July debut for Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi

July debut for Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi

July debut for Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi All-villa resort spanning three private islands On
Waldorf Astoria Hotels & Resorts will soon welcome guests to the heart of the South Malé Atoll with the highly-anticipated opening of Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi . Set to debut on 1 July, the all-villa resort spans across three private islands, providing secluded enclaves and a tranquil escape for discerning travellers complete with a plethora of activities for guests of all generations.
Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi will offer a sophisticated and serene retreat just 30-minutes from Malé International Airport via the resort’s private yacht. An escape or families and couples in search of space and exclusivity, the resort boasts 122 luxuriously appointed villas, each equipped with a pool and uninterrupted views of the Indian Ocean in its own private enclave. Each reef, beach and overwater villa will open onto an indoor and outdoor deck featuring a swinging daybed, dining gazebo, an infinity pool, in-water lounge and an outdoor shower. Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi | 1 Bedroom Overwater Villa Bedroom
In line with Waldorf Astoria’s legacy of culinary expertise, Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi will offer 11 exceptional, specialty-dining venues. Each venue will deliver distinctive, immersive dining experiences – the variety of which is a first in the Maldives. Guests can enjoy an elevated treetop-dining concept at Terra , featuring spectacular views of the ocean and horizon, as well as exquisite food and wine pairings in a tranquil setting seemingly chiselled out of the face of a boulder at The Rock . Yasmeen will boast authentic Middle Eastern flatbreads and mezzes, impeccably prepared crispy Peking duck fresh out of the first wood-fired oven in the Maldives, and embracing the garden-to-table concept, Glow will serve healthy and holistic cuisine made from the freshest ingredients harvested from the resort’s herb garden. To further elevate Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi’s culinary offerings, the hotel will be announcing a partnership with a world-renowned chef and restaurant in the coming weeks. Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi | Terra Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi | The Rock
“As the fifth Waldorf Astoria to open in the region, Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi represents a significant milestone in the brand’s continued growth in Asia Pacific following the successful opening of Waldorf Astoria Bangkok last year,” said Daniel Welk, Vice President, Luxury and Lifestyle Group, Asia Pacific, Hilton.
“We are extremely proud to bring the brand to a destination as synonymous with luxury as the Maldives, and we look forward to delivering unforgettable experiences that reflect Waldorf Astotia’s unique sense of place and iconic service standards.”
For those seeking the ultimate in exclusivity, the Ithaafushi Private Island features a two-bedroom overwater villa as well as a three-bedroom beach villa. The 2,975 square-metre island sanctuary – accessible by yacht – comes complete with a dedicated chef and personal concierge team, as well as its own spa, gym, five swimming pools, entertainment centre and pristine beaches. Two Stella Maris Ocean Villas, inspired by a celestial charm – accessible only by boat – will also allow discerning guests to enjoy unrivalled privacy. Floor-to-ceiling windows, chef service, a jacuzzi and direct ocean access will make for an unforgettable and memorable escape. Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi | Spa
For additional pampering, guests can visit the Waldorf Astoria Spa, comprised of ten idyllic overwater or garden treatment villas, which will offer an extensive menu of treatments and Asian-inspired therapies focusing on relaxation and rebalance. The Waldorf Astoria Young Discovery Park, a water park for young guests, and the Lagoon Pool, are ideal for families looking to enjoy a variety of activities with ease. Other facilities include the beachfront, 40-meter Mirror Pool; the Ocean Pavilion, which will host a range of wellness activities; a fully-equipped fitness centre; and a combined water sport and PADI dive centre. Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi | 1 Bedroom Overwater Villa
Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi will be begin taking bookings from July 1, 2019 and is located at Ithaafushi Island, South Male Atoll, Republic of Maldives.

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Soho’s Delhi Brasserie Restaurant Serve London’s Best Indian Food | Delhibrasserie

delhibrasserie Leave a comment Located in the bustling city of soho, Delhi Brasserie restaurant offers a real culinary journey in the heart of India. We will welcome you in an atypical and warm atmosphere in the colors of India accompanied by haunting music and a staff at your disposal. We offer a wide choice of specialties such as: Starters, Main course and Desserts. Our chefs’ only works with fresh produce and spices imported from India. Also at Delhi Brasserie- T he Best Halal Restaurant in Soho serves high-quality halal meat and for vegetarians, we also offer a wide selection of vegetable-based dishes. We are delighted to make you (re) discover the culinary specialties of India, delicious dishes of Kashmir, perfumed Bengal curries and grilled Tandoors. The great richness of Indian gastronomy allows us to offer a-la-carte of many refined dishes at the height of your desire. Alone, as a couple or family, let yourself be carried away by a refined cuisine, inspired by different parts of India. Do you want to organize a small event? An anniversary celebration, a party with friends or a business gathering? Our team is always at your service to make you spend an exceptional evening at our private dining room. Fill out our online form to organize your group meal. Let yourself be charmed by our private dining room with exotic decoration, the warmth of our welcome and dishes with inimitable and delicious flavors. Do not wait any longer, book your table online easily for an exotic experience.

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The Start Of Fusion On Jamaican And Chinese Food

The Start Of Fusion On Jamaican And Chinese Food By Christopher Powell The Jamaican Chinese cuisines are popular style in food resulting that is from the West Indian and Chinese cuisines. Those influences would be predominantly being Cantonese, main source to the Chinese immigrants at West Indies. The fool itself would be mixture of different time of cooking styles like the Jamaican and Chinese Fusion NY . On of oldest combination is the pasta, it is believe in being the descendant of Chinese noodle and have brought the Italian around thirteenth century. There some people that celebrated the food fusion. The mixes of the English and Indian have produced dishes like Kedgeree. The eighteen saw first of thirty six thousands of East Indians which arrive at Jamaica and that the influences spread which that time of that Jamaican cookbook around eighteen ninety three that were the recipes for coconut jelly and curry. The famous ones would become the favored dish around country and then embraced through newly emancipated people whom used the slow cooking in foods at effort in making them palatable and soft while that work in all day plantation. The curry dishes would grace every nearly menu and using the local meats like seafood, chicken and goat. Foods that based in one culture yet the prepared be using flavors and ingredients inherent in another culture that also be considered as fusion cuisine. In instances, the pizza have made with pepper, cheddar, salsa, or another common ingredients of taco often be marketed as the taco pizza. That particular dish would be the fusion of Mexican and Italian dishes. Another dishes could are fusion or novel in traditions and techniques. Additional, the ingredients which are native to the island, there are foods that have introduced and now are grown locally. The wide variety at seafood, the tropical meats and fruits are available. There are dishes that are variations in cooking and cuisines styles which brought the island on elsewhere. The cooking of mixes often is much maligned and be misunderstood concept. Fusion is commonly applied in acting of mixing two substances in heat. That could relate just to anything from any unclear fusion the procedure on two or three or more of the nuclei would fused in order to forming bigger one. The combination should allow the freedom and experimentation the contrast at textures and flavors. That could take a lot of forms and must be culinary technique which uses ingredients of the completely dish. Another form at combination which mixes with two disciplines that evenly in creating the distinctive and new. It should blend the traditions in more or two nations in creating the interesting and innovative dishes. That should tend in being more common at culture metropolitan and diverse areas there should be wider audience to that foo. There are some examples that include the cuisine. Often featured should be South eastern Asian, south Asian and East Asian alongside dishes another one and offering of dishes which inspired combinations in such cuisines. The cuisine is considered the fusion culture and taking the inspiration from Mexico, France, and Italy then the idea on eastern Asia and then creating of traditional dishes those cultures with the nontraditional materials. That would combines different food in various nations island. About the Author: You can get valuable tips for picking a restaurant and more information about a fantastic Jamaican and Chinese fusion NY restaurant at http://www.henricasrestaurant.com now. Posted by

