Kenya's best food is a kaleidoscope of flavors

Kenya’s best food is a kaleidoscope of flavors

t Meat “People love their meat!,” laughs Adagala. If it’s a gathering or celebration, then nyama choma — Swahili for roast meat, usually goat or beef — is sure to be center stage. “It varies from region to region,” says Adagala. “In the west, we might roast goat with eucalyptus wood, but in Nairobi it’s just a normal roast and served with kachumbari .” Kachumbari (or salsa) “goes well with everything,” she adds. “It’s very simple to make. I like mine with tomatoes, a splash of lime juice, some onions and chili.” Ugali , a polenta-like cornmeal slab, is the other essential side dish. It’s “our staple food,” she says, but it’s “an acquired taste.” Outsiders might complain it’s bland, but for Kenyans, it’s the ultimate starchy comfort food, and with the right spicy accompaniments, it comes to life. “Have ugali with some vegetables and a very rich meat dish, like well-cooked tilapia or matumbo , to bring everything together,” advises Adagala. Matumbo, or tripe, “is dark and black and looks like a towel,” but served up in bao in Nyama Mama’s Asian fusion take on a Kenyan classic, it’s some of the tastiest stomach you’ll eat this year. “We are not wasteful at all,” says Adagala. It’s not just offal that’s on the menu. When the goat is slaughtered for the nyama choma, its blood might find its way into a mutura sausage, a spicy delicacy of offal, garlic, ginger, chili and coriander, all bound together by the red stuff. Fish and chicken ” Tilapia is the most common fish in our country,” says Adagala, and, traditionally, it’s often fried. The vast Lake Victoria, which Kenya shares with Uganda and Tanzania, is the main producer of freshwater fish. Uduvi (shrimp) and kamba (prawns) are particularly delicious wa kupaka , which means “with a rich coconut curry stew.” Kuku kienjeyi — free-range chicken — is also a top candidate for the coconut treatment. Pulses and vegetables Nyama choma might be popular for gatherings, but when it comes to everyday eating, “Kenyan cuisine in its essence is actually heavily vegetarian,” says Adagala. One of the country’s vegetable staples is sukuma wiki , collard greens cooked with onions and spices. Its literal translation is “end of the week,” typical of a food culture which traditionally has been more about subsistence than extravagance. ” Mboga is the umbrella term for vegetables,” explains Adagala. “We have many traditional vegetables which are common in the western part of the country, whch is where I came from.” Kanzira is African kale, managu is African nightshade and terere is “similar to wild spinach.” Adagali recommends trying githeri , a casserole of maize and beans, with a side of avocado, while other popular pulses include ndengu (mung beans) and njahi (black beans). Every cuisine benefits from a starchy potato fix, so for the Kenyan twist try viazi karai (fried potatoes) or viazi via ryo (potatoes in a tomato and coconut sauce). Mukimo is a vividly hued mash of potatoes and green vegetables while irio is a variant with peas and corn. And then there’s matoke , which is part of the plantain family. Adagala says “it’s a lot starchier, a little bit less sweet” and “fantastic for stewing.” Indian and Arabic influence Kenya has a large Indian population, a migration which began in the late 19th century when indentured laborers were recruited from British-ruled India to build the Kenya-Uganda railway. There are plenty of Swahili classics whose names will sound familiar to fans of Indian food — chapati , samosas , bhajia , biryani and pilau — although they’re given a local spin. Kenyan chapati, for example, are made with white or all-purpose flour, and are fried in vegetable oil or ghee before serving. “For festivities, we like having pilau, and also masala fries (French fries with spicy sauce), because they’re just considered a bit more festive,” says Adagala. Cuisine on Kenya’s eastern coast is influenced by the fresh ideas — and ingredients — brought in by trading with India and Arabic countries. “The coastal people are more expressive when it comes to spices, they’re very bold and very assertive,” explains Adagala. “When you come inland, people like their food more simple. They like tasting the essence of the ingredients. They even consider use of spices as an interruption. “When you go to the west, we also like our food more simple. The only difference is we put more traditional salts. We like smoking our meats; we like roasting our meats with specific types of woods.” Sweet things and drinks Mendazi — samosa-shaped but donut-tasting — are a delicious breakfast treat. Vibibi, rice and coconut pancakes, are another light, fluffy delicacy to start the day. And of course, you need something to wash them down with. “We export the best coffee in the world but what Kenyans really love is tea,” says Adagala. Chai masala , lightly fragrant, lightly sweet, milky tea, is a breakfast classic. Tea might often be enjoyed at breakfast with nduma , a starchy tuber which is prepared simply by boiling with a pinch of salt. Alternatively, Adagala prepares it with a crispy coating: Falooda , an Indian-style milkshake, is another of the imports to have made it here from Asia. When it comes to street snacks, sugar cane is often seen for sale. Kenyans old and young like to slice it up and suck upon it like a straw. “For the older folk there’s an alcoholic juice called busaa ; it’s made using fermented soghurm flour,” says Adagala. “You put fermented soghurm flour or just the seeds in a big pot, pour in some water and some yeast, then let it ferment.” When it’s ready, men like to “gather around the pot and they all drink from it.” Where to eat in Nairobi Nyama Mama is “one of the best Kenyan restaurants” in Nairobi, says Adagala. “It’s very popular because it takes Kenyan classics and gives them a nice twist.” She also recommends Swahili Plate, in the Central Business District, for tasty, no-nonsense local cuisine, and for nyama choma she recommends Roadhouse Grill and Carnivore. “Carnivore does everything from beef to crocodile to duck. Everything!,” she says. And for Kenyan-style gourmet burgers, her top tip is Mama Rocks, at hip hangout and “creative hub” The Alchemist. Nyama Mama Delta , Delta Towers, Nairobi, Kenya; +254 704 567567 Roadhouse Grill, Dennis Pritt Road, Nairobi, Kenya; +254 720 768663 Carnivore , Langata Road, near Wilson Airport, Nairobi, Kenya; +254 722 204647 Swahili Plate, Muindi Mbingu St, Nairobi, Kenya; +254 772 435765 Mama Rocks @ The Alchemist, Parklands Rd, Nairobi, Kenya; +254 705 155 155 For more of Kaluhi Adagala’s tips, visit her blog Kaluhi’s Kitchen and follow her on Instagram and YouTube

