city was a British colonial outpost.
His great-grandfather arrived during World War One, overseeing mess halls for British soldiers while his Cantonese speaking father owned restaurants in the eighties and nineties.
Hussein, 33, already had some twenty eateries in his group when he decided to embark on his what he described as his most personal and risky project yet, a restaurant serving dishes from Pakistan’s Punjab region, the family’s ancestral homeland and where he was packed off to boarding school aged six.
His father, a serial entrepreneur and even once Pakistan’s ambassador to South Korea, suggested he restore two old tandoors from his now shuttered restaurant collecting dust in storage.
“He comes from a generation that doesn’t throw things away,” laughs Hussain, dressed in a traditional knee-length tunic and sitting in a restaurant decked with paintings by Pakistani artists. “Actually the results are better than if we had new ovens because these things improve with age.”
Those tandoors, frequent trips to Lahore to perfect recipes and a kitchen overseen by head chef Palash Mitra, earned the New Punjab Club a Michelin star just 18 months after it opened its doors.
‘A benchmark’
The success made headlines in Pakistan, a country that is unlikely to see a Michelin guide any time soon and whose chefs have long felt overshadowed by the wider global recognition gained from neighbouring India’s regional cuisines.
“It makes us proud, it makes us very happy,” Waqar Chattha, who runs one of Islamabad’s best-known restaurants, told AFP. “In the restaurant fraternity it’s a great achievement. It sort of sets a benchmark for others to achieve as well.”
Hussain is keen to note that his restaurant only represents one of Pakistan’s many cuisines, the often meat-heavy, piquant food of the Punjab. At it doesn’t come cheap — as much as $100 per head.
“I’m not arrogant or ignorant to say this is the best Pakistani restaurant in the world. There are better Pakistani restaurants than this in Pakistan.”
But he says the accolade has still been a “great source of pride” for Hong Kong’s 18,000-strong Pakistani community.
“It’s bringing a very niche personal story back to life, this culture, this cuisine is sort of unknown outside of Pakistan, outside of Punjab, so in a very small way I think we’ve shed a positive light on the work, on who we are and where we come from,” he explains.
It was the second star achieved by Black Sheep, the restaurant group which was founded six years ago by Hussein and his business partner, veteran Canadian chef Christopher Mark, and has seen rapid success.
But the expansion of Michelin and other western food guides into Asia has not been without controversy.
Critics have often said reviewers tended to over-emphasise western culinary standards, service and tastes.
Daisann McLane is one of those detractors. She describes the Michelin guide’s arrival in Bangkok last year as “completely changing the culinary scene there — and not in a good way.”
She runs culinary tours to some of the Hong Kong’s less glitzy eateries — to hole in the wall “dai pai dong” food stalls, African and South Asian canteens hidden inside the famously labyrinthine Chungking Mansions and to “cha chan teng” tea shops famous for their sweet brews and thick slabs of toast.
While she’s “delighted” New Punjab Club has been recognised, she has her reservations: “There is a lot of world cuisine operating way under the radar in Hong Kong and it doesn’t get noticed by Michelin or the big award groups.”
‘Taking ownership’
For some, any recognition of Pakistan’s overlooked cuisine is a success story.
Sumayya Usmani said she spent years trying to showcase the distinct flavours of Pakistani cuisine, so heavily influenced by the tumultuous and violent migration sparked by the 1947 partition of India.
When the British-Pakistani chef first pitched her cookbook to publishers on her country’s cuisine, many initially balked.
But in recent years, she says, attitudes have changed. Pakistani-run restaurants in the west that once might have described themselves as Indian are more proudly proclaiming their real culinary heritage, she says.
“I think it’s really good that people are coming out of that fear of calling themselves specifically Pakistani,” she told AFP. “It’s nice that Pakistanis have started to take ownership of what belongs to them.”
Back in Hong Kong, Hussain remarks the hard work has only just begun.
“I joke with the boys and I say that ‘It’s the first Pakistani Punjabi restaurant in the world to win a star, let’s not be the first one to lose a star'”.

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Quick Guide to the Best, Cheap Brooklyn Neighborhoods for Renters

