Instant Noodles Market Size to Reach USD 33,200.2 Million by 2023 at 3.02% CAGR, Predicts Market Research Future

Instant Noodles Market Size to Reach USD 33,200.2 Million by 2023 at 3.02% CAGR, Predicts Market Research Future

Pune, India, Instant Noodles Market is poised to touch USD 33,200.2 Mn by 2023 at an impressive 3.02% CAGR during the forecast period (2018-2023), reveals the latest report by Market Research Future (MRFR).
Market Scope
Instant noodles are making a niche for itself based on its popularity for being tasty, nutritious, and quick to make. Although many would differ with the marketing strategy of instant noodles on the grounds of nutrition, the market has never kept itself away from such promotional campaigns. Especially, involving nutritional grounds. The global instant noodles market is expected to move steadily with a 3.02% CAGR during the forecast period (2016-2023) to reach a valuation of USD 33,200.2 million by the end of 2023. Instant noodles mostly contain dehydrated vegetables, wheat flour, meat, pork, beef, and seafood.
The global instant noodles market is reaping the benefits of rapid industrialization and fast-tracked urbanization. These two features have spurred a demand for ready-to-cook products. Severe issues with hectic lifestyles have led to a growth in the increase of convenience foods. At the same time, a rise in per capita income can be considered a major factor in triggering market growth. The imbalance caused by lack of time for cooking a proper meal has benefited the market well. Manufacturers have come up with fortified instant noodles which is to explore possibilities among the health-conscious populations.
Key Players and Industry Buzz
Several market giants are making an impression in the global instant noodles market. Their impacts can be measured in terms of strategic moves they make to take their individual stands strong. But its far-reaching impact help the global market grow. Companies profiled in the MRFR report are Nestlé S.A. (Switzerland), Unilever PLC (UK), Ajinomoto Co., Inc. (Japan), Campbell Soup Company (US), ITC Limited (India), Nissin Foods Co., Ltd (Hong Kong), Acecook Vietnam Joint Stock Company (Vietnam), Tat Hui Foods Pte. Ltd. (Singapore), Capital Foods Limited (India), and PT Indofood Sukses Makmur Tbk (Indonesia).
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The instant noodles market is mostly getting driven by innovation. Nissin is one of the leaders and never shies away from trying out new things. Nissin, in collaboration with Japan Science and Technology Agency, are trying to sort out the development of cultured meat. They now believe that they have found out a way to take diced steaks to the next level where it would resemble the texture of steak from a real cow. Nestle, on the other hand, is attempting big time to recover the lost ground in India during the previous market downfall. The company has increased its production volume and is introducing new lines to make up for the lost ground. Nissin is also doing great in terms of promotion where they have launched a cup noodle vending machine, in collaboration with Foodbeast. Instagram account would be the currency. The uproar it created on the web is providing the market giant with much-needed leverages.
Forming a Base
The analysis of the global Instant Noodles Market requires a proper segmentation on the basis of product type, pack size, and distribution channel. This is to get a comprehensive view of the market for a better understanding of coming years and gauge how well the instant noodles market can live up to its potential. Based on the type, the instant noodles market can be segmented into cup/bowl and packet instant noodles. The packet segment had the market leash in 2017 but the cup/bowl segment is expected to witness a surge in the consumption. The segment is expected to register 3.33% CAGR over the review period. By pack size, the Instant Noodles Market can be segmented into single pack, four pack, six pack, and others. The convenience of the single pack is taking it ahead of the rest. The four-pack segment can exceed a valuation of USD 7,708.2 million by the end of 2023. By distribution channel, the instant noodles segment includes store-based and non-store-based of which the store-based segment comprises supermarkets & hypermarkets, convenience stores, and others. The store-based segment is dominating but the non-store-based segment can rise substantially during the forecast period.
Browse the market data and information spread across 114 pages with 84 data tables and 20 figures of the report “Instant Noodles Market Report – Forecast 2018-2023” in-depth alongside table of content (TOC) at: https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/instant-noodles-market-1841
Mapping the Market
Instant Noodles Market comprises North America, Europe, Asia Pacific (APAC), and the Rest-of-the-World (RoW). MRFR’s detailed analysis of the market in a region-specific way includes both volume-wise and value-wise data. These are to put light on growth pockets that would help in better market expansion. The APAC market has the maximum market exposure and with a 3.16% CAGR during the forecast period it is expected to make a difference in the global market and among its associates. China is contributing the most in the region. North America’s market to reach a valuation of USD 2,061.7 million by the end of 2023 with the U.S. leading the market. Europe to profit substantially from the changing work culture and high demand for Asia noodles flavors. The market is deemed to exceed a worth of USD 1,268.2 million by 2023. The U.K. to score big in terms of CAGR during the forecast period.
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About Market Research Future:
At Market Research Future (MRFR), we enable our customers to unravel the complexity of various industries through our Cooked Research Report (CRR), Half-Cooked Research Reports (HCRR), & Consulting Services.
MRFR team have supreme objective to provide the optimum quality market research and intelligence services to our clients. Our market research studies by products, services, technologies, applications, end users, and market players for global, regional, and country level market segments, enable our clients to see more, know more, and do more, which help to answer all their most important questions.
In order to stay updated with technology and work process of the industry, MRFR often plans & conducts meet with the industry experts and industrial visits for its research analyst members.
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Why Manchester is England’s most visited city after London

Featured Travel April 30, 2019
When you think of UK tourism, Manchester may not be the first city that comes to mind, but all of that is about to change! Manchester is decidedly having its moment. This vibrant city has shrugged off its industrial reputation to become a modern hub for music, creativity and tolerance with a fantastic foodie scene. And did we mention its two world-famous football teams? Read on to find out why Manchester is England’s most visited city after London! 1. The festivals
Held every other year since 2007, the summer Manchester International Festival is a celebration with performances showcasing music, theatre and art. The 2019 edition will feature a free opening event hosted by Yoko Ono, a play created by Idris Elba and a concert from Janelle Monáe.
Then in the fall there’s the Manchester Food and Drink Festival , where food trucks serving up every imaginable kind of cuisine descend upon Albert Square, home to the town hall. Snack on international eats as you listen to live music and sample beer from the local breweries!
The city that birthed Oasis and The Smiths is also home to the enormously popular Parklife Festival, a 2-day music fest featuring electronic, hip hop and indie music. But it doesn’t stop there… the Manchester Film Festival is a must, as is Manchester Pride , the Manchester Christmas Market and Cheese Fest ! The city’s events calendar will make sure you’re never bored. 2. The arts
Manchester doesn’t mess around when it comes to the arts. In 2015, HOME Manchester was inaugurated, a glittering glass structure housing an art gallery, cinema, theatre, cafés and more. It’s become enormously popular and is the 2 nd most visited attraction in Manchester!
Heading over to Salford Quays, the ultra-modern MediaCityUK was built to be an “international hub for technology, innovation and creativity”. It’s where the BBC has found its home outside of London, and is made up of TV and recording studios, office and apartment buildings, cafés and restaurants. You can’t help but be impressed when you see this collection of modern buildings on the water!
Finally, you can’t miss the Manchester Art Gallery in the city centre in a beautiful early 19 th -century building with thousands of historic paintings! 3. The Curry Mile and craft beer
Manchester has seriously distanced itself from stereotypical British food. In the Rusholme neighbourhood, a stretch of Wilmslow Road is packed with about 70 Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi restaurants! The neon lights will let you know you’ve arrived.
To wash down all that deliciously spicy food, try a pint of craft beer. Microbreweries have been popping up all over the city in the past several years and are the perfect place to experience pub culture with a modern twist! Seven Bro7hers Beerhouse and Cloudwater Brew Co. are a few great options. 4. The Village
A self-proclaimed beacon of celebration, Manchester’s gay village, known simply as “The Village”, is definitely one of the most fun parts of the city! Canal Street is the heart of the neighbourhood and the ideal setting for dinner or drinks overlooking Rochdale Canal. On the other side of the water, you’ll find Sackville Gardens with its memorial to Alan Turing. When the sun goes down, you can dance the night away at any one of the LGBT+ friendly bars and clubs, while if you’re looking for something to do during the day, don’t miss the Alice in Wonderland themed Richmond Tea Rooms for a cup of tea. The Village really comes to life during Pride, so make sure to stop by! 5. The football
It’s actually impossible to talk about Manchester without mentioning football, as it’s one of the biggest reasons why Manchester is England’s most visited city after London. Home to both the Manchester City and Manchester United football clubs, the Mancunians are some serious football fans! A few key differences to keep straight – Manchester City is based at the Etihad stadium, while home base for Manchester United is Old Trafford stadium. In terms of colours, Manchester United fans wear red, while Manchester City supporters don sky blue. And if you can’t decide which team to support, check out the Manchester Derby when the two teams play each other! 6. The libraries
If we had to name one city as a book lovers’ paradise, it would be Manchester. The centre of town is jam-packed with libraries, the most famous of which being The John Rylands Library. Its magnificent vaulted ceilings, stained glass windows and rows upon rows of rare books will delight any bibliophile. The Portico Library and Gallery is a cosy place to sit and read your favourite book or check out the exhibits on offer, while the Manchester Central Library has free Wi-Fi and a nice café. Remember, library cards are free! 7. The students
It’s no secret that one of the reasons why Manchester is so hip and youthful is thanks to its student population. Manchester is home to more than 40,000 students, and the median age of its citizens is just 29 years old. What does that translate to? It means that the cost of living can’t be too high for students to afford, that there are bountiful nightlife options, that the universities attract writers, artists, lecturers and other cultural speakers from all over the world and that the city is always bursting with energy! Ready to experience it for yourself?

