Influences Of Spice Trade In British-India

Influences Of Spice Trade In British-India

Monday, April 1, 2019 Influences Of Spice Trade In British-India Influences Of change Trade In British-IndiaIntroductionColonisation refers purely to migration, for example, to slumpr colonies, trading posts, and plantations, while colonialism deals with this as well as the impression of new territories existing peoples.Spice ColonisationThere be many another(prenominal) reasons to start a resolution and spiciness trade is one of the close to influential key reason since antique times. Spice Colonisation occurs with the judge of spices, spice dispatch, timeline of spice trade, spice influences and impacts in pre-colonisation, during colonisation and post colonisation twain the coloniser and colonised. Spice colonisation happened mostly in southeast eastern Asia areas and India during the Classical period to Middle Age and until the modern colonialism, by Greece, Roman Empire and the Vikings to Western European countries.The invoice of spice is most as old as human civilisation. It is a history of lands discovered, empires strengt hened and brought d own, wars won and lost, treaties signed and flouted, flavours sought and offered, and the rise and fall of different ghostlike practices and beliefs. Spices were among the most valuable items of trade in ancient and medieval times. some of these spices (think of pepper and cinnamon) have become so ubiquitous that it is difficult to put in the fact that until very recently they were rare and expensive commodities. Indeed, the history of trading and trade is the history of spices and it is no exagg epochtion to say that America would not have been discovered were it not for the European desire to break the Arab traders monopoly on spices. The search for a cheaper way to obtain spices from the East led to the keen Age of Exploration and the discovery of the New World. European explorers such as Ferdinand Magellan, Vasco da Gama, and Bartholomeu Dias began their long sea voyages to discover a sea route to the sources of spices. Christopher Columbus went westwar ds from Europe in 1492 to find a sea route to the lands of spices but found the Americas. In 1497 the Portuguese navigator Vasco da Gama discovered a sea route around the southern prime of Africa, eventually reaching Kozhikode on the southwest coast of India in 1498.British in India Spice ColonisationIndia is once the most influential rustic in spice trade and route. Before British colonised India in spice trade, the Arabians, Roman Empire, Portuguese and Dutch had been taking control of India for the same(p) reason. The British Empire has create a company called the British East India Company. The British East India Company was a joint-stock company that was originally organize to do business with the East Indies. But eventually, the company ended up doing business primarily with the Indian subcontinent and China. It is commonly said that in the history of the humanity there is no to a greater extent wonderful story than that of the advent of the British Empire in India. East India Company was unique as it started its humble beginning as the mere trading company and ulterior took over political interest and changed to the find outr of the entire country. In 1799, British Empire had gained its full vigor and was named the most powerful political and soldiery force in India, after Tipu Sultan of Mysore was defeated.Architectural Influences of British in IndiaThe British Empire has brought many influences into India including cultural exchange, cuisine, technologies and most of all, architecture. or so from 1799, the British Empire had commenced the prolonged history of British architecture that was rule in India for the next 200 years. With this elevated status the Britons also gauged the deficiency and responsibility to govern territories under their control and to be viewed as a powerful, civilized force by the Indians.During the colonisation, the British brought with them their architecture style and symbolization as well asmore technologically a dvanced institute methods and materials that the Indians adapted to their own straightway or modified to fit their own social andcultural constructs. While the British held deep admiration for the ancient Indian culture and its relics, including architecture, even to the point of maintaining much of its unique traditions and aesthetics, they both introduced new philosophies, symbolisms, technologies, materials, and building methods to the Indians. These new ideas and elements that the British brought to Indian architecture essentially changed not only the gen whilel appearance, but also the meaning, function, andhow architecture was viewed by the Indians and British alike.Before 1947, the understanding of Indians art and architecture was still colligate to how they perceived their role within British imperialism. However, after India independent they cute to illustrate that India had a living artistic tradition, although the natives were unaware of it, and they considered it t o rescue it from oblivion. In their determined effort to rescue Indias artistic past, people started to develop their own standards for judging and categorizing Indian arts and crafts. Collecting art specimens and organizing them according to scientific principles was driven by the 19th century British pre-occupation with division and classification, amplify in the colonial context by the desire to fathom the form of Indian culture. More im portantly the classification of arts and architectures were tied directly to economy. However, the British intervention was necessary to set India on a rectify prospective.LanguageFirst was the language, many Indians were conversant with the incline language, because the British colonialists mean to export their values and culture by teaching the Indian macrocosm their language. This has brought huge benefits for future development in India after its independence.For the economy, most of companies during post-colonization era still engaged in outsourcing business which trading with European and America. nigh English skill bring them better quality work and more work opportunities. Meanwhile, more businessmen and traders were attracted to India for investment because of the economical labour, good serve and communication. Lot of benefits for native people who could speak better English in trading with each and other.LawSecondly, the British annexed many princely states and formed laws and policies of their own. Slowly but rapidly the entire Indian subcontinent came under the British rule. Although this had met with dissatisfaction and resentment by most of Indians, it still made contribute to Indias future development.Law in modern India largely based on English common law because of the long period of British colonial influence, and mingled legislations first introduced by the British are still in rig in modified forms today especially on improving womens rights in India.Urban DevelopmentBritish ruled in India fo r almost three hundred years, and in the year 1600 British came in India. Then they start to settle in India. Because of global spice trading, most of them firstly settled in the coastal city. During the settlement, British brought lots of their technologies and rules onto this land. Most of them are appeared in the port cities. iodin of most famous port city in India during post-colonial era was Bombay.By middle 19th century, the British introduced the railways, telegraph and postal inspection and repair in Bombay. This great instruments, the railways, postal services signifi fag endtly affected the developmental course of modern India. These technologies increased quality of peoples community and social life. One of great railway station building in India that still can be found nowadays is called Victoria Terminus in Bombay. precedent to the railway age, Bombay had become an important port-city and administrative affectionateness. With additional economic and universe growth happen in Bombay after Indias independent, the demand of residential and industrial lands start to increase. This made Bombays site start to extend from the coast into centre India. The footprint of the city development is followed by the railways route.EndingTrade in India in the present day involves less nationalistic qualities than it did in the past. Spice growers now export their products through their own organizations or through exporting houses. Spices are now distributed by food manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers. With the advances in technology and science, too, the spices are now able to flourish in other parts of the world with similar climates as India. There is no longer the problem of having to conk halfway across the world to obtain spices. The abundance of sources and the absence of influences from profit-hungry nations make for the affordable prices we see every day in grocery stores. However, the spice route played a significant role for Indias developmen t.Quite marvellous in its incomparable neo-classical lordliness stood the Bombay Town Hall. The Greek Doric hunting lodge of its commanding temple-fronts undoubtedly turned eyes for its international outlook. Posted by

Read More…

Why are so many Malaysians from Penang settling in Hong Kong?