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What’s On This Weekend in London: 10th-12th May

This Weekend What’s On This Weekend in London: 10th-12th May Giant margaritas, two days of cheese-eating and an action-packed fitness festival. If that’s not considered balanced, we don’t know what is. Here’s what we’ll be doing this weekend in London. Things to do this weekend in London Queen of Hoxton’s Las Mexicanas Rooftop
Good news for Londoners looking for a spot of rooftop revelry, Queen of Hoxton’s rooftop terrace is back in action, this time inspired by all things Mexican. It’ll be like you’ve stepped into the colourful town of San Cristóbal as you go all out on tacos, tequila and giant frozen margaritas.
queenofhoxton.com The London Whisky Weekender 2019
Back for a stellar sixth edition, the London Whisky Weekender is where everyone from conoiseurres to the curious can sample the very best in home-grown whiskies. Of course there’ll be tastings aplenty, as well as street food, live music and masterclasses.
Tickets available here. London Craft Week
Taking place capital-wide, London Craft Week welcomes the crème de la crème of the craft week to share their practices and celebrate outstanding British and international creativity. This year, the festival brings together over 240 emerging and established artists, designers, galleries and creatives for a programme of workshops, installations and experiences.
londoncraftweek.com Balance Festival
Balance Festival is back with a bang this weekend having cherry-picked the city’s top boutique studios, healthy food, expert trainers, yogis and athleisure brands to put on one unmissable event for London’s wellness warriors. Visitors can expect to see the likes of Stephanie Elswood, Alice Liveing, Carly Rowena and Zanna van Dijk hosting main stage workouts , while EQUINOX will get those glutes fired up in a strength and conditioning class. There’ll also be rich pickings in nutritious food (from avo toast to gourmet burgers) and live cookery classes to inspire healthy cooking at home.
10-12 May; balance-festival.com Dulwich Festival
The Dulwich Festival returns for an annual celebration of art, music, theatre and literature, this time with a theme of ‘Belonging’. Showcasing the local artistic community, the ever-popular Artists’ Open House will see over 200 artists open their homes and studios to the public, providing an up-close insight into their work. There’ll also be music recitals, panel talks, stalls and activities for the whole family.
10-19 May; dulwichfestival.co.uk We Love Cheese Festival
If you’re a fan of a cheese board you’ll want to get yourself over to Battersea Power Station this weekend where We Love Cheese Festival is back for two delicious days of cheesy street food, special menus and cheese sellers from around the globe. Taking place in the Battersea Cites tent is a range of talks and panel sessions including a masterclass in five-minute fondue and talks on sustainability and the rise of vegan cheese. If that’s not enough to whet your appetite, the festival will see a cheesy selection of London’s best street food names including the Rackette Brothers, Mac To The Future, Burger Boy and The Toasty Badger.
welovecheesefest.co.uk Affordable Art Fair
The wellness industry makes itself at home in the art world as the Affordable Art Fair returns to Hampstead. Centred around the theme of wellbeing, the four-day event showcases over 100 international galleries and 1000s of original artworks at affordable prices (from £100 – £6,000). There’ll also be yoga and breathwork classes, therapeutic workshops, immersive art and relaxation classes throughout the week.
affordableartfair.com Fulham Beach
Officially back for the summer months, Fulham Beach brings an urban jungle paradise to south west London. Having taken inspiration from the tropics, the vibrant indoor and outdoor space is a lush and colourful summer paradise, where you’re invited to eat, play, dance and drink the summer away. Expect refreshing cocktails, bottomless rosé, beach brunches, top street food vendors and live music.
neverlandlondon.com Roof East
Find out if you have what it takes in the ultimate adult playground where there are six action-packed gaming lanes where you can curl, bowl or shuffle to victory, as well as crazy golf, Jenga, foosball and table tennis. If that’s not enough, Roof East will also be introducing Roof Eats: a line-up of London’s best street food vendors serving everything from vegan Vietnamese cuisine to burgers and North Indian Kati rolls.