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How you can Choose an excellent Restaurant for Dining

How you can Choose an excellent Restaurant for Dining Excellent meals is some thing that is definitely desired by each individual. Dining out has turn out to be a significant trend presently. Hardly ever do you obtain families consuming at home on weekends anymore as long waiting lists for tables at restaurants have grow to be a common phenomenon. Get a lot more details about miyagis duba iEating out is simple, swift and exciting. Be it a family gets with each other, business lunch or youngsters birthday party, people are generally arranging outings to enjoy good food and conversation.Restaurants currently are buzzing with consumers. As restaurants offer specialized menus and themes that suite every occasion, additional and much more clients are taking advantage.It appears that people everywhere are generally on the lookout for fantastic food within a comfortable atmosphere that they’re able to inform their pals and family about.So how do you know which sort of restaurant is ideal for your occasion? No matter whether it is just a fast bite or perhaps a fine restaurant, we give you a rapid guide beneath to assist you decide on the perfect location. Following this information and facts, you will see ideas on how you can choose fantastic dinners after you happen to be sitting at the table.Outside and Live EntertainmentSpecialized restaurants are feature live entertainment, ordinarily in an outdoor setting, like on a patio. These restaurants are excellent for friendly gatherings where everyone can love an incredible meal with each other and delight in the sights and sounds of live music entertainment. These restaurants commonly supply table service as well as a great selection of dished to choose from. The atmosphere in these restaurants is filled with energy with people conversing and also the music playing. The subsequent time you’re searching to have a terrific time using a group of friends, choose an outdoor and live entertainment experience.Casual DiningCasual dining generally represents rapid food joints serving swift food via self-service. They do not usually offer you table service and meals is usually served in disposable plates and containers. Casual dines are greatest when you find yourself around the go and should grab a speedy bite. They serve moderately priced food in a casual atmosphere. Cafes and tea houses also qualify within this category of casual dines. Casual dining establishments are perfect for students and mates finding together.Fine DiningA fine dining experience combines food and art collectively. It focuses additional on the service, presentation, and providing a terrific general dining experience to its guests. You commonly ought to be formally dressed in such restaurants as jeans along with a t-shirt might make you really feel a little out of location. The service is prime notch as well as the meals is served together with the utmost delicacy appealing as a lot to the eye since it does for your palate. Fine dines are usually priced higher than other dining establishments mainly because the focus is just not only on meals but around the ambience as well. Several people choose fine dining restaurants to get a unique occasion to produce it a memorable experience. It is also the perfect setting for a romantic date.Top quality DiningQuality dining establishments offer you a specialty menu. By way of example: Chinese, Mexican, Italian, Thai, Barbeque or Indian. Commonly, you can find not a range of various cuisines to select from, only certain menu products from one region. Every single Quality Dining restaurant represents a distinct facet of the restaurant industry and conveys its personal personality. Like fine dining establishments, good quality dining restaurants possess a good mood-setting ambience, genuine hospitality and a welcoming environment that preserve customers coming back. It is the perfect restaurant when seeking to have the authentic flavor of a distinct cuisine. However, it lacks the assortment of alternatives from unique cuisines that a fine dining restaurant would serve.Dining RestaurantsDining restaurants are suitable for any casual setting. They may be normally restaurants exactly where you’ll be able to sit down and enjoy your meal, as opposed to carryout restaurants that do not give a seating location. Moderately priced, and usually higher in wide variety, these dining restaurants are also appropriate for kid parties and modest get collectively.Tips on how to Select a great DinnersWhether it really is seafood, chicken, steak, or any other dish, under are some superior guidelines to follow when ordering at the dinner table.Seafood DiningOrdering seafood dishes is usually tricky, especially when you will find lots of options to select from. Seafood can range from an endless list of fish platters to an assortment of unique shellfish dishes. No matter what you find yourself choosing, you can find several items to maintain in thoughts. Very first, find out the freshness on the seafood. It’s simple, the fresher the catch, the greater tasting it will be. You do not want seafood in the event you need to settle for any catch from a couple days ago. Be polite and ask the server should you are certainly not positive.Chicken DiningChicken dishes are very typical in most restaurants, along with the way they are ready can differ an awesome deal. Ordering chicken will not be difficult so long as you realize the fundamentals. When ordering chicken, beware of heavy sauces. Restaurants usually mask the poor excellent of their chicken dishes with heavy sauces. A superb restaurant uses sauces in moderation to just blend together together with the top quality taste from the chicken.Steak DiningSteak can be a man’s greatest friend. Normally found in restaurants, steak is normally paired with uncomplicated side products to make a meal. In picking the right steak dinner, one issue to help keep in thoughts may be the distinct cuts of beef accessible. From sirloin to filet mignon, the reduce of beef has probably the most to perform with the texture and flavor of your steak. The second criteria to consider is how cooked you like your steak. Stick to properly performed for extremely thick cuts of beef and medium to medium-well for thinner cuts. Some people even prefer medium uncommon but be cautious of having a steak that is definitely not completely cooked. Posted by

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Prego, The Westin Mumbai Garden City’s Italian Fun-Dining restaurant launches a New Menu

In association with Asian Art House by Suman Gupta Mumbai, April 2019: Prego, The Westin Mumbai Garden City’s Italian Specialty restaurant, unveiled a new menu to enhance the restaurant’s fun-dining experience with authentic yet innovative gourmet flavours of Genoese cuisine. In association with the Asian Art House, the exquisite afternoon witnessed a camaraderie of like-minded guests who appreciate fine art and exquisite food. The unique showcase titled ‘Shades of Asia’ juxtaposed a curated collection of Indian and Vietnamese art featuring 30 superlative artworks from renowned artists, alongside the newly introduced menu. The creations displayed include works by eminent names like MF Husain, Amit Bhar, Laxman Aaley, Sangeeta Babani, Thota Laxmanan, Bhaskar Rao Botcha, Rangoli Garg, Sujata Sah Sejekan and Gourishankar Soni. Prego offers guests unique artistic flavours from the kitchens of Italy and brings to life a culinary art house where guests can enjoy a lively show kitchen while feasting on the most loved Italian classics including fresh pastas, homemade bread, and delicious hand-tossed pizzas. Inspired by the flavours of Genoa – Italy’s principal seaport, the cuisine is based on traditional Mediterranean cooking and very rich in ingredients and flavors. Executive Chef Rahul Dhavale along with Chef Antonello Cancedda, Chef de cuisine of Prego redefine gastronomic experiences with their proficient skills. Commenting on the launch of the new menu, Antonello Cancedda, Chef De Cuisine at Prego shares, “As an Italian and a local of Italy’s ancient port city – Genoa, Genoese cuisine is ingrained in me since I was a child. The cuisine is authentic, flavorful and extraordinarily enticing. I was always fond of my mother’s cooking style & having one meal of the day together with the family was a tradition where Pizzas were a favorite amongst everyone.” He further adds, “The new menu of Prego – our authentic Italian fun dining restaurant located at the Lobby Level is a tribute to Genovese cuisine. It offers a twist of authentic Italian culinary trends. The food specialties of Liguria has a notable inclusion of Genoa’s invention – Pesto & is enjoyed at all hours of the day. Some must haves from the menu include ‘Burrata A Calazione’, ‘Trofiette Al Pesto Della Rina’ and ‘Pollo Alla Cacciatora’.” A sojourn of two exquisite artistic endeavors amalgamate with ease at Prego, The Westin Mumbai Garden City, commemorating an unforgettable and enriching afternoon of masterful artwork complemented with gourmet delights. About The Westin Mumbai Garden City: Located in close proximity to the International airport as well as business and shopping centers, The Westin Mumbai Garden City is the perfect combination of comfort and convenience for any traveller. The property lives by the brand’s signature ‘Let’s Rise’ program that communicates Westin’s commitment to its guests’ well-being before, during and after their stay. Conceptualized around the Six Pillars of Wellness – Feel Well, Work Well, Move Well, Eat Well, Sleep Well and Play Well, The Westin Mumbai Garden City offer guests a holistic wellness experience within the city. With an inventory of 268 spacious and well-appointed guest rooms & suites, the hotel houses distinct F&B outlets such as Seasonal Tastes, Prego, Kangan, Splash and Eighteen The Lounge, which serve an array of palatable flavors from around the world. Guests can also experience offerings such as the iconic award-winning Heavenly® Bed, the Heavenly Spa by Westin™ provides exuberant spa treatments integrated with natural therapies, the RunWESTIN™ that provides scenic three and five mile running maps to help guests stay fit and find the best route to explore the surroundings on foot, with the Run Concierge for group runs, Westin Gear Lending with New Balance® and more. Share

