JUNE DINING

JUNE DINING

Our round up of the best chic eats venues
Sofitel Bahrain Zallaq Thalassa Sea & Spa BBQ De La Plage @ Le Bar De La Plage Every Thursday 7pm onwards Kick off the weekend with an elegant affair by the beach on Thursday evenings from 7pm for the weekly BBQ De La Plage, as the delightful aromas from Le Bar De La Plage fill up the air. Savour a delicious selection of tenderly grilled meats and thirst-quenching cocktails paired with live music by DJ, Dr. Sal. Call 1763 6363 for reservations and more information.
Ladies Night @ Shisha Lounge Every Wednesday You not only get a contemporary twist on traditional oriental cuisine, but you’re provided with the rich tastes and aromas of the finest shishas at Shisha Lounge. The vibe is relaxing with a female-friendly atmosphere for you and your friends – plus, the best part – it’s 40% off menu items. Call 1311 0110 for reservations and more information.
Four Seasons Hotel Bahrain Bay Afternoon Tea @ Bay View Lounge Daily, 12noon to 9pm A cup of quality tea along with gourmet bites is the perfect excuse for a little break during a busy day. BD14.6 net for one or BD26.7 net for two guests. Call 1711 5000 for reservations and more information.
Le Meridien City Centre Bahrain Business Lunch @ Baharat Sunday to Thursday 12noon to 3pm Enjoy a selection of International and Middle Eastern cuisine inspired by the restaurant name Baharat (spices). It’s a buffet concept featuring a tandoor oven and indoor grill, and dishes are prepared in an open kitchen. Lunch buffet at BD16 net. Soup and salad buffet for BD7 net. Kids aged six to 12 dine at half price. Call 1717 1441 for reservations and more information.
The Westin City Centre Bahrain Burger and Hops Combo @ Mezzanine Bar & Lounge Sunday to Wednesday, 2pm to 1am Thursday to Saturday, 12noon to 1am Hungry and thirsty? Try the mouth-watering homemade Cheese Burger plus an ice-cold pint of your choice. This is for all the carnivores out there who enjoy a nice juicy feast with their favourite sip – a hearty yet classy choice. Call 1717 1441 for reservations and more information.
One Arabic Night @ Cellar 59 June 28 9pm to 2pm If you’re a fan of Arabic Music then this Night is for you! Cellar 59 is planning a phenomenal Arabic themed party; grab your dancing shoes and join DJ Boudi while he spins the night away with an amazing mix of Arabic and English House music or you can enjoy a marvellous show by a renowned belly dancer and singer alphonso. Free entrance for ladies and BD10 net for gents. Call 1600 0111 for reservations and more information.
Chocolatea Time @ The Palm Lounge Daily, 2pm to 6pm If you have a particularly sweet tooth for chocolate then this is the perfect Afternoon Tea for you. From the dark, milk or white chocolate fondue to the beautifully handcrafted chocolate pastries, your chocaholic’s dream is about to come true. BD25 net for two people. Call 7770 7070 for reservations and more information.
Chef ’s Table Experience @ Primavera Daily, 12noon to 3pm and 7pm to 11pm Enjoy a sumptuous five-course Chef ’s Table menu especially prepared by Chef Vincenzo Nigro. The indulgent set menu includes fried eggplant with cherry tomato and smoked ricotta cheese, homemade Bolognese tortellini, hammour with Sicilian eggplant caponata, lamb fillets with herb crust, green peas, sautéed mushrooms and fondant potato and fruit and vegetable minestrone with yogurt sorbet. BD29 per person. Call 1758 6499 for reservations and more information .
Downtown Rotana Every Thursday 6pm to 10pm Visit Teatro every Thursday and indulge in a rich multi course menu designed by the speciality chefs representing the finest of Indian Cuisine. The new Natak experience, a theatrical culinary journey through the tastes and textures of India, is a multi course menu which will immerse you in exciting Indian flavours from all over the region presented in a unique and different way. Every dish from the six course Natak menu will tell you a story about the culinary features of India. Spoil yourself with an exciting Natak experience and tempt your senses while chilling with live entertainment and the mesmerising tunes of our lovely Saxophonist for only BD16 net. Call 1311 9999 for reservations and more information.
Gulf Hotel Bahrain Convention & Spa Art of Cooking Every Saturday 10.30am to 12noon The Art of Cooking Class is designed for home cooks with busy lifestyles who have a passion for food. The hotel offers intimate handson and demonstration classes, from the building blocks of cooking to their delicious and exclusive mouth-watering menus, led by professional chef instructors. Special Aprons with the logo and Chef hats will be provided for guests alongside completion certificates to be awarded to all guests at the end of the class. Prices for Cooking Classes will be at BD18 net per person including lunch. Limited seats – 8-10 guests only, so booking in advance is recommended. Call 1771 3000 for reservations and more information.
Soup & Main Promo @ Golestan Restaurant Lunch, 12.30pm to 3.30pm, and dinner from 7.30pm to 11.30pm If you love Persian food, this is the award-winning eatery to visit and satisfy all your cravings. Try the special soups in Golestan Restaurant during lunch and dinner. Their menu includes Sorba Adas, Khorest-eQueema and Nana Koobideh. Available throughout June. Call 1753 3533 for reservations and more information.

