Jiggs Kalra, Famous Food Columnist, Dies At 72

Jiggs Kalra, Famous Food Columnist, Dies At 72

A post shared by Zorawar Kalra (@zkalra) on May 21, 2019 at 7:32am PDT
His friend, Vir Sanghvi, a food-critic, was among the first ones to tweet about his death.
“Goodbye old friend.The great Jiggs Kalra who did so much to rediscover the lost secrets of Indian food and who gave chefs their rightful place in the sun goes off to that great kitchen in the sky to ensure that the Gods eat his wonderful food.There will never be another Jiggs,” Mr Sanghvi tweeted.
“My deepest condolences to ⁦@ZorawarKalra⁩ & Dildeep.They were the best son & daughter-in-law Jiggs Kalra could ever have hoped for. At this sad time I remember how Zorawar kept his father’s legacy alive and turned Jiggs’s name into a global brand.I know how proud Jiggs was,” he wrote in another tweet. My deepest condolences to ⁦ @ZorawarKalra ⁩ & Dildeep.They were the best son & daughter-in-law Jiggs Kalra could ever have hoped for.At this sad time I remember how Zorawar kept his father’s legacy alive and turned Jiggs’s name into a global brand.I know how proud Jiggs was. pic.twitter.com/awYE4PVkFX — vir sanghvi (@virsanghvi) June 4, 2019
Several tributes followed:
Filmmaker Hansal Mehta, in a condolence message for Jiggs Kalra, wrote on Twitter, “Thank you for introducing me to Indian food and it’s treasure of recipes. All your books adorn my bookshelf and the masala and oil on each page is testimony to how your recipes have shaped my passion for cooking.” RIP Jiggs Kalra. Thank you for introducing me to Indian food and it’s treasure of recipes. All your books adorn my bookshelf and the masala and oil on each page is testimony to how your recipes have shaped my passion for cooking. — Hansal Mehta (@mehtahansal) June 4, 2019
Calling him a “master chef”, filmmaker Vivek Agnihotri wrote, “The master chef is gone but the taste, flavours, hospitality, uniqueness and richness of #JiggsKalra cuisine will remain.” The master chef is gone but the taste, flavours, hospitality, uniqueness and richness of #JiggsKalra cuisine will remain.The memories of great moments spent at Masala Library while devouring world’s best cuisine will remain.Om Shanti Jiggs. pic.twitter.com/zvZEokMD8u — Vivek Ranjan Agnihotri (@vivekagnihotri) June 4, 2019
Jiggs Kalra was the first Asian to be inducted in International Food and Beverage Gourmet Hall of Fame. He is the brain behind some of the most critically-acclaimed and best performing restaurants in the country like Masala Library by Jiggs Kalra, Made in Punjab, Farzi Cafe and Pa Pa Ya .
He also represented India at various international food festivals and summits, apart from having served the likes of British royals Prince Charles, the late Princess Diana and former US President Bill Clinton.
Author of over 11 titles on Indian cuisine, Jiggs Kalra’s book ” Prashad ” is considered ‘the bible’ for the chefs of today. NDTV Beeps – your daily newsletter

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These are all the places in Liverpool we’ve lost and gained this year so far

What’s On These are all the places in Liverpool we’ve lost and gained this year so far Look back at the venues the city has lost – as well as the new ones that have opened Share Ellen Kirwin What’s On Reporter 18:50, 5 JUN 2019 Get the biggest What’s On
As we approach the middle of the year, we are looking back at how the food and drink scene has evolved in the city over the last few months.
Liverpool is a fast paced city and it’s not unusual for a lot to change in a matter of weeks, including closures and brand new openings.
So far, it seems that 2019 in particular has been an ever-changing year, with some large chains and independent eateries both coming and going.
Here are just some of the places that Liverpool has welcomed and lost in 2019 so far: Openings (Image: Manchester Evening News)
The Indian street food and craft beer restaurant opened at the end of May.
Having quickly established itself in both Leeds and Manchester, the Liverpool site on Bold Street is opened to the public on Friday, May 24.
The 4,000 sq ft venue can be found on the first floor above Cow Vintage and Cycle Republic – next door to Greggs.
The menu features Bundobust’s take on authentic Indian Street food, with classics such as Bundo Chaat, Vada Pav and Okra Fries. Read More Rosa’s Thai Cafe
Launched by Saiphin Moore and her husband Alex in London’s iconic Brick Lane in 2008, the Thai restaurant has taken London by storm.
It now has various venues in the most renowned areas of the the capital, and when Saiphin decided to expand the brand, she knew Liverpool would be the best place to start.
The Albert Dock restaurant can expect dishes such as salmon red curry, stir-fried aubergine with chilli and basil, and Rosa’s famous Pad Thai signature. Read More El Pecado (Image: El Pecado)
A brand new tapas bar and restaurant has launched in Liverpool – in the former Our Kitchen on Bold Street.
The restaurant has been opened by a passionate team made up of chefs and wine and hospitality experts.
Menu highlights include the quail egg and sweet pepper tart, roast chicken thigh, spiced tomato and pepper sofrito plus the spiced aubergine, plum tomato and rocket bocadilla dishes. A vegan menu is also available.
At the bar, cocktails and specially selected wines are also available. St Paul’s Social (Image: ©Nic Taylor)
A new bar and restaurant has opened in Liverpool city centre, in St Paul’s Square.
The venue is open from morning till night, from early coffee, to well-deserved after-work cocktails.
St Paul’s Social food menu includes a selection of breakfast , lunch and light bites, with a wide range of vegetarian and vegan options.
St Paul’s Social will be open from 7am until late on Monday to Friday, with a Happy Hour running every day. Read More Silk Rd
Silk Rd , which already has restaurants in Liverpool city centre, Heswall and Bramhall will expand to Hope Street.
Following the success of Silk Rd’s first site launch in July 2017, the business duo Chris Williams and Javier Mellado have welcomed approximately 70,000 guests in to their restaurants and employed over 100 people across the North West.
Taking inspiration from the Silk Road trail, which spans three continents from the Pacific to the Mediterranean, the restaurant brand serves up authentic cuisine in the form of small plates and tapas. The Watering Can (Image: The Watering Can)
Greenbank Park in South Liverpool has welcomed a cafe and bar.
Serving breakfast, small plates and cocktails, the venue is set to bring a new element to the much-loved family park.
In the day, customers will be able to choose from breakfast, sandwiches, salads and an extensive selection of freshly-made cakes and pastry.
The evening menu features a fusion between British and Mediterranean small plates. Read More The Little Shoe
The team behind East Avenue Bakehouse, on Bold Street, has opened The Little Shoe in St George’s Hall.
The Little Shoe is open in what was formerly the basement Heritage Cafe, at St George’s Hall , every day from 10am to 5pm (except for Sundays when the Heritage Centre of St George’s Hall is closed).
The cafe will serve coffee and tea, as well as cakes and light bite options, or lunch and afternoon tea.
The Little Shoe will also serve alcoholic drinks. Champagne and Fromage / Coucou Canard First-look inside Champagne & Fromage on Victoria Street, Liverpool. Photo by James Maloney
The restaurant, which many will know from its time in Grand Central Food Bazaar , is one of the company’s first branches outside of London.
The bistro specialises in artisan French farmhouse cheeses, charcuterie and smaller grower champagne.
Champagne + Fromage will be serving favourites such as sharing boards, baked Camembert and fondue, afternoon tea, tartines and macaroons, with a selection of champagne to compliment each.
Coucou Canard has also made the move from Grand Central Food Bazaar.
The new restaurant is French-inspired, utilising simple recipes and using seasonal and locally sourced produce.
Open from 8am daily for its popular breakfasts, Coucou Canard is set to serve French bistro-style sharing dishes created by Head Chef Dawid Glinkowski. Closures (Image: James Maloney/Liverpool Echo)
A popular Georgian Quarter restaurant has announced after 10 years in business.
However, it’s not all bad news, HOST intends to still offer its Thai, Chinese and Japanese cuisine in different locations across the city.
HOST has not yet confirmed which locations it will occupy. Ego
Much loved city centre restaurant Ego has closed its doors for the last time in February.
The Hope Street restaurant, which was known for its Mediterranean food, had been in business for 18 years.
However it’s not all bad news for fans of Ego as the team has announced it will be relocating to The Punchbowl in Sefton Village. Creams Cafe (Image: Andrew Teebay/Liverpool Echo)
Creams Cafe, opposite John Lewis in Chancery House on Paradise Street, is the latest local restaurant to become a victim of the current ‘economic climate’.
The American-style dessert restaurant opened in December 2017 and was part of a franchise that has more than 35 branches across the country.
A spokesperson for Creams Cafe told the ECHO: “It has closed due to the current economic climate and Brexit.” Jamie Oliver
Jamie Oliver’s Italian restaurant in Liverpool ONE has closed its doors for the last time, after almost a decade in business.
The restaurant opened in the city in 2010 and the Liverpool branch was the first North West restaurant the celebrity chef opened.
However it was recently revealed that the chef’s restaurant group has gone into administration and the city centre restaurant will close as a result. The Hub Alehouse and Kitchen (Image: Liverpool Echo)
The Hub Alehouse and Kitchen, on Hanover Street, close for the last time on Sunday, June 2.
The news comes after the Liverpool-based restaurant group that previously owned the venue – Bistro Qui? – went into administration and put three of its restaurants on the market including The Hub and The Refinery in Liverpool.
Bistro Qui? was founded in 2003 and ran a total of seven sites including Chica Peruvian Kitchen, Button Street Smokehouse and The Hub – all of which are now closed or due to close. The Vincent Cafe
Liverpool city centre restaurant The Vincent Cafe & Cocktail Bar has closed.
The Exchange Flags venue was due to be taken over by Aiden Byrne from previous owners Paul Adams and Steven Gerrard but the Kirkby-born chef pulled out of the deal in April.
A month on, exciting news for the venue was revealed that Manchester restaurant El Gato Negro would be expanding their brand to Liverpool . Button Street Smokehouse Button Street Smokehouse – formerly home to Probe Records on Button Street, Liverpool. Photo by James Maloney
A much loved Liverpool restaurant has closed its doors after five years in business.
The American-inspired barbecue venue Button Street Smokehouse, near Mathew Street, will no longer serve its famous burgers and meatilicious dishes.
The news was announced on Facebook as the former General Manager posted in the Liverpool Hospitality Exchange group: “Button street Smokehouse closed its doors for the last time this morning. I’ve got a few floor staff and chefs that may need some work.
“If you could post up any links for them in this thread, I can pass it on and would be very appreciative!” Read More