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usman012 said: ↑ This is not just his problem but most of the Indians .Just go and check Pakistani videos .Indians are commenting about Pakistan so bad . Click to expand… usman012 said: ↑ I do not need consultation not me .All i say is that meat has nothing to with healthy or Unhealthy .I see Indians on Youtube commenting on Pakistani food videos and spitting venom when they see Meat dishes .All is about respect .I respect Indian culture and food .You respect our culture and food .Do not bring healthy or Non healthy things in this matter . Click to expand… It is not in my nature to show even an iota of disrespect to your cuisine or way of life, i can’t speak for Indians in general but i personally don’t have a beef with any of you Pakistanis. I don’t need to view Pakistani food vlogs on YouTube to form an opinion, your food tastes great and i absolutely relish many of your dishes.
You came across a sensible guy, and my comment on your cuisine was purely from a scientific standpoint. I understand that an average layman has little idea about the nitty gritty of these things and explaining could be an arduous task. So let it be, just remember this comment when you or a family member make your next trip to a cardiologist. Peace.
Pan-Islamic-Pakistan said: ↑ He keeps going on about NE, but I think he’s a negroid from Gujarat. They usually take fake personas when they come here. Click to expand… I don’t remember ever having a conversation with you, for all we know you might be a Bangladeshi masquerading as a Pakistani.
Pan-Islamic-Pakistan said: ↑ The forum is so much better when it is only Pakistanis and supporters. Click to expand… As opposed to holding meaningful discussions and informed debates with those having a contrarian point of view. As they say that ignorance is bliss.

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Shopping within a limited budget