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Food orders score big on Swiggy this IPL season

Food orders score big on Swiggy this IPL season Delhi, May 10 (IANS) As IPL fever enters its last leg, online food delivery platform Swiggy on Friday said food orders shot up by 30 per cent during match timings compared to non-cricket days. Smaller cities like Vapi, Pilani, Kanyakumari, Rewa, Nizamabad and Kadapa have emerged victorious, as they saw over 117-fold increase in orders once the IPL started, the food delivery platform said in a statement. Smaller cities not only ordered more often but also spent more. “Places like Shillong, North Goa, Shimla and Ooty left many of the metros behind to make high value orders,” the company said. “Foodies in Hyderabad, Bengaluru and Delhi placed the maximum orders every time there was a sixer,” the company added. Not far behind were foodies in Kota, Bhubaneshwar and Jaipur who made it to the top 10 cities. Every time a batman hit a six, Indians celebrated by ordering these dishes – Chicken Biryani, Paneer Butter Masala, Chicken Fried Rice, Kadhai Paneer, Masala Dosa, Vegetable Biryani and Tandoori Chicken, said the company. North Indian and Chinese were the most ordered cuisine this IPL. “Chennai and Kolkata stuck to the Chicken Biryani while Delhi bowled for Dal Makhni and Bengaluru batted for Masala Dosa,” Swiggy noted. Bengaluru ordered the most chicken wings while Delhi ordered the most pizzas and samosas, said the company. Mumbai ordered the most nachos while Chennai ordered the most French fries. –IANS

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Check out These South Florida Eateries in May

RSS Check out These South Florida Eateries in May With absolutely no shortage of different places to savor a great meal in South Florida, some newer eateries are generating lots of buzz this month for their menu and the ambiance.
Miami Beach, FL — ( SBWIRE ) — 05/10/2019 — Head inside Miami Beach’s Generator Hostel on Collins Avenue to find The Jim and Neesie. This place has lots of different drinks in addition to cocktails and various dishes such as the crispy skin airline chicken or the carrots roasted in citrus. The atmosphere combines hip with approachable. Hopping over to neighboring Miami, Maska on 1st Avenue focuses on Indian cuisine devised by its Michelin level chef Hemant Mathur. The menu also has contemporary plates to choose from. Some of the food guests may want to try include duck-filled tacos, the multitude of stuffed breads, or perhaps the highly regarded tandoori lamb chops. Swan & Bar Bevy lies to the north of Maska. A collaborative effort by widely known names like hospitality tycoon David Grutman, singer and producer Pharrell Williams, and Europe Top Chef winner Jean Imbert, this establishment focuses on a “modern chic” ambiance with the fancy dishes to back it up. Choose the caviar tossed spaghetti or go the upper floor for a Bohemian-influenced drink at Bar Bevy. About Blackstone International Realty Blackstone International Realty provides buyers, sellers, and renters with the finest luxury properties throughout South Florida including Miami Beach real estate. Each agent is thoroughly trained to provide clients with exceptional service, professionalism, and competency in transactions. Besides its brokerage services the company also provides in-house title and closing services. For more information on the company or Continuum in South Beach call 305-588-2451. Media Relations Contact

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Visit to Sikkim

Excellent hotel, outstanding service.. we tried the Spa on arrival, we had a fantastic experience. The rooms are very spacious, balcony was very refreshing. Food was excellent with a nice assortment of North/ south Indian and continental cuisine. The staff was so caring and hospitable. We did all out trips to South Sikkim, North Sikkim and East Sikkim through the Hotel Travel Desk. Special mention to Sagar who did an outstanding job of putting together our itinerary and arranging good vehicles and great drivers. Yogesh and Agya were very knowledgeable and gave an great service. We also fell in love with the souvenier shop, best souveniers very inexpensive. Overall we had a magical experience. I highly recommend this hotel to anyone who wishes to visit Gangtok.nnManju Kashi