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All About Yogurt #AtoZChallenge

All About Yogurt 29, 17
The yogurt shelves in the super market look totally different from what it was a few years ago. The market is flooded with newer flavours and brands of yogurt.
If you flip through any wellness magazine, you will be advised to eat yogurt everyday. Facts about Yogurt Yogurt is made by fermenting milk with a yogurt culture. Health benefits of yogurt include bone health and aiding in digestion. Some yogurts contain active, living bacteria known as probiotics, which can help keep the intestines healthy and restore balance in of intestinal flora. Yogurt is loaded with protein, calcium, and vitamin B6 and B12, riboflavin, potassium, and magnesium. Difference between Yogurt and Curd
Curd and Yogurt are almost the same thing, mainly differing in the method of preparation.
Indian curd made by boiling and cooling the milk to 30-40°C and adding a spoonful of curd. Curd has lactic acid bacteria or lactobacillus. This bacteria multiplies itself and in few hours ferments the milk to form curd.
Yogurt is prepared using similar techniques to curd but the fermentation of the milk is done by adding two specific strains of bacteria called lactobacillus bulgaris and streptococcus thermophilus. Other strains of lactic acid bacteria may also be added. The addition of these bacteria makes the product standardised and homogenous. This ensures both quality and right quantity of bacteria in the yogurt. Types of Yogurt
Here are different types of yogurt.
Low Fat or Non-Fat : Low-fat, or reduced-fat yogurt, is made with 2-percent milk. Non-fat yogurt is made with zero percent or skim milk.
Greek Yogurt : Greek yogurt is thick and creamy. It is made by straining regular yogurt to remove the liquid whey. It is often used in Mediterranean-style cooking and dips. It has a higher protein content than other yogurts, but it contains less calcium. It is available in full fat, reduced or low fat and non-fat or zero percent.
Balkan-style or Set-style Yogurt :The warm cultured milk mixture is poured into containers then incubated without any further stirring. This has a characteristic thick texture and is excellent for enjoying plain or using in recipes.
Swiss-style or Stirred Yogurt : The warm cultured milk mixture is incubated in a container, cooled and then stirred for a creamy texture, often with fruit or other flavourings added. This yogurt is often slightly thinner than Balkan-style or set yogurt and can be eaten as-is, in cold beverages or incorporated into desserts.
Skyr : Similar to Greek yogurt, skyr, pronounced “skeer,” is an Icelandic-style yogurt that is dense, creamy and high in protein. Compared to regular yogurt, skyr requires 4 times the amount of milk to make and contains 2 to 3 times more protein.
Kefir : Kefir is a cultured, fermented milk drink, originally from the mountainous region that divides Asia and Europe. It is similar to yogurt – but a drink, with a tart, sour taste and a slight ‘fizz’. It contains three times the amount of probiotic cultures than yogurt.
Lassi: This Indian yogurt drink is made by thinning yogurt with a little water and adding either savory spices such as cumin, or sweet fruit juices such as mangoes.
Matsoni : It is a fermented milk product of Armenian origin, found in Caucasian cuisine, particularly in Armenia and Georgia. In Japan, it is called Caspian Sea yogurt . This yogurt is set at room temperature and requires a longer period of fermentation.
Frozen Yogurt : Frozen yogurts are often seen as a healthful alternative to ice cream. However, many frozen yogurts contain the same amount of sugar or more as regular ice cream.
Flavored or Fruity Yogurt : It’s the sweet, cool, flavoured and “healthy” version of yogurt. Fresh or cut fruits like strawberries, banana, mango etc are added to yogurt along with sweeteners.
Labneh : This Middle-Eastern yogurt is uber-creamy. It is extensively straining which makes it thicker than even Greek yogurt. It’s generally made from cow’s milk and is often drizzled with some olive oil, topped with a sprinkling of za’atar, and served with flatbreads for dipping.
Non-dairy yogurt : Non-dairy yogurt alternatives include soy yogurt and coconut milk yogurt.
Lactose- free Yogurt : Lactose-free yogurt is made with cow’s milk, but has been treated to break down the lactose or milk sugar found in milk. It tastes very similar to regular yogurt and is a good source of protein, calcium and probiotics. Diet Tips
Yogurt is healthy and nutritious and should be a part of regular diet. Here are some ways to incorporate it in daily diet. Have plain, unsweetened yogurt and sweeten it with fruit, unsweetened applesauce or a small amount of pure maple syrup or honey or add vegetables like cucumber, tomatoes, boiled potatoes, mint etc to make raita. Avoid pre-made fruit and yogurt desserts, as these often contain unnecessary added sugars. When baking, use yogurt instead of butter or oil. Use plain Greek yogurt instead of sour cream to top baked potatoes or tacos.
There are a lot of reasons to have yogurt, it’s delicious, versatile and loaded with nutrients. Do you enjoy yogurt? Which type do you like best? My theme for this year’s Blogging from A to Z April Challenge is Food Talks . Join me for some interesting, fun conversations about food experiences, experiments, basics, tips, ideas, hacks, trends and much more. Like this:

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Cloud kitchens turn biryani into a hot-selling fast food