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Double standards of Dress Code

I stayed in Imperial Hotel and had dinner at one of its prestigious restaurant, Daniell’s Tavern (sounds like a British pub but it’s very elegant and formal – fine dining serving Indian cuisine. nnAs I was heading towards the restaurant, I asked one of the managers who was standing by the lobby where we could get good Indian food for dinner. nHe suggested Daniell’s and also told me that there’s a dress code (smart casual) and suggested that I have long pants (I was wearing Bermudas). I went back to my room to change to my pants. nWe proceeded to the restaurant (there’s a sign outside that state ‘Smart casual dress code’) and enjoyed our dinner.nAbout 45 minutes later, a group of Caucasian diners came in and were immediately ushered to their table. 2 of the men were in Bermudas! nThey sat down, ordered food and nothing of the dress code thing was brought up.nnWe finished our dinner and approached the manager in the lobby for an explanation. nnObviously they apologized and were trying to explain but no explanation can replace the fact that there was Double Standard practice here.

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Bombay Balti at Radisson Blu Hotel, Doha

2 June 2019 07:00 am Bombay Balti at Radisson Blu Hotel, Doha Radisson Blu Hotel Doha A perfect staycation in the heart of Doha. The Radisson Blu Hotel, Doha is renowned for its attentive service and stunning interiors. It features 583 unique designer rooms accompanied by an endless culinary journey with 8 on-site restaurants & 3 all-day dining cafés with a wide choice of international & local dishes; 6 bars including Doha’s largest entertainment nightclub, Qube. Spectacular leisure facilities with landscaped gardens, temperature-controlled swimming pool, state of the art fitness center and an exclusive wellness center. Share it! Location: Radisson Blu Hotel Doha Date: 3 June 2019 – 31 December 2019 Time: 06:00 pm – 11:00 pm Ticket Purchase: By Phone Phone: +974 4428 1555
Who doesn’t love Indian curry?
Wait no more…sit under cover and gaze at Doha’s night sky sampling the unique Indian style cuisine originating from Birmingham! Bombay Balti offers the hustle and bustle of your favourite curry house!
Spend QR150 and get 15% food
discount on your next visit! Offer runs until 31 August 2019
Open Daily from 18:00 – 23:00Reserve your table now : +974 44281555 Radisson Blu Hotel Doha A perfect staycation in the heart of Doha. The Radisson Blu Hotel, Doha is renowned for its attentive service and stunning interiors. It features 583 unique designer rooms accompanied by an endless culinary journey with 8 on-site restaurants & 3 all-day dining cafés with a wide choice of international & local dishes; 6 bars including Doha’s largest entertainment nightclub, Qube. Spectacular leisure facilities with landscaped gardens, temperature-controlled swimming pool, state of the art fitness center and an exclusive wellness center. Liked this event? Share it! Print it! Send by e-mail Tags:

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Food Adventure in Suriname

by -Raisa and Raisha-
It feels repetitive, but it’s the truth! We really do love food.
If you need just one reason to visit Suriname it should be because of the FOOD , even though there’s definitely more reasons why you’ll enjoy traveling to this country.
Suriname has a very interesting cuisine, a combination of different cultures has made it so diverse and undeniably amazing, including influences from India , Africa , Indonesia , China , the Netherlands and of course the Indigenous people.
Here the food doesn’t get boring, even for the locals, no wonder since they could eat something completely different every day, depending on what they’re craving.
Because the ethnicities in Suriname are so different and have a strong identity, you’ll be able to find dishes, snacks and beverages from the varied cultures, but with a Surinamese twist.
During our visit we managed to eat a lot of great dishes and snacks from different backgrounds, but still considered as Surinamese food. Native Surinamese Food
It’s hard to pin point what exactly is native Surinamese food, considering the variety. Pom
Pom really is a staple dish, that can’t be missed during festivities. It requires time to prepare it and then bake it, it’s basically a work of art.
The main ingredient is the root of a plant called pomtajer, chicken is added then covered in a sauce made with tomatoes, onions, and oil before being cooked in the oven. Nowadays people add more ingredients, but that’s what a classic pom includes.
Don’t leave Suriname until you’ve had some great Pom! Warme Vis
You’ll find a lot of snacks, and we mean a lot of snacks in markets , on a Wednesday market we found some ‘Warme Vis’ (you could translate it as ‘Warm Fish’), it’s smoked fish. Bread with fillings (Broodjes)
Basically anywhere you can find people selling bread with a variety of fillings, either on display right in front of houses or in shops.
One of the best sandwhiches we had we bought from a woman selling in front of her house, it was a bread filled with well seasoned fish (they had just caught it, super fresh).
A popular spot we stopped at was ‘ Anthony’s Corner ‘, a shop in Paramaribo that sells bread which you can garnish with pom, cod fish, liver, egg curry and more. Fruit in Vinegar (Zuurgoed)
Zuurgoed is fruit in vinegar and it’s a popular snack in Suriname.
You can find assorted pickeled fruit in all the supermarkets here, people also sell them at markets. It’s really good and can get addictive, our favorite is papaya zuurgoed. Worst (streetfood sausage)
Right before we had to leave to the airport, we stopped at a stand next to the road and bought some worst, so spicy but so good. Surinamese – Javanese Food Saoto Soup
This soup is not like any other soup!
The key is the broth, which has sereh stems, laos, ginger and the lontai can’t miss. The garnishes are prepared separately and then added to the broth at the end when it’s served, these include pulled chicken, bean sprouts, fried potato, fried onions, fried garlic, boiled eggs and if you wish you can add white rice.
The best soup ever! (At least one of the best) Nasi
Nasi Goreng literally means ‘fried rice’ in ‘Javanese’. Sometimes pieces of meat and vegetables are added. It’s typically spiced with sweet soy sauce, shallot, garlic, ground shrimp past, tamarind and chilli.
This dish is usually accompanied by chicken and some greens. Bami
Stir fried noodles made with spaghetti and popular Surinamese ingredients like Ketchap (a mix of ingredients and spices), onions, garlic and more ingredients depending on who makes it. Usually it’s accompanied by chicken, some sort of greens and then topped with a spicy peanut sauce.
It’s so good! Pitchel or Petchel
If you love veggies this dish is for you.
It’s a mix of vegetables such as bean sprouts, cabbage, spinach and green beans, all topped with a spicy peanut sauce. Teloh
It’s fried cassave (aka yucca), it’s really good with dried cod fish “Bakkeljauw” or trie fish (tiny dried fish), it’s even better if it’s spicy. Javanese Snacks
Bakabana : It’s a fried plantain snack, of Indonesian origin. The plantain used is ripe, battered and then fried. You eat it with a spicy peanut sauce. This is a great option if you just want a snack
Peyek : It’s a great savoury fried Javanese cracker. We tried the classic peyek with peanuts and also with dried shrimp (which we found in the market).
Tahoe : Tahoe is the javanese way of preparing tofu, usually it’s made with a super spicy sauce. A great vegetarian option.
Loempia : The Surinamese version of Chinese spring rolls, but loempias are more thick and soft, because they’re dipped in an eggwash, then fried. It’s really delicious paired with a sweet and sour spicy sauce. Surinamese – Indian food Masala, Curry
You can’t go wrong with a good curry mix or masala. The powder mix used in surinamese-indian dishes are yellow toned and it packs in a lot of flavour. Don’t miss out on the Chicken, duck, eggs and if you’re vegetarian you’ll always find a veggie curry option around as well. Surinamese Roti
In Suriname, roti is made in different ways, either plain, with potatoes in the dough or lentils. You eat it just with your hands, no cutlery needed.
It can be accompanied by chicken/duck curry, potatoes, boiled egg and/or various vegetables, most notably kousenband aka yardlong bean, sometimes eggplant and shrimp. Bara
Bara is a deep fried savoury snack made from soaked urad dal (also known as split black lentils) and spices, it’s usually served with a sweet and tangy chutney.
It kinda looks like a donut. The perfect snack!
As you can see we managed to try out staple Surinamese meals, but there’s way more dishes this destination has to offer, like peanut soup, plantain soup, sate, rice and beans, more desserts and snacks.
And if you’re vegetarian or vegan Surinamese food has your back with a lot of options.
Be sure to check out our blogpost about Suriname, Paramaribo and Surroundings . Remember, travel and EAT!