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A rare glimpse into the sweeping — and potentially troubling — cloud kitchens trend

Independent restaurant owners may be doomed, and perhaps grocery stores, too.
Such is the conclusion of a growing chorus of observers who’ve been closely watching a new and powerful trend gain strength: that of cloud kitchens, or fully equipped shared spaces for restaurant owners, most of them quick-serve operations.
While viewed peripherally as an interesting and, for some companies, lucrative development, the movement may well transform our lives in ways that enrich a small set of companies while zapping jobs and otherwise taking a toll on our neighborhoods. Renowned VC Michael Moritz of Sequoia Capital seemed to warn about this very thing in a Financial Times column that appeared last month, titled “The cloud kitchen brews a storm for local restaurants.”
Moritz begins by pointing to the runaway success of Deliveroo , the London-based delivery service that relies on low-paid, self-employed delivery riders who delivery local restaurant food to customers — including from shared kitchens that Deliveroo itself operates, including in London and Paris.
He believes that Amazon’s recent investment in the company “might just foreshadow the day when the company, once just known as the world’s largest bookseller, also becomes the world’s largest restaurant company.”
That’s bad news for people who run restaurants, he adds, writing, “For now the investment looks like a simple endorsement of Deliveroo. But proprietors of small, independent restaurants should tighten their apron strings. Amazon is now one step away from becoming a multi-brand restaurant company — and that could mean doomsday for many dining haunts.”
The good news . . . and the bad
He’s not exaggerating. While shared kitchens have so far been optimistically received as a potential pathway for food entrepreneurs to launch and grow their businesses — particularly as more people turn to take out — there are many downsides that may well outweigh the good, or certainly counteract it. Last year, for example, UBS wrote a note to its clients titled “ Is the kitchen dead ?” wherein it suggested the rise of food delivery apps like Deliveroo and Uber Eats could well prove ruinous for home cooks and as well as fresh food providers, including restaurants and supermarkets.
The economics are just too alluring, suggested the bank. Food is already inexpensive to have delivered because of cheap labor, and that will cost center will disappear entirely if delivery drones every take off. Meanwhile, food is becoming cheaper to make because of central kitchens, the kind that Deliveroo is opening and Uber is reportedly beginning move into, as well. (In March, Bloomberg reported that Uber is testing out a program in Paris where it’s renting out fully equipped, commercial-grade kitchens to serve businesses that selling food on delivery apps like Uber Eats.)
The favorable case for cloud kitchens argues that businesses using the spaces are paying less than they would for traditional restaurant real estate, but the reality is also that most of the businesses moving into them right now aren’t small restaurateurs but quick service brands that already have a following and aren’t particular known for emphasis on food quality but instead for churning out affordable food, fast.
As Eric Greenspan, an L.A.-based chef who has appeared on many Food Network shows and has opened and closed numerous restaurants over the course of his career, explains in a new, independent documentary about cloud kitchens : “Delivery is the fastest growing market in restaurants. What started out as 10 percent of your sales is now 30 percent of your sales, and [the industry predicts] it will be 50 to 60 percent of a quick-serve restaurant’s sales within the next three to five years. So you take that, plus the fact that quick-serve brands are kind of the key to getting a fat payout at the end of the day . . .”
During an age when fewer people frequent them traditional restaurants — with their overhead and turnover and razor-thin margins — running one simply makes less and less sense, Greenspan continues.
“[Opening] up a brick-and-mortar restaurant these days is just like giving yourself a job. Now [with centralized kitchens], as long as the product is coming out strong, I don’t need to be there as a presence. I can quality control remotely now. I can go online and [sign out of a marketplace like Postmates or UberEats or Deliveroo] and not piss off any customers, because if I just decided to close the restaurant one day, and you drove over and it was closed, you’d be pissed. But if you’re looking for [one of my restaurants] in Uber Eats and you can’t find it because I turned it off, well, you’re not pissed. You just order something else.”
Big players only need apply . . .
The model works for now for Greenspan, who is running numerous restaurant “concepts” from one cloud kitchen in L.A. Perhaps unsurprisingly, that facility belongs in part to Uber cofounder Travis Kalanick, who was early to grok the opportunity that shared kitchens present. In fact, it was early last year that he announced he was investing $150 million in a startup called City Storage Systems that focused on repurposing distressed real estate assets and turning them into spaces for new industries, like food delivery.
That company owns CloudKitchens , which invites chains, as well as independent restaurant and food truck owners, to lease space in one of their facilities for a monthly fee, along with additional fees for data analytics meant to help the entrepreneurs boost their sales.
The pitch to restaurateurs is that CloudKitchens can reduce their overhead, but of course, the company is also amassing all kinds of data about its tenants in the process that one could seeing using over time. Little wonder that Amazon wants in or that these outfits have at least one serious competitor in China — Panda Selected — that is doing exactly the same thing and which raised $50 million led by Tiger Global Management earlier this year.
No one can fault these savvy entrepreneurs for seizing on what looks like a gigantic business opportunity. Still, the kitchens, which make all the sense in the world from an investment standpoint, should not be embraced so readily as a panacea, either.
Most obviously, they rely on the same people who drive Ubers and handle food deliveries — people who aren’t afforded health benefits and whose financial picture is forever precarious as a result. As with Uber drivers, Deliveroo employees tried to gain status as “workers” last year with better pay and paid but they were denied these rights because they have the option of asking other riders to take their deliveries. The EU Parliament more recently passed new rules to protect so-called gig economy workers, though the measures don’t go far.
Meanwhile, in the U.S, Uber and Lyft continue to fight legislation, including in California, that would turn their drivers and other gig workers into employees. In fact, though a bill passed the California assembly late last month that would give employee status to contract workers, Uber and Lyft are worried enough about its possible passage now in the state’s senate that the fierce rivals have teamed up to battle it.)
Ripple effects . . .
As Moritz suggests, shared kitchens stand to benefit some far more than others. While big chains, and renowned chefs like Greenberg, can take advantage of them given their brand recognition, smaller restaurants are more likely to be adversely impacted by them, and if they disappear, there are other ripple effects, including on housing markets.
Even Matt Newberg, a founder and foodie from New York, could see the writing on the wall when he recently toured CloudKitchen’s two L.A. facilities, along with the shared kitchens of two other companies: Kitchen United which last fall raised $10 million from GV, and and Fulton Kitchens , which offers commercial kitchens for rent on an annual basis.
Newberg is responsible for the aforementioned documentary (which you can also watch below), and he suggests that he most taken aback by the conditions of the first facility that CloudKitchens opened and operates, on West Washington Boulevard in South L.A. Though most restaurant kitchens are chaotic scenes, Newberg said that as “someone who loves food and sustainability” the easy-to-miss warehouse didn’t feel “very humane” to him. It’s windowless for one thing (it’s a warehouse). Newberg says that he also counted 27 kitchens packed into what are “maybe 250-square-feet to 300 square-foot spaces,” and a lot of people who appeared to be in panic mode. “Imagine lots of screaming, lots of sirens triggered when an order gets backed up, tablets everywhere.”
Adds Newberg, “When i walked in, I was like, holy shit, no one even knows this exists in L.A. It felt like Ground Zero. It felt like a military base. I mean, it seemed genius, but also crazy.”
Notably, Newberg says CloudKitchen’s second, newer location is far nicer, as are the facilities of Kitchen United and Fulton Kitchens. “That [second CloudKitchen warehouse] felt like a WeWork for kitchens. Super sleek. It was as quiet as a server farm. There were still no windows, but the kitchens are nicer and bigger.”
Growing pains . . .
Every startup has growing pains, naturally, and presumably, shared kitchen companies are not immune to these. Still, Moritz, the venture capitalist, recalls a telling story in that FT column. He says that in the early 2000s, his firm, Sequoia, invested in a chain of kebab restaurants called Faasos that planned to delivery meals to customers’ homes but was getting crushed by high rents and turnover among other things, so opened a centralized kitchen to sell kebobs. Now, he says, Fassos produces a wide variety of foods, including other Indian specialities but also Chinese and Italian dishes under separate brand names.
It’s the same playbook that Eric Greenspan is using, telling Food & WIne magazine last year that his goal was ultimately to have six delivery-only concepts running simultaneously, with two menus each for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Greenberg, who is obviously media savvy, can probably pull it off, too, as has Fassos. But for restaurants that are not known franchises or have the star appeal of celebrity chef, the future might not look so bright.
Writes Moritz: “In some markets there is still an opportunity for hardened restaurant and kitchen operators — particularly if they are gifted in the use of social media to build a following and refashion themselves. But they need to move quickly before it becomes too expensive to compete with the larger, faster-moving companies. The mere prospect of Amazon using cloud kitchens to provide cuisine catering to every taste — and delivering these meals through services such as Deliveroo — should be enough to give any restaurateur heartburn.”
It should also worry people who care about their neighborhoods. Cloud kitchens may make it easier and cheaper than ever to order take-out, but there will be consequences, some of which most of us have yet to imagine. from TechCrunch https://ift.tt/2IUUBrM