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Da Village

By ediblereading In Reviews
I remember being irked when Comptoir Libanais opened in its fancy new space on the Oracle Riverside. It felt like such a lazy attempt to steal custom from my beloved Bakery House: didn’t the people going there know that just across the IDR you could get much better, far cheaper Lebanese food from a proudly independent restaurant which had been there for years? Was being able to drink really enough consolation for such underwhelming food?
In reality, perhaps I was just peeved by another chain opening in a town which really doesn’t need any more. I certainly wasn’t so annoyed when Bakery House itself opened, when there was already another Lebanese restaurant in town (La Courbe, which did good food but never quite transcended being a big glass box that did good food). This crossed my mind this week when I decided to visit Da Village, an Afghan restaurant which opened in January on the Oxford Road, literally a handful of doors down from Kobeeda Palace, an Afghan restaurant on the Oxford Road. Couldn’t they have opened somewhere else? I remembered when I first got reports of it opening, at the end of last year. “Oh God” people on Twitter said, “Kobeeda Palace must be closing.”
“I suppose there can only be a few possibilities” I said to my friend Yasir as he drove us to the nearby Tesco car park. “Either there’s such a big Afghan community that it can support two restaurants, or they’re really going after Kobeeda Palace, or they’ve made a huge misjudgement.”
“I guess so” said Yasir, pulling into an empty space. I’ve known Yasir for years – we first worked together over fifteen years ago, and in the intervening time both of us have done a very patchy job of growing up. Yasir’s family are from Islamabad, not that far from the border with Afghanistan, and he knows that cuisine better than most people I know. Not only that, but he makes some of the best kofte kebabs I’ve ever tasted. If anybody was the right person to test out Da Village with, it was Yasir.
“By the way, when you say the words ‘Da Village’, do you think of…”
“…Ali G? Definitely.”
The windows of Da Village are tinted so you can’t see in, so I was surprised when we went in to find it was a pretty nice space, pleasingly spacious with pretty big tables. The chairs looked comfy too, although when I tried to pick it up by the handle at the top of the backrest it came away in my hand: impressive going for a restaurant barely three months old.
But anyway, it was a nice room. There were some hanging plants breaking the room into smaller sections, tasteful lighting and some art along one wall – a selection of pictures of landscapes, a quote by Alexander the Great saying “God must have loved Afghans because he made them so beautiful”. That was superimposed over the classic National Geographic portrait Afghan Girl , which I’d seen many times but not realised was connected to Afghanistan.
“I’ve seen that photo before somewhere.” I said.
“Oh yes, it’s basically the Afghan Mona Lisa” said Yasir. “It’s a very famous image.”
The eyes followed you round the room, which was no mean feat when you were in the same seat throughout the meal.
The other thing that wasn’t a hundred per cent clear was whether Da Village was a takeaway or an eat in restaurant. The menu blazed away on big screens above the counter but when we asked the waitress ushered us to sit down, so it transpired that it was both. The menu was wider than that at Kobeeda Palace, with kebabs and wraps, burgers, food from the grill, curries and biryanis. Yasir and I quickly came to an agreement to eat three meals between two and pretend one of them was a starter, the by now traditional approach of passing off greed as research. We slurped at a mango lassi each as we waited for our food to arrive – pretty good, but I wished you could buy a jug of the stuff, like you could at Kobeeda Palace for not much more money.
I’d really wanted to try Da Village’s interpretation of chapal kebabs, having enjoyed other versions in the past. It’s a dish technically from the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan – flattened, fried lamb kebabs absolutely studded with chilli – and I had a good feeling about them as soon as they reached the table.
I wasn’t wrong: if I’d liked them before, I truly loved them this time. They managed to marry the outer crunch perfectly with the firm, coarse centre, tender without being dry. They came with salad, a naan and three dips and assembling mouthful after mouthful was so enjoyable that I only realised partway through how effectively the heat had crept up on me and started dabbing my nose with a second napkin.
One dip was a deep red hot sauce, with a little smoke and pungency, but better was the verdant green dip which combined sweet mint and a little chilli. The naan was suspiciously circular and lacking in bubbles or airiness, and that made it difficult to use to scoop and dip, but it tasted nice enough. We happily ploughed through a kebab each but in the back of my mind I was thinking that I would gladly come back and have a couple to myself, especially for the princely sum of eight pounds.
“These are as good as any I’ve had in Reading” said Yasir, whose capacity for heat was unsurprisingly greater than mine. We also had a starter, “Da Village hot potatoes” which was simply some cubed fried potatoes served in the same red sauce that came with the chapal kebabs. They were okay, but the potatoes were waxy, too firm and a little undercooked, without enough of the texture of a really good fried potato.