Shopping within a limited budget April 22, 2019 2:06 PM Subscribe I have $140-ish to feed myself every month and I struggle to figure out what to buy. Can you help me come up with a shopping list and recipes that take in my celiac disease so I can eat every day? First excuse the formatting as my keyboard isn’t working and I can’t start a new paragraph. I have poor cooking skills but willing to learn though any mistakes will end up being more costly than for those who have money so no extreme gourmet recipes please. I have an aversion to veggies as I grew up in a meat and two veg household where all veggies were boiled so I’m just beginning to figure out what I like. Mostly I end up buying potatoes and the odd spinach. I also grew up with what I call basic white people 1970s food. I’m trying to stretch past that but it does end up being my default. I have – a microwave, a toaster, an oven, a slow cooker, a refrigerator with a small freezer. posted by kanata to Food & Drink (41 answers total) 32 This is a really, really good video made when it looked like the US government shutdown was going to leave Americans on food stamps having to make one month of food stamps stretch to two months. I know you’re in Canada and the cost of food is different, but the average food stamp allowance in the US is $133 per month, so it’s not far off from your budget at all. There is no fancy cooking in this plan and a reasonable amount of variety. How close you can approximate this depends completely on the food store(s) you can access, which I know can be an issue. However, this makes $133 last for two months, so I think you can get good mileage out of this for your $140 per month. It’s very worth watching the whole thing IMHO. 2:29 PM on April 22 [ 13 favorites ] Do you have access to budget grocery stores or places like Trader Joe’s or ethnic markets? Asking only because that can help as well after you have decided what you want to make. Sorry, I am on my phone about to go to bed but I will look for ideas tomorrow. posted by Bella Donna at 2:31 PM on April 22 [ 1 favorite ] A really wonderful resource is the free cookbook Good and Cheap . It is not specific to celiac, but has some ideas that should be adaptable to a gluten free diet. posted by goggie at 2:31 PM on April 22 [ 12 favorites ] I’ve recommended this recipe before on Ask Metafilter, and I recommend it to you now. Red lentils, some olive oil, plus add in a $1 bag of frozen veggies (any sort that looks good to you, I’d go with just a mix), plus any spices (garlic? dried red chile?) and any protein that you want (sausage, chicken, etc) – or just skip the meat. You’re getting protein, fiber, healthy fat, and lots of nutrients. Under $1/meal. (You should buy lentils that specifically say they’ve been processed in a facility without gluten.) I’d also recommend oatmeal or oat groats, which can be made sweet or savory. You can make them with water or with milk. You can add just cinnamon and sugar, or you can stir in various savory ingredients (an egg, frozen veggies, nutritional yeast) for a sort of risotto . As with lentils, you can make up a big batch and eat it for the week, to save time and money. Black or pinto beans and rice would also be a good option for you. Depending on your level of hunger, you could also make a meal of cruciferous vegetables with dairy – e.g. broccoli or cauliflower smothered with cheddar, baked brussels sprouts with butter and parmesan, etc. Cheese does tend to up the price of meals, and I think that you might end up less full after a bowl of cauliflower and cheese than a bowl of beans and rice, but it might be worth a try, as it’s quick to make, nutritious, and fairly cheap. I’d say if you’re gluten free and trying to do it on the cheap, various types of lentils/beans in general are going to be your friend if you’re looking for filling one-pot meals. Add some healthy fat, some mixed frozen veggies, and possibly some meat, and you’re all set. If you eat meat, you can often get cheap meats by looking at reduced items that will expire (I cook with these virtually always and have never given myself food poisoning). Chicken thighs can be had deskinned/deboned for maybe $1.50/pound, and cook really well with lentils and beans. I’ve often gotten sausage for $1/pound that expires in a day or two. Also I’d obviously avoid gluten-free substitutes of glutenous foods, which tend to be very expensive (gluten-free crackers, bread, tortillas, etc.). posted by ClaireBear at 2:33 PM on April 22 [ 7 favorites ] Also, if you eat meat, it’s hard to go wrong with putting meat + potatoes + carrots into the slow cooker. It works wonders on fatty/cheap cuts of meat. Look for beef chuck (in my area, $4-5/pound not on sale), or chicken thighs ($1.50/pound). Put in slow cooker in the morning. Add potatoes and carrots chopped into large bite-sized pieces. Add some spices, or don’t. Cook for 10-12 hours on low for beef; 5-6 on high for chicken. Boom. Several meals for probably $1-3/meal. posted by ClaireBear at 2:36 PM on April 22 [ 3 favorites ] Are there food pantries or food banks you have access to in your area? Any ‘free veggie’ spots (there are a few in my town, it’s less of a risk to bring home free veg in case you don’t like it). I know others will have great specific shopping lists and recipes, but access to free food will make your budget go a lot farther and give more variety. Dont forget to check craigslist for free fruit / veg in season, FB marketplace, and Olio (it’s an app that lists local free groceries)! posted by ananci at 2:37 PM on April 22 [ 1 favorite ] The slow cooker may be your best tool here. Relatively cheap meats, frozen veg and time on low cook will make you delicious stew/soup that can be frozen and reheated as needed. Add a celiac friendly grain product and you’re got a great meal. Try googling community kitchens. Many local places offer cooking lessons and even celiac specific ones in many places. Can you access a community garden or plant a few small containers for some plants/herbs. This can help stretch a good budget and make meals a bit more interesting (lettuce, parsley, cherry tomatoes are all pretty easy and useful. Even a few herbs indoors can be worthwhile and fun). Corn based tortillas and a bean mix with just a wee bit of cheese for yum should also work for you. Add a salsa for flavour and zing. If eggs are relatively cheap where you are they can be a cheapish protein as well. Look for breakfast burritos as a freezable meal. Cool in bulk, freeze and microwave for a easy quick breakfast which is far cheaper than fats good. posted by Northbysomewhatcrazy at 2:40 PM on April 22 [ 2 favorites ] Budget Bytes is a great website with a variety of meals. Here is a link to her Gluten Free recipes. She tracks the cost of each meal (obviously your results will vary depending on your location). But this is a great place to start browsing and looking for recipes that look good. That can help you find more veggies that you like. Looking at your budget, if you eat 2 meals a day, you’ll have $2.33 to spend per meal. This recipe is $1.79 per serving. Gluten free soy sauce might cost a bit more. Some costs will be more though because you may have to buy full containers to start. Look for recipes that utilize things you already have on hand and/or cut out things you don’t. On the recipe above, you can use a plain veggie oil in place of the sesame oil. It won’t be as delicious, but you can try it another time if you have sesame oil in the future. Use red pepper flakes instead of sriracha. Don’t be afraid to make a large meal as long as the price per serving is low. You can freeze SO many foods. posted by hydra77 at 2:56 PM on April 22 [ 2 favorites ] Oh I meant to add the stores available to me: Save on foods (like a safeway) Quality foods (expensive grocery) No frills (Canadian budget food store) Dollar stores posted by kanata at 3:08 PM on April 22 Seconding Budget Bytes. Her recipes have become staples for us. posted by COD at 3:54 PM on April 22 This red beans and rice recipe is, at least according to the calculator provided, 81 cents a serving. It freezes well and could be halved. You can also make or pair it with sausage if you like. We made it recently and it was good – we used a combo of paprika, cayenne and chili powder instead of the onion powder; we also skipped the cilantro garnish. This kind of dish is super versatile and you can use other spices or other types of beans to change it up. posted by vunder at 4:02 PM on April 22 [ 1 favorite ] I like making mexican-style rice and beans sometimes. Easy and very cheap, and relatively healthy. Mix ~4 cups of cooked rice with some veggies cooked in a frying pan (I like onions, bell peppers and celery, but you can use pretty much any veggies you prefer) and a can of beans (I like black). Add spices (cumin, chili powder, cayenne) and sauces (I like a few tablespoons of chili sauce and heavy drizzling with hot sauce). Fry a few min to dry things up, then you’re good to go. posted by randomnity at 4:05 PM on April 22 [ 1 favorite ] I appreciate the recipes. I didn’t know of budget bytes and will dive in. Is there similar resources to help me make a grocery list so that I can spread the ingredients out? I tend to have to shop once a month to get deals. posted by kanata at 4:07 PM on April 22 Start a garden if you have the space. You would be surprised how much can be grown in even a small space. Check local nurseries for advice and plantings. Any friends who grow vegetables will be useful. There are books in the library and youtube videos to help. posted by conrad53 at 4:24 PM on April 22 Oatmeal is generally gluten free, and you can eat it the standard way (sweet, like for breakfast). Or you can make it savory! I’ve cooked (aka microwaved, but stove-top will work, too) oatmeal in soupbrothstock and eaten it with frozen mixed veggies & canned beans. You can also use gluten-free soy sauce (you can grow more scallions from the ones you buy at the store! just stick the roots in a cup of water and put in the sun) or beans and salsa . …I just discovered that ” zoatmeal ” (zucchini oatmeal), which supposedly tastes like zucchini bread exists. posted by devrim at 4:25 PM on April 22 [ 2 favorites ] I know you said the food pantry near you doesn’t do gluten free things, and that may be true for prepared meals that they serve. But food banks also provide food for you to take home – some of it will certainly be not okay for you, but some of it will be. Stuff like rice, canned veggies and fruit, tuna fish, peanut butter, frozen meat, sometimes eggs, sometimes fresh produce. So if there’s one near you, it’s definitely worth checking out. Having said all that, I’m a big fan of crustless quiches. There are a million recipes out there, all very flexible to suit whatever you have on hand. posted by lyssabee at 4:28 PM on April 22 [ 6 favorites ] Have you applied for special diet allowance? posted by mikek at 4:45 PM on April 22 [ 2 favorites ] Do you have the Flipp app? No Frills will price match if you find a better deal at another major and local grocery store. Clip what you’d like on Flipp, they’re ok with referring to the app. Also, ask store staff when they apply discounts to meat. I was going to say, if you’re old-school, go old-school. Cook a Sunday roast. Beef or pork loin, or roast chicken or turkey. Portion it off, freeze; pull a portion out for a meal – you can have it plain with potatoes you’d prepare fresh that day, or use it as an ingredient in another dish. It can be cheaper to get a huge pork roast (and portion it off that way) than to get individual bits. Depends on your appetite, but I need about 200g of raw meat for a meal to feel full. So a 1 kg roast would be good for five meals. Once you do this a few times, you’ll have a freezer full of options. For beef and pork, I stud the meat with a knife all over, insert peeled garlic cloves, cover in oil and some salt and use Delia Smith’s temperatures and timings (google eg “roast beef Delia”). For a whole chicken, I stuff a quartered onion in it, cover with oil and salt (and refer to Delia). If you’re at home and don’t like smells sticking around for the hours things take in a slow cooker, you can also soften the cheaper, tougher meats by marinating them (and cooking for less