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Latest Thai Foods News

Cuisine / Latest Street Foods News Latest Street Foods
Portland Reflects On The Impending Closure Of The Alder Street Food Cart Pod This weekend, the food carts between SW Ninth and 10th, Alder and Washington, will serve their final meals, rolling away to new locations across town. As those food cart owners prepare for a new phase in their careers and lives, Oregonians are reliving … Read more on Eater
These Are The New Restaurants & Food Halls To Visit This Summer From massive food halls to anticipated new openings across town, Chicago’s food scene is sizzling this season. Progressive Indian newcomer Rooh Chicago tempts with ayurveda-inspired cocktails like the Delhi 6 with whiskey and rose shrub. (Photo by Marc … Read more on Michigan Ave
Meet The 74 Year Old Queen Of Bangkok Street Food Who… Bangkok is legendary for its fun and its food. Especially its street food. And one vendor’s is so good, it has earned a Michelin star for the second year running. Raan Jay Fai is a small, seven-table joint in Old Bangkok that’d be easy to miss if it weren … Read more on WFUV

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London opening up to India’s diverse cuisines – The Economic Times

Is Indian food beginning to get the respect it deserves in London where restaurants, pop-ups and food writers have been focusing lately on a nuanced approach to the country’s cuisines? By Jun 29, 2019, 11.30 PM IST 0 Comments BCCL Tiger prawns, sago fritters and Indian sorrel chutney at Indian Accent London It’s a midsummer day in London — bright, warm, with a nip in the air. We have had an elaborate meal at the Indian Accent restaurant in Mayfair: badam pasande, khoya mattar, nargisi kofte, yam tahiri, potatoes with lotus seeds and chironjee, shammi kebab and fake ones made with black gram. It’s the food of the community that I was born into —Kayasth, scribes to Mughal emperors, who had a composite culture focused on food, music and Scotch whisky. My family’s recipes have been cooked by chef Manish Mehrotra in his inimitable style. Many of the movers and shakers in the London food scene are sampling this heritage cuisine that is making a debut in the city where restaurants, popups and food writers have all been lately focusing on a nuanced approach to Indian gastronomy. This is effecting a change in the perception of Londoners who are recognising a complexity and diversity in Indian cuisines that go beyond a goopy curry mess. Throughout our meal, liberally laced with whisky cocktails in the middle of a working day, passionate discussions have broken out at various tables about this changing image and whether we are in the midst of a definitive “India moment” that has the potential to catapult Indian food to its rightful stature as a great and complex cuisine of the world. At my table are Camellia and Namita Panjabi, owners of the Masala World restaurant group, groundbreakers of Indian gastronomy in London with their acclaimed restaurants; chef Sriram Aylur, the highly respected head chef of the one-star Michelin restaurant Quilon (the only one in London to serve detailed coastal Indian food), chef and cookbook writer Manju Malhi , a specialist in Anglo-Indian food; and Sameer Taneja, former head chef of Tallie Joe and Benares who is now consultant at Kanishka, chef Atul Kochhar’s new restaurant focusing on food from the northeastern states. They are all deliberating and debating the evolution of Indian food in London in the last three-four years: Whether it is beginning to get the respect it deserves. The Beginning The UK’s love affair with the curry goes back to the Victorian times when, apparently, Queen Victoria ordered it to be cooked for her dinner every day. Taking cue, the upper classes made it fashionable to have at least one generic “hot” dish at their social dinners, which were thought to be incomplete if they did not serve at least one curry. For the past two-three years, however, this love affair has been on the wane. Curry houses, mostly Bangladeshi run, have been in a crisis, shutting steadily, with The Guardian reporting in 2017 that two-three are closing every week across the UK. Yawar Khan, chairman of the Asian Catering Federation (a body that represents 35,000 ethnic restaurants and takeaways in London), was also quoted in the press as saying that half of London’s curry houses will disappear in the next decade. Many reasons have been put forth for this crisis, including a shortage of subcontinental chefs, who are finding it difficult to get work visas since 2006, when the clampdown on work permits began. Changing customer preferences is also a big reason for the curry’s exit from the UK’s national imagination. “More and more people from the UK are travelling to India and are more knowledgeable about the finer points of Indian cuisines. Earlier, people assumed that the whole of India ate one kind of food, which was curry. Now, restaurants are catering not just to Brits but also to Indians who are travelling to London and who research online on the kind of Indian restaurants they would like to go to when they are in London,” says Malhi, who grew up in the UK and has observed this transition in the last three-four years. Chef Manish Mehrotra, however, cautions that even now “Indian restaurants that do not put cliched dishes like chicken tikka masala, butter chicken or vindaloo in whatever form on their menu have to struggle to get audience recognition in London because customers have a strong curry image of the cuisine”. (Indian Accent London does not have butter chicken on its menu.) Even during the pop-up, a common refrain was “but this does not taste like Indian food”, pointing to the problem of dominant perception. However, a shift may just be evident with younger consumers. “The millennials are adventurous. They are curious about the provenance of ingredients, specific spices beyond chilli, and are not afraid to try these,” says Aylur. In fact, from the conversations that I had, it emerged that the demand for “authenticity” is gaining so much currency that even curry house owners are travelling to India to pick up regional recipes. At a restaurant such as the spectacular The Veeraswamy — established in 1926, it is London’s oldest Indian restaurant and is now owned by the Masala World group — the emphasis on sourcing ingredients has always been paramount. It is evident in dishes such as the rogan josh, which is unlike the bastardised curry in most restaurants even in India. At The Veeraswamy, it is a dish that chef Heston Blumenthal comes to eat. It is splendid in its subtlety with mild Kashmiri red chillies and pran (a particular type of shallots), all sourced from the Kashmir Valley. “In fact, we import all our spices from India to maintain the correct taste of classical Indian recipes,” says Camellia. This kind of detailing that is necessary to produce nuanced Indian food is still an exception. However, it may be the need of the hour as people look for “authenticity”. Marks & Spencer, for instance, caused a social media outrage last year when it introduced Bengali Turmeric Curry, with customers and critics crying foul about supermarkets’ peddling “fake foreign food” and cultural appropriation. Rise of Regions Supermarket chain Waitrose tipped Indian street food to be the next big thing in the UK. It may well be. Tesco is selling bhel. The feted celebrity chef Vineet Bhatia has opened a deli counter called Kama at Harrods where he recreates the food of his Mumbai childhood. Interest in regional Indian food is at an all-time high, because unlike curry’s “heavy” image, regional Indian and street food are seen as light, nutritious and flavourful. This is turning the stodgy image of Indian food on its head. Camellia Panjabi was arguably the first to introduce street food and regional dishes in her restaurants in London. “When I quit the Taj in 2001 and opened Masala Zone, I conceptualised it as a thali and street food restaurant, offering light and flavourful dishes from different regions, with an emphasis on vegetarian food that I also wanted to highlight,” says Camellia. “However, there was resistance. People in London, used to eating chunky meat dishes, started telling me that ‘you are cutting down on our protein’, so I gave an interview talking about how Indian regional meals were balanced diets and that caught attention,” she recalls. It has taken almost 20 years for perceptions to change. Instead of the heavy and meat-centric food of the north-west frontier that set the tone for so much of London’s Indian fixation, the accent these days is firmly on regional traditions. The latest entrant is Kanishka that serves food from the seven states of the Northeast. In the last two years, many others have popped up — from Asma Khan’s Darjeeling Express (where home cooks often host dinners) and Kahani, inspired by Tamil food, to the family-run Gunpowder that does dishes such as uthapam with pulled duck, and Roti-Chai, a modern casual diner with small plates and food inspired by street hawkers and roadside restaurants from different regions in India. Dishoom, the high-street chain, is now expanding to Manchester. Tooting — London mayor Sadiq Khan’s neighbourhood, where three years ago my highlight meal was at a Pakistani dhaba, Lahori Karahi — is now apparently a dosa paradise. “Thanks to social media, customers have become more knowledgeable and it is not as if you can serve them food that is inauthentic or low on quality even if they are paying £20,” says chef Taneja. As the epicentre of the discerning gourmet world, London matters. Changing stereotypes here may just mean that a tipping point has been reached and that Indian cuisines, in all their diversity and complexity, may now be ready to find a wider recognition all over the world. The writer looks at restaurant trends, food history and culinary cultures 0 Comments Want stories like this in your inbox? Sign up for the daily ET Panache newsletter . You can also follow us on Facebook , Twitter and LinkedIn . Read more on

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A rare glimpse into the sweeping — and potentially troubling — cloud kitchens trend