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Farm to Table for Kids

Farm to Table for Kids 3 June 25, 2019 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm America/Los Angeles Timezone 2019-06-25T10:00:00-07:00 Coastal Orange County Events Cooking Classes & Demos Family, Kid & Teen Events
Farm Class for Kids!
On Tuesday, June 25th from 10am to 1pm, spend a day on the OHG Education Farm learning about soil, seeds, food, and community. This one-day event is geared towards children ages 7-12. Students will receive hands-on garden education and an interactive cooking demonstration followed by lunch. The class will be conducted by the OHG Education Farm Committee and the OHG Culinary Enthusiast Lisa Gilmore. All students will receive their own aprons and recipes to take home. Space is limited so reserve your seat today. Cost is $35 per student to cover lunch, take homes and materials. Farmers’ Market – Tustin Jun 5 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm Tustin Corner of El Camino Real and 3rd Street Wednesday 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. (rain or shine) Manager – Trish Harrison Chili Cheese Lover’s Deal @ Wienerschnitzel – Irvine Jun 5 @ 10:00 am – 11:45 pm Chili Cheese Lover’s Deal Wienerschnitzel Chili Cheese Lover’s Deal (April 29-June 30): After existing as a regional offer only for years, Wienerschnitzel’s Chili Cheese Lover’s Deal becomes a chain-wide phenomenon April 29-June 30. The restaurant’s three most-requested[…] Rye Whiskey Flight Wednesday @ Wild Goose Tavern – Costa Mesa Jun 5 @ 10:00 am – 11:45 pm Don’t miss Rye Whiskey Flight Wednesday at Wild Goose featuring $25 pours of High West, Rendevous, Willet, Angels Envy and Whistle Pig 10 Year Rye! Every Wednesday from 10 am to 2 am. Burger & Bordeaux Wine Pairings @ Del Frisco’s Grille – Irvine Jun 5 @ 11:00 am – 10:00 pm Del Frisco’s Grille, the new American bar and grill known for its vibrant ambiance, presents a specially-curated “Burgers & Bordeaux” menu that pairs three well-regarded wines from France with three newly introduced burger dishes at[…] Farmers Market Shopper Discount @ Lido Bottle Works – Newport Beach Jun 5 @ 11:00 am – 11:00 pm Farmers Market Shopper Discount Every Wednesday Lido Bottle Works gives a 10% discount on appetizers if guests come in with a Lido Marina Village Farmers Market receipt. Pick up your fresh farmers market finds and[…] Fish Fry Wednesdays @ My Italian Kitchen – Seal Beach Jun 5 @ 11:00 am – 9:30 pm Join My Italian Kitchen every Wednesday for Fish Fry Wednesdays. The Wednesday special includes your choice of: Half Price Fish n’ Chips or Fish Sandwich with the Purchase of a Drink. About My Italian Kitchen:[…] Fresh New Summer Menu @ Acapulco – Costa Mesa Jun 5 @ 11:00 am – 9:30 pm A New Summer Menu offered now through August 18th at all Acapulco locations featuring a Shrimp Cocktail Grande Appetizer, a combination of jumbo and small shrimp in a cocktail sauce chamoy, with avocado slices ($13.99).[…] Limited Time Summer Menu @ El Torito – Irvine Jun 5 @ 11:00 am – 11:00 pm WHAT: A New Summer Menu, featuring a Loaded Tostada Nachos appetizer, individually topped tostadas that are indeed loaded with pork-chorizo, refried beans, salsa picante, tomatillo sauce, and warm melted cheese. And all of it topped[…] New Seasonal Menu Items @ Counter (The) – Newport Beach Jun 5 @ 11:00 am – 9:00 pm New Seasonal Menu Items The Counter announces two new seasonal menu offerings: The Juicy Lucy Burger and the Farm Fresh Salad will be available for a limited time only. The Juicy Lucy Burger features hot, melted cheese[…] Pint Night Wednesday @ C4 Deli – Santa Ana Jun 5 @ 11:00 am – 8:00 pm C4 Deli: The Cure for the Commons has a weekly Pint Night Wednesdays: This offers one of the deli’s featured drafts for $5 per pint, in addition to getting to take home the glass. C4[…] South African Wine Wednesday @ Mozambique – Laguna Beach Jun 5 @ 11:00 am – 10:00 pm South African Wine Wednesday On Wine Wednesday get 50% off all South African labels with the purchase of an entree. (Limit $100). Visit Mozambique’s website for reservations and more information. Wine Wednesday @ Ways & Means Oyster House – Huntington Beach Jun 5 @ 11:00 am – 10:00 pm Way’s & Means Oyster House located right on Pacific Coast Highway in Huntington Beach hosts weekly Wine Wednesday: This opportunity includes 50% off their wide variety of eclectic wine selections. Located by the beach, Ways[…] Wok’d Wednesdays @ P.F. Chang’s – Irvine Spectrum Jun 5 @ 11:00 am – 11:00 pm Wok’d Wednesdays Visit a P.F.Chang’s near you on Wednesdays for Wok’d Wednesdays featuring 1/2 off Fried Rice Entrée (chicken or veg) and $5 Classic Mojito available all day long for loyalty club members. Become a[…] Express Lunch @ Gaucho Grill – Long Beach Jun 5 @ 11:30 am – 4:00 pm For the busy Long Beach executive on the run! Gaucho Grill on Pine Avenue, in the heart of the city’s bustling downtown, is debuting Express Lunch where guests can order and enjoy a wide range[…] Fried Chicken Day Every Wednesday @ Hook and Plow (The) – Hermosa Beach Jun 5 @ 11:30 am Fried Chicken Day – Wednesdays! Celebrate at the Hook & Plow in Hermosa Beach with their popular Chicken & Waffles every Wednesday. Crispy organic buttermilk fried chicken on house-made lemon ricotta waffles, served with blueberry[…] Grab & Go Lunch @ Davio’s Northern Italian Steakhouse – Irvine Jun 5 @ 11:30 am – 3:00 pm Grab & Go Lunch Davio’s has a rotating menu of items available for Grab & Go during lunch hours. In addition to menu, they have daily soup, sandwich, and salad specials. Call Grab & Go at 949.763.3171 or sign[…] Limited Time Delux Surf & Turf B… @ Davio’s Northern Italian Steakhouse – Irvine Jun 5 @ 11:30 am – 10:00 pm Davio’s Celebrates Memorial Day with the launch of their Delux Surf & Turf Burger Beginning Memorial Day Weekend, Davio’s Northern Italian Steakhouse in Irvine added a luxe twist to their famous steakhouse burger with flavors[…] Lunchtime Plates Menu @ The Capital Grille – Costa Mesa Jun 5 @ 11:30 am – 3:00 pm Lunchtime Plates Menu With your time at a premium during the day, The Capital Grille has made it so a remarkable lunch can easily be yours to enjoy. The Plates menu promises two courses for $20, served[…] Red Table Wine Wednesday @ Red Table – Huntington Beach Jun 5 @ 11:30 am – 11:00 pm Red Table hosts a routine Wine Wednesday: Come relax, eat, and drink, while getting to enjoy half off all bottles of wine (excluding bottles over $100, in addition to house whites and red). With an[…] Two Course Express Lunch Specials @ Royal Khyber Fine Indian Cuisine – Santa Ana Jun 5 @ 11:30 am – 2:00 pm Healthy and nutritious two-course Express Luncheon Menu Monday-Friday: 11:30 am – 2 pm. Entrée Specials (Choice of 1) $10 *Selections served with Soup of the Day, Basmati Rice Pilaf, Veggies & Nan Bread SAAG DAL[…] Wine Wednesday @ Hendrix Jun 5 @ 11:30 am – 10:30 pm Wine Wednesday 25% Off Bottles All Day Looking for a go-to Wine Wednesday? Join Hendrix anytime on Wednesday and enjoy 25% off bottles of wine from our handpicked selection. Wine Wednesday 1/2 Price Bottles @ Red Table Restaurant – Huntington Beach Jun 5 @ 11:30 am – 9:00 pm Wine Wednesday 1/2 Price Bottles Go out to eat on Wednesdays at Red Table for Wine Wednesday – 1/2 price bottle all day including the reserve list and champagne. Make a Reservation Wine Wednesday @ Oak Grill at the Fashion Island Hotel – Newport Beach Jun 5 @ 12:00 pm – 10:00 pm Wine Wednesday Wine up, and wind down at Oak Grill every Wednesday! From noon until close, order up your favorite bottle of wine at 50% off—Now that’s the ultimate Wine Wednesday. Exclusions may apply. Select bottles[…] Wine Wednesdays @ ParkStone Wood Kitchen – Newport Beach Jun 5 @ 12:00 pm Join ParkStone Urban Kitchen + Taps every Wednesday for 50% off wine glasses and bottles. Visit www.parkstonerestaurants.com for more information. Available for dine-in only. Not valid with other coupons, offers or discounts. Excludes tax and[…] All Night Happy Hour @ Social – Costa Mesa Jun 5 @ 3:00 pm All Night Happy Hour Visit Social in Costa Mesa on Wednesdays from 3 pm until close for a Happy Hour that lasts all night! Check out their Happy Hour menu. Whisk(e)y Wednesdays @ Roxanne’s – Long Beach Jun 5 @ 3:00 pm – Jun 6 @ 2:00 am Enjoy Whisk(e)y Wednesdays at Roxanne’s in Long Beach. Weekly on Wednesdays they will be offering whiskey drink specials and $1 each wings. For more information visit their website. Whiskey Wednesday @ Red Bar & Lounge at Hotel Irvine – Irvine Jun 5 @ 3:00 pm – 11:59 pm Where there’s whiskey, there’s fun. Order your favorite whiskey cocktail every Wednesday night at Red Bar and Lounge for just $8 each. Wine Wednesday @ Tackle Box – Costa Mesa Jun 5 @ 3:00 pm – 9:00 pm Wine Wednesday Visit Tackle Box in Costa Mesa on Wednesdays from 3 pm to 9 pm for Wine Wednesday where guests can get 50% off all bottles! Half Off Wine Wednesdays! @ Salt Creek Grille Jun 5 @ 4:00 pm – 10:00 pm Unwind with Half off Wine Wednesdays Salt Creek Grille Hump Day is here & it is fabulous at Salt Creek Grille! Tonight and every Wednesday, enjoy all wines by the glass at HALF PRICE! Here’s Your Wife Wednesdays @ SeaLegs Wine Bar – Huntington Beach Jun 5 @ 4:00 pm – 10:30 pm Here’s Your Wife Wednesdays Visit SeaLegs Wine Bar on Wednesdays to find your wife! Here’s Your Wife Wednesdays feature half-priced bottles of wine all night! If you’re wondering where your wife is, she’s probably there. Whiskey Flight Wednesday @ Aqua Lounge – Newport Beach Jun 5 @ 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm Whiskey Flight Wednesday New: Whiskey Flight Wednesday From 4 to 8 p.m. In Aqua Lounge $5 Japanese Whiskey Flights, including a rotation of Nikka, Hibiki, Suntory, Kaiyo, Kikori and other Japanese whiskeys, are offered every Wednesday[…] Whiskey Wednesdays @ Oak Grill (at Island Hotel) Jun 5 @ 4:00 pm Join Oak Grill for their Whiskey Wednesdays featuring $7 pours all night. For more information, visit www.oakgrillnb.com. Wine Wednesdays + King Crab Legs @ SeaLegs Wine Bar – Huntington Beach Jun 5 @ 4:00 pm