time in the oven). Maybe you could have one meat- and potato-focused meal a day, and one more bean/legume? (Other than breakfast.) posted by cotton dress sock at 5:17 PM on April 22 My weekly dinner menu in one period when I was broke and had no time: Black beans with sweet potatoes: sautee onion, add a couple teaspoons of curry powder and a teaspoon of salt, a microwaved sweet potato, and two cups of black beans. Alternatively, a microwaved sweet potato mashed with peanut butter and salsa. Sounds weird but trust me. Tofu veggie stir fry with rice: soak cubed extra firm tofu in soy sauce for at least half an hour. Fry in oil. Add more soy sauce or stir fry sauce, and a bag of frozen veggies. Serve with rice. Chili: sautee an onion, add chili powder, cumin, black pepper. Add a can of diced tomatoes, cooked beans, and corn (amount depends on how much you want to make). Baked potatoes with cheese, and broccoli if I was feeling fancy Beans and rice with salsa and cheese Pasta (you can use gluten free): simmer TVP in red sauce (you could use meat instead if you eat it), serve with pasta. I made enough for leftovers each night to use for the next day’s lunch. My breakfasts were (thawed) frozen berries, plain yogurt, and almonds. You could add gluten free oats to that. posted by metasarah at 5:37 PM on April 22 [ 2 favorites ] If you don’t mind shopping more frequently, check your preferred supermarket for “manager’s special” (i.e., about to spoil) meat. It’s usually heavily discounted, but as long as you cook or freeze it immediately, there’s no real difference. It’s a cheap way to eat steak occasionally, and to cut costs in general. posted by kevinbelt at 6:00 PM on April 22 I just got cut off from the dietary allowance since I didn’t get the forms in in time. I assumed that social services would follow their rules and let me know. Slightly frustrated that I have to affirm every year that yup still celiac. So this month I have 140 instead of 180. I’m in the process of getting it again. I eat rice and eggs frequently. I find that slow cookers make all the food taste the same and that’s another thing I would like to learn. Everything gets boring when in the last 2 weeks I’m eating the same thing. Quite often I end up eating meat by itself as I’m good at stockpiling that. I’d actually like to eat less meat but am not sure if that’s possible if I dont like frozen veggies as all I know about them is you boil them until they suck. Tips on how to make things taste different or how to use them for multiple meals would be appreciated too. I will definitely look up lentils and how to cook them as I like them. posted by kanata at 6:04 PM on April 22 Greens are often very affordable. Here, collards, spinach, and mustard greens are 88 cents for a large bunch. I like to put whatever I am eating on a huge portion of raw greens, especially spinach. Doing so makes a meal more filling and adds vitamins and fiber. I’d avoid kale, because hipsters have made it less affordable. Walmart here has bags of steamable frozen veggies for $1. I stock my freezer with tons of them and just toss a bag in the microwave for a healthy side. Right now, I’ve got green beans, several bags of broccoli, cauliflower, and peas. Tofu is cheaper than meat. Press out the water, marinate in anything tasty, and bake for a protein. Overnight oats make a delicious breakfast or late night snack. Soak old fashioned oats in your choice of liquid, add a dollop of yogurt, and top with frozen fruit. Beans. Beans on everything. Canned beans are cheap, dry beans are cheaper. Eat dal. Make beans and greens, and put it on top of brown rice. Eat baked beans on toast. posted by easy, lucky, free at 6:16 PM on April 22 [ 1 favorite ] Ooh, it sounds like you might be overcooking your frozen vegetables then… Frozen vegetables are already kind of cooked in that they’re blanched before being frozen. So you really only need to warm them up really, and cooking them for much longer than that will actually reduce their nutritious value anyways. They should still be a vibrant fresh color when you’re finished color, not a dull washed out color like they’ve been canned! If you take a bag of frozen peas (for example), pour a bowl full, put it in the microwave for ~2 minutes, take it out and stir, then microwave for another minute, the peas should still be bright green and fresh but now warm. If you mix in cheese or soy sauce or salsa or hot sauce on top, you have a simple and tasty side. posted by devrim at 6:42 PM on April 22 [ 1 favorite ] Also, if you’re bored of boiled / steamed vegetables, can you try roasting them? It’s a bit trickier with frozen vegetables, but it’s still doable ! posted by devrim at 6:46 PM on April 22 [ 1 favorite ] A lot of the frozen steamer veggies are pretty good at this point. They’ve figured out how to hit the sweet spot before getting overcooked, so I’d recommend those. To make things taste different, buy some spice mixes. Things like Cajun spice (you can be really frugal if you have s Popeye’s chicken near you by taking extra packets of their Cajun Sparkle) or garlic and herb. Even Parmesan cheese works. You can also make your own pretty easily (there are recipes all over the Internet), which is probably good from a gluten-free perspective. To add flavor to veggies, steam them, then drizzle some olive oil over them, and sprinkle on your spice mix of choice. posted by kevinbelt at 6:55 PM on April 22 [ 1 favorite ] If you like roasted potatoes I think you would like roasted Brussels sprouts. Wash the sprouts, cut them in half lengthwise, toss them with some olive oil or whatever oil you have, and squeeze the juice of one to two lemons over it. Salt and pepper and stick them in at 400 degrees for about 30-40 minutes. You could also add some red pepper flakes, or lemon pepper, or garlic if you had some available. You should be able to buy big bags at Walmart and they last pretty long! 7:02 PM on April 22 [ 2 favorites ] I can also vouch for this Mexican rice recipe as very tasty—I sub in spicier peppers because I like heat. 7:05 PM on April 22 [ 1 favorite ] Non wheat noodles are cheap as fuck at a pan-Asian markets, and are apocalypse proof. Sweet potato burritos or tacos. Holy shit . Stick the sweet potato with a fork a few times. Microwave the sweet potato for several minutes. Let it cool slightly so you don’t burn your fingers to nubbins, chop into 1/2inch size chunks, then toss into a skillet with some oil and ‘taco seasoning’ (packet, blended yourself or just chili powder and paprika; your call). Roast at 400 +/- until golden brown and delicious. Hit it with some lime. Paired with beans, rice, and some veg, and you’ve got a dope burrito that could feed an army. Paella as a technique not as a recipe can lead to some really great results. A base of long-simmered aromatics, add a single smokey sausage, some paprika, short grain rice and whatever tender vegetables like peas, green beans, asparagus, red-peppers. Alton brown goes overboard (as always) but the technique here is solid, and are good bones for even a simple paella (just do it in a hot oven instead of a grill). In our house we joke this is ‘spanish stir fry’ because we just use so many different things in this recipe. The bottom gets all crispy, and it’s a great use for spare broth kicking around. Its been a while since I was single and cooking solo, but when I was, my grocery budget looked like that. Learning how to break down a chicken is an invaluable skill for budget cooking. An example of how a chicken would routinely be broken down and used. I link to a couple recipes that should probably be halved: One chicken yields two breasts, two thighs, two drums and two wings, and the bones. One breast would routinely get turned into chicken tikka masala , which over rice would be at least 2-4 meals depending on your stretch. The thighs would go into something that’s more along the lines of claypot chicken (I would usually top with greens sautéed with a little sesame oil and if you’re feeling flush, adding a 6.5 minute egg to the bowl can be great). Again, this is probably three meals? The drums then get stripped and done up with ‘taco mix’ or just straight cumin/chili powder/lime and tacos are made if you get some avocado or greens or onion on there. Soup was usually something along the lines of pho-ga , but instead of pressure cooking everything I’d just use that as a template and make broth from the chicken bones, and use the last breast sliced thin in the mix. All of those meals share overlap in cheap aromatics like ginger, cilantro, limes, green onions, and various spices. There is quite a bit of overlap between some easier latin american and pan-asian cooking (spice ratios change, and somethings drop out and are added, but the overlap is there). You’ll likely have enough chicken broth to do another bean-based soup like a minestrone or any number of fairly wide-ranging soups . posted by furnace.heart at 7:09 PM on April 22 [ 1 favorite ] Glad to hear your resubmitting! When I was in a similar situation I used a combination of apps/websites to find cheap food, and different recipes . I used Flipp to identify when high value items became more affordable – for example, setting my location to the North Island I found that Walmart has eggs for 2.77/18 – this works out to 500 calories/dollar, which just fits within your budget of about $5 a day. After picking a few ingredients I used the website Eatthismuch to generate meals that used what I decided on, and back when I used to use it I could tweak the recipe generator for dietary needs, cost, and reusing leftover ingredients. Finally, you really, really should use the food bank, I know that much of the food won’t be usable to you but even simple things like a jar of mayonnaise or a tin of vegetables would make your budget much easier as each one of these could cost almost as much as your daily food budget. posted by mikek at 7:13 PM on April 22 [ 1 favorite ] >Oatmeal is generally gluten free Oatmeal is not safe for celiac unless specifically certified gluten free posted by mikek at 7:19 PM on April 22 [ 3 favorites ] re frozen veggies: saute them in butter / oil / drippings with as much salt as you like. They’re healthier just steamed, but I don’t actually like most vegetables enough to eat them plain like that. A little fat and salt goes a long way to making them edible. If you put a cover on the pan for a while at first, they steam in the butter/etc. as well as in their own moisture, so you get softer veggies but still with the added flavor. Cook to your preferred texture. posted by current resident at 7:21 PM on April 22 Frozen fish, some kinds might be cheaper than beef – add butter and lemon, plus maybe some spices. Beans in tomato sauce/canned tomatoes can be nice for variety. Do you bake your own gluten free treats? Starting that can save you money in the long run, and provide a hobby. What sorts of spices do you have on hand already? We can suggest recipes that use what’s easily available now. Rice cooked in chicken broth or coconut milk can be a nice flavor distraction. Try to visit ‘ethnic markets’ or shop the ‘ethnic section’ of your grocery store. Larger packages of spices for less money. posted by bilabial at 8:42 PM on April 22 Another source of recipes: Jack Monroe (linking to the gluten-free tag). She prices things out according to where she lives, but hopefully what’s cheap for her will tend to be cheap where you are as well. In general, for almost any vegetable, I’d recommend trying it roasted first of all. It’s a good way to get both flavor and texture, and you can experiment with how cooked and/or caramelized you want things to be. Err on the side of roasting for less time rather than more – if things are undercooked to your taste you can just put then back in the oven, but it’s harder to rescue overcooked food. Do you like spices? They’re a good way to get variety. If you try things like the slow cooker-type of recipes described above (which don’t have to be made in a slow cooker if you don’t have one) you can try something a lot of Indian recipes do, which is to use a tadka – basically frying and adding all the strong flavors at the end. If you’re using dried chillies, put a small number (like, one or two unless you know you can handle more) in