Story Cloud kitchens turn biryani into a hot-selling fast food The FICCI-PWC report pegged the organised biryani delivery industry at around Rs 2,500 crore – companies here include Hyderabad’s Paradise, Behrouz Biryani, Biryani Blues, and Biryani by Kilo among others Goutam Das 16:18 IST Biryani is increasingly being packaged and delivered like pizza, especially by companies running cloud kitchens or those who may not have dine-in restaurants.
There is one Indian fast food that is giving pizzas and burgers a run for the money. Indians have an ever-growing appetite for the biryani. Yes, it is meant to be slow-cooked but the biryani is increasingly being packaged and delivered like pizza, especially by companies running cloud kitchens or those who may not have dine-in restaurants; they depend on home delivery as the primary business.
A report by industry body FICCI and PWC, ‘The changing landscape of the retail food service industry’, which was released in December 2018, stated that ethnic cuisine is rising in the organised segment of India’s food services market. “Over the last few years as food delivery apps, quick-service restaurants (QSRs) and take-away outlets have begun to dominate, biryani has emerged as an unlikely champion of India’s fast food scene, unseating pizzas and burgers, which used to dominate standardised fast food kitchens. According to food delivery apps, it is among the most popular dish ordered and its demand far surpasses that of Western imports,” the report mentioned.
Zomato, for instance, reported that Chicken Biryani was the most ordered food item as well as the most picked up in 2018. Other food apps reported similar findings even in 2017.
The FICCI-PWC report pegged the organised biryani delivery industry at around Rs 2,500 crore – companies here include Hyderabad’s Paradise, Behrouz Biryani, Biryani Blues, and Biryani by Kilo among others. Some of them have raised angel and venture capital and want to build their biryani business into a worldwide chain. Business Today recently spoke to Vishal Jindal, co-founder of Biryani by Kilo, to understand this story. Here is what he said:
1. From a consumer’s point of view, biryani as a product caters well for ordering-in. It doesn’t get soggy as a burger would. It is also a complete meal with protein, carbs, and loads of flavour. On the other hand, newer food services start-ups prefer the cloud kitchen model since there are less capital costs and no rentals, a bugbear in the dine-in model. The cloud kitchens can be located in areas that are not prime.
2. Nevertheless, it is difficult for cloud kitchen companies to build a brand – there are too many players who try to do many food categories from one kitchen, everything from sandwiches to curries. Biryani by Kilo just focusses on biryanis and kebabs. It serves three biryanis – Hyderabadi, Lucknowi, Kolkata – and has positioned itself in the premium segment. Half a kilo of biryani can cost above Rs 400. The company uses two years naturally aged basmati rice, the masalas are sourced from Kerala and the butchery is done in-house for quality control. It has a longer delivery time – deliveries can take up to 80 minutes since the biryani is prepared in individual earthenware after an order is received. The company wants to control the whole value-chain including the last mile. About 150 are employed as delivery staff. “Having your own delivery people makes a difference because they are able to represent the brand better, and explain the product to the customer,” Jindal says.
3. The company wants to build an ‘idiot-proof model’. In other words, it is working on automation, and making its systems and processes robust like that of McDonald’s or KFC. Doing that means it wouldn’t need very experienced chefs to run its kitchens; people will low skills could also be trained to prepare biryani. The company, currently, has a turnover of Rs 50 crore from 15 cloud kitchens and five dine-in outlets across NCR, Punjab, and Mumbai. It is exploring master franchisee options in the UAE and the UK.

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10 New Restaurants To Visit In May 2019 Including A Korean Eatery And Plenty Of IG-Worthy Joints