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Above all, food!

8 Herbs and Spices No Kitchen Should Be Without It would seem these days that the media just simply cannot get enough cookery. I don’t think there is ever a time of day when there isn’t a cookery show of some sort being aired. This is a good thing! These programs can inspire us to try something different, to experiment and learn about another culture all through the power of food.But how many times have you had the urge to dust off your cookbooks and cook yourself up a treat after watching one of these programs. You scour your many, rather too pristine looking cookbooks, and finally find a delicious looking recipe which doesn’t seem too difficult. You scan the ingredients list mentally ticking off the ingredients you know are already sitting in the cupboard waiting for their moment of glory. But then it happens! You start reading off ingredients like saffron strands, cardamon pods and star anise. Do you happen to have these knocking about your kitchen? No, me neither. Your enthusiasm for the project starts to dwindle, you put the cookbook back on the shelf and go and make yourself beans on toast instead. It happens a lot. Once upon a time cookery was surrounded by an air of snobbery. It was associated with dinner parties and posh restaurants. Only those who had the time, the money and of course the saffron threads could really appreciate the fine art that is food. I think that there is still an element of this to be found in certain types of cookery writing today. However, it is such a shame to be put off cooking just for the lack of a few herbs and spices. I believe that you can have near endless culinary possibilities with just 8 simple, and inexpensive herbs and spices in your kitchen cupboard. Here’s a quick run down: 1. Garlic This miracle little bulb can be used in nearly every genre of cooking you could think of. It’s not just used to stuff snail’s shells, it is used in many curry dishes, works well in pasta sauces, chilli dishes and adds a wonderful flavour if you’re just roasting it with meat, fish or vegetables. And, of course, who can ignore the prodigy that is garlic bread. For those of you seeking a more intense experience, try a raw clove steeped in olive oil. Just don’t try and kiss anyone afterwards. 2. Coarse Black Pepper There is a reason why I am saying course pepper here. I’m not just being a pepper snob. Fine ground pepper is okay but I find that using coarse pepper gives more of a punch and therefore adds a little extra spiciness to a dish. Of course, you could always crack the peppercorns yourself but having a jar of coarse black pepper within easy reach of the cooker is far easier and just as effective. Black pepper again is just as versatile as garlic and in fact they often go hand in hand together in to the pot. I use black pepper in nearly everything I cook. 3. Chilli flakes Chilli is my not so secret weapon when it comes to adding a bit of flare to a ordinary boring dish. If you always have it at hand you can always throw together a simple curry or, more obviously, a chilli. It should not just be reserved for the obvious dishes though; just by adding a few chilli flakes to a simple bolognese can give it a little kick which will warm your cockles up nicely. Also, try adding a few flakes to a simple stir fry to spice things up a bit. Don’t fear the chilli. Just because you don’t like a hot curry or chilli doesn’t mean you should dismiss this wonderful little pepper. Start by added very small amounts, i.e. a very small pinch and build up. I assure you, you will soon become hooked. Chilli is not just reserved for the main course! Try adding it to a chocolate cake, hot chocolate or chocolate mousse. 4. Cumin Seeds No curry dish is complete without cumin seeds. It is a staple in a lot of Indian cooking and with it in your spice repertoire your won’t go far wrong. Cumin has a warming flavour that works well in a lot of dishes and not just in Indian cuisine. Ground cumin will work fine but I prefer the depth of flavour and texture that you get from the seeds. This spice is one of my favourites for adding to vegetables like carrots or potatoes for a simple but delicious side dish. 5. Garam Masala You may have started to notice a theme developing here, and yes I cannot deny it, Indian cooking is by far my favourite style so I may be a little biased. Bear with me I do move on I promise. I have included garam masala because it is a wonderful coverall kind of spice, or more precisely, a mixture of spices, which can be used to knock up a simple curry with little fuss. Different brands have slightly difference blends so it might be worth trying a few to see which one suits your palette best. 6. Ginger In my eyes ginger is the king of all spices. It is used frequently in curries (sorry!), far eastern and oriental cooking. It can be used in cakes and puddings and can also be enjoyed as refreshing beer or a hot soothing tea. There is nothing this little rhizome can’t do. For a savoury meal treat try frying up some slices of ginger with beef. The zingy taste of ginger works beautifully with the earthy beef and is a staple in Oriental cooking. Also, give pickled ginger and white fish a go, it is a marriage made in heaven. For the sweet-toothed among you try ginger and orange together in a sponge pudding. The zing and the zest work together to create a delightfully spicy and refreshing treat. 7. Basil Fresh basil leaves crunched up and sprinkled over olive oil drenched tomatoes with mozzarella is as near to heaven as you are going to get. However, if you are like me and find it impossible to keep a basil plant alive for more than a day you can opt for the dried stuff in a jar. The flavour won’t be anywhere near as intense but it will be enough to make a simple pasta sauce delicious. I find basil works beautifully with most white fish, especially if your enlist the help of garlic and a spot of lemon juice and is the natural partner of tomatoes and cheese. But don’t restrict this sweet and warming herb to just these few dishes. Try sprinkling over a coconut rich Thai curry. The flavours blend beautifully together and the little speckles of green break up the monotonous colour of the sauce. 8. Coriander (Cilantro) I know I promised to move away from the curry theme but no list of herbs and spices would be complete without coriander. And while it is true that coriander is a main stay in most curry dishes it should by no means be restricted to this type of dish alone. Coriander is slightly citric in nature and therefore works great with fish dishes and seafood. Try sprinkling over king prawns or calamari, I promise you won’t be disappointed. Due to it’s fresh cooling nature it works wonderfully in salsas or sprinkled over tomatoes, cucumber and even watermelon. So there you have it, my top 8 herbs and spices that no kitchen should be without. With this small selection you will me able to make a multitude of delicious dishes (and not just curry) with little fuss and expense. Happy cooking!