some generous amount of hot oil until they puff up. If you’re using hard spices (like cumin seeds, coriander seeds, mustard seeds, pepper corns, cardamom seeds, cloves, etc) add them to the oil (the seeds will pop when they’re ready). If you like onions, garlic, or ginger you add them and saute to taste. Then you add the whole thing to whatever you’ve cooked, stirring it in so the flavors permeate. It’s worth finding better instructions online (maybe on YouTube) since the spices and chillies need to be done pretty quickly so they don’t burn, and the seed popping might surprise you at first. But it’s a pretty easy way to get some wonderful flavor. Spices can be expensive at some grocery stores, so if you can find any cheap ethnic stores or online sources that might get you a lot farther. Ethnic stores often also sell things like rice and legumes cheaply and in bulk. Some alternatives to a straight-out tadka: -adding carmelized onions, garlic, or even sugar-rich veggies like carrots (again, carmelized) to whatever you’re cooking at either the beginning or the end. -Adding some spice, whether with peppers, powder, or hot sauce -don’t underestimate salt and pepper, especially the former -lemon juice, lime juice, or sometimes vinegar: acids kind of “brighten” things up. -a good curry paste with coconut milk feels (to me) pretty decadent. Curry paste can be more expensive than just using some spices, but I’ve found being able to look forward to a decadent meal every week or so helps me put up with relatively boring or repetitive food the rest of the time – bits of fresh herbs added at the end. If you can find a cheap herb plant or two, that’s especially useful when you’re cooking for one since you can just use small quantities without buying a whole bunch. These things might sound like unnecessary expenses, but they’re a way to make some of the cheapest foods (especially lentil/bean-based foods) both delicious and much less repetitive, even if you’re basically cooking the same things all the time. posted by trig at 9:06 PM on April 22 [ 2 favorites ] I’m celiac and some of the advice above, while well meaning, isn’t good for celiacs. Oats, quinoa, beans and lentils in the US are rarely gluten free unless certified and then they are very expensive. Oats aren’t OK for all celiacs even if they are gluten free because some people react to a similar protein in oats. Asian products do not have the same labeling requirements as US so be careful there. Slow cooker food is a taste I have never acquired, personally so I’m not a fan. Meat and two veg is kinda good for you. Learn how to prepare vegetables and salads so you like them and it’s about as healthy as you can get for your dietary needs. I personally eat fish and veggies mostly and some carby things for snacks, like certified gluten free crackers which I only buy at Costco because they are laughably expensive elsewhere. Sometimes I make casserole type things, and when I have a glut of cheap veggies I make soup and freeze. Most of my family is gluten free so we have it down. I recommend looking into cuisines that are largely gluten free traditionally. Many Irish recipes are, asian cuisines too and Indian food is often also gluten free. Traditional American recipes are and presumably traditional foods from other places wheat was not common until the 19th century. For example: potatoes or sweet potatoes, carrots, peas and some sauce make an awesome curry which goes a long way. For specific veggies: Frozen peas are easy and delicious. Boil some lightly salted water, pop them in and wait till they float then drain and eat. Easy and very tasty. Don’t steam, they get gross. Frozen corn: same as peas. Frozen carrots are gross imho: I eat them in stews and curries but not plain. Canned veggies: should all die in a fire. Potatoes: peel, cut in half or quarters, parboil (put in water and bring to boil then immediately take off heat and drain), allow to dry over heat till they look fluffy then roast in the oven while basting in butter or meat juice until the outside is crispy and golden. Forget “tossing in olive oil and herbs”, this is how you make potatoes delicious. Small potatoes: leave the skin on and boil in salted water till 90% cooked. Then broil in the oven to make the skin crispy. Season and eat. Yum. Yams and sweet potatoes: cut into strips like fries, roll in oil and herbs and roast in the oven with a quick broiling at the end to crisp them up. Squash (small): cut into thin discs and fry in a pan on both sides till they are soft and getting pretty well done and dark brown but not quite burnt, Or spiralize and treat like pasta. Squash (giant): cut in half long ways, scoop the insides out and mix with pre-cooked ground meat or cheese/potato and other seasonings, then reinstall and roast the whole thing. Look up stuffed marrow for recipes. Mushrooms: fry in butter not oil (they get soggy) and eat with chicken or make into soup. Tomatoes: dice roughly and make putanseca which is just any old veggies you have cooked in a frying pan with oil. Or slice and eat with salt and basil which you can grow in a mason jar. Stir Fry: cut leftover veggies up and fry briefly at very high heat in whatever pan you have with some sauces. Add leftover cooked meat at the end. Green peas, snow peas and other summer veggies are great for this. Omelettes: the trick is to cook the veggies in another pan so they don’t make the omelette soggy. Combine at the end. posted by fshgrl at 11:53 PM on April 22 [ 1 favorite ] Oh and Amazon has cheap spices and gluten free snack food. I order from there quite a bit for stuff like that. Jsut be careful your spices are gluten free too posted by fshgrl at 11:55 PM on April 22 You can do this!! We were on a VERY strict grocery budget at one point because we had to be. Do you like peanut butter or other nut butter? I ate a lot of celery with peanut butter (and sometimes raisins) and apples or bananas with peanut butter. Other recipes from that time period include “orange poppy seed cabbage” (stir fried cabbage with poppy seeds, orange peel and orange juice, maybe onions and soy sauce, served with rice) and “cheesy mustard lentils” (brown lentils, cheese of whatever type, and dijon or brown mustard). posted by Ms Vegetable at 7:01 AM on April 23 I’m going to recommend you 4 cookbooks – one of which I recommend every dang time there’s an AskMe, and three that I don’t. * The Moosewood Daily Special is nothing but soups and salads, and are actually meant to go together; the Moosewood restaurant has about 2-3 “soups of the day” and 2-3 “salads of the day”, and their lunch special is a cup of the soup of your choice plus a small plate of the salad of your choice. Recommending this because a) a vegetable-heavy diet can be cheaper, b) many of these recipes keep well in the fridge so it’s easy to make up a couple batches and leave them there and you just reheat a bowl at a time, and c) it’s really hard to screw up soup. Soup is also friendly to “improvisation” – if the recipe calls for a particular vegetable and you don’t have it, it’s usually okay to just leave it out. * How To Cook A Wolf is a small book by the famous food writer M.F.K. Fisher. The first edition came out during the Second World War, and was meant to advise people on how to cope with wartime rations and limited budgets; the second edition came out in the 1950s, and adds in a little other information about “how to make sense of the food advice people are shoving down our throats”. It can sometimes assume a level of familiarity with the kitchen and cooking, but most of it is very sound advice mixed in with recipes. Then there’s An Everlasting Meal by Tamar Alexander, which treads much of the same ground as How To Cook A Wolf but is written for 21st-Century sensibilities. Both writers are lovely. * Then there’s Simplicity from a Monastery Kitchen . This is by a brother in a Dominican Monastery in upstate New York who’s become the author of several cookbooks now; I stumbled upon his soup cookbook a few years ago and it joined my collection. This is a better option, though; it has more than just soups, embraces seasonal produce, and the ingredients for most of what he makes are pretty dang cheap (not surprising given this is from a monastery). The recipes are also pretty simple (hence the name). It’s still healthy and lovely food despite its simplicity, which is kind of his point; most of the main-meal dishes are egg-based, but still lovely (there’s an omlette recipe with goat cheese that I’m thinking I might have the resources for tonight and I’m actually finding myself excited by the prospect). posted by EmpressCallipygos Cooking frozen vegetables – my favorite easy/cheap way to cook them is to roast them in the oven on high heat with oil and salt. I usually set the oven around 400 F. Basically, dump them from the bag onto a tray, add a good amount of oil (whatever is cheap and you have on hand should be fine), season with salt. Cook for something like 15 – 30 minutes – it depends on the vegetable and your oven and your preferred level of doneness. I really like broccoli cooked this way, but cauliflower, carrots, and probably just about anything will work. You can add spices if you want, but just the oil + salt is good too! This also works with fresh vegetables (and the texture is better with fresh), but it’s still good with frozen ones – plus much easier and cheaper! posted by insectosaurus at 9:44 AM on April 23 Seconding Jack Monroe otherwise known as the Bootstrap cook. She is on Instagram and Facebook, too. posted by Enid Lareg at 9:47 AM on April 23 I’m going to start out by seconding a few of the suggestions made up above: I’ve found Flipp really useful for finding food items at a reasonable price. It lets you browse flyers from a wide variety of stores, has a Shopping List function (which allows you to create a list of items you’re interested in buying in future, and then lets you see which stores are currently advertising those items in their flyers), and lets you “clip” items from flyers to create a customized list of items from each store’s flyer. So, each week when the new flyers are published I click on each item on my Flipp Shopping List, see where it’s on sale, and then “clip” items from the flyers for reference. This lets me see at a glance that right now, where I am, strawberries are more than $3/lb at Loblaws but they’re $1.77/lb at No Frills, and also that Food Basics has butter on for only $2.77/lb. Then when I’ve done that for my whole list I look at the summary Flipp has created with my clippings (sorted by store) and decide which store(s) it’s most economical for me to shop at this week. This is useful for planning the menu for the week too, since I can see which perishable ingredients are on sale and then find recipes that use those items: last week there were sales on whole chickens, chicken thighs, yellow onions, carrots, potatoes & coconut milk, so my boyfriend and I did up a HUGE pot of Chinese style chicken & veggie curry, and a slow-cooker chicken with veggies. We put the chicken carcass in the freezer to be turned into soup later on. Moosewood Restaurant, mentioned above, has been famous for over 40 years and has a long series of vegetarian cookbooks which I found really useful for getting myself accustomed to cooking with vegetables beyond steaming them in the microwave (I favour the original Moosewood Cookbook, and Moosewood Restaurant Cooks at Home – Fast and Easy Recipes for Everyday). My local library (in Ontario) has copies of ALL of the books, but Moosewood does share some recipes on their website too. Jack Monroe , also mentioned above, became famous after she started writing a blog about being long term unemployed, in dire poverty, and having to feed herself and her toddler son on the equivalent of $20 Canadian per week. Now she’s a cookbook author, an activist and advocate (trans, anti-poverty, mental health) and journalist. Her recipes favour cheap simple frequently shelf-stable ingredients with quick cooking times and require the bare-minimum of cooking equipment. Her cookbooks are harder to come by in Canada (my library doesn’t have any yet, but will be getting her newest book when it comes out this summer), but there are lots published on her new website or published in The Guardian.