10 New Restaurants To Visit In May 2019 Including A Korean Eatery And Plenty Of IG-Worthy Joints 30th April 2019 New restaurants to visit in May 2019
To quote NSYNC’s most famous member, “It’s gonna be May.” After the high of visiting Jewel and Shilin Night Market, it’s back to digging into tasty dishes at the four corners of Singapore. From America’s most popular burger point to a Japanese stall serving cheesy beef don, here are 10 new restaurants to check out in May 2019 . 1. Jam at SIRI HOUSE
Check out Jam At SIRI HOUSE the next time you’re planning a soirée with your girlfriends. The 42-seater restaurant at Dempsey is fitted gorgeously with crystal chandeliers, plush chairs and chinoiserie wallpaper. The kitchen is helmed by Ming Tan from Park Bench Deli as well as Jeremy Cheok who was previously from New Ubin Seafood, so you can expect dishes with exciting flavours.
Start off with their Chicken In A Biscuit ($12++) to share, before indulging in a bowl of their Pappardelle ($33++) . The scrummy pasta dish has strong umami notes, as it features a bisque-like sauce made from roasting prawn and lobster heads in butter. The S’mores ($18++) will cap off your meal on a high note with its tart raspberry ganache.
Address: 8D Dempsey Road, #01-02, Dempsey Hill, Singapore 249672 Opening hours: Tue-Sun 11:30am to 2:30pm, 6pm to 10:30pm Tel: 9667 0533 Website 2. Shake Shack
The burger joint everyone has been waiting for has finally arrived at Jewel Changi Airport. A fine casual restaurant, Shake Shack ’s service and quality of food is way better than most fast food joints, though prices are still kept low and affordable.
Choose from a range of burgers and hot dogs. If it’s your first time there, get the ShackBurger ($9.20) , which is a cheeseburger boasting US Angus beef patty and pillowy potato buns. Their shakes are not to be missed. Try the Singapore-exclusive Pandan Shake ($7.80) – a blend of vanilla ice-cream, pandan, and coconut that’s topped with gula melaka crumble.
Address: 78 Airport Boulevard, #02-256, Jewel Changi Airport, Singapore 819666 Opening hours: Daily 10am to 10pm 3. Sora Boru
Serving food from $3.90 nett, Sora Boru has taken over the jarringly empty space at [email protected] where Yoshinoya used to reside. Though the menu mainly features Japanese rice bowls, we were impressed with novel creations such as their cheesy Snow Beef Don ($7.50/$11.90) and spicy Volcano Beef Don ($7.50/$11.90) .
If you have already tried the sweet and savoury beef bowls, order their Bara Chirashi Ebimayo Aburi Don ($9.50/$16.90) the next time you visit. It comes with a generous scatter of diced salmon, tuna, swordfish, and scallops.
When looking for an affordable spot to eat in town, Sora Boru makes for a good option as choices between a regular size or substantially sized mini portion are available.
Address: 313 Orchard Road, #B3-19/20, [email protected] , Singapore 238895 Opening hours: Mon-Fri 11am to 10pm, Sat-Sun 11am to 11pm Sora Boru is not a halal-certified eatery, but their food contains no pork or lard. 4. Penguin’s Kitchen
Penguin’s Kitchen is tucked away in the quiet alleys of Serangoon. The tranquil vibes here go perfectly with their dark interior palette – brown furniture juxtaposed against their grey concrete floors.
They serve Thai food here, and you can consider the Stir Fried Hot Basil Pork Rice ($8) . Minced pork and dices of chilli and garlic are thrown into a wok, and finished with a generous handful of basil.
Another dish to consider would be their Green Curry Chicken ($10) . The blend of herbs used in this curry really shines through. Lemongrass, chillies, kaffir lime are but a few components that give the curry a gorgeous, herbaceous fragrance.
Address: 9 Opal Crescent, Singapore 328404 Opening hours: Daily 11am to 11pm Tel: 6291 5949 Website 5. Herit8ge
Opened by the minds behind Harry Potter-inspired Platform 1094 and pretty pastel cafe Fresh Fruits Lab, Herit8ge reinvents local favourites at the idyllic fifth floor of Jewel Changi Airport. Woven rattan furniture and plating influenced by classic porcelain wares add nostalgic touches , reflecting their desire to show traditional Singaporean dishes in a new light.
The Claypot Seafood Mapo Tofu Pasta ($25++) amps up Hokkien mee, pairing baked cheesy scallops, juicy king prawns with crab meat spaghetti for a barrage of seafood flavour. If you want to hang out and knock down cocktails with friends, something from the tapas menu might do the trick, such as Nyonya Rendang Lamb Bao ($15++) . Chinese mantou meet aromatic Nyonya lamb rendang to create finger food that your Peranakan grandmother would approve of.
Address: 78 Airport Boulevard, #05-206, Jewel Changi Airport, Singapore 819666 Opening hours: Daily 9am to 3am Tel: 6962 7720 Website 6. What’s Pide
Hailing from South Korea, What’s Pide is a brand new stall at China Square Central that sells pide stuffed with all sorts of savoury fillings. Unlike traditional flatbread, the bread here has a spongy texture as a result of their secret recipe.
This translates to a dish that’s able to retain all the different flavours better. Case in point, the Mrs Park ($9) – a pocket full of seasoned bulgogi beef, pickled jalapeno and caramelised onions. The pillowy interior acted as canvas to absorb the sweet traces of beef and vinegary notes of jalapeno. Other standouts include the Prawn Star ($8.50) that’s filled with soft-shell prawns, and the Eda-san ($7.50) featuring mushroom balls doused in wasabi mayo.
Address: 22 Cross Street, #01-63, China Square Central, Singapore 048421 Opening hours: Mon-Thur 8am to 9pm Website 7. Xiao Yang Guo Kui
Xiao Yang Guo Kui specialises in the eponymous guo kui – a classic Chinese flatbread with a 1000-year history. Baked in a cylindrical oven, the flatbread boasts the crisp crust of a bing but lacked the usual unctuous aftertaste.
If you’re trying guo kui for the first time, we recommend the Shanghai Happy Family ($3) , which combines the fillings of Chongqing Pickled Vegetables ($2.50) , Jiangsu Pickled Greens ($2.50) , and Xi An Mixed Greens ($2.80) .
Fun fact: try dabao -ing the snack and enjoy it with curry for a taste that is both familiar and foreign at the same time.
Address: 60 Jurong Gateway Road, #01-10C, Jurong East Interchange, Singapore 608548 Opening hours: Daily 6:30am to 9:30pm Website 8. Yun Nans
While we often think of ma la xiang guo or xiao long bao when Chinese food is mentioned, Chinese cuisine has so much more to offer. Yun Nans at Jewel Changi Airport serves Yunnan dishes, and specialises in the province’s famous steam pot chicken.
The Steam Pot Chicken Soup ($23.90++) here is served in the clay pot it’s cooked in, and it’s made without a single drop of water added to it. Prepared the traditional way, the porous clay pot, filled with chicken and herbs, is sealed within a bigger pot of boiling water. As it cooks, the steam condenses, along with the juices of the ingredients, to form a rich, flavourful soup.
Another dish that we really enjoyed was the Charcoal Grilled Seabass with Lemongrass ($22.90++) . The layer of fiery red chilli seasoning on top gave life to the soft, tender fish, and tempted us to keep going despite the blazing heat on our taste buds. Try their Stir Fried Wild Porcini Mushroom with Dried Chillies ($24.90++) as well, which truly reminded us of the many mushroom dishes some of us had in Yunnan.
Address: 78 Airport Boulevard, #02-217, Jewel Changi Airport, Singapore 819666 Opening hours: Daily 10am to 10pm 9. BOTANY
Founded by the same people behind Dazzling Cafe, BOTANY is a new cafe along Robertson Quay that serves Western dishes with an Asian twist. Its leaf-shrouded chandeliers and walls, coupled with its high ceilings, make for a prime date night location.
Image credit: BOTANY
Peruse the menu and you’ll find that the selections are pretty affordable. We loved the Uni Truffle Capellini ($28++) featuring smooth Japanese sea urchin, topped with fresh and briny roe. Other delectable options include their popular Avocado Toast ($18++) – a sourdough toast served with smashed avocado, sautéed kale and sous vide egg – and Dazzling Café’s Signature Honey Toast ($18++) that’s sure to delight Shibuya toast lovers.
Address: 86 Robertson Quay, #01-03, Singapore 238245 Opening hours: Sun-Thurs 9am to 10pm, Fri-Sat 9am to 11pm Website 10. Ho Fook Hei
Ho Fook Hei is located at the newly renovated wing of Great World City. This casual eatery serves Cantonese delights that will keep you coming back for more. A definite order to place would be their Specialty Rose Wine Soy Sauce Chicken ($19++/$35++) . It features beautifully poached chicken, drenched in a thin yet robustly flavoured sauce.
Just like its sister restaurant Joyden Seafood, Ho Fook Hei doesn’t disappoint with their steamed fresh fish. Notable mentions include their Cod Fish Fillet ($24.80++) and Seabass Fillet ($14.80++) . There are four choices of sauce and cooking style, but we highly recommend ordering the fish steamed with old ginger sauce, which highlights the natural sweetness of its white meat.
Address: 1 Kim Seng Promenade, #01-141, Great World City, Singapore 237994 Operating hours: Daily 11:30am to 3:30pm, 5pm to 9:30pm Tel: 6219 2262 Website Bonus 1: Indian Express
Led by Chef Manjunath Mural, One-Michelin-Starred The Song Of India has long been revered as one of Singapore’s best spots for an Indian meal. The freshly-renovated Indian Express delivers that pedigree in a stylish yet affordable setting, as Chef Mural’s protege, Chef Umed Singh, serves up authentic Indian flavours with finesse.
Curries in Singapore are too often oily and one-dimensional in flavour. Each curry we were served here was a breath of fresh air, from the smoky Butter Chicken ($14++) and devastatingly aromatic Prawn Masaledar ($18++) to the surprisingly bright Lamb Shank ($16++) .
For a crash course of their best meats, get a Tandoori Mixed Grill Platter ($19++) , containing generous portions of juicy tandoori chicken and dish, as well as intensely spiced lamb kebabs.
Address: 38 Race Course Road, Singapore 218555 Opening hours: Daily 12pm to 11pm Tel: 6341 7429 Website Bonus 2: FatPapas
FatPapas is the place to visit for all burger addicts. They’ve recently introduced Impossible Foods into their lineup and boy, were we impressed. For the uninitiated, Impossible Foods are plant-based substitutes for meat products, making them a vegetarian-friendly option.
Currently, this extends to four items in FatPapas, with the Impossible Cheese Burger ($18++) impressing us the most. The patty tastes exactly like beef, which bodes well for vegetarians who might miss the taste of meat. This thick patty is sandwiched between Carbolite Chia Seed buns alongside melted aged cheddar and smoked Chipotle sauce.
Other selections include the Impossible Meatball Spaghetti ($18++) and the Impossible Chili Queso and Chips ($15.50+) .
Address: 83 Punggol Central, #01-31, Singapore 828761 Opening hours: Daily 11am to 10pm Website Bonus 3: Brotzeit
No stranger to the scene, Brotzeit is a frequent go-to for many when the German food cravings strike. They’ve recently introduced a seasonal white asparagus menu, which lets you try the rarely found veggie in various delicious forms.
This huge sharing platter, Spargelplatte ($79++) , comprises smoked salmon, two types of ham, poached eggs, potatoes, and 400g of white asparagus covered in hollandaise sauce. It’s great for those who want to try white asparagus without forgoing other Brotzeit classics.
If you’re more adventurous, go for the Zitronen Käse Creme Mit Spargel ($10++) . This deconstructed lemon cheesecake comes with white asparagus ribbons, that add a refreshing touch to the dessert. Alternatively, get their Spargel Mit Rinderfilet ($39++) or Spargel Mit Barramundi ($32++) , which offers white asparagus with beef tenderloin and grilled barramundi respectively.
Address: 313 Orchard Road, #01-27, Discovery Walk at [email protected] , Singapore 238895 Opening hours: Mon-Thur 11:30am to 12am, Fri 11:30am to 1am, Sat 10am to 1am, Sun 10am to 12am Tel: 6834 4038

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Instant Noodles Market Size to Reach USD 33,200.2 Million by 2023 at 3.02% CAGR, Predicts Market Research Future