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Remembering Jiggs Kalra

June 06, 2019 16:02 16:02 IST more-in The man who first made food writing a matter of pride, passed away on Tuesday
I remember first meeting J Inder Singh ‘Jiggs’ Kalra at an aphrodisiac food festival he had organised at the late Aangan restaurant in the Hyatt Regency. It was in the twilight of the 1990s — Delhi was still the Republic of Butter Chicken, and although Atal Bihari Vajpayee, who had just become Prime Minister, was famous for his evolved palate, we could count restaurants of note on our fingertips. And if they did get written about by lowly mortals like me, the reviews would appear in one distant page of the emerging city supplements.
Jiggs Kalra, with his portly frame, authoritative voice and fiery temper, however, was India’s first star culinary writer, who discovered new worlds of food right in our backyard and gentrified street food much before it became the fashionable thing to do.
The other well-regarded food writer of his time, Behram Contractor, who was better known as the satirist Busybee, was content writing about Mumbai and putting its hole-in-the-wall eateries on the map of the elite. Another ‘food influencer’ of the time, Camellia Panjabi, also from Mumbai, was busy opening iconic restaurants for the Taj Group, although she left her imprint on the gastronomic lexicon of the country in the form of the best-selling 50 Great Curries of India .
Jiggs, on the other hand, driven by his prodigious appetite for a deeper understanding of Indian cuisine, walked the food streets of India and discovered old-world masters such as Tunday in Lucknow and Ram Babu, Agra’s famous paranthewala .
He egged on chefs to get creative and bolster the Indian repertoire with dishes like tandoori salmon (Vajpayee’s favourite) and spun stories to popularise these inventions, the most famous of them being that of the toothless nawab for whom the kakori kebab had been created. He turned their inventors — at a time when they were barely seen outside kitchens — into rock stars, by promoting them in his columns, and on television. Many of the chefs he partnered with — from Arvind Saraswat and Richard Graham to Manjit Gill, Manu Mehta, NP Singh and SPS Chaudhury (who collaborated with him on his ageless book, Prashad ) — attained fame and glory along with him.
An Army officer’s son, Jiggs went to Mayo College, Ajmer, and his juniors (it was Bharat Kapur, founder-editor of First City magazine, who narrated this story to me) remember how he was held up by the teachers as an old student worthy of emulation by the new generation. A favourite of Khushwant Singh during his stint as editor of The Illustrated Weekly of India , Jiggs was a part of what must have been Indian journalism’s most talented batch of trainees — his compatriots were Bachi Karkaria, his flat-mate (based in Dubai since 1984) Bikram Vohra, Anikendra Nath ‘Badshah’ Sen and Ramesh Chandran. Rest in peace It was in 1998, when I had started my foray into food writing, that I met Jiggs Kalra for the very first time. It was at a food festival at The Park, and to say that I was overawed would be an understatement. It was the first time in my career that I was meeting Colossus himself! Unsure of how to address him, I hesitantly asked him what I should call him. “Call me Jiggs,” he chuckled, with the slightest hint of a slur. “Unless,” he continued with a twinkle in his eye, “You are planning to give me some gaali ”. Not by word or deed did he give away that he had never heard of me, and for an aspiring food writer, I felt one among equals. I’m sure he’s drinking his fill of Amrit where he is, trying to decode the exact recipe!
He covered the 1971 War from the Western Sector for the Weekly (that was when Mayo teachers started singing his praises), but he became a name to be reckoned with only as a food writer. His friends remember how they would look forward to accompanying him to food reviews. And he would recall the names of many subsequently famous (or infamous) people — from Farrokh Bulsara (before he became Freddie Mercury) to Vijay Mallya — who would be at parties that Bikram and he would throw at their bachelor’s pad on Mount Pleasant Road in Mumbai. Here, Army-supply rum (Old Monk) made up for the ordinariness of the food.
I was last with an active Jiggs when he had gone to Agra to oversee the meals that Vajpayee and General Pervez Musharraf had during their fruitlesssummit in 2001. A few days after his return, he called me and I could barely recognise his voice. He was slurring and spoke with great difficulty. All I could understand was that he had suffered a paralytic stroke.
The stroke may have made him wheelchair-bound and affected his speech, but it did not bind his spirit. He suffered it gallantly and his mind kept ticking away. Whenever I would meet him at his son Zorawar’s successful restaurants, he would, as if by magic, recover his speech and have instructive stories to narrate, about a dish here, or an ingredient there. That’s the Jiggs that I will always remember. Feisty till the end — and truly, as his guru Khushwant Singh once described him, the ‘Czar of Indian Cuisine’.
The writer is an independent food and beverages writer. He is also the founder-director of the Tasting India Symposium.

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Tourism Industry In Indonesia Politics Essay