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From Brew Hall to defensive miscues, Loons seek improvements at Allianz Field

By Andy Greder / St. Paul Pioneer Press Today at 6:35 p.m. Minnesota United midfielder Jan Gregus (8) prepares for a corner kick against New York City in front of Loons fans during the first half of their April 13 game at Allianz Field in St. Paul. David Berding / USA TODAY Sports
ST. PAUL — Minnesota United wants Allianz Field to be both a cathedral and a fortress.
A cathedral — in soccer parlance — for fans to revere the beautiful game, and a fortress in terms of difficulty for opposing MLS teams to visit and come away with a win.
United has been working to refine both that consumer experience and its sporting operations after the St. Paul stadium debuted April 13 with 19,796 fans watching the Loons settle for a 3-3 draw with New York City.
The Loons (3-3-1) will now face the Los Angeles Galaxy (6-1-0) in the first night game at Allianz Field at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 24. It will kickoff three straight home games, including matches against D.C. United at 12:30 p.m. Sunday and the Seattle Sounders visiting at 7 p.m. May 4. In the stands
United had about 15 run-up events before the stadium opener, but only one training session for the Loons ahead of their first game there. A snowfall of 8 1/2 inches fell on the grass field about 48 hours before kickoff and precluded the Loons from training at the stadium a few days before to the game. A few snowbanks on the West side of the field were the only traces of winter left by game time.
“When a stadium gets opened, there can be a a negative tone to what happened,” United CEO Chris Wright said. “There can be a negative tone to what went awry operationally, or something happened that maybe was a deflection from the pride that everybody has in the stadium. To be very honest, we didn’t get that.”
But Wright said United has a list of 200 items to be improved, all organized on a big spreadsheet. Some of the main objectives come in food and beverage service.
The Brew Hall on the north side of the stadium was a massive success during the Saturday opener, Wright said. The demand, however, was too much for United — which is self-managing the stadium — to keep up with the sales of suds.
Delaware North, United’s food and beverage partner, has since spent $25,000 to convert its paper point-of-sale system to a digital operation to speed up sales. The club hopes to have that enhancement up and running by Wednesday’s game.
Allianz Field also had shortages of pizza and cuisine from Hot Indian and Brasa. “(They) got completely shellacked,” Wright said of the latter two stands. “They were out of food about halfway through halftime. So that is over 400 units per stand. We’ve got to address that, which they are. That’s a good problem to have.”
The Allianz Field opener, which also dealt with the stress of nearly 1,000 credentialed staff, media and other officials, also served as the rollout of Minnesota United using 100 percent digital tickets. Wright reports few substantial issues in how that software on MNUFC’s app was first adopted. On the field
On the soccer side, Minnesota reverted back to the defensive struggles from its first two years of MLS play, which originated at TCF Bank Stadium. After giving up three goals to New York City, they gave up four to Toronto FC in a 4-3 loss Friday in Ontario.
With that spike, the Loons are on pace to give up more goals than they did in either of their first two MLS seasons. That in itself is remarkable considering they set an MLS record for most goals allowed in consecutive campaigns.
“One of the things that we are searching for is a defensive identity,” said Wright, who oversees sporting director Manny Lagos, coach Adrian Heath and the rest of the sporting staff. “We’ve long been criticized, and rightfully so, for the number of goals that we give up, the way we give up goals, etc.
“I know our coaching staff and players are working very, very hard on changing that,” Wright said. “I want Allianz Field to become a place that is very, very difficult for opponents to play in. We’ve got to seek that, and a big part of that is the mentality of our players and our coaching staff. The mentality of our soccer operations and the mentality of our supporters.”
Heath and players such as Ozzie Alonso, Michael Boxall and Brent Kallman have chalked up the defensive lapses to individual errors or a lull that has come in the moments after one goal is scored. Against New York City and Toronto, the Loons gave up two goals over a few short minutes.
“We are trying to eradicate individual mistakes,” Heath said Monday. “It’s what we’ve spoke about. I don’t think there has been anything wrong with the collective positioning of the group, but individuals are making errors that’s costing us dearly every single game.”
Loons players said the first game at Allianz Field was difficult because the stadium was new to them, too.
“We’ve got to go on and make it our home now,” Heath said. “It’s early days, I know, but we’ve got to make it a fortress.” Additional Articles Recommended by The Daily Republic