Quick Guide to the Best, Cheap Brooklyn Neighborhoods for Renters February 4, 2019 0 Brooklyn offers many possibilities for families moving on a budget
Brooklyn is becoming more and more popular every year. It offers business opportunities , tasty food, a top-quality education system, and an amazing cultural scene. For this reason, the housing costs are on the constant rise . The opportunity creates itself, and luxury homes and buildings are being built at a fast pace. Median rent is going higher and higher, which can become a real problem and drive away families on a budget . If you have ever wished to move to Brooklyn yourself, you might be concerned with this information. With this in mind, we will talk today about best, cheap Brooklyn neighborhoods for renters .
Here is your opportunity to find out that there is another option . A cheaper one that still gives you same chance to live a happy and prosperous life with your loved ones. Moving on a budget
Before we start talking about the best, cheap Brooklyn neighborhoods for renters, let’s talk about your budget. If you are planning to move to Brooklyn, you are already spending a lot of money on your relocation. The first step would be to cut down your expenses when moving . For example, find local moving experts in the Brooklyn area . Best way to move to Brooklyn is to find local professionals . They already know the city, which makes your transition more comfortable. Affordable packaging material
Another way of saving money when relocating is to find affordable packing supplies in Brooklyn . Our advice is to always search for discounts . There is no reason to be all fancy when packing your belongings. It is much more important that you put your money to good use . Use free stuff when you can, learn to work with what you have, and the entire process will be a piece of cake. Best, Cheap Brooklyn Neighborhoods for Renters Contents
To be able to talk about best, cheap Brooklyn neighborhoods for renters, we came up with the list of least expensive neighborhoods . Today, we will talk about: Crown Heights Flatbush Sunset Park
Each of these locations is an opportunity waiting to be discovered . Before you sell your home and move to Brooklyn, let’s look at where you can go. Crown Heights
If you are searching for a perfect balance between families and younger people , Crown Heights is the place for you. It is just a 30-minute commute away from Manhattan. The 2, 3, 4 and 5 trains are connecting directly to A and C trains, and this will make your life easier. One of the reasons why people come in great numbers to Crown Heights is the Caribbean carnival
Median rent is around $2,600 per month , which is cheaper than Clinton Hill or Prospect Heights . Nevertheless, Crown Heights is an equally convenient choice for your family. The reason why this wonderful community is on the list of best, cheap Brooklyn neighborhoods for renters is its diversity and positive vibe . Crown Heights had its rough times in the past, but the crime rate has notably dropped in the past ten years . This neighborhood is now home to a mix of Caribbean and Jewish-Orthodox communities . There are many carnivals and parades in Crown Heights that draw in many people during a year. Windsor Terrace
Our list of best, cheap Brooklyn neighborhoods for renters now takes you right between Prospect Park and Greenwood Cemetery . Here is where you will find this attractive family-oriented block . On the other hand, if you are a young individual eager to relax and have some fun, take a step into one of the easy-going bars and restaurants , such as Butterfunk Kitchen or The Double Windsor .
Median rent is around $2,500 , and an excellent thing about Windsor Terrace is that it has the vibe of Park Slope but without overly expensive rents . F and G lines take you directly to midtown Manhattan in under an hour
One of the cons might be the commute, although we can’t really say that we can treat it as such. With transit lines F and G, it is relatively easy to commute within Brooklyn . However, if you wish to get to midtown Manhattan, it might take about 1 hour. Flatbush
Here is where you will find a great combination of low prices and economic and social diversity . Flatbush has become home to many new residents in the past decade. A diverse range of cultures including Bangladeshi, Pakistani, Central American, Caribbean, West Indian, Jewish, Indian, and Asian are living together in one happy community .
One of the best things about this neighborhood is the Flatbush Food Co-op , a grocery line that offers everything you need. They have been in business since 1976, and so far they have always delivered exceptional service and high-quality products .
Caption: Old style Victorian houses in Flatbush are a beautiful place to live
Median rent is at $2,150 per month , which is reasonably priced. Whether you are a fan of old Victorian homes, brick townhouses, or prewar apartment buildings , you will find your place.
Just like Crown Heights, Flatbush had its crime problems. Nevertheless, the crime rate dropped for a whopping 85% in the past two decades, and it became a safe community for raising your family . Sunset Park
We are coming to an end of our list of best, cheap Brooklyn neighborhoods for renters. We have saved one of the best neighborhoods for last. Sunset Park offers affordable median rents that go as low as $2,000 per month . In return, you get to enjoy a beautiful view of Manhattan and become a part of an old school neighborhood . The exquisite taste of authentic Asian and Latin American cuisine will charm you into moving to Sunset Park.  Sunset Park is a great place to enjoy a sunny day with your loved ones
It is an excellent choice for people commuting to Downtown Manhattan and Brooklyn , accessed by the N and R trains. For the past couple of years, many young people have been moving in, mostly because of the Industry City complex on the waterfront . Plus, there’s an amazing chain of shops and stores that offers a variety of products. Pack your bags, Brooklyn awaits!
We sincerely hope that you liked our list of best, cheap Brooklyn neighborhoods for renters. If you are attracted to these diverse and friendly communities , go ahead and become a part of them. Still, know that there are many great choices , and this list is just a nudge to push you in the right direction. You are the one who needs to decide where your place under in the Sun will be! TAGS