English Français Instant Noodles Market Size to Reach USD 33,200.2 Million by 2023 at 3.02% CAGR, Predicts Market Research Future Instant Noodles Market Report Insights and Industry Analysis by Product Type (Cup/Bowl, Packet) Pack Size (Single Pack, Four Pack, Six Pack), Distribution Channel (Store-Based, Non-Store-Based) Region, Competitive Market Size, Share, Trends and Forecast 2018 – 2023 April 30, 2019 09:58 ET | Source: Market Research Future Pune, India, Instant Noodles Market is poised to touch USD 33,200.2 Mn by 2023 at an impressive 3.02% CAGR during the forecast period (2018-2023), reveals the latest report by Market Research Future (MRFR). Market Scope Instant noodles are making a niche for itself based on its popularity for being tasty, nutritious, and quick to make. Although many would differ with the marketing strategy of instant noodles on the grounds of nutrition, the market has never kept itself away from such promotional campaigns. Especially, involving nutritional grounds. The global instant noodles market is expected to move steadily with a 3.02% CAGR during the forecast period (2016-2023) to reach a valuation of USD 33,200.2 million by the end of 2023. Instant noodles mostly contain dehydrated vegetables, wheat flour, meat, pork, beef, and seafood. The global instant noodles market is reaping the benefits of rapid industrialization and fast-tracked urbanization. These two features have spurred a demand for ready-to-cook products. Severe issues with hectic lifestyles have led to a growth in the increase of convenience foods. At the same time, a rise in per capita income can be considered a major factor in triggering market growth. The imbalance caused by lack of time for cooking a proper meal has benefited the market well. Manufacturers have come up with fortified instant noodles which is to explore possibilities among the health-conscious populations. Key Players and Industry Buzz Several market giants are making an impression in the global instant noodles market. Their impacts can be measured in terms of strategic moves they make to take their individual stands strong. But its far-reaching impact help the global market grow. Companies profiled in the MRFR report are Nestlé S.A. (Switzerland), Unilever PLC (UK), Ajinomoto Co., Inc. (Japan), Campbell Soup Company (US), ITC Limited (India), Nissin Foods Co., Ltd (Hong Kong), Acecook Vietnam Joint Stock Company (Vietnam), Tat Hui Foods Pte. Ltd. (Singapore), Capital Foods Limited (India), and PT Indofood Sukses Makmur Tbk (Indonesia). Get Free Sample @ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/sample_request/1841 The instant noodles market is mostly getting driven by innovation. Nissin is one of the leaders and never shies away from trying out new things. Nissin, in collaboration with Japan Science and Technology Agency, are trying to sort out the development of cultured meat. They now believe that they have found out a way to take diced steaks to the next level where it would resemble the texture of steak from a real cow. Nestle, on the other hand, is attempting big time to recover the lost ground in India during the previous market downfall. The company has increased its production volume and is introducing new lines to make up for the lost ground. Nissin is also doing great in terms of promotion where they have launched a cup noodle vending machine, in collaboration with Foodbeast. Instagram account would be the currency. The uproar it created on the web is providing the market giant with much-needed leverages. Forming a Base The analysis of the global Instant Noodles Market requires a proper segmentation on the basis of product type, pack size, and distribution channel. This is to get a comprehensive view of the market for a better understanding of coming years and gauge how well the instant noodles market can live up to its potential. Based on the type, the instant noodles market can be segmented into cup/bowl and packet instant noodles. The packet segment had the market leash in 2017 but the cup/bowl segment is expected to witness a surge in the consumption. The segment is expected to register 3.33% CAGR over the review period. By pack size, the Instant Noodles Market can be segmented into single pack, four pack, six pack, and others. The convenience of the single pack is taking it ahead of the rest. The four-pack segment can exceed a valuation of USD 7,708.2 million by the end of 2023. By distribution channel, the instant noodles segment includes store-based and non-store-based of which the store-based segment comprises supermarkets & hypermarkets, convenience stores, and others. The store-based segment is dominating but the non-store-based segment can rise substantially during the forecast period. Browse the market data and information spread across 114 pages with 84 data tables and 20 figures of the report “Instant Noodles Market Report – Forecast 2018-2023” in-depth alongside table of content (TOC) at: https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/instant-noodles-market-1841 Mapping the Market Instant Noodles Market comprises North America, Europe, Asia Pacific (APAC), and the Rest-of-the-World (RoW). MRFR’s detailed analysis of the market in a region-specific way includes both volume-wise and value-wise data. These are to put light on growth pockets that would help in better market expansion. The APAC market has the maximum market exposure and with a 3.16% CAGR during the forecast period it is expected to make a difference in the global market and among its associates. China is contributing the most in the region. North America’s market to reach a valuation of USD 2,061.7 million by the end of 2023 with the U.S. leading the market. Europe to profit substantially from the changing work culture and high demand for Asia noodles flavors. The market is deemed to exceed a worth of USD 1,268.2 million by 2023. The U.K. to score big in terms of CAGR during the forecast period. Browse Related Reports: Instant Beverage Premixes Market Information Type (Instant Coffee, Instant Tea, Instant Milk, Instant Health Drinks, Instant Soup), Function (Plain and Flavored), Distribution (Store Based and Non-Store Based) and Region Forecast to 2023 https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/instant-beverage-premix-market-4475 Ready to Eat Meals Market Information by Product Type (Ready Meals & Mixes, Bakery, Noodles & Pasta, Non-Alcoholic Beverages, Herbs & Spices, Soups), Cuisine (Indian, Italian, Chinese, Continental)), Specialty Type (Natural, Preservative Free, Vegetarian, Non-Vegetarian), Form (Dried, Frozen, Instant, Cooked, Fresh), Packaging (Can, Box, Bag, Sachet, Vacuum Pack), and Region- Forecast to 2022 https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/ready-to-eat-meals-market-1979 About Market Research Future: At Market Research Future (MRFR), we enable our customers to unravel the complexity of various industries through our Cooked Research Report (CRR), Half-Cooked Research Reports (HCRR), & Consulting Services. MRFR team have supreme objective to provide the optimum quality market research and intelligence services to our clients. Our market research studies by products, services, technologies, applications, end users, and market players for global, regional, and country level market segments, enable our clients to see more, know more, and do more, which help to answer all their most important questions. In order to stay updated with technology and work process of the industry, MRFR often plans & conducts meet with the industry experts and industrial visits for its research analyst members. Contact: Market Research Future Office No. 528, Amanora Chambers Magarpatta Road, Hadapsar, Pune – 411028 Maharashtra, India Phone: +16468459312 Email: sales@marketresearchfuture.com Related Articles More articles issued by Market Research Future More articles related to:

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Restaurant Review: Mowgli

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A few weeks ago, in the midst of vac under the typically unpredictable weather, I joined a certain St Peter’s finalist and former president of the PPE society for dinner at Mowgli on the Westgate terrace. Mowgli is an Indian restaurant: it specialises in tiffins: home or canteen-cooked meals and snacks in steel containers. It was quite heartening for me to learn about such a concept since these boxes, also commonly-used by students and labourers in China, rekindled my childhood memories; on the other hand, the structure of the typical Chinese and Indian meals are so different that I was very intrigued to see what was on offer here.
Walking into the restaurant, it was quite clear that it had a unique style. The light inside was neither fully bright nor as dim as those high-class establishments that emphasise on the candlelight. A hint of festivity could be detected with light strings dispersing around the room, and the swings provided a feeling of youth. The decor was certainly not very Indian: it would not feel out of place to serve pizza or steak in there. For me, although I could see the efforts made to make the restaurant stand out, the degree of uncertainty and confusion was a bit too high for me. And this was not helped by the high level of noises during the peak dinner hours.
We sat down and opened the menu. It was definitely impressive, with very creative dish names and a comprehensive cocktail menu as well. While I am not normally a fan of fusion cuisines (whatever is an Indian chip butty), I was more than willing to give it a try.
I decided to go for the butter chicken. According to the menu: For me, butter chicken is my go-to dish when I am discovering a new Indian restaurant because it encompasses every aspect of the beauty of Indian food: the aroma, the richness and the colliding flavours oscillating around your tongue.
The waiting time for our food passed quickly as Ed and I updated each other with our lives and were overcome with nostalgia about our days in Kosovo. The actual food itself, however, was disappointing. This ‘tiffin’ that is so hyped about is not even close enough to feed a hungry soul, in Delhi or Oxford. My first bite gave me the feeling of a slight blandness, which is really not common for Indian food. Fair enough that it has almost no spices at all-the dish was advertised to be mild in the menu, but I could not really taste any other flavours either. The chicken was kind of dry, and the worst thing about the dish was that it was not even hot. A tiny, lukewarm dish with uninspiring tastes just added to the confusion the restaurant’s decor brought me. The poori I ordered with the butter chicken was normal but nothing special as well.
I chose the rose and cardamom lassi to accompany my meal. I quite liked the inventive combination and it certainly gave me more flavours to appreciate compared to my food. It was also not very sweet which made it more elegant and attractive. Having said this, the lassi was slightly watery and could have been thicker. It might sound harsh, but I have had some lassis that I can drink for the rest of my life and this was not one of them.
And then there came the bill. For two meat tiffins, two portions of pooris, a lassi and a beer, it came to £35, and neither of us was full. It is certainly not the most economical option for students, and pretty expensive even among the more upscale restaurants around the city. To give you an idea, I ate a whole wasabi sushi box just half an hour later. Tiffins cost from £7 to £9, and you probably need two of these and some rice or bread to have a fulfilling meal.
So all in all, I was fairly disappointed with the experience and what Mowgli had to offer. It is definitely not my Indian place of choice in Oxford, and I would not recommend going there unless your purse is full. I would not, however, write off the restaurant completely just yet: the fierier Goan fish curry received better feedback from Ed and the menu has many other exciting items. If you have money and enjoy dining on the rooftop of Westgate, see for yourself.