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The Seduction of Thai Cuisine Spicing it up in the Land of Smiles and Chilies!

Article written by Anita Draycott, www.anitadraycott.com .
“Have you eaten rice today?” This common salutation among Thai people reflects importance of food and rice to their diet and culture. Indeed, the humble grain is the ideal foil and cushion for curries and stir-fries. Food is taken so seriously in Thailand that kings have written odes to curries.
Thai people are also sensualists when it comes to their cuisine. And once you’ve tasted the real thing, you will forever crave the complex and mystical mélange. Thai food appeals at least three of the five taste senses: sour, sweet, salty, spicy and sometimes bitter.
Like the culture itself, Thai food is the product of various ethnic influences, including Chinese, Indian, Malaysian, Vietnamese, Cambodian and European.
According to a worldwide poll of 35,000 people by CNN Travel, Thai cuisine is one of the most popular in the world.
As much as I love eating Thai food, the idea of preparing a meal has been a bit daunting. So, on my last trip to Thailand, I packed a large appetite and enrolled in two Thai cooking classes.
The Joy of Cooking in Bangkok
Bangkok’s first cooking school opened its doors at the Mandarin Oriental hotel in 1986. It was here that Chef Narain introduced me to the secrets of Thai cuisine.
I had signed up for “Hands-on Cooking and Authentic Thai Lunch.” Aprons tied, our small group went outside onto the patio to wash our hands. Even this was a sensory experience. We ribbed slices of aromatic kaffir lime onto our hands before rinsing. The oil in the lime acts like a natural hand lotion with a sublime fresh citrus aroma. We sniffed around the herb garden and snipped a bit of Thai basil.
After Chef Narain introduced the recipes and various exotic ingredients, we sliced, diced and pounded our way through four Southern Thai recipes: stir-fried beef with lemon grass; steamed egg with shrimp paste; rice vermicelli with a curried sauce of crab and wild betel; dumplings with coconut sauce.
I learned that southern Thai cuisine uses a lot of coconut milk and cream and more spices than the milder northern Thai dishes. Lemons are never used, only limes. I discovered that the smaller the chilli the hotter and the bird’s eye used in the most of our dishes is dynamite. Fish sauce and shrimp paste are indispensable in Thai cooking. Thai people generally eat most dishes with a fork and spoon, using chopsticks mainly for noodles.
We prepared everything from scratch and that involved what chef described as “anger management” while furiously pounding the ingredients for curry paste with a mortar and pestle.
At the end of the class, each participant was awarded a certificate and a gift bag with a fresh apron and a selection of herbs. Other graduates have included actor Sacha Baron Cohen and Harry Potter director, David Yates.
“No one ever fails,” said chef as he led us to a table set at the adjoining Sala Rim Naam restaurant to enjoy the fruits of our labours. As if by alchemy, all of the ingredients in each dish seemed to balance each other, resulting in a complex symphony of sensational tastes in my mouth. The slightly sweet coconut milk mellowed the funky shrimp paste and fiery chillis in the steamed egg dish. My favourite was the curried crab with its turmeric-infused golden sauce bursting with the tang of kaffir limes leaves, yet tempered with coconut milk and palm sugar. Sublime!
www.mandarinoriental.com/bangkok
Fantastic Forkfuls in Phuket
For my next culinary adventure I flew south to Phuket to attend a Royal Thai Cuisine session at the Blue Elephant Cooking School & Restaurant founded by chef Nooror Somany Steppe.
We met our teacher, Molly, at the impressive century-old former governor’s mansion. From there we strolled across the street to the Downtown Phuket Market—a feast for the senses. Pyramids of different coloured curry pastes, bundles of lemongrass, Thai garlic and basil, galangal, kaffir limes and freshly harvested morning glory leaves tempted from the ground floor. The variety of tropical fruits was remarkable: stinky durian, spiky rambutans, green and ripe mangos and my favourite, mangosteens.
Catch of the day, meat and poultry are sold on the second level. Molly informed us that the best chickens are the free-range yellow ones that have been dipped in turmeric. We refreshed with some coconut water and made our way back to the mansion to prepare lunch.
My fellow foodies were Irina and Anatoli from Moscow. For each dish, Molly demonstrated the steps and we, at our individual cooking stations, copied her technique. We pounded all the chilli paste ingredients for the Yellow Beef Curry with abandon. We gently tossed the ingredients for a spicy and sour vermicelli salad with squid, prawns and scallops. We mastered both cucumber and peanut sauces for the chicken satays and deep-fried fish filets in a light tempura batter and made a sauce of pineapple, tamarind juice and sweet basil leaves.
Cooking completed, we received graduation certificates and headed to the adjoining restaurant to enjoy the fantastic spectrum of flavours served with aromatic jasmine rice. Again I was gobsmacked at the successful interplay of textures and flavours. Who would have guessed that fresh pineapple, fish sauce and deep-fried basil leaves would be the ideal accompaniment for fish?
www.blueelephantcookingschool.com
Thai Tricks
Mise en place , the French culinary phrase for “everything in its place” seems to be the most essential part of Thai cooking. At both schools, trays with precisely measured ingredients for each dish were prepared in advance for each student. The actual skill required to produce dishes didn’t involve a deft hand (such as required for rolling French pastry or Italian pasta) or the great knife skills of a sushi master. No, it’s more about having all the ingredients ready to go, using some elbow grease with the mortar and pestle and understanding the power of chilies and the balance of power.
Now, back home with a pantry stocked with fish sauce, an array of herbs and spices and some pre-packaged curry and shrimp pastes (sorry chefs), I have mastered some of the wonders of the cuisine of the Kingdom.
Have you eaten rice today?

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Aurum Brew Works launches in Bengaluru |

Aurum is the Latin word for gold and the source of its chemical symbol, ‘au’. Aurum Brew Works, which was launched recently on Sarjapur Road, is a microbrewery with contemporary cuisine. The brand aims to curate beers with best in-class international malts and hops to ensure finest quality of brew. The food experience at the microbrewery is a showcase of Western, modern Indian and Karnataka cuisine, suiting the tastes of Bengaluru’s knowledgeable and well-traveled citizens. The house desserts are a delight to the eyes and taste buds. Contemporary, yet classy, the venue is spread across multiple zones across two floors, which is why a bunch of the city folk hung out at the launch party.

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