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 Why are so many Malaysians from Penang settling in Hong Kong? HONG KONG (SCMP): When Cheah Cheng Hye left his hometown of Penang in northern Malaysia in 1974 for a higher paying job with The Standard newspaper in Hong Kong, his plan was to stay a few years until he saved enough money to buy his family a house. Unable to afford a flight, Cheah – 20 at the time – travelled to Hong Kong on a cargo ship. These days he is the proud owner of a BMW with a special licence plate that reads “Penang”. He is also the founder of one of Asia’s largest independent asset management firms, Value Partners. Like Cheah, many Penangites have left in search of greener pastures as part of a nationwide trend that has seen an estimated 1 million Malaysians living and working abroad. The diaspora has increased rapidly since the 1980s and continues to rise, according to the World Bank’s Malaysia Economic Monitor. About 15,000 Malaysians now live in Hong Kong, according to the Consulate-General. Though the Consulate does not record what state they come from, Penangites are widely thought to be the largest group in the city. “Better career opportunities, higher income and quality of life are decisive factors influencing Malaysians who leave,” said Hwok-Aun Lee, a Senior Fellow with the ISEAS – Yusof Ishak Institute in Singapore who studies labour and social policy in Malaysia. As in the case of Cheah, whose move meant an immediate 500 per cent pay rise, the higher salaries Hong Kong has to offer have long been a beacon for Malaysians seeking to work abroad. Chess Yip first came to Hong Kong in 1987 to work as a flight attendant. Now, more than 30 years later, she has returned to the city to work as a service associate at a Southeast Asian restaurant. “Like many others, I came for economic reasons,” said Yip. But what drew her back to Hong Kong was something different. “It is so much more diverse and global, more cosmopolitan,” said Yip, now a mother of two teenage sons. A year after she first arrived in Hong Kong, her childhood sweetheart joined her, though they returned to Penang in 1999 to raise their children. “I always wanted to come back. I liked Hong Kong because I found it very organised and the people are much more straightforward, kind of like me,” she said. The two cities also share a common past. George Town, the capital city of Penang, was founded in 1786 by Francis Light as a free port for the British East India Company. Its location along the Malacca Strait made it a popular landing spot for immigrants from all over Asia and particularly southern China. “For some older Penang Chinese, there are strong cultural links and family links too,” said Cheah. “People from these two places can instantly recognise many similar elements,” he added. But when the state’s free port status was revoked in 1969, its economy took a hit. Today, George Town’s laid-back lifestyle and its Unesco World Heritage Site in the city centre draw in the tourists but are less attractive to professionals, who find the city lacking in career opportunities. “Until 1985, Penang had more college graduates than Kuala Lumpur but not as many jobs, so Penang exported skilled labour to the nearby British colony of Hong Kong,” said N. Balakrishnan, an entrepreneur who was educated in Penang and spent more than two decades in Hong Kong. Balakrishnan says the similar colonial history means the two places share professional and business standards based on the British model, making it easy for those in accounting, medicine and law to work in Hong Kong. “After five years in medical school and another year’s residency in the hospital, you’re used to the system,” said 61-year-old Philip Beh, an associate professor of Pathology at HKU. For him, staying in Hong Kong after completing medical school at the University of Hong Kong was a no-brainer – and not just because he married a woman from Hong Kong. However, Beh had another, more pernicious reason for leaving – he was 11 when the bloody May 13 race riots between ethnic Chinese and Malays broke out in 1969, mainly in Kuala Lumpur, where Beh was studying at the time. Urban areas with larger Chinese populations were also affected, including Penang and Malacca. The riots led to the death of 200 people, according to official records, but unofficial accounts from Western diplomats put the death toll higher, at 600. Most of the dead were ethnic Chinese. “After that, everything changed. As a Malaysian Chinese, suddenly you realise you’re not welcome anymore,” Beh said. Following the riots, the government at the time proposed the New Economic Policy in 1971, an affirmative action plan meant to eradicate poverty, particularly among the Malays who were forced into making a living through subsistence agriculture under British rule. Fleeing Discrimination Under the NEP and later the 1991 National Development Policy implemented by Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad during his first stint in power from 1981 to 2003, the ethnic Chinese and Indians living in Malaysia began to face increasing discrimination in Malaysia. Many chose to leave, sparking worries of brain drain in the country. In 2010, then Prime Minister Najib Razak’s promise to undo race-based affirmative action policies was embraced by many non-Malays, but he later backtracked on the pledge. Hwok-Aun Lee says the dashed hopes for reform of many Malaysians, particularly Malaysian Chinese, may further fuel the brain drain. “This is what I would call a vicious loop of hollow promises and overzealous expectations,” said Lee. “The failure of the country to have a candid, measured and critical conversation on race-based policies further polarises Malaysians and perpetuates this cycle of false promise and dashed hope.” Whether the new government will be able to reverse the current exodus of talent, Lee thinks those that left are likely monitoring developments at home before making a decision. “Returning home carries more weight because it is more permanent, and also may entail financial sacrifice,” said Lee. The World Bank’s Malaysia economic monitor estimates almost 90 per cent of the Malaysian diaspora in Singapore are ethnic Chinese. From that, Lee says, it can be deduced the percentage of ethnic Chinese in the global Malaysian diaspora is disproportionately high. However, the discrimination and lack of opportunity faced by Chinese Malaysians has also made them more resilient, says Gan Khai Choon, who co-chairs the Malaysian Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong and Macau with Cheah Cheng Hye. Ethnic Chinese make up most of the population on Penang Island – Penang state also includes Seberang Prai on the Malay Peninsula – according to the last census in 2010. “They’re more hungry, more flexible and more hardworking,” said Gan, who is also from Penang. “It is a fact of life that Malaysians, and Penangites in particular, are probably the best employees at a management level,” said Gan. Gan also says people from Penang have an added advantage over other migrants – they come from a state which is home to several of Malaysia’s oldest schools, including the Penang Free School, founded in 1816, as well as Convent Light Street School, the oldest girls’ school in Penang, founded in 1862. This has led to Penangites becoming globally competitive, and in Hong Kong, many of them find a place in multinational corporations, law firms and as faculty members of Hong Kong’s universities. Yet despite their successes, the people of Penang who have found their fortune in Hong Kong remain loyal to their hometown, Gan says. “You feel a sense of belonging to Malaysia. In fact, some of us are even more passionate about Penang than those living in Penang,” said Gan. Cheah Cheng Hye agrees. “There are a number of social causes that have benefitted from the flow of money sent home by Malaysians living in Hong Kong,” he said. Hong Wrong? Hong Kong, however, also has its drawbacks. Chess Yip notes the rising cost of living in Hong Kong is making it harder to save money. Cheah says overcrowding and air pollution are other negatives. Indeed, some people turn to Penang as an escape from Hong Kong’s high costs and crowded streets. Many who have worked in Hong Kong for years return to seek comfort and luxury in the streets of George Town. Mariam Lim, originally from the mining town of Ipoh in Perak state, northwest Malaysia, has retired comfortably in Penang after working in Hong Kong as a human resources manager for multi-national corporations for 11 years. “When I was working in Hong Kong, I always had to remember to leave for a Hong Kong antidote,” she joked. “I love Penang, my friends are here, the people are nice and it’s culturally very rich. My family isn’t too far away either in Kuala Lumpur and Ipoh, I didn’t have second thoughts about coming home,” she added. Lim’s sentiments are shared by Hongkongers looking for a quieter place to retire, and the Malaysia My Second Home scheme, which grants foreigners 10-year visas to live in the country, has made Penang one of their top choices. Some of them are retired Hong Kong policemen, who declined to be interviewed, wanting to keep a low-profile. “Initially I thought I would promote Kuala Lumpur when I was asked by my Hong Kong clients where to stay in Malaysia, but they like Penang,” said Sam Choong, a lawyer who works with applicants of the Malaysia My Second Home scheme. “It’s a dream for them to have a more tranquil, holiday island style life and they have more space,” said the agent, who has offices in both Penang and Kuala Lumpur. Lorinna Gehrig, who was born and raised in Hong Kong but married a Swiss husband, first made her way to Kuala Lumpur, before being convinced by people at the Embassy of Switzerland in Malaysia to retire in Penang. “When I first arrived in Penang, we were staying at the Eastern & Oriental hotel and sitting outside looking at the Malacca Strait, it felt like Hong Kong 40 years ago,” said Gehrig. “And I was thrilled to hear the Indians here speaking fluent Cantonese,” she gushed. Gehrig has been living in Penang since 2007. Property prices were a huge draw for her. Along with an apartment, she and her husband Stefan Gehrig bought a row of heritage shophouses in George Town, where they have invested in a cafe, a boutique hotel and an art gallery. “For the same price, I can get a place 10 times the size of a Hong Kong property,” she said. She also appreciates how accepting Penangites are of her mixed marriage, saying: “No one looks at us strangely here.” For the Penangites that have left, their hometown continues to call to them. Pathology professor Philip Beh, who has been away from Malaysia for more than 40 years, finds himself dreaming of Penang’s world-famous cuisine. “My taste for the food never diminishes,” he said. While Cheah Cheng Hye insists he can never fully retire from running his company, he hopes to spend more time in Penang. “When world-class opportunities in cities like Hong Kong, London and Singapore are available, it is hard to resist when we’re younger. But I think Penang has a good environment, apart from a few traffic jams here and there.” – SCMP Posted by