A rare glimpse into the sweeping — and potentially troubling — cloud kitchens trend A rare glimpse into the sweeping — and potentially troubling — cloud kitchens trend June 28, 2019 TechCrunch , Technology Independent restaurant owners may be doomed, and perhaps grocery stores, too.
Such is the conclusion of a growing chorus of observers who’ve been closely watching a new and powerful trend gain strength: that of cloud kitchens, or fully equipped shared spaces for restaurant owners, most of them quick-serve operations.
While viewed peripherally as an interesting and, for some companies, lucrative development, the movement may well transform our lives in ways that enrich a small set of companies while zapping jobs and otherwise taking a toll on our neighborhoods. Renowned VC Michael Moritz of Sequoia Capital seemed to warn about this very thing in a Financial Times column that appeared last month, titled “The cloud kitchen brews a storm for local restaurants.”
Moritz begins by pointing to the runaway success of Deliveroo , the London-based delivery service that relies on low-paid, self-employed delivery riders who delivery local restaurant food to customers — including from shared kitchens that Deliveroo itself operates, including in London and Paris.
He believes that Amazon’s recent investment in the company “might just foreshadow the day when the company, once just known as the world’s largest bookseller, also becomes the world’s largest restaurant company.”
That’s bad news for people who run restaurants, he adds, writing, “For now the investment looks like a simple endorsement of Deliveroo. But proprietors of small, independent restaurants should tighten their apron strings. Amazon is now one step away from becoming a multi-brand restaurant company — and that could mean doomsday for many dining haunts.”
The good news . . . and the bad
He’s not exaggerating. While shared kitchens have so far been optimistically received as a potential pathway for food entrepreneurs to launch and grow their businesses — particularly as more people turn to take out — there are many downsides that may well outweigh the good, or certainly counteract it. Last year, for example, UBS wrote a note to its clients titled “ Is the kitchen dead ?” wherein it suggested the rise of food delivery apps like Deliveroo and Uber Eats could well prove ruinous for home cooks and as well as fresh food providers, including restaurants and supermarkets.
The economics are just too alluring, suggested the bank. Food is already inexpensive to have delivered because of cheap labor, and that will cost center will disappear entirely if delivery drones every take off. Meanwhile, food is becoming cheaper to make because of central kitchens, the kind that Deliveroo is opening and Uber is reportedly beginning move into, as well. (In March, Bloomberg reported that Uber is testing out a program in Paris where it’s renting out fully equipped, commercial-grade kitchens to serve businesses that selling food on delivery apps like Uber Eats.)
Yes, the businesses using the spaces are paying less than they would for traditional restaurant real estate, but the reality is also that most of the businesses moving into them right now aren’t small restaurateurs but quick service brands that aren’t particular known for emphasis on food quality but instead for churning out affordable food, fast.
As Eric Greenspan, an L.A.-based chef who has appeared on many Food Network shows and has opened and closed numerous restaurants over the course of his career, explains in a new, independent documentary about cloud kitchens : “Delivery is the fastest growing market in restaurants. What started out as 10 percent of your sales is now 30 percent of your sales, and [the industry predicts] it will be 50 to 60 percent of a quick-serve restaurant’s sales within the next three to five years. So you take that, plus the fact that quick-serve brands are kind of the key to getting a fat payout at the end of the day . . .”
During an age when fewer people frequent them traditional restaurants — with their overhead and turnover and razor-thin margins — running one simply makes less and less sense, Greenspan continues.
“[Opening] up a brick-and-mortar restaurant these days is just like giving yourself a job. Now [with centralized kitchens], as long as the product is coming out strong, I don’t need to be there as a presence. I can quality control remotely now. I can go online and [sign out of a marketplace like Postmates or UberEats or Deliveroo] and not piss off any customers, because if I just decided to close the restaurant one day, and you drove over and it was closed, you’d be pissed. But if you’re looking for [one of my restaurants] in Uber Eats and you can’t find it because I turned it off, well, you’re not pissed. You just order something else.”
Big players only need apply . . .
The model works for now for Greenspan, who is running numerous restaurant “concepts” from one cloud kitchen in L.A. Perhaps unsurprisingly, that facility belongs in part to Uber cofounder Travis Kalanick, who was early to grok the opportunity that shared kitchens present. In fact, it was early last year that he announced he was investing $150 million in a startup called City Storage Systems that focused on repurposing distressed real estate assets and turning them into spaces for new industries, like food delivery.
That company owns CloudKitchens , which invites chains, as well as independent restaurant and food truck owners, to lease space in one of their facilities for a monthly fee, along with additional fees for data analytics meant to help the entrepreneurs boost their sales.