Monday, June 3, 2019 Tourism Industry In Indonesia Politics Essay Tourism Industry In Indonesia Politics EssayUnity in Diversity, is the national motto of Indonesia, is a term that strikes deep into the heart of this dynamical and attractive Southeast Asian nation. Few places offer such cultural classification and geographical complexity as Indonesia, and no cardinal journeys here atomic number 18 ever alike.Location, Geography and ClimateIndonesia is composed of seventeen thousand islands that str and so on everyplace five thousand miles along the equator. The Malay Peninsula and Indochina atomic number 18 situated to the north-west, and the genuine of Australia lies due south. Northward lie the Philippines and Micronesia.The worlds largest archipelago, Indonesias constellation of islands straddles the divide between the Asian and Australian continental plates. As a turn up, the islands offer a stunning variety of turn overographies and ecologies Mist-shrouded vol laughingstockoes and mountains, unexplored rain forests, thousands of miles of beaches, and endless offshore reefs animation a dazzling abundance of wildlife, making Indonesia an ideal destination for adventure and eco-travel.The great majority of the estates essential islands ar of negligible size, but it does holdwholly or in partseveral islands that be enormous. These include Sumatra, Kalimantan (formerly Borneo, and shared with Malaysia), Sulawesi, and Java. The Indonesian state of Irian Jaya occupies the western half of New Guinea, which is the worlds second largest island (behind Greenland). The close to populous of the Indonesian islands by far is Java, substructure to the sprawling capital city of Jakarta. Other notable islands include the exotic, popular resort island of Bali, Lombok, Catholic Flores, and Komodo, home of dragons. http//www.geographia.com/indonesia/indo2.jpgThere are two discernible seasons in Indonesia the dry season, which extends from June to October, and the rainy season, which lasts from November to March. Both are hot. The coastal regions, however, are oft cool, and in the mountains the air is often chilly.Overview of the countryIndonesia is one of the largest countries in south-east Asia, between the Indian ocean and the pacific ocean which contain master(prenominal)ly mountainous and covered with rain forests, swamps and consists over 13000 islands. Jakarta is the capital of Indonesia. Jakarta, capital of Indonesia and the countrys largest commercial center. Indonesia declared its independence on 17th august 1945 from Japan but Netherlands agreed to transfer sovereignty in 1949. Susilo Bambang is the president and Muhammad Yusuf kalla is the vice-president of Indonesia. Bahasa is the official language in Indonesia which is modified form of Malay but the to a greater extent or less widely speak language is Javanese. 88% of Indonesians populations are Muslim. It has a very large trading environment, with several countries ranging in harvestings from gas to textiles. 22% of its populations l ived below poverty line.Flag of Indonesia-http//8bahasa-indonesia-ccc.wikispaces.com/ filing cabinet/view/indonesia_flag.jpg/307489752/351227/indonesia_flag.jpgDemographic profile of Indonesiamhtmlfile//HFOLDER1GCRIndonesia%20-%20Wikipedia,%20the%20free%20encyclopedia.mhthttp//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/05/Indonesia_%28orthographic_projection%29.svg/250px-Indonesia_%28orthographic_projection%29.svg.pngAccording to the 2010 national census, the population of Indonesia 237.6 one trillion million million, with high population growth at 1.9%. 58% of the population lives on java, the worlds approximately populous island. notwithstanding a fairly effective family planning program that has been in place since the 1960s, population is expected to grow to around 265 million by 2020 and 306 million by 2050.There are around 300 native cultural group in Indonesia, and 742 different languages and dialects. Most of Indonesians are descended from Austronesia- speaking con course whose languages can be traced to proto-Austronesia (PAN), which possibly originated in Taiwan. Another major grouping is Melanesians, who inhabit eastern Indonesia. The largest ethnic group is the Javanese, who comprise 42% of the population, and are politically and culturally dominant. The Sudanese, ethnic Malays, and Madurese are the largest non-Javanese groups. A sense of Indonesian nationhood exists alongside strong regional identities. Society is largely harmonious, although social, religious and ethnic tensions choose triggered dreadful violence. Chinese Indonesians are an influential ethnic minority comprising 3-4% of the population. Much of the countrys privately owned commerce and wealth is Chinese-Indonesian-controlled, which has contributed to considerable resentment, and even anti-Chinese violence.The official national language is Indonesian, a form of Malay. It is based on the prestige dialect of Malay, that of the Johor-Riau Sultanate, which for centuries had been the lingua franca of the archipelago, standards of which are the official languages in Singapore, Malaysia and Brunei. Indonesian is universally taught in schools consequently it is spoken by nearly every Indonesian. It is the language of business, politics, national media, education, and academia. It was promoted by Indonesian nationalists in the 1920s, and declared the official language chthonian the name Bahasa Indonesia on the resolution of independence in 1945. Most Indonesians speak at least one of the several hundred local languages and dialects, often as their first language. Of these, Javanese is the most widely spoken as the language of the largest ethnic group. On the other hand, Papua has over 270 indigenous Papuan and Austronesia languages, in a region of active 2.7 million people.While religious freedom is stipulated in the Indonesian constitution, the government officially recognizes sole(prenominal) six religions Islam, Protestantism, Roman Catholicism, Hin duism, Buddhism, and Confucianism. Although it is not an Islamic state, Indonesia is the worlds most populous Muslim-majority nation, with 86.1% of Indonesians cosmos Muslim according to the 2000 census. On 21 May 2011 the Indonesian Sunni-Shia Council (MUHSIN) was established. The council aims to hold gatherings, dialogues and social activities. It was an answer to violence committed in the name of religion. The majority of Muslims in Indonesia are Sunni. 9% of the population was Christian, 3% Hindu, and 2% Buddhist or other. Most Indonesian Hindus are Balinese, and most Buddhists in modern-day Indonesia are ethnic Chinese. Though now minority religions, Hinduism and Buddhism remain defining influences in Indonesian culture. Islam was first adopted by Indonesians in northern Sumatra in the 13th century, done the influence of shell outrs, and became the countrys dominant religion by the 16th century. Roman Catholicism was brought to Indonesia by early Portuguese colonialists and missionaries, and the Protestant denominations are largely a result of Dutch Calvinist and Lutheran missionary efforts during the countrys colonial period. A large proportion of Indonesians-such as the Javanese abangan, Balinese Hindus, and Dayak Christians-practice a less orthodox, syncretic form of their religion, which draws on local customs and beliefs.ECONOMIC OVERVIEW OF INDONESIAIndonesia has a mixed parsimony in which both the private orbit and government play significant roles. The country is the largest economic system in Southeast Asia and a member of the G-20 major economies. Indonesias estimated gross domestic product (nominal), as of 2010 was US$706.73 million with estimated nominal per capita gross domestic product was US$3,015, and per capita gross domestic product PPP was US$4,394 (international dollars). June 2011 At World Economic Forum on eastbound Asia, Indonesian president said Indonesia will be in the top ten countries with the strongest economy within th e next decade. The Gross domestic product (GDP) is about $1 trillion and the debt ratio to the GDP is 26%. The manufacture sector is the economys largest and written reports for 46.4% of GDP (2010), this is followed by services (37.1%) and agriculture (16.5%). However, since 2010, the service sector has employed more(prenominal) people than other sectors, accounting for 48.9% of the total chore force this has been followed by agriculture (38.3%) and industry (12.8%). Agriculture, however, had been the countrys largest employer for centuriesIndonesia, a vast polyglot nation, grew an estimated 6.1% and 6.4% in 2010 and 2011, respectively. The government made economic advances under the first administration of President YUDHOYONO (2004-09), introducing significant reforms in the financial sector, including tax and customs reforms, the use of Treasury bills, and capital market development and supervision. During the global financial crisis, Indonesia outperformed its regional neigh bors and joined mainland China and India as the only G20 members posting growth in 2009. The government has promoted fiscally conservative policies, resulting in a debt-to-GDP ratio of less than 25%, a small current account surplus, a fiscal deficit below 2%, and historically low roves of inflation. Fitch and Moodys upgraded Indonesias credit rating to investment grade in declination 2011. Indonesia still struggles with poverty and unemployment, inadequate infrastructure, corruption, a complex regulatory environment, and unequal resource distribution among regions. The government in 2012 faces the ongoing challenge of improving Indonesias short infrastructure to remove impediments to economic growth, labor unrest over wages, and reducing its fuel subsidy program in the face of rising oil prices.GDP (official exchange treasure)$832.9 billion (2011 est.)GDP real growth rate6.5% (2011 est.)country comparison to the world 396.2% (2010 est.)4.6% (2009 est.)GDP per capita (PPP)$4,70 0 (2011 est.)country comparison to the world 157$4,400 (2010 est.)$4,200 (2009 est.) tune data are in 2011 US dollarsGDP composition by sectorAgriculture 14.7%Industry 47.2%Services 38.1% (2011 est.)Industrial production growth rate4.1% (2011 est.)country comparison to the world 78CURRENCYcOVERVIEW OFINDUSTRIES, TRADE AND COMMERCEThe industries in Indonesia are classified as followsAgriculture With 42.1% of the total labor force engaged in agriculture, Indonesia can be rightly considered an agrarian economy. The sector contributed 14.4% to the countrys GDP in 2009. In 2006, the country yielded food crops worth 213,529,700 million rupiahs, which was 35% more than the 2003 level. Rice and coffee remains the major producer of the country, making it the worlds fourth biggest producer of these products.Textile and Apparel The textile and apparel manufacturing industry of Indonesia ranks 14th in the world. In 2008, the value added by textiles and clothing manufacturing dropped to 1.2%. I ndustry was hard hit by the global recession of the late 2000s. Around one hundred fifty-five textile production companies went bankrupt in 2009 due to an increase in the cost of production and enormous inflow of cheap stuff from China mine The fall in commodity prices in 2009, due to the global economic downturn, resulted in several major mining companies putting their investment plans on hold. However, the mining industry is expected to reach US$123 billion by 2014, with social classly growth of 10%-11% from 2010 onwards. Increase in international interest can be seen in the Indonesian coal sector, after the significant number of deals that took place in the last quarter of 2009.Tourism Tourism is among the biggest economy boosters in Indonesia. This is presumable in the fact that 6.45 million visitors came to the country in 2009, despite of hotel bombings in Jakarta. Tourism contributes 3% to the GDP of the country. The touristry growth plan for 2010 aims at 7 million remote tourists. However, this is much lower than that of its tiny neighbor Singapore, which was visited by 9.5 million people in 2009.Other IndustriesPetroleum and natural gas, footwear, cement, chemical fertilizers, plywood, food, etc.ECONOMIC SECTORSOn 25 January 2011, after talks by Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and visiting President of Indonesia Susilo Bambang Yudhoyuno, India and Indonesia had signed business deals worth billions of dollars and plant an ambitious target of doubling trade over the next five years. Tourism wise, Indonesia is one of only 14 countries in which tourist visas prior to instauration are not required in India. Indian Nationals also are issued tourist visas on arrival in Indonesia.India also has further economic ties with Indonesia done its free trade agreement with ASEAN, of which Indonesia is a member.President of Indonesia Sukarno was the first chief guest at the annual state day parade of India. In the year 2011 too, President Susilo Bambang Y udhoyuno was the chief guest for the same.In 1998, agriculture accounted for 19.5 percent of Indonesias total GDP, industry for 45.3 percent, and services for 35.2 percent, a quite different scenario than in decades past. For the first 20 years after independence in 1945, the agricultural sector contributed more than 50 percent of the nations GDP from independence. There was little development of industry, and production per capita was no more than it had been when Indonesia was a Dutch colony. From 1965-74 there were few major industrial projects due to the still weak economy and a strategy of import substitution, which created more jobs.In the early 1970s the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) raised oil prices, greatly increasing Indonesias export income. Indonesia used this windfall, as well as profits from high prices for tropical agricultural products in the 1970s, to build heavy industries, such as steel, and advanced technologies, such as aeronautics. B y the 1980s this industrialisation process allowed growing industries such as steel, aluminum, and cement production to reduce the dependence of the economy on agriculture.These industries, especially the high-tech ones, met with only mixed success, and none of them generated the significant employment required by such a populous country. Agriculture and natural resources were still important to the economy, and Indonesias economy was vulnerable to frequent changes in the prices of these commodities, as well as of oil and gas. Oil earnings dropped in 1982-83 from US$18.825 billion to US$14.744 billion and kept falling over the next 2 years. Non-oil exports grew but not enough to make up for the fall in earnings. As Indonesias balance of payments became negative, the World Bank pushed Indonesia to open its markets, and beginning in the mid-1980s the government initiated reforms to boost manufactured exports in order to strengthen the economy. These measures included a currency de-val uation to stand by make exports competitive, export incentives, the relaxation of rules on foreign investment and trade, and an end to some monopolies, such as plasticsOVERVIEW OF BUSINESS AND TRADE AT INTERNATIONAL LEVELIndonesia carries exports and imports at an international level as well.Indonesia Exports Commodities-Oil gas, Plywood, Textiles, Rubber, galvanising appliances, etc.Indonesia Imports Commodities-Machinery and equipment, Chemicals, Fuels, Foodstuffs, etc.FDI rules in Indonesia allow 100% FDI investment in s pick out areas of business only. It limits foreign direct investment to 95%, with a minimum of 5% ownership by an Indonesian. It allows FDI investment with certain conditions that stipulates the sectors which are closed to FDI investment.TradeTRADE INVESTMENT COMPLEMENTARITIESIndia Indonesia bilateral trade is at least two millennia old. In the ancient past, the two nations used to trade in