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12 Most Versatile Vegetables & Herbs Every Container Gardener Must Grow

Home Balcony Gardening 12 Most Versatile Vegetables & Herbs Every Container Gardener Must Grow 12 Most Versatile Vegetables & Herbs Every Container Gardener Must Grow StumbleUpon Whether you’ve got a big backyard garden or a small balcony container garden these Versatile Vegetables & Herbs are must grow and used in every cuisine.
Even if you don’t have a backyard to start a full-fledged garden, you can start a small “urban garden” by growing vegetables and herbs on your patio or balcony with a few simple supplies. A few pots, some potting soil, plant seedlings or seeds are really all you need.
Just imagine how good it would be if you’ll be able to harvest homegrown juicy tomatoes and fresh basil leaves instead of buying tasteless tomatoes and shriveled basil from your local grocery store.
All these versatile herbs and vegetables in this list are most commonly used in almost all the cuisines. You can grow them and utilize them fresh in your breakfast, lunch or dinner recipes. Herbs 1. Basil
A sweet must be a part of your herb garden. As nothing is better than fresh basil sprinkled on a homemade marinara sauce, homemade pizza or Caprese salad. You can also add it to soups, dips, and curries. Learn how to grow basil here . 2. Rosemary
Any devout carnivore will agree that a sprig of rosemary can turn a great steak into the most amazing and flavorful steak. The flavor is simply out of this world. If you haven’t tried lamb or steak with a rosemary skewer, add it on your to-do list. 3. Cilantro
One of the most powerful herbs, but for anyone who loves homemade salsa (tomato or mango) or enjoys authentic Mexican & Indian food, cilantro is a must grow. No Indian curry can be complete without it, and you can also garnish your salad with it or make a chutney.
Also Read: How to Grow Cilantro in a Pot 4. Oregano
No self-sufficient Italian cook can survive without a readily available source of fresh oregano. A must have for anyone who regularly makes their own homemade pasta sauces. But you should know there are different species of oregano (e.g., Mexican, Greek, Italian) so make your selection based on the type of foods you cook most often.
Also Read: How to Create an Italian Container Garden 5. Chives
For that perfect blend of raw onion like taste without the crunch, chives add a level of subtle flavor that most people can’t quite figure out. Goes great with garlic mashed potatoes. Also, is one of the easiest to grow herb, which grows well in small pots. 6. Parsley
You can grow either Italian or Flat-leaf parsley or Curl-leaf parsley or both according to your food choice. The flat-leaf parsley has a more strong flavor and mostly used in Italian cooking, in Pasta and Pesto recipes. Whereas, curl-leaf is mild and less flavorful and used for garnishing and salad dressing. Here’s more about growing parsley . 7. Mint
You can even grow mint indoors on a windowsill. This aromatic herb needs a few hours of direct sunlight and slightly moist soil all the time. Mint taste awesome when used for yogurt dressing and on cucumber salad. Mint pestos, chutneys, and dips are already famous. It’s also used in smoothies, juices, and many Asian recipes. Vegetables 8. Mesclun
The mixture of assorted salad greens is called Mesclun. Grow them together in a wide container or bowl; a window box would be fine. For this, purchase mesclun seed mix or make your own by adding seeds of your choice like lettuce, mustard, arugula, mizuna, cress, or spinach, the list is long.
It’s extremely easy to use a pair of scissors to snip off a bowl of mesclun, give it a rinse, and in 5 minutes or less, you’ve got a healthy dinner ready to go after you add some goat cheese and walnuts. If you clip off the top 2/3 of the plant, it regrows within a few weeks, so it basically does all the work for you after you plant the seeds.
Also Read: How to Create a Salad Bowl Garden 9. Bell Peppers
Bell peppers (green, yellow, or red) are a popular ingredient in many recipes. In salads, noodles, pasta, pizza, soups, curries you can’t miss their role, and if you start counting the recipes that require them, on the web, your research will not complete soon. We must agree they’re a must grow vegetable on your balcony and growing them is not difficult. 10. Tomatoes
Tomatoes, how could we miss them. The most favorite vegetable (or fruit) of many and most used as well. Homegrown tomatoes taste so good that much that you can’t explain unless you experience. They’re one of the productive container vegetables but needs some care, regular dose of fertilizer and water. All the essential tips on growing tomatoes in containers are here . 11. Scallions/Spring Onions/Green Onions
One more in this list of most versatile vegetables and herbs ! Depending on where you live, these great little onions can have multiple names. They are a cinch to grow if you’ll follow this article . Use them in various dishes like omelets and scrambled eggs. Add the chopped leaves to salads, pasta, noodles, naans, etc. 12. Hot Peppers
If you love spicy food and want to add some zing in your food. Don’t miss the chili plants. The hotness and size of the hot pepper fruits depend on the varieties you’re growing. You can enjoy the chilies in many recipes. Learn how to grow it here . Just by growing these 12 versatile vegetables and herbs , you’ll be able to prepare a variety of meals and salad recipes.