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civvver said: ↑ What would you bring to a multi cultural potluck? My work is having one and we’re supposed to bring a family recipe or ethnic dish. I thought about this, I really don’t have any family recipes. I have my own goto recipes, but nothing ethnic, unless you consider shish kebabs or chicken stir fry ethnic. If someone asked me what your signature recipe was it’d probably just be chicken stew in the crock pot. There are four meals we have almost once a week because they are easy, fast and agreeable to everyone in my fam: Chicken stew in the crock pot, grilled or baked salmon, burgers and tacos. Stew I make ahead, salmon you just throw in the over for 20 mins, and the other two I can whip up the protein in like 10 minutes and we just fix a couple sides. But I wouldn’t bring any of those to a potluck.
I guess I am going to make some homemade fresh egg fettuccine and a light sauce, either simple olive oil, white wine, lemon, garlic, herbs, or sausage and peppers with a little tomato paste. I don’t really consider italian-american food very ethnic, but I my roots are central Europe, all we eat is like meat and potatoes and grandparents didn’t cook all that much. I made ravioli and lasagna before but honestly the payoff wasn’t worth the effort. It tasted maybe 10% better than store bought for like 300% more effort. I think the fresh pasta quality is lost in the other flavors when it’s baked/stuffed. Fresh pasta is like 100% tastier than dried in my opinion for at most 50% more effort.
So what would you bring to a multi cultural pot luck?
As a side note, half my team is indian, and there are some chinese people working here too so I’m sure they can bring something very typical in their native cuisine that’ll seem exotic to the rest of us. Click to expand… but your current recipes are what the family eats, and possibly even what your children will cook when they leave the house. so they are family recipes, no? give it some time and they’re family traditions, give it some cultural change and they’re ethnic
to me “ethnic” as in “ethnic supermarket” just means specific to an ethnicity. so for example gumbo, a reuben sandwich, biscuits and gravy, chitlins, lobster bisque, a specific bbq and maybe even regional burger styles should be considered “ethnic”. a lot of American food that isn’t mickey dee’s should but I don’t think that’s what was meant in the request just my piece of mind
Btw Knödel is a German dish (tho I am sure there is a eastern european variant of it). commonly made with potatoes, I prefer a different kind: Semmelknödel
made from Old bread!

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Third annual Dearborn Restaurant Week returns Feb. 11

Third annual Dearborn Restaurant Week returns Feb. 11 2:41 pm Sarah Kominek COMMUNITY
DEARBORN – Dearborn Restaurant Week returns Feb. 11 with its third annual event with more than 30 participating restaurants.
Sam Abbas, an organizer of the event and West Dearborn Downtown Development Authority chair, said he thinks there is no better thing to bring people together with than food.
He said the event brings people in from outside the city to get a taste of what Dearborn “really is.”
“Everybody has this view of Dearborn and what it’s all about,” Abbas said. “A lot of people miss the mark on the diversity that’s in the city and within the cuisines, too. The best part about the city is that you can go down Michigan avenue and have everything from Mongolian to Indian, Lebanese to traditional American food. You can go to the four corners of the world and enjoy any meal you’d like.
“Restaurant Week was created to allow people to come together and enjoy a meal at a slightly discounted price and to bring exposure to these restaurants,” he added.
Participating Dearborn restaurants offer their regular menus and the Dearborn Restaurant Week menu fixed-price, three-course meal for $10, $20 or $30.
“The lunch and dinner options and affordable price points makes Dearborn Restaurant Week the ideal time to sample Dearborn’s diverse food scene,” Abbas said.
“Downtown Dearborn is a top Metro Detroit food destination and we are continuing to add new spaces and experiences to explore,” said Cristina Sheppard-Decius, Dearborn DDA executive director. “Dearborn Restaurant Week is really an opportunity to celebrate the incredible culinary talent and options we offer in Downtown Dearborn as we invite all to pull up a chair and dig in.”
Abbas said participating Dearborn restaurants reported a successful turnout for previous Restaurant weeks with sales increases of up to 30 percent.
“It’s people coming from all around that maybe wouldn’t have ventured off and tried some of these restaurants,” he said. “It gives you the chance to try at least three or four restaurants throughout the week at a very affordable price.”
Tickets are not required to participate. Visit DearbornRestaurantWeek.com for a list of participating restaurants or to make a reservation for some required restaurants.
According a press release on Jan. 28, the participating restaurants include Al Ameer, bd’s Mongolian Grill, Brome Modern Eatery, The Butcher’s Grille, Caesars Coney and Grill, Cheat Treats, Dearborn Meat Market, Edison’s, Famous Hamburger, Ford’s Garage, Habib’s Cuisine, LA Bistro, La Fork, La Pita, La Shish, Lefty’s Cheesesteak, Lue Thai Café, M Cantina, Mint 29, Mocha Bistro, New York Deli, Peacock Indian Cuisine, Sheeba Restaurant, Shawarma Bash, Trio Eats, Xushi Ko and Zo’s Good Burger.
Dearborn Restaurant Week is hosted by Downtown Dearborn’s East and West Dearborn Downtown Development Authorities in partnership with flagship sponsor Ford Land Development and many others. Tags

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