Read More…

Vivacious #Vrindavan (Iskcon Temple)

Stories of a family on travel spree March 29, 2019 familialwanderlust 2 Comments on Vivacious #Vrindavan (Iskcon Temple) Vivacious #Vrindavan (Iskcon Temple)
What do you do if you haven’t bought a present for your wife’s birthday? You pray to the Lord, right! Well that’s what I did and got the answer…take her to Vrindavan. And thus we were on a yet another impromptu program…having only a day to spare and not much vigour to drive down for longer duration to any distant location. Since past few months, my wife’s colleague was inspiring her to go to Vrindavan. Having not visited Vrindavan, even though we were only at a stone throw away distance in Delhi, we thought to give it a try this time.
And thus began our search for a hotel. A frantic search on Tripadvisor returned some interesting results. There are not many chain hotels in Vrindavan except for Sarovar Portico and Country Inn. Having had an average experience at Country Inn, Corbett Park earlier, we decided to try Sarovar Portico this time. After inquiring at Sarovar Portico, the quote provided was INR 3800 for a Deluxe room with additional INR 1000 for extra person, my 10 year old son. The package included breakfast. Since we had to travel by our car and I had read some reviews on Tripadvisor which mentioned that the hotel only has parking for 20 cars, I inquired if the hotel would have enough parking to accommodate my truck. Some previous visitors to Vrindavan had mentioned on Tripadvisor that weekends could be very crowded in Vrindavan and parking is generally a problem even in hotels around then. Since we were scheduled to reach Vrindavan on a Friday, there were chances we were in safe zone. We were, however, informed by friends who had earlier visited Vrindavan that there are enough paid private parking spaces in Vrindavan where cars can be parked overnight. The guy at reception of our hotel later told us that now paid parking is a preferred revenue stream for people of Vrindavan and anyone who has vacant piece of land creates a paid parking where one can park vehicles. So just in case you visit on a weekend and the hotel is unable to oblige with parking space, you have the option of parking your car at any of these paid parking space. Most of these parking spaces are near the temples but there are enough e-rickshaws and three-wheelers plying in Vrindavan to help you move within the city. Thankfully, our hotel replied that they have ample parking space, which was a welcome relief. 1. The Journey
Unless you commence your onward journey from Delhi early in the morning, you are bound to be caught up in a traffic pile up at one or the other choke-points within Delhi. Due to some professional commitment of my wife, we planned to leave for Vrindavan around 1 pm on a Friday. The route taken was Ring Road – Baba Banda Singh Bahadur Setu – Noida – Greater Noida – Yamuna Expressway. Due to a traffic pile up on Ring Road, it took us almost 1.5 hours to touch Yamuna expressway, though the drive after touching Banda Singh Setu was smooth. One advice – plan your journey to beat the surprise pile-ups in Delhi and preferably start early.
I would say Yamuna expressway is one of the smoothest super highways in India and probably one of the few where you can put your car into cruise control. You would find many empty stretches on the expressway, probably because it is a heavily tolled road (monetarily only, mind you!) and all free-riders generally prefer the old Delhi-Mathura road (via Faridabad) for their journey. The speed limit on the expressway is 100 kmph and there are speed sensors placed throughout the expressway so be cautious before you press that right foot down. The wide empty road is very tempting but one has to be mindful of the speed limit while driving. Also, the road is cemented and hence your tires could heat up as you go fast – worn out tires run the risk of bursting and so for your safety it is advisable to keep your horses (read bhp) in check.
The total journey time, right from origin point, for us was around 4 hours, including a snack stop-over of 30 minutes. The one-way toll charge up until Vrindavan is INR 275. You can also take a return ticket if you plan to return within 24 hours, though I don’t think one would return within 24 hours from Vrindavan. There are some good eateries on the expressway in case you suffer from the customary “Dilli-e-Belly”. No, I am not referring to the Delhi belly as foreigners popularly know it, I am referring to a “believe me you are hungry” sensation, which a true Delhi wala experiences as soon as someone mentions Chole Bhature, Butter Chicken or Raj Kachori in a casual discussion. But believe me, those empty stretches on expressway do induces a feeling of emptiness in one’s stomach. Just before the Jewar toll gate (around 40 kms down the Yamuna expressway), you would find Starbucks, Subway and Highway Masala. There’s a ‘Dhaba’ restaurant as well, which might have a menu to give you the Delhi-wali feeling. I haven’t seen the menu of the Dhaba so in case, the menu lets you down, I am not to be blamed. I happily treated myself to Double Choco Chip Ice cooler at Starbucks rather than testing the outer limits of of my stomach. A fellow traveler enjoying his coffee..this is what your happiness looks like when you satisfy your Dilli-e-belly!
Rest of the journey was uneventful. One needs to take exit 7A to go to Vrindavan onto a double lane road that takes you through a typical village road setting with agricultural fields flanking the road on both sides. However, at some points on the road you would see modernity merging into simplicity of a small town/village as you would see billboards announcing “Paragliding” vociferously.
I didn’t have the courage to explore paragliding options, especially on hard plains, and thus I didn’t delve deep into the where, how and who of paragliding. But as they say – in India, everything is possible and you would find interested audience too. There are many local dhabas (eateries) on the way to Vrindavan as you take the exit 7A and you can try some local food (strictly vegetarian).The journey time to reach the hotel would be 20 minutes to once you take the detour at exit 7A.
A piece of advice – For return journey, you would have to cautiously decide your time of departure. For us, while returning, the road (Sri Kripalu Ji Maharaj Marg) leading to Yamuna expressway (marked below) was closed around 12 noon by the local police, probably due to some religious procession.
Someone told us that it is a regular feature around that time. Thus, one would have to time his/her departure precisely in consultation with someone having local intelligence, such as the hotel front desk. We were told that the blockade would run until 12.30 pm but we decided not to take our chances and headed back to the hotel to gather information regarding any alternate route to reach Yamuna expressway. If you ask the locals, they would suggestion to take the old Mathura-Faridabad road. Thankfully, we consulted the hotel front desk and were suggested another route (marked in picture below) to reach the link road leading to Yamuna expressway.
The alternate route runs from the hotel southwards through Hotel The Royal Bharti. One would have to take a left turn at a T-point after passing Royal Bharti and then it is a straight run (after crossing a circle) until you reach a flyover. Take a u-turn to go up the flyover and voila! You are on the link road to Yamuna expressway. Had we trusted the locals on the road, we would have struggled on the old Mathura-Faridabad road, which as I said earlier, is crowded as opposed to the relatively deserted Yamuna expressway.
As soon as you touch the expressway in your return journey, within next 20 kms or less, you would see a bunch of eateries on your left. There are different eating options – non-veg and veg, North/South Indian and Italian (read Pizza hut and Costa Coffee) and Bikano cafe. 2. The hotel
Moving next to our place of stay, Sarovar Portico is apparently at one end of the city, probably the outskirts. This is evident from the fact that you can see wide roads and relatively lesser traffic. You can trust Google maps to reach the hotel as the location is precisely marked therein. Once near the hotel, you can see the towering structure of the hotel from a distance, probably because there is lots of open space in the vicinity. In particular, there are open fields flanking the hotel building (as can be seen from windows) and this is the closest you can get to nature in this otherwise semi-arid area. View from hotel View from roomBeautiful fountain at the entry gate