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Every Easter, we feast on…

[br]Pork, mutton, beef or duck for the family repast, depending on which part of the country you grew up in[br][br][br][br]Christian communities across India celebrate Easter with aplomb after the 40 days of abstinence during Lent. Though the traditional meal differs in each, it invariably consists of meat, in some form, along with a sumptuous spread.[br][br]Lamb has always been considered a religious symbol, yet, every region of India has its own favourite meat on Easter. While eggs and Easter bunnies, symbolising hope and new life, are commonplace among children, an Easter spread, centered around meat, is enjoyed with fervour after the fasting period.[br][br]Easter is all about tradition. Alluring images of food on Instagram not withstanding, deep down, everyone craves for a home-cooked meal. After all, it is all about memories.[br][br]East Indians[br][br][br][br] [br]The native Christians of Mumbai, the East Indians, traditionally ate duck and rabbit. Today, however, pork has replaced these as the main meat for their celebrations.[br][br][br]Chef Shannon Lawrence, sous chef, The Bombay Canteen, Mumbai, looks forward to the family Easter meal. “Generally, the family tradition is to eat an elaborate roast pig. But sometimes, there is a pork sorpotel or pork sambari too.”[br][br]Painstakingly prepared days in advance, pork sorpotel is an old delicacy. Made with their coveted bottle masala, it is enjoyed with fugia, which is deep-fried bread made with fermented maida, eggs and coconut milk. It is also eaten with chittiap, a popular flat bread that is similar to appams. Pork sambari, made with ginger, garlic, bottle masala and spices, is unique owing to the pearl onions and tamarind, which balance the dish.[br][br]Chef Lawrence recalls the wedding pulao, an elaborate rice dish with boiled eggs, caramelised onions and dry fruit that used to be a must-have on Easter during his grandparents’ time. “Each family member used to clamour for the eggs in the dish, but only the lucky first few got them,” he reminisces.[br][br]“Mutton tope, a spicy mutton bone curry, is also a favourite. During the last boil, poha is added, to absorb the spices and thicken it. Our family, however, skips the poha and prefers to wallop the curry with the home-made fugias. Dessert, is invariably the baked coconut and semolina, thali sweet and of course, Easter eggs made by mummy.”[br][br]Up North[br][br]Christians in North India, usually indulge in chicken and mutton, as their choice of meats. Using everyday, local ingredients and spices, a larger variety of dishes is prepared for this feast.[br][br]A Punjabi Christian, chef consultant Bakshish Dean believes in relishing a traditional meal on Easter. Meat aloo curry, mutton or jeera pulao, raita, a vegetable, salad and halwa is always their typical lunch. The meal is home-cooked from scratch with his own spices, and halwa, a Punjabi favourite, is always the first choice for dessert.[br][br]Syrian Christians[br][br][br][br][br] [br]In Kerala, the choice of meats on Easter varies in every region. While it is chicken or mutton mappas with palappams, or beef ularthiyathu, a dry roast and pork peralan in Kottayam, Alappuzha prefers duck prepared in coconut milk and mild spices. Pork is eaten in Angamaly, while in Fort Cochin it is pork vindaloo, beef chops and stew.[br][br]The Central Travancore Christians enjoy pairing their meat with the white, fluffy vattayappams, made with fresh palm, sweet toddy, raw rice, sugar and coconut.[br][br]Says Chef Saji Alex, chef de cuisine, Kochi Marriott, “My mother’s mutton mappas, pork peralan, beef ularthiyathu with palappam and meen (fish) vattichathu along with pulissery and rice were my favourites as a child, and the flavours still linger in my memories.”[br][br]To the East[br][br]The Anglo-Indians in Bengal prefer to start their breakfast with buffarth, a chicken stew with bread. But Chef Silvester Surajit Roy admits that although the Bengali Christian cuisine has a strong Anglo-Indian influence, they generally relish a desi organic chicken as a roast on Easter. “We follow a European recipe, but with a Bengali touch. We add turmeric and a ginger-garlic paste, and it is paired with pilaf rice.”[br][br]He adds, “In the absence of an oven, this chicken was cooked on a chulha in my parents’ home. The heat from the dying embers of the chulha would be perfect to slow-cook the chicken.” A root vegetable preparation with chicken is another speciality in their family.[br][br]A pork preparation, with the choi jhal chilli from Bangladesh, is his favourite. “With no ginger garlic, only roasted coriander, cumin and other spices, this chilli adds zest to the dish. Sweets after a meal differ in each family, but, payesh and pathishapta (traditional Bengali rice crepes stuffed with coconut and jaggery) are common.”

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San Francisco’s Iconic Eats for Every Neighborhood