The pitch to restaurateurs is that CloudKitchens can reduce their overhead, but of course, the company is also amassing all kinds of data about its tenants in the process that one could seeing using over time. Little wonder that Amazon wants in or that these outfits have at least one serious competitor in China — Panda Selected — that is doing exactly the same thing and which raised $50 million led by Tiger Global Management earlier this year.
No one can fault these savvy entrepreneurs for seizing on what looks like a gigantic business opportunity. Still, the kitchens, which make all the sense in the world from an investment standpoint, should not be embraced so readily as a panacea, either.
Most obviously, they rely on the same people who drive Ubers and handle food deliveries — people who aren’t afforded health benefits and whose financial picture is forever precarious as a result. As with Uber drivers, Deliveroo employees tried to gain status as “workers” last year with better pay and paid but they were denied these rights because they have the option of asking other riders to take their deliveries. The EU Parliament more recently passed new rules to protect so-called gig economy workers, though the measures don’t go far.
Meanwhile, in the U.S, Uber and Lyft continue to fight legislation, including in California, that would turn their drivers and other gig workers into employees. In fact, though a bill passed the California assembly late last month that would give employee status to contract workers, Uber and Lyft are worried enough about its possible passage now in the state’s senate that the fierce rivals have teamed up to battle it.)
Ripple effects . . .
As Moritz suggests, shared kitchens stand to benefit some far more than others. While big chains, and renowned chefs like Greenberg, can take advantage of them given their brand recognition, smaller restaurants are more likely to be adversely impacted by them, and if they disappear, there are other ripple effects, including on housing markets.
Even Matt Newberg, a founder and foodie from New York, could see the writing on the wall when he recently toured CloudKitchen’s two L.A. facilities, along with the shared kitchens of two other companies: Kitchen United which last fall raised $10 million from GV, and and Fulton Kitchens , which offers commercial kitchens for rent on an annual basis.
Newberg is responsible for the aforementioned documentary (which you can also watch below), and he suggests that he most taken aback by the conditions of the first facility that CloudKitchens opened and operates, on West Washington Boulevard in South L.A. Though most restaurant kitchens are chaotic scenes, Newberg said that as “someone who loves food and sustainability” the easy-to-miss warehouse didn’t feel “very humane” to him. It’s windowless for one thing (it’s a warehouse). Newberg says that he also counted 27 kitchens packed into what are “maybe 250-square-feet to 300 square-foot spaces,” and a lot of people who appeared to be in panic mode. “Imagine lots of screaming, lots of sirens triggered when an order gets backed up, tablets everywhere.”
Adds Newberg, “When i walked in, I was like, holy shit, no one even knows this exists in L.A. It felt like Ground Zero. It felt like a military base. I mean, it seemed genius, but also crazy.”
Notably, Newberg says CloudKitchen’s second, newer location is far nicer, as are the facilities of Kitchen United and Fulton Kitchens. “That [second CloudKitchen warehouse] felt like a WeWork for kitchens. Super sleek. It was as quiet as a server farm. There were still no windows, but the kitchens are nicer and bigger.”
Growing pains . . .
Every startup has growing pains, naturally, and presumably, shared kitchen companies are not immune to these. Still, Moritz, the venture capitalist, recalls a telling story in that FT column. He says that in the early 2000s, his firm, Sequoia, invested in a chain of kebab restaurants called Faasos that planned to delivery meals to customers’ homes but was getting crushed by high rents and turnover among other things, so opened a centralized kitchen to sell kebobs. Now, he says, Fassos produces a wide variety of foods, including other Indian specialities but also Chinese and Italian dishes under separate brand names.
It’s the same playbook that Eric Greenspan is using, telling Food & WIne magazine last year that his goal was ultimately to have six delivery-only concepts running simultaneously, with two menus each for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Greenberg, who is obviously media savvy, can probably pull it off, too, as has Fassos. But for restaurants that are not known franchises or have the star appeal of celebrity chef, the future might not look so bright.
Writes Moritz: “In some markets there is still an opportunity for hardened restaurant and kitchen operators — particularly if they are gifted in the use of social media to build a following and refashion themselves. But they need to move quickly before it becomes too expensive to compete with the larger, faster-moving companies. The mere prospect of Amazon using cloud kitchens to provide cuisine catering to every taste — and delivering these meals through services such as Deliveroo — should be enough to give any restaurateur heartburn.”
It should also worry people who care about their neighborhoods. Cloud kitchens may make it easier and cheaper than ever to order take-out, but there will be consequences, some of which most of us have yet to imagine. from TechCrunch https://ift.tt/2IUUBrM