“There are a lot of desis in this restaurant” said Yasir. “That’s a good sign.”
“What are desis?”
“You know – Indians, Pakistanis, Bangladeshis… it’s a general term.”
“That’s useful to know – I always worry about saying there are lots of Indians in a restaurant in case it sounds a bit, I don’t know, colonial.”
Yasir looked at me as if I’d said the stupidest thing on earth.
“There’s absolutely nothing wrong with saying a restaurant is full of Indians.”
“Isn’t there?”
“No, not at all.”
“It feels like such a minefield. I’ve been criticised in the past for that kind of thing. And anyway, you’re always joking about taking bombs on holiday and you refer to anybody who isn’t a Muslim as an ‘infidel’. Are you the best judge of these things?”
He grinned wolfishly. “Possibly not.”
Yasir’s main course was a double kobeeda kebab – a kofte, as it’s otherwise known. As a Muslim, Yasir can only eat halal meat but, for reasons best known to him, he refuses to eat most meat because he doesn’t like the texture. Or, as he used to put it when we worked together, “I can’t have solid meat in my mouth but I do love mince” (and if at this point you’re imagining Larry Grayson I’d say you’re not a million miles from the truth).
He generously let me try some of his kofte and I liked it very much – very firm and coarse and perhaps not as wet and pappy as it might be at other establishments. Ironically, that’s why Yasir preferred the kobeeda from a couple of doors down: it takes all sorts, I suppose. It needed more sauce (and perhaps we should have asked for some, given that we’d used most of ours on the chapal kebabs) but it was still tasty and excellent value at nine pounds. The rice it came with was pleasant enough, but not in the same league as at, say, Bakery House.
I had chosen the karahi chicken, as my reference dish in Afghan restaurants. It came to the table with all the sizzle and steam you could hope for, and it looked the part. But it was, on some levels at least, all mouth and no trousers: the sauce lacked depth and complexity and was more peppery than spicy. I would have liked some ginger in it, or heaps of coriander, but instead it was a very glossy and extremely oily sauce that did all its shouting up front without enough to back it up.
The meat was on the bone and some of it was very easy to get off – some pieces, on the other hand, had so little meat that it hardly felt worth the bother. They brought another naan with the karahi and this dish was where it really disappointed – not enough lightness or flexibility to allow for the proper scooping that would have transformed the experience.
Our mostly-empty plates sat in front of us for some time after we admitted defeat, during which time the restaurant started to fill up with friends and families. Our waitress, who had been lovely all evening, rather forgot about us at this point, although she did eventually bring the bill when we waved her down and boxed up some leftover kobeeda and chapal kebab for Yasir’s lunch the next day. We didn’t mind: it was nice to catch up, to gossip and to reminisce. Around us plenty of buddies were doing the same, and if they thought we were misfits they certainly didn’t let on. Our dinner for two – more food than we could eat and a couple of mango lassis – came to thirty-three pounds, not including service.
“I wish I could have the chapal from this place and the kofte from Kobeeda Palace in a single restaurant” said Yasir. “And the sauces from Bakery House! I really love their orange chilli sauce, I could eat that all day.”
“I love the chapal here too, but I preferred the kobeeda here. But the karahi chicken at Kobeeda Palace is miles better.”
We argued the toss a little longer – designing our own little Top Trumps deck of Reading restaurants – and not for the first time I found myself thinking that restaurants are often about compromises. You rarely get everything you want in a single package, but that’s even more complicated when your closest competitor is literally the closest – a few doors down and offering the same dishes, in a slightly different way and at a slightly different price.
I can imagine there are people out there who have never been to Kobeeda Palace and might chance upon Da Village first, drawn in by the slightly fancier exterior. Maybe they would like it better, because you never forget your first love. Maybe they’ll be the Coke and Pepsi of Reading’s Afghan restaurants, and everybody will have a different favourite. I liked Da Village a lot, and some of its dishes are definitely better than their Kobeeda Palace equivalents. But I’m a sentimental soul, and will I ever really stop at Da Village when I could walk another minute down the Oxford Road and go to the original and best? I don’t know: maybe two or three times out of ten, and maybe not. Perhaps we should just be glad that Reading has two decent Afghan restaurants, even if they could be a little more helpfully spaced out.
On the walk back to the car park we went past Kobeeda Palace. The lights were on, you could see through the windows and the place was buzzing and packed. Rather unworthily, my instinctive reaction was to smile. That’s right, you show them , I thought to myself. Da Village – 7.0 387 Oxford Road, RG30 1HA 0118 4378657