To us, the parking space appeared sufficient to accommodate more than 20 cars contrary to as someone pointed out on Tripadvisor. There’s ample space near the hotel gate well guarded by hotel security and thus parking should ideally not be a problem. This is how the vehicles are parked within the hotel premises: Parked cars along the boundary of the hotel inside the premises. Judge for yourself how sufficient it is
The front-desk area and lobby has an opulent feel with a lingering fragrance of Rajnigandha flowers that announces that you are in Lord Krishna’s presence. Portraits of Radha adorn the walls of the lobby area, thereby creating a mini Krishna-leela environment. I would let the pictures do the talking as words probably won’t be able to do justice to what one would actually feel. The check-in process was smooth though a bit time consuming because of many check-ins happening around the same time. As I said weekends are the busiest days and I could already feel that. We were told that all rooms are non-smoking ones. So if you are the one who needs a fag every now and then, only God (anyone except for Lord Krishna) can help you here.
The room allotted to us was spacious with all basic amenities – king size bed, wardrobe, air-conditioner, huge windows for enabling ample natural light to seep in and most importantly – free Wi-Fi! The bathroom was spacious with operational shower and hot & cold water supply, and a shaving mirror too. Yes, shaving mirrors are a luxury unless you are at a 5-starred hotel, and to get it in a semi-luxurious hotel in a small town in Uttar Pradesh, I was truly feeling regal. Here are some pictures of the room (please don’t mind the mess – the pic is of the next day around our check-out and is a pure reflection of how much of a relaxed holiday we had) and the bathroom.
Since we had an extra guest – my son – I was told at the time if check-in that an extra bed would be placed in our room at night. To our surprise, the room service person arrived with a mattress and no bed! Upon inquiring, I was told that the hotel has limited beds and since the hotel was running to its full capacity, there were no extra beds available. So if you need an extra bed, I would suggest ordering one immediately when you check-in so that you don’t have to hear that excuse. We did not take the mattress as we didn’t want our son to sleep literally on the floor. Probably, this is one thing that the hotel needs to take care of quite seriously. I had booked at least 3 days in advance and they would have roughly known the extra guests in all the rooms in their hotel on a particular date, and thus could have sourced extra beds accordingly.
Here’s the look of the clean gallery on our floor – do note that hotel boasts of more than 60 rooms.
The hotel has a single restaurant – Tripti – that serves delicious vegetarian food. And when I say vegetarian it means one without any onion and garlic –‘Braj ka khana’ as the poster at the entrance of the restaurant announced. We thought of giving Tripti a try for dinner. Buffet dinner is available @ INR 550/head and the menu, at least when we had dinner, included Indian cuisine with some Chinese and continental dishes.
The restaurant is not very big and we realised this during breakfast time the next morning when all residents descended upon the restaurant at the same time and all hell broke loose. There were people all over the place – some were standing because all tables were occupied and no body was following queue system. It was chaotic and the pooris were vanishing as soon as fresh ones were being replenished in the basket. Even though I would say that staff was not sufficient to handle huge crowd situations, unfortunately, it was the unruly behaviour of the revellers that made the entire situation unpleasant. There were people shouting at the staff for poor/slow service without realising that it was chaotic because there were more people than the place could accommodate. The sad part – even when they could see that there’s too much chaos, still people continued to pour in making the situation worse. The staff was still trying their best to placate the cranky guests but the hotel definitely needs to put some crowd management processes in place to handle such situations.
Having said that, the food was delicious. Breakfast menu had North Indian – Poori suzi, Aloo paratha – and South Indian – Idli, Vada – options apart from the usual stuff – Vermicelli, Bread, Muffins, tea, lassi and shakes.
The best part of the food is that it doesn’t settle down forever in your stomach – the food is light and can be best described as homely.
Also, just in case you stuff in your stomach to the brink, the hotel has a well-equipped gym and a kids-play room. The kids-play room was not operational when we were there. Gym at the hotel
Moreover, there is a small garden at the back of the hotel. The garden looked beautiful but the entry to the same was closed, the reason for which was not known. Looked like a good option for a morning stroll, provided it is operational. 3. Things to do at Vrindavan
If you ask any local for suggestions regarding what to see in Vrindavan, he/she would spell out – Prem Mandir and Iskcon Temple (owing to their vicinity to the hotel), Banke Bihari Temple (somewhere around 2 kms from the hotel but in old city) and Govardhan (a drive of 25 kms from the hotel). Since it was a weekend, we were pre-warned that it would be crowded on roads and we had the first hand experience of that when we went for our first excursion in evening.
I was too young in my earlier visit to Vrindavan and back then Iskcon temple was primarily known for foreigners who would roam about the temple premises dressed as a devout Hindu performing Aarti and chanting hymns. If I remember correctly, the temple was known as ‘foreigner wala temple’. So this time when I was back in Vrindavan after almost 25 years, I thought of taking my family to this unique temple.
Since the place around temple is very crowded and there are not many parking spaces just near the temple, it is not advisable to take your car. We took an e-rickshaw from the hotel for INR 100 and he dropped us at gate no. 1. We were fortunate to have reached the temple somewhere around 7 pm, the time of the evening Aarti. But since it was Aarti time, there was a huge crowd at gate no. 1 waiting to get in. Generally, you won’t find best of security arrangements at such religious places, especially ones which are not under a security-threat and thus, if you have a family member who gets perturbed by huge (unmanageable) gatherings, better enter the temple through gate no. 2 (at the rear side). Just ask the flower vendors outside the temple, who would be happy to guide you to gate no. 2, which is less crowded.
True to its history, as I knew it, we could still see many foreign origin Krishna disciples chanting and dancing unabashed while being deeply engrossed in their bhakti. You can take your mobiles within the temple premises but photography is generally prohibited especially in the inner sanctum. We did manage to click a few photographs seeing that people were clicking photographs despite the prohibition signage. Thinking that I may not be back here for next 25 years maybe, I took a risk and clicked one photograph of the inner sanctum. It was mesmerizing watching people so deeply engrossed in chanting as if there was no one around. Have a look at some of the beautiful moments I could manage to capture within the temple premises The cookie Prasad The inner sanctum at the time of evening Aarti
The temple premises also has Swami Prabhupada’s samadhi built within a grand complex. But I didn’t dare take a photograph of that as again it was prohibited and I truly respected that. However, if you wish to buy some souvenirs to take back home, here’s something you can sample: A cute Radha-Krishan souvenir – made of cloth and hence it is very light to carry back home. Price – INR 350
We came out of the temple at around 7.45 pm and it had already become quite crowded outside. We had planned to visit Prem Dham temple on our way back to hotel but unfortunately, due to swelling crowd at Prem Dham temple’s entry gate, we thought of giving it a skip. Here’s an outsider glimpse of the temple: Prem Dham temple
To conclude, I would just say that it is always good to explore your spiritual side at some point of time. Even if you are not a strictly religious person, it could be a great experience seeing how people who were not born in this country or within the Hindu faith, have devoted their lives to Krishna.
Go to Vrindavan at least once and experience first hand as to why Hinduism is called a ‘Way of Life’. Advertisements