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Excerpt | From Kababs to Pulao, the Art of Cooking in the Time of Mughals – The Wire English

Nuskha-e-Shahjahani recaptures the nostalgia of the Mughal era, presenting the recipes and unveiling the mystique of the royal kitchens. Till now, no efforts were made to bring to light the treasure of recipes revealing the art of cooking in the time of the Mughals.
The original manuscript begins without any trace of the author or date of its compilation. The chapters describe the preparations of different dishes of those days in detail, and include recipes for making and preparing breads, soups, pulaos, kababs, do-piyazahs, fish, samosas and sweets. It takes you inside the imperial kitchens, where food was cooked with the right amount of spices to enhance the base flavours of the dishes. Specific combinations of herbs and flavouring agents characterised these foods, the blend of which was developed by expert cooks in keeping with the advice of the royal hakims.
Nuskha-e-Shahjahani reveals that few spices were used in cooking; cartloads of almonds, pistachios, walnuts, apricots, plums, raisins and saffron were imported along the new roads that were constructed to facilitate trade. The sweet and salty tastes relished by the Mughals are quite apparent from the selection of recipes in the manuscript. The extensive use of nuts, gold and silver leaves, saffron and aromatic herbs made food exotic and flavourful.
Salma Yusuf Husain
The Mughal Feast: Recipes From The Kitchen Of Emperor Shah Jahan
Roli Books, 2019
Most of the dishes mentioned in the manuscript were prepared in bulk, as there were many guests and family members to cater to, so the quantity of ingredients was huge. However, today recipes are mostly prepared for much smaller groups. Thus, one may reduce the quantities of the ingredients mentioned in the manuscript as per one’s liking. Furthermore, some recipes, such as Yakhni Talavi, may appear to be incongruous with their chapter descriptions, but since they are placed this way in the original manuscript, we have decided to leave them as they are. Also important to note is the old use of shangarf or cinnabar for food colouring; as this book is a translation, it has been left in, but it is not to be used due to certain health risks.
The manuscript also provides helpful tips for cooking. Methods to clean fish, soften bones, make artificial bone marrow and colour food using juices of vegetables and essence of flowers throw light on the creativity of the cooks of the royal kitchens. It mentions the method of cooking zeer biryan through indirect cooking by placing bamboo sticks at the bottom of the pan and placing the main ingredient of the dish like meat, fish or paneer over it. The dish was then cooked on dum. It was common to cook food on low heat and finish on dum, a technique adopted extensively in India under the name dum pukht.
The arrival of every dish was a ceremony and history will never forget the pomp of those times, along with the flavours which remain only in the pages of handwritten manuscripts of those days, such as Nuskha-e-Shahjahani. Not only the imperial kitchens of the emperor, but also the bazaars of the city were charged with the smoke of different kababs, and the environment was filled with the fragrance of nahari, haleem, qormas and qaliyas. The array of breads was dazzling. Festive occasions were never complete without baqarkhani, kulchas and sheermals. Sharbat ke katore and kulfi ke matke added colour to the scenario. The city of Shah Jahan was a paradise of food with the creations of local and foreign chefs.
This luxurious way of serving and preparing food continued only till the time Shah Jahan ruled, as his son Aurangzeb did not believe in luxury, pomp and show. Unfortunately, the last years of this great emperor were unhappy. Deposed by his son Aurangzeb, Shah Jahan was imprisoned in Agra Fort and remained there for eight years until his death in 1666. Legend has it that Aurangzeb ordered that his father be allowed only one ingredient of his choice, and Shah Jahan chose chickpeas. He chose them because they can be cooked in many different ways. Even today, one of the signature dishes of North Indian cuisine is Shahjahani dal, chickpeas cooked in a rich gravy of cream.
§
AMBA PULAO
Serves: 6-8
sweet and tangy mango lamb rice
Ingredients
Lamb, cut into pieces 1 kg
Rice 4 cups / 1 kg
Ghee 1 cup / 250 gm
Onions, sliced 1 cup / 250 gm
Ginger (adrak), chopped 4 tsp / 20 gm
Coriander (dhaniya) seeds, crushed 4 tsp / 20 gm
Salt 4 tsp / 20 gm
Cloves (laung) 1 tsp / 5 gm
Raw mangoes (kairi) 1 kg
Sugar 3 cups / 750 gm
Cumin (jeera) seeds 2 gm
Black peppercorns (sabut kali mirch) 1 tsp / 5 gm
Cinnamon (dalchini), 2 sticks 1˝ each
Pistachios (pista), fried ½ cup / 125 gm
Almonds (badam), fried ½ cup / 125 gm
Raisins (kishmish), fried ½ cup / 125 gm
Method
GURAK KABAB
Serves: 4
chicken stuffed with meat and slow-cooked on cinnamon bed
Ingredients
Chicken, cleaned, washed, skinned 2 (700-800 gm each)
Onion juice ½ cup / 125 ml
Ginger (adrak) juice ¼ cup / 60 ml
Salt to taste
Vegetable oil 3 tbsp / 45 ml
Lamb, minced 400 gm
Onion, medium-sized, sliced 1
Coriander (dhaniya) seeds, crushed 1 tbsp / 15 gm
Ginger (adrak), chopped 1 tbsp / 15 gm
Saffron (kesar), dissolved in milk 1.5 gm
Yoghurt (dahi), whisked ¼ cup / 60 gm
Cinnamon (dalchini) sticks to cover
the bottom of the pan 8-10
Ghee ½ cup / 125 gm
Black gram (urad dal) flour ½ cup / 125 gm
Freshly ground to a fine powder:
Cloves (laung) 1 tsp / 5 gm
Cardamom (elaichi) 1 tsp / 5 gm
Black peppercorns (sabut kali mirch) 1 tsp / 5 gm
Method
Excerpted from The Mughal Feast: Recipes from the Kitchen of Emperor Shah Jahan by Salma Husain, published by Roli Books.
The Wire English