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Saffronsworld.blogspot.com

STAR STUDDED LAUNCH OF AN ALL NEW CLUB & LOUNGE “SATELLITE” -The Club” HIGHLIGHTS- 1. Girish Shetty Tellar -Managing Director 2. Directors- Varun Bafna, Kirit Ramani, Shashi Pawar, Preetam Madhukar 3 Bala Shetty- General Manager 4. Huge space to accommodate two sections 5. First Lounge & Club in Mumbai with Matrix Lights 6. Bringing Global Cuisine 7. Different brands of liquor in all shapes and sizes at inexpensive rates specially curated menu to indulge in gastronomical delights. 8. International & National, Live Bands during the weekdays & weekends. 9th May 2019 in Mumbai- For the party enthusiasts of Mumbai, “SATELLITE” is the latest foray into the world of clubs and Lounges. The impeccable launch of “SATELLITE” saw the very fashionable domiciles of Mumbai and amongst those some of the regular faces of the social circuit Sunil Grover, DJ Akthar, DJ Aqeel, Dj Sheizwood, Mahesh Shetty, Prashant Virender Sharma, Shanthipriya , Yash Birla, Ramji Gulati, Bhumika Gurung, Sudhanshu Pandey, Zulfi Syed, Dr.Sharmila Nayak, Mitaali Nag, Roma Navani , DJ Sheizwood, Aditya Singh Rajput, Madhuri Pandey , Hemant Chadha, Rajeev Khinchi, Anirudh Dhoot, Anjali Pandey, Aziz Zee, Shakir Shaikh, Ali Merchant, Bob Brambhatt and many more Girish Shetty Tellar -Managing Director & Bala Shetty- General Manager says ” Satellite is a well define place what Mumbai was missing about. We have a wide range of thermal menu & global trends of spirits at a reasonable amount. After traveling throughout the world we have personally placed everything that our vision could place into reality ” Tell me more- Food & Drinks: – The place boasts of a brilliant bar & kitchen with an exhaustive menu of different ‘global cuisine’ delights like Persian, Chinese, Mediterranean, Indian, American. “SATELLITE” redefines the city’s vibrant social scene with unique tailor-made cocktails, an extensive international wine-by-glass menu and an array of delectable food from across the globe catering to eclectic tastes of guests. “SATELLITE” will have an in-house mixologist who will ensure that every guest is served customized cocktails to suit their palates experimenting on an array of flavors and spirits contrary to the mainstream cocktails. It promises to transport gourmands as a mid-night party spot and a captivating experience for the connoisseur, serving eclectic Multi cuisines & different brands of liquor in all shapes and sizes at inexpensive rates specially curated menu to indulge in gastronomical delights. Ambiance: – “SATELLITE” offers two different sections for the mood of the guests. The entrance of the lounge gives high energy zone vibes. A large well-lit & well-done lounge & club section dominates the space with a separate section for private parties. “SATELLITE” will be the movers & shakers of professional visual dream with the use of Matrix lights at the lounge. The place aims at having collaborations with future innovators of the nightlife industry and musicians from across the globe. They assure patrons memories that could last a lifetime & experiences that will blow your mind. The interior of the club section is a blend of the comfortable lounge in a classic disco setting. The red, grey & white seating is offset with the heavily lit hues giving the guests a modern-yet-old retro vibe. That’s not it! The state-of-the-art décor and contemporary the ambiance at the city’s newly opened lounge will play background to the luxury the experience will be equipped with audio, lighting and video systems, serving the need for a true entertainment venue. “SATELLITE” is synonymous with the urban lifestyle. It has deeply looked into every aspect of space planning, presentation, etc. while designing the place. Hospitality: – The warm welcome by the staff of, “SATELLITE” lent the guests their first few moments of comfort, it is committed to providing the consumer with the highest level of hospitality services. The lounge aims to create a niche for them and set new benchmarks in quality, efficiency, and service. Posted by

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Experience The Pinnacle Of Modern Indian Hospitality With The Launch Of Farzi Cafe’s New Menu

Email Other Apps In this blog post, I cover the launch of a new menu at Farzi Café , the Modern Indian Bistro in DLF Cyber Hub, Gurugram. Nearly five years ago, Zorawar Kalra introduced us, the gourmet diners, to the Modern Indian Bistro ‘ Farzi Cafe ‘ with the aim of bringing the Indian cuisine back in vogue. Back then, the gourmet experience was a perfect amalgamation of traditional global and Indian classics, with local and regional influences, contemporary presentations, culinary styles, and chic ambiance. Last month, the quirky, modern Indian cafe announced the launch of its new menu on the expanse of Cyber Hub to beguile and charm patrons all over again. Yours truly was in attendance too when the menu was revealed by none other than Zorawar himself! For the uninitiated, the word ‘Farzi’ can have several connotations … but at Farzi Café , it has just one – creating illusion through its cuisine. At Farzi Café , culinary art meets the alchemy of modern presentations and cooking techniques to absorb you into the ultimate gastronomic illusion. The multi-award winning restaurant hailed for introducing the first-of-its-kind Indian bistro concept offers an absolute dining experience to guests by combining elements of molecular gastronomy. The new menu of the Farzi Café is filled with a hearty dose of Indian flavors and influences; it’s Indian food to the world in all its modern avatar, retaining its kosher. Curated with Farzi’s continuing endeavor to savor palates, the new menu takes on global comfort food using natural, new, and lusty ingredients. What stands out naturally is the fusion of Indian cooking art and zest in a high energy space. The casual dining air is perfect to enjoy the tapas style menu, essaying fusion dishes from around the world, along with a diversity of molecular cocktails and liquor options that you’ll love. The new menu offerings at Farzi Café can be best enjoyed with an array of eclectic dishes to begin with, like the Rock Shrimps with Kasundi Cream, Murgh Shorba with Pulled Chicken Khari, Malabar Parantha Quesadilla with Tempered Palak Paneer smoked with Tamarind Yogurt, Tandoori New Zealand Lamb Chops, and many more. Don’t forget to try the signatures like Mutton Gilafi Seekh Roll and Vegetable Khurma Roll from the Pao, Bao, and Rolls. My favorites include the scintillating and gluttonous kebabs like Bhatti Tangri Kebab and Malai Badam Broccoli. Room for more? Go for the Exotic Sizzlers and Street Specials like Dal Moth “Matka Chat” and Station Omelette Bread. Savor pizzas from all over the world with Goan Chorizo and Pepperoni and Tadka Snowpea and Asparagus. Looking for some healthy options? Try nutrition meal bowls like Quinoa, Avocado and Khow Suey bowls. For mains, I’d recommend the Summer Vegetable Kofta Croquettes, Mutton Irachi Pepper Fry, Slow-cooked Lamb Shanks, and Asparagus and Water Chestnut Khurma. End your dining experience the Farzi style with A-lister desserts like the Carrot Cream and Rose Petal netted Ras Malai Tres Leches and Cinnamon Waffle with Ice Cream and Hot Chocolate. Styled like a European bistro with strong Indian influences, Farzi Café offers faux grass walls, wood and glass paneled doors cum windows which divides the space into two. Open it up for a classic bistronomie experience. With wood flooring and a concert stage set for live performances, the bistro also boasts of one of the longest bars in the region. The dining experience and hospitality offered at Farzi Café is topnotch, showcased through the restrained elegance and refinement of the chic interiors and naturally lit spaces. For food enthusiasts like myself, a visit to Farzi Café is always an honest and enriching gourmet escapade. Indulgent moments at the cafe allowed me to experience the pinnacle of modern Indian hospitality, combined with the quirkiness of its new menu. I can’t wait to be farzified again!