Read More…

How I Use Instant Pot for Japanese Cooking

Instant Pot is my partner in the kitchen for cooking authentic Japanese dishes like chawanmushi, Japanese curry, Japanese-style potato salad, and many others.s It speeds up the cooking time without sacrificing the quality and authenticity of the dishes. That’s why I love my Instant Pot and want to show you today how I use it in my daily Japanese cooking.
Chawanmushi (Savory Egg Custard)
If you looked up Instant Pot recipes on the web, you’re most likely get an infinite result. Undoubtedly the multicooker has been a life-changing kitchen appliance to legions of people out there. From the universally loved spaghetti bolognese to the classic Indian butter chicken, there seem to be the Instant Pot versions for us who want to save time.
The truth is there are yet too many Japanese Instant Pot recipes out there, and I know you’re probably curious how I use the gadget for my daily cooking. For the latest & final installment on my 3-part Instant Pot series, I will talk about how I use my Instant Pot in my daily Japanese cooking and what I cook with it.
In case you missed, here are the first two parts:
5 Reasons Why I Love My Instant Pot Which Instant Pot You Should Buy
Cream Stew (White Stew)
Instant Pot for Japanese Cooking As I get older, I crave more and more for washoku dishes that I grew up eating – rice and a wholesome range of seasonal ingredients. These classic Japanese dishes are my kind of comfort food. Many of them are simmered dishes or nimono (煮物), which include beans, dried foods, and root vegetables.
To prepare these dishes on the stovetop, it can be rather time-consuming and labor intensive. I sometimes wish they are much easier to cook! However, with the help from the Instant Pot, cooking homestyle Japanese food have gotten a whole lot easier and so much FASTER. And my stress level for feeding a family of four has gone down significantly.
If you’re not familiar, a typical Japanese style meal includes rice as a main dish, one soup, and 3 side dishes (it’s called Ichiju Sansai 一汁三菜), usually with 1-2 simmered dishes. Yeah, talk about elaborate. It’s no simple feat to rustle up Japnese dinner every day, especially if you’re a working parent.
With the Instant Pot, I plan out my preparation in a way that I can work on the main dish or other dishes while the Instant Pot handles the cooking of a laborious dish. I make sure to cook many large portions (see more Japanese-style meal prep dishes ) so I can store whatever leftovers in the refrigerator or freezer and serve the different dishes throughout the week. Home cooked Japanese food accomplished with minimal effort and smart planning!
Takikomi Gohan
Before we move on to what I cook with the Instant Pot, I think it’s also important to know the Pros and Cons of the Instant Pot cooking.
Pros and Cons of Pressure Cooking Pros
Shorten cooking time into 1/3 of time (great for brown rice, a big chunk of meat, tendons, meat with bones). The meat falls off the bone easily and bones in the fish become tender and edible Save on electricity To cook simmered dishes with the traditional stovetop method, you have to stand in the kitchen for a long time to keep checking on the food. I can never leave the kitchen! Now I can just walk away once I turn on the instant pot, and leave my kitchen to do other stuff. I love that I can start cooking dinner as late as 5 pm instead of 4 pm.
You may need some initial testing but once you get the idea of the timing, you are good to go. Take your kids to karate practice or clean the house with the extra free time; Instant Pot got you covered.
Cons
Tender/softer vegetables cook too fast, so some vegetables need to be added in later (or leave out for better consistency). Cannot open the lid in the middle of cooking (to add tender vegetables or skim the scum). Flavors may not be well absorbed just because the meat is tender. Some vegetables may lose nutrients due to too much pressure. Can’t cook leafy greens and food that requires crunchy/crispy texture like Kinpira Gobo (Burdock Root) and Kinpira Renkon (Lotus Root) . Hard to control the seasonings while cooking. Now, this seems like a long list of cons, but they have not stopped me from cooking my dinners in the Instant Pot. I learned to work around the problem by cutting vegetables in bigger chunks and by choosing the right type of ingredients for pressure cooking. In fact, it has empowered me to cook more at home instead of resorting to takeout or eating out.
Chikuzenni (NIshime)
How I Use My Instant Pot So what type of Japanese dishes do I make with my Instant Pot? Here are some of our favorites on Just One Cookbook:
Kakuni (Pork Belly)
1. Big Chunk of Meat One of the key strengths of the Instant Pot is cooking meats to tender perfection in record time. Before owning the Instant Pot, I rarely cook Japanese dishes that call for big chunks of meats, but now I enjoy making a variety of recipes by leveraging on the pressure cooking feature of the multicooker.
Short Ribs Steamed Pork Kakuni
Oden (Fish Cake Stew)
2. Stews + Soups Seriously, if you love soups and stews like I do, it’s a strong enough reason to get an Instant Pot. When you can cut down cooking time at least in half, it means you get to make and enjoy your favorite dishes regularly.
Japanese Curry Oden (Fish Cake Stew) Japanese Cream Stew Sapporo Soup Curry
Black Beans (Kuromame)
3. Dried Beans Cooking dried beans used to seem like an extravagant use of my time, but now it’s something I can tackle with ease. The Instant Pot has the ability in cooking beans from dry in a short time and the result is always so tender and flavorful. Instead of buying the canned stuff, I have started to cook more homemade red bean paste to make delicious sweets and snacks for the kids.
Red Bean Paste (Anko) Black Beans (Kuromame) Soybeans (to make Miso)
Nikujaga (Meat & Potato Stew)
4. Root Vegetables From daikon, gobo (burdock root), renkon (lotus root) to carrot, Japanese cuisine features a lot of root vegetables in our daily meals. Instant Pot is particularly suited to cook these root vegetables, making healthy home cooking a possible task to conquer.
Nikujaga (Meat & Potato Stew) Chizukenni/Nishime Japanese Potato Salad
Beef Tendon Stew (Gyusuji Nikomi)
5. Tendons It usually takes a painfully long time (3 hours!) to tenderize tendons. With the Instant Pot, it can be cooked perfectly within 30 minutes.
Beef Tendon Stew (Gyusuji Nikomi) 6. Whole Fish Flounder (Karei カレイ), mackerel (Saba 鯖), horse mackerel (Aji アジ), red snapper (鯛), sardine (Iwashi イワシ ), and Pacific saurey (Sanma 秋刀魚) are great to cook in the instant pot. Just within 15 minutes, the whole fish including bones are nice and tender. Fish bones cooked in a pressure cooker are soft and edible, great for extra calcium! I’ll share the recipe when I get some good fish.
Steamed Rice
7. Rice It usually takes 90 minutes to cook short-grain brown rice in a rice cooker and 30 minutes on the stovetop. Instant Pot makes it the fastest with 20 minutes. Compared to short grain white rice, the cooking time for brown rice is significantly longer, therefore I like cooking brown rice in the Instant Pot. I love the Mocchiri (モッチリ) texture, or mochi-like texture, of brown rice cooked both in the Instant Pot and donabe (Japanese earthenware pot). I’ll share the recipe soon!
Japanese Curry
Top 3 Dishes I Made Most Using Instant Pot for the Past 3 Months It had been cold and rainy in the past 3 months, so I made these dishes with my Instant Pot most frequently for my family.
Japanese Curry Oxtail Soup Chawanmushi (Savory Egg Custard) Another favorite of ours is Pulled Pork , which I make a big batch and used in tacos, donburi (rice bowl), and sandwich!
Instant Pot Kabocha Flan
Have you tried cooking Japanese recipes with Instant Pot before? Do you have a favorite? Are there any specific recipes you’d like me to share? I’d love to hear from you!
Disclosure: This post is sponsored by Instant Pot . All opinions expressed are my own, and I only work with brands and products that I personally use and thoroughly enjoy. Thank you so much for supporting the companies that keep Just One Cookbook going.
Sign up for the free Just One Cookbook newsletter delivered to your inbox! And stay in touch with me on Facebook , Pinterest , YouTube , and Instagram for all the latest updates.
from Merah Hati Cintaku https://ift.tt/2COoBC9
via MerahHatiCintaku.blogspot.com