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Fancy an Italian? Secret Service reviews Veneziaa restaurant in Burton

You probably walk past it every day Share Get the biggest Daily stories by email Subscribe Thank you for subscribing We have more newsletters Show me See our privacy notice Could not subscribe, try again later Invalid Email
There have been are quite a few Italian restaurants popping up around Burton in the last few years but one, in particular, seems to have started it all off.
Veneziaa is located on a main gateway into Burton town centre, on the corner of Station Street and Guild Street , and is seen by thousands of motorists every day, situated below the former Burton Museum.
You may have walked by but never been in. And if you don’t want to go in you can always order from its takeaway service via Deliveroo and have delicious Italian straight to your door.
To start off, my three guests and I ordered a selection of drinks, both soft and alcoholic. You can choose from a wide selection of wines and we opted for a glass of Merlot. Read More Fancy a curry? Secret Service reviews Apne Indian restaurant
The restaurant boasts authentic Italian cuisine and there was a vast menu boasting fresh starters and sweet desserts, catering for gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan diets.
As well as a long list of pasta dishes, guests can also try tender fillet steaks with a Mediterranean taste and, of course, authentic stone-baked pizzas done the Italian way – thin crust, rustic and hand-made. The setting
Veneziaa does not have a car park, but most guests can park in either nearby George Street , which is free after 8pm and just a short walk away, or Middleway Park, which is free after 3pm.
When you enter the restaurant, you are walking into a clean, tidy venue with welcoming staff.
The decor is very posh, with wine glasses laid out over red, elegant napkins with a crisp white tablecloth underneath. Read More The Waterfront
A look out of the window did not provide much of a scenic view, but to make up for it the windows are partially blocked with decor to give you a more enclosed feel.
We were seated immediately and served with crisp bread sticks to munch on while perusing the drinks menu. Starters
We ordered two two starters between four of us – one was a vegetarian sharing platter which was more than enough for all of us and the other was a sausage and chorizo starter.
The vegetarian platter consists of bread, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, roasted garlic, sun-dried tomato, olives, mozzarella, black olive tapenade and roasted pepper tapenade.
This was brought to us on a wooden tasting board filled with pots of the various dishes. The vegetarian sharing platter was a great starter at Veneziaa (Image: Burton Live)
While many of us love our bread and dips, we were not connoisseurs of tapenades.
However, we were pleasantly surprised at how tasty they both were, even if we are not massive fans of olives or peppers.
For saying it fed four of us with a bit left over, £7.95 is not a bad price. Next up was the sausage and chorizo dish.
For £5.95 it contained a pot of spicy tuscan sausage and picante chorizo with olives in the restaurant’s classic marinara sauce.
And it was delightful. So much flavour in the tomato sauce covering delicious mini-sausages and well-cooked chorizo. Mains
The choice on the menu is huge, with the dishes spanning two pages, crammed full of authentic Italian meals to cater for every taste.
You could pick from your standard pasta dishes – spaghetti, tagliatelle, tortellini and lasagne – and freshly-made pizza with a large range of toppings.
Then you have your chicken dishes, beef dishes, fish and the salad dishes.
We settled on several interesting-sounding options. Two of us opted for the lasagne, with a side of fries, which were absolutely delicious – so many cheese flavours all in one go. The cost came to a total of £31.90. The tortellini quattro formaggio which is the stuffed pasta with four cheeses (Image: Burton Live)
I opted for tortellini quattro formaggio, which is the stuffed pasta with four cheeses, spinach, garlic and shallots in a creamy sauce.
It was amazing. Many of us may have had stuffed pasta before, but I can guarantee you will never have had anything like this before.
Just the right balance of salt and cheesy goodness we can expect from this dish. And it was only £10.95 – absolute bargain.
And last but not least was the tortelli alle provincini – stuffed pasta with cheese and spinach, served with mushrooms, peas, peppers, garlic and tomato sauce – a must for any vegetarian out there. And a snip at just £9.95. Dessert
We were stuffed, but there is always room for pudding and with a look at the separate menu it was hard to pick, but I am a sucker for banoffee pie.
The thick real cream on a bed of crunchy biscuit and caramel was just perfect. It was served on a platter with a dollop of cream.
For four of us eating three courses, the total came to just £91 and we agree it was an absolute bargain for the fantastic quality of food we were served. The banoffee pie went down a treat (Image: Burton Live)
*Burton Live makes undercover visits to restaurants, takeaways and cafés with a view to providing a fair, balanced and accurate report on customer service and the food on offer. Our hope is that, for the sake of both the business owner and the customer, we can report positively about the places we visit. However if our experience is not 100 per cent positive then we are duty-bound to report on exactly what we find. Read More