spices, timbers, minerals, precious stones, cotton silk.In present, trade ties have not realized their true potential which can be attributed to the lack of imaginative. Planning as well as ignorance on the part of the business communities of the two countries.Now India and Indonesia are increasingly seen as acclivitous Asian economies. trade and investment complementary need to be comprehensively explored.As a result of the continued growth of Indias economic transaction with the ASEAN from 1970 onwards, the meter of trade grew in volume. By 1982 the ASEAN countries shared Indias export which had been 2.6 percent in 1970 had risen to 4.2 % .During the same period Indias total imports from the region had risen.PRESENT TRADE dealings OF INDIA AND INDONESIAhttp//www.ecaii.org/images/stories/header.jpgToday, both the countries maintain cooperative and friendly relations. India and Indonesia are two of the few democracies in Asian region which can be projected as a real democracy. As fellow Asian democracies that share common values, it is natural f or both countries to nurture and foster strategic alliance. Indonesia and India are member states of the G-20, the E7 (countries), the Non-aligned Movement, and the United Nations.With an expanding economy and increasingly favorable investment climate, Indonesia stands as a key economic entity in the ASEAN region. Its abundance of natural resources and a flourishing manufacturing sector have ensured a successful relationship with the booming Indian economy in areas of trade and investment.Though trade relations were formalized with the signing of a Trade promise in 1978, there was an absence of a forum for periodic talks between the two countries. The bilateral effort was revitalized with the first ever India-Indonesia critical point Commission Meeting (JCM) held in Yogyakarta in September 2003. The meeting resulted in the formation of an India-Indonesia Expert Working group with the primary objective of enhancing and diversifying bilateral trade and investment relations. So far, the JCM has met thrice with the most recent meeting in 2007, producing a comprehensive Plan of Action in areas comprising trade, infrastructure, and investment. This underlines the increasing political support for the bilateral process which would provide the much-needed political impetus to deepen economic relations between the two countries.Indonesia is presently Indias second-largest export market in ASEAN (second only to Singapore). India mainly exports refined petroleum products, oil seeds, chemicals and iron and steel products to Indonesia. On the other hand, it is one of Indonesias largest buyers of crude oil and further, imports its mining, petroleum and paper products. In 2006, Indias exports increase by 33.77 per cent to US$1.407 billion from US$1.052 billion in 2005. Imports on the other hand grew by 17.18 per cent in 2006 to US$3.39 billion from US$2.878 billion the previous year. The two countries intend to work towards a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with an aim to boost bilateral trade to US$10 billion by 2010.In the area of investment, there are more than twenty major Indian manufacturing joint ventures in Indonesia. Majority of these investments were undertaken in the 1970s and 80s mainly in textiles, synthetic fiber and steel industries with India being among the top 5 investors in Indonesia up to 1985. Major Indian companies that established themselves in this phase included, the Lohia Group (Indorama Synthetics), Ispat Group (Indo Ispat), Aditya Birla Group (having four units in textiles and yarns) and Tolaram Group among others.The recent upturn in the Indonesian economy and the accompanying political change has further a greater emphasis on investments in new industries. There has been a distinct shift from basic raw material industries to automobiles, infrastructure, energy, and services. TVS Motors of Chennai has invested US$45 million in a motorcycle plant near Jakarta while Bajaj Auto is converting traditional three wheelers into CNG-po wered ones and launched its new two wheeler specimen Bajaj Pulsar in the Indonesian market in November 2006. Various private entities have also made investments in areas like coal mining, plantations for bio-fuels and extraction of minerals. Along with investments in new industries, new Indian players have started making an entry into the Indonesian market. Companies like the Tata Power Company Limited and Essar Steel Limited are aspect to invest in energy and steel along with public sector giants such as the National Aluminum Company Limited (NALCO), National caloric Power Corporation (NTPC), and Rail India Technical and Economic Services Limited (RITES).On the other hand, Indonesian investment in India is rather low and ranks thirty-sixth in the FDI inflow to India. Though there has been increasing participation by Indonesian groups especially in West Bengal, the stringent regulatory climate in India is perceived as a primary deterrent for Indonesian companies looking to invest in a big way. Limited direct flights between the two countries and restrictive visa requirements by India have further proved to be a hindrance to greater Indonesian participation in India.Recently, the two countries have been at logger heads over differences pertaining to the India-ASEAN FTA. Indonesia has been pushing for greater access of its palm oil exports to India while India wants a reworking of the negative list put forward by Indonesia. Further, at a bilateral level, there are also issues pertaining to the Indian demand for the removal of non-tariff barriers on its exports of meat and processed foods. Though India is one of the largest exporters of halal bovine meat in the world, Indonesia continues to ban Indias bovine meat and milk products on the grounds that India is not free from Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD).Despite the mentioned issues between the two countries, there is optimism about the potential that exists for greater economic ties. With both countries facing d aunting infrastructural and energy challenges, there is tremendous opportunity for investments on both sides. With opportunities and forum for cooperation in place, it is important that economic actors in both countries step up and work towards enhancing economic partnerships. Companies in both countries need to bring in potential synergies for their mutual benefit and ensure that attempts at cooperation are not restricted to inter-governmental meetings and commissions.PESTEL ANALYSIS of Indonesia considering the TOURISM INDUSTRYPolitical analysisIndonesia is considered as Republic country. It declared its independence on 17th August 1945 from Japan so 17thAugust is the national holiday. Indonesia is legal rules and regulations arebased on Roman-Dutch law. Theirconstitution has abrogated by national Constitution in 1949and Provisional Constitution abrogated in 1950 which restored on 5 July 1959.Political perceptual constancy In Indonesia after every five year option is being con tested for president and vice president post by direct vote of the citizenry. Last time it was held on 8 July 2009 (next tobe held in July 2014) Susilo Bambang has elected as president and Muhammad Yusuf Kalla is the Vice-President. Similarly, Cabinet also appointed by the president. So for next 5 years there are more chances of stability of the government.Indonesia is a republic with a presidential system. As a unitary state, power is concentrated in the central government. Following the resignation of President Suharto in 1998, Indonesian political and governmental structures have undergone major reforms. Four amendments to the 1945 Constitution of Indonesia have revamped the executive, judicial, and legislative breakes. The president of Indonesia is the head of state, commander-in-chief of the Indonesian National Armed Forces, and the coach of domestic governance, policy-making, and foreign affairs. The president appoints a council of ministers, who is not required to be electe d members of the legislature. The 2004 presidential election was the first in which the people directly elected the president and vice president. The president may serve a maximum of two consecutive five-year terms.The highest representative body at national level is the Peoples informative Assembly (MPR). Its main functions are supporting and amending the constitution, inaugurating the president, and formalizing broad outlines of state policy. It has the power to impeach the president.The MPR comprises two houses the Peoples Representative Council (DPR), with 560 members, and the Regional Representative Council (DPD), with 132 members. The DPR passes legislation and monitors the executive branch party-aligned members are elected for five-year terms by proportional representation. Reforms since 1998 have markedly increased the DPRs role in national governance. The DPD is a new chamber for matters of regional management.Most civil disputes appear before a State Court (Pengadilan Neg eri) appeals are heard before the High Court (Pengadilan Tinggi). The Supreme Court (Mahkamah Agung) is the countrys highest court, and hears utmost cessation appeals and conducts case reviews. Other courts include the Commercial Court, which handles bankruptcy and insolvency a State Administrative Court (Pengadilan Tata Negara) to hear administrative law cases against the government a Constitutional Court (Mahkamah Konstitusi) to hear disputes concerning legality of law, general elections, dissolution of political parties, and the scope of authority of state institutions and a Religious Court (Pengadilan Agama) to deal with codified Sharia Law casesPolitical scenario will play a pivotal role in defining the flourishing of tourism in Indonesia. If there are less political conflicts then tourists all over the world will feel safe in travelling. Even after the starting of the business in Indonesia it becomes a duty to maintain the safety and health of the travelers especially those travelling through road and rail..ECONOMIC ANALYSISIndonesia has a mixed economy in which both the private sector and government play significant roles. The country is the largest economy in Southeast Asia and a member of the economies. Indonesias estimated gross domestic product (nominal), as of 2010 was US$706.73 billion with estimated nominal per capita GDP was US$3,015, and per capita GDP PPP was US$4,394 (international dollars).June 2011 At World Economic Forum on East Asia, Indonesian president said Indonesia will be in the top ten countries with the strongest economy within the next decade. The Gross domestic product (GDP) is about $1 trillion and the debt ratio to the GDP is 26%. The industry sector is the economys largest and accounts for 46.4% of GDP (2010), this is followed by services (37.1%) and agriculture (16.5%). However, since 2010, the service sector has employed more people than other sectors, accounting for 48.9% of the total labor force, this has been followed b y agriculture (38.3%) and industry (12.8%).Agriculture, however, had been the countrys largest employer for centuries.According to World Trade Organization data, Indonesia was the 27th biggest exporting country in the world in 2010, moving up three places from a year before. Indonesias main export markets (2009) are Japan (17.28%), Singapore (11.29%), the United States (10.81%), and China (7.62%). The major suppliers of imports to Indonesia are Singapore (24.96%), China (12.52%), and Japan (8.92%). In 2005, Indonesia ran a trade surplus with export revenues of US$83.64 billion and import expenditure of US$62.02 billion. The country has extensive natural resources, including crude oil, natural gas, tin, copper, and gold. Indonesias major imports include machinery and equipment, chemicals, fuels, and foodstuffs. And the countrys major export commodities include oil and gas, electrical appliances, plywood, rubber, and textiles.Prime lending rate If we talk about their commercial Bank p rime lending interest rate it is quiet decent which is 6.41% and their Central bank discount rate is 10.83%. (CIA, 2009) wrinkle or individual tax systemTax system has various rules and categories for example on first 25,000,000 income rate of tax is 10% then on next 25,000,000 it is 15% and on next 50,000,000 it is 30%. In the same way Income Tax on interest from Indonesian banks is fixed at a final 15% for both companies and individualsSOCIO-CULTURAL ANALYSISIndonesia has about 300 ethnic groups, each with cultural identities developed over centuries, and influenced by Indian, Arabic, Chinese, and European sources. Traditional Javanese and Balinese dances, for example, contain aspects of Hindu culture and mythology, as do wayang kulit (shadow puppet) performances. Textiles such as batik, ikat, ulos and songket are created across Indonesia in styles that vary by region. The most dominant influences on Indonesian architecture have traditionally been Indian however, Chinese, Arab, an d European architectural influences have been significant.Sports in Indonesia are generally male-orientated and spectator sports are often associated with outlawed gambling. The most popular sports are badminton and football. Indonesian players have won the Thomas Cup (the world team championship of mens badminton) thirteen of the twenty-six times that it has been held since 1949, as well as numerous Olympic medals since the sport gained full Olympic status in 1992. Its women have won the Uber Cup, the female equivalent of the Thomas Cup, twice, in 1994 and 1996. Liga Indonesia is the countrys premier football club league. Traditional sports include sepak takraw, and bull racing in Madura. In areas with a history of tribal warfare, mock fighting contests are held, such as, caci in Flores, and pasola in Sumba. Pencak Silat is an Indonesian martial art.Indonesian cuisine varies by region and is based on Chinese, European, Middle Eastern, and Indian precedents. Rice is the main staple food and is served with side dishes of meat and vegetables. Spices (notably chili), coconut milk, fish and chicken are fundamental ingredients. Indonesian traditional music includes gamelan and keroncong. The Indonesian film industrys popularity hit in the 1980s and dominated cinemas in Indonesia, although it declined significantly in the early 1990s. Between 2000 and 2005, the number of Indonesian films released each year has steadily increased.The oldest evidence of makeup in Indonesia is a series of Sanskrit inscriptions dated to the 5th century. Important figures in modern Indonesian literature include Dutch author Multatuli, who criticized treatment of the Indonesians under Dutch colonial rule Sumatrans Muhammad Yamin and Hamka, who were influential pre-independence nationalist writers and politicians and proletarian writer Pramoedya Ananta Toer, Indonesias most famous novelist. Many of Indonesias peoples have strongly rooted oral traditions, which help to define and preserv e their cultural identities.Media freedom in Indonesia increased considerably after the end of President Suhartos rule, during which the now-defunct Ministry of Information monitored and controlled domestic media, and restricted foreign media. The TV market includes ten national commercial networks, and provincial networks that compete with public TVRI. Private radio stations carry their own news bulletins and foreign broadcasters tack on programs. At a reported 25 million users in 2008, Internet usage was estimated at 12.5% in September 2009.More than 30 million cell phones are sold in Indonesia each year, and 27 percent of them are local brands. This has formed the lifestyle of the people in Indonesia.While starting a tourism business in Indonesia the attractions of the place need to be identified first. Tourists all over the world Posted by