Read More…

The LaLiT Resort & Spa Bekal- Just Right for Romance this Spring

Legend has it that Kerala was the land reclaimed by the Sage Parashurama, an avatar of Lord Vishnu, when he flung his sacred axe into the sea. This could be one of the reasons this beautiful land is referred to as God’s Own Country.
This moniker could also be an acknowledgement of the natural bounty and the breath-taking beauty that the state has been blessed with. With the verdant greenery on the one hand and the azure waters of the Arabian Sea lapping at its shores on the other, it is no surprise that Kerala is one of the top tourist destinations in the country and draws visitors from all over the globe. It is the perfect place to enjoy romance and solitude, to indulge in a rich culture, and to appreciate the beauty of Mother Nature in all her pristine glory.
This is the ideal vacation spot you have been looking for to stage a weekend getaway from a feverishly hectic city life.
The Beauty of Bekal
The beauty of Kerala’s beaches is legendary. The Bekal beach in the heart of Kasaragod, however, is a class apart. The towering and imposing Bekal Fort, built in 1650, and on the other hand the sprawling golden sandy beach that beckons, is spectacular in its own right. The Bekal Fort is the largest in Kerala and rises about 130 feet above sea level. What makes Bekal all the more special is the River Nombili that snakes its way through this luxuriant and breath-taking region. The lagoon overlooking the beach has relatively calm waters making it ideal for a stay in the houseboats and enjoying the golden sunsets.
The rich, dark green of the coconut groves and the thick foliage around the LaLiT Resort and Spa Bekal will transport you right into the land of your dreams. The mystic Nityanandashram Caves, the Bekal Hole Aqua Park, the serene Ananthapura Temple, and the stately Chandragiri Fort are all places to explore with your beloved when you visit this town.
Why the LaLiT Resort & Spa Bekal? The LaLiT Resort & Spa Bekal, one of the best beach resorts in Kerala , is spread over an area of 17,000 square feet. The property is located in the most scenic part of Bekal and operates 38 large and luxurious suites that guests find delightful. Apart from 3,500 square feet of conference and banqueting space that can host corporate retreats, weddings, and other special occasions, the LaLiT Resort & Spa Bekal offers numerous sports and recreational activities for its guests. The multi-cuisine restaurant and bar at the resort is a favourite with the guests.
The LaLiT Resort & Spa Bekal has received many accolades for its warmth, its services, and its beauty, including the top 10 romantic resorts in the world by Condenast.
In 2017, The LaLiT Resort & Spa Bekal was ranked “best beach property” by the Outlook Traveller Awards. In 2018, it received “outstanding 5.0 out of 5 ‑ 2018” award from Hotels.com.
Just Right for Romance If you have been unable to shake off the routine and rigmarole of everyday life and spend quality time with your significant other, a romantic getaway at the LaLiT Resort & Spa Bekal must be one of the things you do right away.
It is ranked among the best resorts in Kerala for honeymoon . Rent a secluded gazebo or riverside tent with your own personal chef and butler, and spend all the time in each other’s company appreciating the mesmerising sights of the Nombili, the sun, the sand, and the surf. Plan candle light dinners on a full-moon night by the outdoor pool, and rekindle the romance in your life. The large outdoor pool is perfect for a late-night swim with your partner.
Refresh, Relax, Rejuvenate
One of the best kept secrets of Kerala is the Ayurvedic detoxification system called Panchakarma which is a combination of massages, healthy food, and rejuvenating therapies. The best place to indulge yourself and your partner in such Ayurvedic aroma and beauty therapies is the Rejuve at The LaLiT Resort & Spa Bekal. Rejuve received the GeoSpa AsiaSpa Award for the “best Ayurvedic spa & wellness center” both in 2015 and 2017.
Indulge in beauty and weight management programs and couple’s massages with medicinal herbs, coconut oil, aromatic oils, and sandal wood paste in this luxurious 13 room spa. There can’t be a better way to unwind with your loved one and recharge yourself. Complementing the health-oriented treatments from Rejuve are the health-food options at the in-house Kerala restaurant, Nombili.
At Home on a Holiday
While we all want to get away and take a vacation the first chance we get, we do miss the comforts of home. The warmth and cordiality of the service at the LaLiT Resort & Spa Bekal Kerala Hotel will make you feel right at home on your holiday. Nombili, the in-house restaurant, named after the river that flows throw Bekal, is the perfect place to experience the delights of gourmet cuisine without having to enter a kitchen.
Breaking the myths of health-conscious foods being bland, the restaurants offers nutritious but scrumptious multi-cuisine meals. If you are a gourmand and a connoisseur of regional cuisine, this is the perfect place to sample the very best of Kerala’s seafood, prepared the authentic way. This, however, is not all. You may opt for a variety of cuisines – from European to Asian to North Indian at the Nombili Restaurant.
The outdoor Nombili bar is a poolside extension of the restaurant and stocks some of the best wines and vintage spirits available in the country.
Kerala Special
What is a trip to Kerala without enjoying the rich cultural heritage of the South? The LaLiT Resort & Spa Bekal organises regular cultural performances for the guests. These include ancient dance forms such as Kathakalli, Kuchipudi, Bharatanatyam, Theyyam and Mohiniyattam. Most of these are based on musical renditions of legends and tales from the Ramayana, the Mahabharata, and the Puranas and the experience of watching these heart rendering performances is always an impassioned one. If you are in Bekal on a festive day, you may also get to see one of these performances in the open courtyard of the Ananthapura Temple.
The resort also arranges for short stays on a boathouse in the nearby backwaters. This is one romantic experience you must not miss out on, particularly if you are at Bekal on a full-moon night.
What’s More? The LaLiT Resort & Spa Bekal offers a host of activities and experiences for its guests. From fishing in the lagoon to kayaking and canoeing on Nombili River, and water sports along the beach – if you are up for adventure, it’s yours for the taking. If you are planning to take a peaceful break you can opt for yoga and meditation sessions on the resort grounds. Take a helicopter ride from the in-house helipad to catch a bird’s eye view of the stunning vistas and beautiful skyline across the Arabian Sea.
The LaLiT Resort & Spa Bekal Hotel in Kerala is a family-friendly property. Your kids will enjoy the playroom and children’s activities available in-house and stay completely secure. Do not forget to check out the herbal garden at the Rejuve, which is shaped like a human form and grows herbs that are specifically used to detoxify and cure ailments.