San Francisco’s neighborhoods are full of must-have foodie experiences. By Tyler Cohn San Francisco’s Iconic Eats for Every Neighborhood Sponsor Ad
Did you come to San Francisco just to eat? Don’t be embarrassed; this is what San Francisco is famous for! If you’re here to treat yourself, you might get overloaded by the options. Not to worry; we’ve gone ahead and picked out the must-eats in San Francisco at a number of famous and unique places all throughout the city’s wonderful, diverse neighborhoods. Enjoy these iconic San Francisco eats ! Fisherman’s Wharf
One of San Francisco’s most visited neighborhoods, Fisherman’s Wharf is your best bet for finding three classic San Francisco delicacies: sourdough bread, Dungeness crab, and cioppino.
Sourdough Bread The massive Boudin Bakery at Fisherman’s Wharf lets you see the scrumptious sourdough bread as it’s being made, and offers a variety of ways to enjoy it.
Dungeness Crab PIER 39 ‘s great seafood restaurants, including Fog Harbor Fish House , all serve up delicious Dungeness crab.
Cioppino As for cioppino , San Francisco’s homegrown seafood stew, we suggest Scoma’s , one of the oldest restaurants on the Wharf. North Beach
Pizza San Francisco’s Little Italy has some of the West Coast’s best pizza. Tony’s Pizza Napoletana has produced some prize-winning pies that we promise are worth the wait.
Focaccia Bread The Liguria Bakery on Stockton St. offers a taste of the old country with its handmade focaccia, baked fresh daily.
Cappuccino We recommend trying Tosca Cafe’s cappuccino, which has a bit more to it than your average brew: Marie Duffau Bas Armagnac, Buffalo Trace Bourbon, Dandelion Chocolate Ganache, and organic milk. Chinatown
The first and largest Chinatown in the U.S., San Francisco’s Chinatown is bursting with good eats .
Dutch Crunch BBQ Pork Buns When visiting award-winning Mr. Jui’s, these incredible appetizers are a must.
Salt and Pepper Crab This is a popular dish in the neighborhood, but nobody does it better than R&G Lounge .
Fortune Cookies If you want to see the origins of an American Chinese food staple, you can visit the Golden Gate Fortune Cookie Company! Embarcadero/Financial District
San Francisco’s busy downtown is home to a wide variety of dining experiences, from grab-and-go storefronts to a Michelin star-winning restaurant.
Secret Breakfast Ice Cream San Francisco loves its ice cream. No flavor put the obsession on the map more squarely than this concoction from local maker Humphry Slocombe, which blends bourbon ice cream and corn flakes. It has to be tasted to be believed.
Cellophane Noodles You’d never expect to find one of the city’s best restaurants at its ferry terminal, but San Francisco is all about the unpredictable. At The Slanted Door, one of San Francisco’s most honored eateries, diners are treated to exceptional Vietnamese cuisine. Our go-to dish is the cellophane noodles, with green onion, sesame, and Dungeness crab.
Dim Sum Don’t be surprised that the best dim sum in the city is outside of Chinatown. At both of Yank Sing’s downtown locations , you’ll find a terrific variety of delicious dim sum.
The Financial District also offers chic, contemporary dining at places like Wayfare Tavern as well as the classic, no-frills professionalism of local legend Tadich Grill . There’s great bayside dining at elegant eateries such as La Mar , Waterbar , and EPIC Steak , each with their own spectacular view of the Bay Bridge. And if getting things super-fresh is your style, head to The Ferry Building on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays for its enormous farmers’ market. Union Square
You can shop ’til you drop in Union Square . Why not refuel with some of these exceptional dishes in the neighborhood?
Curried Shrimp Naan At Taj Campton Place , you’ll find excellent Indian cuisine with a strong California influence. Our favorite is the curried shrimp naan. Fun fact: this restaurant has been awarded 10 Michelin stars in the past eight years!
French Onion Soup Cafe Claude is tucked away on tiny Claude Lane, a spot that would be easy to miss in the hustle and bustle of Union Square. What shouldn’t be missed, though, is their awesome French onion soup. This bistro, which regularly features live music, feels like a tiny piece of Paris in San Francisco.
Brussel Sprouts At Le Colonial , where French and Vietnamese cuisine combine to amaze your senses, we can’t get enough of the crispy, chili-glazed brussel sprouts, served with portabello mushrooms, carrot chips, and nuoc cham. Central Market
This rapidly evolving neighborhood is home to a little bit of everything, from historic theaters to major tech company offices. It also has a terrific variety of food you absolutely have to try.
The Cruffin Perhaps you’ve heard about this bakery sensation. Visit Mr. Holmes Bakehouse on Larkin St. for your chance to sample their signature cruffin, which regularly has people waiting in line before they open.
Bahn Mi No one creates these Vietnamese sandwiches better than Saigon Sandwich, also on Larkin St. Whether you get yours with roast chicken, roast pork, or meatballs, you won’t be disappointed.
Beignets We’re a long way from New Orleans, but the beignets at Brenda’s French Soul Food on Polk St. taste like they came straight from the French Quarter. SoMa/Yerba Buena
Looking for a place to eat after a long day of convention sessions at The Moscone Center ? SoMa/Yerba Buena is full of great options.
Tapas Out with a big group? The best way to sample the most of the menu at Bellota is to select from their shared tapas plates. You can’t go wrong no matter what you pick. Roasted beets, crispy cod, and poached prawns are just some of the delicious options.
Meatballs Delarosa has 10 terrific pizzas on the menu, but our favorite item is their tremendous meatballs served in spicy marina sauce.
Wasabi Lobster The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) has more than just priceless art within its walls. It also has In Situ , an outstanding restaurant that compiles its menu from almost as many different places as the museum does its art collection. Among an always changing list, the wasabi lobster, served with mango jelly, Thai vinaigrette, and wasabi marshmallow, is our current favorite. Mission District
The Mission is the center of San Francisco’s Latino community. It’s home to terrific food , abundant public art , and some of the city’s most eye-popping annual events.
Burrito Among the many great things to come from this neighborhood is the fabled Mission-style burrito: overstuffed with beans, rice, pico de gallo, sour cream, guacamole, and the meat of your choosing. It’s a must-have for visitors, and there are plenty of places that compete for the title of best burrito in the Mission. La Taqueria, El Farolito, and Papalote are just a few of them.
Oysters Whether you go for brunch or dinner, oysters are always abundant at Foreign Cinema . This one-of-a-kind restaurant serves up exceptional cuisine while showcasing classic and rare films along its exterior patio wall. Castro/Noe Valley
Going out to some of the bars and clubs in San Francisco’s LGBT neighborhood? Then you’ll want some quick, easy eats before or after your evening adventures.
Cookies Hot Cookie may be small, but its creations certainly aren’t! These monster cookies, available in a variety of flavors, are a must when visiting the Castro.
Pizza One of the best by-the-slice options in the city is Marcello’s, located right across the street from the historic Castro Theater and steps from the Castro Muni stop. They have a variety of toppings and are open until 1 a.m. Civic Center/Hayes Valley
Jam-packed with some of the city’s major cultural institutions and hottest venues—the Asian Art Museum , San Francisco Symphony , San Francisco Opera , San Francisco Ballet , and SFJAZZ , to name but a few— Civic Center/Hayes Valley has plenty of options for a pre-show meal and a post-show drink.
Sardine Chips Hear us out! At Rich Table , the family style menu has options for the cautious diner (spaghetti, roasted cauliflower) as well as choices for the more adventurous. For our money, the most unique thing on the menu are the sardine chips, which we can report are great.
Soft Garlic Pretzels Absinthe Brasserie & Bar takes its cues from French and Northern Italian cuisine. While you might expect to find great pretzels at a German beer hall, we promise these classic twists, served with Vermont cheddar Mornay, are the best.
Mezcal Cocktails At Cala , an excellent Mexican restaurant on Fell St., a number of their cocktails have this smoky liquor as their primary ingredient. Whether you try the classic margarita or something more creative, you won’t be disappointed.
Mussels The mussels at Chez Maman West on Gough St. are unstopably good. When we say that, we mean you’ll have a hard time stopping yourself from ordering more! Haight-Ashbury
The home of hippie-dom still has its free-loving style, as well as some more recent, tasty additions.
Sausage At Magnolia Gastropub & Brewery , you can choose from andouille, English banger, currywurst, or beer bratwurst—or you can have all four, by ordering the full sausage board with sauerkraut and stone ground mustard.
Cuban Sandwich At Cha Cha Cha, in the thick of the Haight and just a few blocks from Golden Gate Park , diners must sample the Cubano Clasico Sandwich on the lunch menu. It’s a big, meaty, drippy delight. Fillmore
Fillmore has its own storied music history. Everyone from Duke Ellington to The Doors has played venues along the main drag of this neighborhood. Now it’s as well known for its top-notch dining as much as anything else.
Toast Don’t laugh. You haven’t had toast until you’ve been to Jane, on Fillmore Street, and had their toasted walnut and fig bread, topped with fresh Jersey ricotta, honey and hazelnuts. What a decadent way to do breakfast!
Ribs State Bird Provisions is one of the most well-regarded restaurants in the city. There’s always a bit of surprise to the dining experience there. For one thing, its simple storefront is easy to walk past on busy Fillmore St. For another, the menu frequently changes. If luck is on your side, you’ll find the pork ribs served with black beans and black garlic on the menu. We say, go for it! Japantown
San Francisco’s Japantown is one of the few remaining such enclaves in the U.S. Visit this neighborhood for its history, its culture, and its great food!
Sushi Put yourself in the hands of a skilled sushi chef for a superlative meal at Kiss Seafood. The space is tiny (and quiet), so you’ll need a reservation, but you’ll be rewarded with an elegant, subtle, and highly personal meal.
Japanese Snacks Ever wonder what satisfies a sweet tooth halfway around the world? You can find out by purchasing authentic Japanese treats at a number of stores in the Japan Center on Post St. Visit Nijiya Market or Daiso or Ichiban Kan—or all three—for plenty of sweets inside this large neighborhood mall. Nob Hill
Once the exclusive home of San Francisco’s movers and shakers, Nob Hill is now home to some of the grandest hotels in the city—and some of the best places to enjoy a strong cocktail.
Cocktails There is a drink and a location to suit every style in Nob Hill. Looking for kitschy fun? Party in the Tonga Room in the Fairmont Hotel , with its tiki torches and simulated tropical storms. Want breathtaking elegance? Head to Top of the Mark in the InterContinental Mark Hopkins , with its dramatic views and fabled history. Trying to capture the spirit of the titans who shaped the city? Visit the Big 4 in the Scarlet Huntington Hotel .
Prime Rib One of San Francisco’s signature steakhouses , The House of Prime Rib on Van Ness Ave. offers top quality beef, cut to your liking. Marina/Pacific Heights
The north end of the city slopes down from the majestic tip of Pacific Heights to the Marina , a neighborhood full of great dining best traveled on foot.
Strawberry Almond Cake You might think that a restaurant dedicated to vegetarian cuisine wouldn’t have much in the dessert department. You’d be wrong. This fully vegan delight at Greens Restaurant simply can’t be missed.
Jamaican Jerk Chicken Tacos There’s a little bit of everything in these neighborhoods, which is why you can find this Caribbean twist on typical tacos at Palm House on Union St.
Pizza We know; pizza has appeared on this list a few times already. What makes the pizza at A16 so special is the incredible wood-fired oven that heats them up. Whatever toppings you choose (and there are many), you can’t go wrong. Richmond/Presidio
This expansive neighborhood west of Arguello St. stretches all the way to the sea. Maybe that’s why it’s so full of great places to eat.
Dim Sum Not satisfied with the downtown options? Out here, you have your pick of the litter. Hong Kong Lounge, Ton Kiang, and Shanghai Dumpling King are just a few excellent options.
Burmese Cuisine B Star and Burma Superstar are serving up some exceptional Burmese food, from a 22-ingredient rainbow salad to sesame beef to okra tofu.
Ramos Fizz Head to the end of the road and visit the famous Cliff House for a ramos fizz. This unusual cocktail—made with gin, lemon and lime juices, heavy cream, and egg whites—may have been created in New Orleans, but it’s been perfected here in San Francisco. Sunset
South of Golden Gate Park is the Sunset . If you’re looking for places still undiscovered by most visitors, the Sunset is where to dine.
BLTs Heaping sandwiches on sourdough bread served at Devil’s Teeth Baking Company are a challenge worth accepting.
Chicken Wings The dry-fried wings at San Tung are legendary. They’re always on the menu (except for Wednesdays, when the restaurant is closed).
Coffee Andytown Coffee Roasters makes their own delicious blends inspired by the sights, sounds, and flavors of the neighborhood. Bayview
If you want some great seafood without the crowds of Fisherman’s Wharf, head for the Bayview on the city’s south side.
Seafood Two of our favorite spots in the neighborhood both have plenty of history. The Old Clam House has been shucking and selling since 1861, and Radio Africa was one of the founders of San Francisco’s storied restaurant pop-up trend. Both offer excellent cuisine. The Old Clam House is a bit more predictable, while Radio Africa changes their menu every month. All the more reason to make multiple visits! Treasure Island
Want to have a drink in the middle of San Francisco Bay? Head across the Bay Bridge to Treasure Island , the next neighborhood about to boom in San Francisco.
Beer The one-of-a-kind views of San Francisco’s skyline at Wood’s Island Club are best enjoyed with one of their original brews. The size of the establishment is matched by its wide variety of beers, ranging from IPAs to pilsners to saisons.

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