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Weight loss: Trying to shed kilos? Have chillies

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Refrain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks, name calling or inciting hatred against any community. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines by marking them offensive . Let’s work together to keep the conversation civil. Be the first one to review. We have sent you a verification email. To verify, just follow the link in the message Weight loss: Trying to shed kilos? Have chillies By – Created: Jun 5, 2019, 11:00 IST facebook twitter incom We share a kind of love-hate relationship when it comes to chillies. A lot of people love chomping on green chillies along with their meals, while there are others who cannot handle spicy food items. Chillies are an important part of Indian cuisine. They don’t only make the food tasty, but even have some amazing health benefits. So, for those who avoid spicy food, you might be missing out on some amazing health benefits of this spice, weight loss being one of them. How chillies help in weight loss Do you sweat profusely when you eat something spicy? That happens because of the presence of an active component called capsaicin in red chillies. When you have something spicy, your heart rate increases and the blood rushes to the skin and you start to sweat. This happens when capsaicin modifies the body’s internal thermostat which makes you feel warmer. Spicy food suppresses appetite The pain which is triggered in your stomach and intestine after eating chillies make you feel fuller sooner and suppresses your appetite. It also helps to reduce the craving for fatty, sweet and salty foods. Spicy food helps burn calories Capsaicin helps to break down body fat and increases the calorie burning process. Studies suggest that people who consume chillies on a regular basis burns about 50 calories a day. Other benefits of eating chilies Research shows that people who eat spicy food items are less likely to suffer from life-threatening illnesses. Chilli eaters are even less likely to suffer from a heart attack, respiratory disease, and even cancer. Bottom line Chilles have been blamed for a long time for causing stomach ulcers and irritable bowel syndrome, so people who are suffering from some kind of stomach issues should avoid it at all cost. Always consume chillies in moderation, do not go overboard with it. End of the article

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