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Good ambience and excellent food

We have come for breakfast at The Eatry. The food is excellent, Especially the South Indian dishes by Chef Sundar are the best. The other cuisines are also good. Special mention for the pancakes they were just so soft. The service by Rana, Pradeep, Opi is good. They were humble and quickly responsive. Thanks for delightful experience.

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Register for TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis Training: Milwaukee

June 30, Milwaukee Meet TapRooT® in Milwaukee for , July 18-19
quickly. Register here now to secure your spot in the 2-Day TapRooT ® course in Milwaukee, July 18-19, 2019.
In two days with TapRooT® , you will learn how to conduct an investigation and develop effective Corrective Actions. A TapRooT® course can accelerate your career and has proven a professional game changer for many.
TapRooT® is designed for learners at all levels. You will learn to precursors, Techniques include: SnapCharT®, Root Cause Tree® & Corrective Action Helper®. Upon course completion, attendees will receive a certificate and a 90-day subscription to TapRooT® VI, the online software service. Most importantly, you will have the advantage of professional training in your expertise and on your resume!
Attendees should bring safety incidents or quality issues from their workplace for a team exercise. These may be either written reports or, alternately, you may have knowledge of an incident without a written report. We’ll divide into teams of 2-4 people, with each team analyzing a different problem.
We’ll meet on July 18 for the 2-Day TapRooT ® course. You will likely want to explore Milwaukee so below we’ve included highlights of your host city.
Register here to take the 2-Day TapRooT ® course in Milwaukee . Experience Milwaukee
Milwaukee is known as the “big city of little neighborhoods.” Here, you’ll find friendly folks, delectable cuisine, a Midwestern culture, and unique experiences. Like Lake Michigan, the only Great Lake entirely within the U.S.
Discovery World : Whether you’re awestruck at the Tall Ships or Great Lakes, looking through the Simple Machine Shipyard, or Les Paul’s House of Sound, you’re surrounded by hands-on science, technology, and the environment.
Photo Op : Go around the cool exterior walkway of Discovery World to view Lake Michigan and the downtown area.
Milwaukee Public Museum : You can get lost in the floors of anthropology, geology, botany, history, zoology, and even a vintage European Village.
Sprecher Brewery Tour : See how the brewing process happens, from factory to shelves. Of course, you can sample brews in the mix of activities!
Brady Street : Sense the Midwest atmosphere on this street that offers nightlife, coffee houses, restaurants and ethnic cuisine, and shops.
Riverwalk : Go for the views and great dining along the Milwaukee River.
Historic Third Ward : A jewel in downtown, the Ward is home to a thriving arts community, shopping, restaurants. On the north end, you’ll find Milwaukee Public Market , fully decked out with a wine bar, diverse culinary vendors with vegetarian and vegan options, local swag for sale, something for your sweet tooth, and more.
The beach : Yes, with sand and water, on beautiful Lake Michigan, which has a water surface of 22,300 square miles. Milwaukee has 1,400 acres of beaches and parkland on the water. Bradford Beach, in downtown Milwaukee, was selected as one of the Travel Channel’s top 11 city beaches.
Best Place at the Historic Pabst Brewery : Fascinating building, with a tour that clues you in on much of Milwaukee.
Did you know : Lake Michigan’s name is derived from an Ojibwa Indian word, “mishigami,” which means “large lake”? Milwaukee eateries
Milwaukee Ale House : Sit on the patio of this microbrewery and restaurant and enjoy the Milwaukee River sights and sounds.
Blue’s Egg : Coffee and carry-out or have breakfast or lunch at this Art Deco eatery.
The Capital Grille : Upscale steakhouse and classic American fare.
Odd Duck : Inventive New American menu with creative cocktails.
AJ Bombers : Happy hour, great burgers and beer, open until late.
Milwaukee Brat House : Great brew selection. Brats, Wisconsin cheese soup, chicken sandwiches, pretzels—all locally popular.
Glorioso’s Italian Market : Shop in the market while waiting for your food. Great meatballs and sauce.
St. Paul Fish Company : Dinner specials nightly. Fresh seafood and a mix of American favorites.
Discover more to explore from our Milwaukee Pinterest board and begin planning your TapRooT® trip to Wisconsin today.
quickly. Register here now to secure your spot in the 2-Day TapRooT ® course in Milwaukee .

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