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Now Serving: BEST MALAYSIAN CUISINE

Home to a multi-cultural society, Malaysia offers a variety of gastronomical delights that are sure to tickle your tastebuds. From sweet to savoury cuisine, this Southeast Asia country has it all.
Anith Adilah Othman goes on a trip with Tourism Malaysia to sample some of its delectable delicacies. Here are some of the must-have meals for travelers who are keen on making their tummies happy on holidays:
1. Satay
. . Satay. GT2/Anith Othman Satay is probably one of the most popular food in the region. Think of it as the Malaysian version of the Japanese yakitori. The meat of choice, typically chicken or beef, is marinated and skewered before placed on a grill over a charcoal fire. It is traditionally paired with peanut sauce for that perfect spicy and nutty taste that complements the meat perfectly. Make it into a whole meal by having it together with compressed rice cubes known locally as nasi impit.
Where to go: Savour the most succulent satay at R&H Cafe in Muar, Johor – the only place in Malaysia where satay is eaten for breakfast, lunch and dinner. The restaurant also gained fame for being one of the Sultan of Johor’s favourite breakfast joints.
2. Mee rebus
Mee rebus. GT2/Anith Othman This is not an average noodle dish. Mee rebus, or literally translated to boiled noodles in Bahasa Malaysia, is a unique concoction featuring yellow egg noodles basked in a sweet potato-based gravy. The dish is typically garnished with sliced green and red chillies and fried shallots. It is also served with a slice of calamansi to give it that nice sour pop. Mee rebus is enjoyed across Malaysia, Indonesia and Singapore.
Where to go: If uniqueness is what you crave for, head on over to Sup Tulang ZZ in Johor Bahru, Johor for a special mee rebus that comes with a piece of shank, and a straw for you to sip on the bone marrow.
. . 3. Nyonya cakes
Nyonya cakes. GT2/Anith Othman The word Nyonya refers to the female descendants of Chinese immigrants to the Malay archipelago in the 15th Century. Famed for their legendary culinary skills, the Nyonyas have left a unique cooking legacy that remains a pride of Melaka up to this day. One of their popular delicacies are Nyonya cakes, also referred to by the locals as Nyonya kuih. The cakes are a variety of desserts made generally from glutinous rice or glutinous rice flour with coconut and pandan fillings. The natural blue dye used in Nyonya kuih comes from butterfly pea flowers which lends a striking colour to them, making them Instagram-worthy.
Where to go: Hidden along a small alley on Jalan Tengkera, Melaka is one of the oldest Nyonya kuih shops in town dubbed Baba Charlie. The business remains humble, operating from the same house-cum-shop that it started in decades ago. At Baba Charlie, not only you get to sample these delicious cakes, you also get to watch how they are made in the open-style kitchen.
4. Indian cuisine
Indian delights. GT2/Anith Othman One of the reasons Indian food have always managed to strike a chord with the rest of the global population is its soulful, spicy taste. You’d be surprised how you can still get that authentic Indian taste regardless of where you go in Malaysia, thanks to the country’s rich history. In the 10th century, Tamil Muslims migrated from South India to the west coast of Malaysia and brought with them an incredible variety of cooking techniques and spices. Today, you can take your pick from the Malaysian take of naan, to fish head curry to chicken tandoori and we are sure you will leave satisfied.
. . Where to go: Pay a visit to Johor Bahru’s only Northern Indian fine dining eatery, Spice Villa, where the dishes are specially prepared using premium local and imported spices. Some of its must-haves include mutton masala, red snapper curry and gobi manchurian.
5. Otak-otak
Otak-otak. GT2/Anith Othman Otak-otak is a grilled fish pâté made of ground fish meat mixed with tapioca starch and spices. The mixture is then wrapped in banana leaf and grilled over charcoal fire. It is believed that otak-otak originated from Sumatra, Indonesia where the people were heavily involved in the fishery industry. Generations later, it became a famous traditional delight across the region. Since then Muar has transformed into one of the most popular places for producing the best otak-otak.
Where to go: At K&Y Frozen Food Enterprise in Johor, not only you get to savour fresh made otak-otak, but you also get to buy some frozen ones to be shared with family and friends. In 1989, K&Y’s late founder Tay Chun Long and wife Koh Ju Tian had made numerous experiments to invent a new way of packaging and freezing below 18 degrees Celsius without the use of preservatives. Even after a few days, the otak-otak is guaranteed to taste as fresh as the ones newly-made.
6. Seafood fiesta
Kam Heong Crab. GT2/Sar Sokunthy There is something fishy about people who do not enjoy seafood, especially the freshest catch from the local shores of Malaysia. The seafood dishes here are mostly prepared in a fusion style with a heavy influence of Chinese-style cuisine. Some of the most popular seafood menus in Malaysia include kam heong crab, steamed fish and salted egg squid. If you are looking to satisfy your crawfish cravings, this is the place to be.
Where to go: Head on over to Nelayan Seafood by the Coast in Johor where you can dig into the crème de la crème while enjoying an unobstructed view to Desaru Coast – one of the most scenic beaches in the Southern part of Malaysia. It offers both indoor and outdoor dining and private rooms for special occasions.
Barongan dance at Homestay Parit Bugis. Sar Sokunthy April 26, 2019 Johor: Malaysia’s own Southern belle Malaysia’s Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad gives a news conference after a cabinet meeting in Putrajaya, Malaysia May 23, 2018. REUTERS/Stringer July 3, 2018 New members of Malaysia’s Cabinet sworn in August 31, 2018 Happy 61st Merdeka day The Chinese New Year celebration organised by the Embassy of Malaysia wasn’t just about food and merriment; it’s also about friendship and unity among Malaysian expats in the Kingdom. KT/Raquel Bacay February 25, 2019 Embassy of Malaysia celebrates Chinese New Year

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Johns Creek International Festival celebrates diversity

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BY JYOTHSNA HEGDE
Atlanta, GA, May 9, 2019: With a population of well over 83,000, Johns Creek is home to substantial Indian, Chinese, Korean, Mexican and other ethnicities and nationalities.
Embracing and celebrating its diversity, Johns Creek showcased its numerous cultures, cuisines and crafts with the second annual Johns Creek International Festival held on April 27, 2019 at the Heisman Field across the Atlanta Athletic Club. The city partnered with the Convention and Visitors Bureau and the Johns Creek Arts Center. The festival attracted over 22,000 at its inaugural event and expected anywhere around 15,000 attendees this year.
“The Johns Creek City Council Diversity Task Force, an informal committee of community members and led by Council member Jay Lin, created the idea for the International Festival in 2016. The committee wanted to find a fun and unique way to bring people together to celebrate the city’s diversity,” said Bob Mullen, City Communications Director. WATCH: Johns Creek City Communications Director Bob Mullen and city spokeswoman Edie Damann in conversation with Jyothsna Hegde.
“The festival features live performances from local and regional groups showcasing different cultural music, dances and other performances. The second feature is the wide-ranging array of art and craft works made by local and regional artisans. The final key component for a successful festival is the flavorful food and drink – everything from bratwurst to sushi,” said city spokeswoman, Edie Damann.
“21 of the 53 retail vendors are returning. They range from jewelers to a Northview High senior who brings back handmade scarves from weavers in India,” noted Damann
Featuring 32 food vendors, of which 15 were food trucks, no palate was left disappointed with abundant choices of cuisines including Indian, German, Mexican, Hungarian, Italian, Dutch, Cajun, Middle-eastern, Japanese, Jamaican, Taiwanese, American, Korean, Brazilian, Greek, Thai, French, and Chinese.
Kids found plenty of ways to have fun in the sun with face painting, henna and various other activities. The international beer and wine garden offered the opportunity for adults to squash their thirst, international style.
Two stages provided ample opportunity for performers to present their talent and traditions. Main stage hosts included popular personalities Mara Davis, who is the co-host of Atlanta East, Karyn Greer, host of Atlanta Eats radio and Shafiq Jadavji, who serves as a board member for Johns creek arts center and is on the Johns Creek City recreation and parks advisory committee.
Dance, music, even circus performances from Chinese, Peruvian, American, Carribean, Irish Taiwanese, Mexican, Korean, Indian and Chinese cultures added vibrancy and dimension to the festival.
Dr. Nazeera Dawood’s Chai and Just Chat session, Bharatanatyam by students of Bharata Darshana, Yoga by Sunita Joshi, Kids Yoga by Biana Rama, Rama Yogi and dance performance by Jalpa Dance Academy represented the Indian segment of entertainment.
“I have challenged myself to use less plastics, grow fresh produce, use more compostable cups / straws at events, be sensitive to the hunger issue that exists in GA and beyond and to preserve nature,” said Dr. Dawood. She commended Georgia House of Representatives for the Resolution to recognize April 27 as Mother Earth Day. She thanked State representative Angelika Kausche for signing the Resolution which also acknowledged the humanitarian efforts of Chai and Just Chat sessions in engaging public though interactions with experts and community advocacy.
Boy Scouts of America deserve a special mention for managing parking to perfection ensuing smooth entrance and exit points.
“The City of Johns Creek is extremely proud of its diverse, multi-cultural composition. The breadth of countries and cultures represented by our residents in one of the reasons our city is so exceptional,” said Mullen. JOHNS CREEK INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL COVERED IN OUR VIDEO NEWS BULLETIN

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