Read More…

Blog #5: Culinary Cultural Appropriation

abril 1, 2019
Por Carlin Pappas
Food has always been a way for cultures to define and differentiate themselves, each cuisine comprised of ingredients and spices that lend to its own unique identity. For example, Indian cuisine relies heavily on the use of turmeric, while Italian cuisine uses oregano. But the question over ownership of a particular food sparks and interesting debate over culinary Culinary cultural appropriation is the act of adopting culinary practices of one people or society by members of another and typically more dominant people or society. Trade and globalization have led to the colonization of foodscapes.
In Portland, Oregon, Kooks Burritos was forced to shut down after accusations of stolen recipes and The situation over the burrito cart, operated by two white women, has left many to question ‘ who ’ exactly has the right to represent the food of a different culture or country. Chef Rick Bayless.
Chef Rick Bayless, a white guy from Oklahoma, is considered one of the premier experts on Mexican food in the US, with restaurants in Los Angeles and Chicago. His cooking is so highly regarded that he cooked for former Mexican President Felipe Calderon during his visit to the White House in 2010. According to Bayless, many of his critics have said that by virtue of his race he “can’t do anything with Mexican food” (NPR, Godoy & Chow). However, he calls the criticism “plain racism.” Instead, Bayless says his cooking aims to promote the “greatest cuisine on the planet.”
Bayless, who is bilingual and has spent years traveling through Mexico and studying the regional cuisine, explains his love for Mexican food “comes from a deep understanding” of the food and culture. But, realizing what his critics mean when they critique his cooking is instrumental to the debate around culinary What Bayless fails to recognize is his own privilege in the kitchen as a white male. According to Francis Lam, “An American-born chef is more likely than an immigrant to have the connections and the means to grab investors or news media attention—even more so if the chef came up through a prestigious restaurant or culinary school.” Bayless has the privilege of returning from Mexico to the United States after each visit. To him, cooking Mexican food isn’t a necessity but an economically-beneficial luxury. He is able to profit off of the recipes that represent lived experiences of the Mexican people. Although he admits that his relationship to Mexican food comes with some restrictions (acknowledging that since his name is non-Hispanic, he cannot mess with the food very much), he still neglects to understand his own advantage in his exploitation of Mexican cuisine. While I do think that people of different races have the right to cook foods that are not ‘ethnically theirs,’ it is important that one remembers their own privilege in the process of the cooking as a way of avoiding complete appropriation of a cuisine or culture. Cooks like Bayless should be cautious when equating their culinary experience to those of the people from which their recipes are borrowed. Trejos Tacos at USC Village. Cava at USC Village.
Bayless is not the only culprit in culinary Students at Oberlin College expressed their dissatisfaction with the university’s dining halls. Banh Mi, a traditional Vietnamese sandwich, served at Steven Dining Hall used ciabatta bread, pulled pork and coleslaw instead of French baguette, grilled pork, pate, pickled vegetables and fresh herbs. One student asked, “How could they just throw out something completely different and label it as another country’s traditional food?” In an attempt to provide a large number of people with food at a cheap cost, many universities fall in the trap of translating international plates to an American public as a façade of offering a ‘diverse array of cuisine’ Personally, I have not eaten at a USC dining hall since my freshman year, however, I see the same thing happening at my sorority house. At least once a week, the menu will boast an international-themed meal. For example, this week for dinner the menu has ‘Chicken Teriyaki, Asian Veggie Stir Fry, Potstickers, Egg Rolls and Fruit Cobbler’ listed. Simply labelling something as another culture’s cuisine—in this case, calling rice with vegetables “Asian Veggie Stir Fry”—is a blatant example of culinary cultural appropriation and translation. Similarly, many of the restaurants in the village, like Cava and Trejos Tacos, advertise Mediterranean and Mexican fare, respectively, but such titles are subjective towards a largely American audience. Trejos Tacos would not be considered Mexican cuisine to someone from Mexico, but to someone who has less exposure to Mexican food it may be all they know. Even Trader Joes sells ‘Asian Stir Fry,’ which is comprised of a mix of vegetables. The name in itself implies
Columbising is the process of “discovering” something that has existed forever. It is taking something that does not belong to you, claiming it as your own and introducing it to a new demographic of people. When Lucas Peterson wrote an article on Timoteo, an Elote Man in Lincoln Heights, he was accused of columbising. However, ‘Elotegate’ brought an influx of people to Timoteo’s business and encouraged people outside of his immediate community to try foods that they may not have been familiar with. Food writing is a great way to raise awareness around cultures and different culinary practices. I believe that Peterson and Professor Portnoy’s writing does not appropriate Latino culture, but rather raises awareness around the many different types of cuisines. Writing about food not only benefits the cook, but the consumer. It increases visibility and popularity for marginalized communities. Wes Avila of Guerrilla Tacos.
Over the semester, I have enjoyed writing about my own experiences visiting a variety of Hispanic establishments. I have liked learning about how cooks have adapted and evolved their own recipes to fit the landscapes in which they operate. For example, Wes Avila of Guerrilla Tacos uses influences from his California roots and applies modern twists to traditional tacos. I believe that there is a fine line between cultural appropriation and culinary experimentation. When cooking, it is important to remain genuine to yourself and wary of exploiting other cultures. It is ok to cook another culture’s cuisine, but important to remember your privilege and background and be mindful of culinary exchange as to avoid appropriation, either intentional or unintentional. Share this:

Read More…

The Best Restaurants for Business Lunch in London

Originally posted on https://www.capitalalist.com/best-restaurants-for-business-lunch-in-london/ London is home to exquisite restaurants typifying the stylish and modern flair of the city. With a backdrop of sophisticated dcor and high-quality cuisine, many London restaurants are revered as ideal places outside of the office to entertain clients, to close business deals and to have intimate meetings covering important business decisions. Capital A List is your guide to the best restaurants for business lunch in London .
Galvin La Chapelle has a prime city location just off Bishopsgate, and is one of the best restaurants for business and entertaining clients. It is the third restaurant opened by Chris and Jeff Galvin, following the success of Galvin Bistrot de Luxe and Galvin At Windows .
Galvin La Chapelle is lavishly designed inside a Grade II converted Victorian chapel. Its interior dcor matches its grand exterior with its high-vaulted ceilings and wall arches, as well as its spacious and open floor design. Its opulent design aesthetic is injected with elements of modernity seen in its glass enclosed seating area raised above of the rest of the dining space, an ideal restaurant to have a business meeting in London.
The seamless juxtaposition between traditional and new luxury is also carried through in its contemporary French cuisine that has earned Galvin La Chapelle a Michelin Star. Highlights on the menu include its signature lasagne of Dorset crab with creamy beure blanc and pea shoots, as well as the wild sea bass served with cockles, sea beets and oyster.
Galvin La Chapelle offers businesses the best location for business and to inspire and impress clients with rich and opulent French cuisine and interior design.
City Social , located in the heart of London’s financial district and on the 24th floor of the iconic skyscraper Tower 42, can be classified as one of London’s best restaurants for business lunches, meetings and dinners. Its sleek and professional dcor inspired by art deco is complemented by the clean finishing of wall-to-ceiling windows showcasing panorama views of London’s landmark skyscrapers, including the iconic Gherkin and Heron Tower. The best seats are against the windows with deep and curved leather booths creating private and quiet corners for intimate business meetings. City Social also has two private dining areas with their own private entrances allowing business clientle private rooms to discreetly celebrate their successes or to host corporate events.
The head Chef, Paul Walsh has worked closely with the Michelin star chef, Jason Atherton to curate creative yet simple dishes showing the finer-side to English cuisine. On the menu includes the traditional English Shepard’s pie, cooked salmon fillet lightly poached and served with a salad of fennel and celeriac and rich Lobster accompanied by chips cooked in duck fat and garnished with tomato puree.
With the backdrop of the stunning city skyline, and equally fantastic dishes, City Social offers a location suited to both quick business lunches and dinners, as well as luxurious spaces for more formal business events.
Take a glass elevator to the 38th and 39th floor of Heron Tower, and you will find yourself walking into the natural oasis of Sushisamba . Sushisamba embraces an earth-to-sky motif adeptly captivated in its 360-degree panoramic views of London, and bamboo latticed ceiling draped with hanging lights and living plants and flowers.
Sushisamba is iconic for its intercontinental fusion of Japanese , Brazilian and Peruvian cuisine, design and music. With a trio of appetisers, guests can experience Peru with the proffers cancha seviche, a collection of crunchy corn kernals dipped in a sharp citrus-based dressing. The Brazilian influence is seen in the fish taquitos, and lastly Japan is represented in the green bean tempura spears with a pot of black truffle aioli.
Sushisamba has recently reintroduced their Omakase menu, making it one of the best restaurants for business lunches. This is a set menu including crispy yellowtail taquitos, sea bass tempura and wagy gyoza with smoked emulsion and heritage carrots. The menu is ideal for business clientle that wish to have a quick meal in a stunning environment, as it is based on the Japanese tradition of letting the chef select your order. For big business functions, large platters at 45 each can be ordered and feature five different meats, including grilled hanger steak, rib-eye, pork tenderloin and chorizo and linguica served with chimichurri.
With the interior reminiscent of a greenhouse adorned in living foliage, and a sophisticated ambience evoked by artwork inspired by the 20th century, Sushisamba is the best restaurant for any business occasion.
After 21 years of serving high-quality cuisine and earning two Michelin stars for 15 consecutive years, The Square in Mayfair is considered a must have in any business diary. It all started with Phillip Howards, co-owner of the popular The Ledbury and Kitchen W8 in Kensington, and the humble idea to merge seasonal produce with modern French cooking techniques.
The Square is no stranger to the tides of change, and recently re-opened under the umbrella of MARC , a restaurant group which includes the two Michelin star The Greenhouse, and the Private Members’ Club, Morton’s . The Square has always been sleek and sophisticated, but with its recent refurbishment reflected in its large-scale modern paintings and leather banquettes, it has only elevated its interior design to incorporate modern and minimalistic elements suited to low-key business meetings and lunches in London.
Lunch dining is one of the main priorities at the Square, owing to its central location to business clientle, and is expedited in the form of two set menus including a three-course meal and six-course tasting menu reasonably priced at 37 and 60 respectively. Courtesy of Head Chef, Clement Leroy , the simplistic and light features in the dcor are complemented beautifully with the contemporary French cuisine. The crisp violet artichoke served with confit quail egg and parmesan ice cream, and roasted veal sweetbread with squid, black truffle and pomelo are two highlights on the set menus.
The no-fuss interior design and atmosphere, coupled with a central Mayfair location and straightforward set lunch menus, prove why The Square is and will always be one of the best restaurants for business lunch in London.
For a taste of Hollywood standard cuisine, there is no better location than Cut , located at 42 Park Lane. Cut is one of 20 fine dining restaurants opened by the celebrity chef, Wolfgang Puck, best known as the talent behind the feasts at the past 23 Oscar Award ceremonies.
Cut is an elegant destination for business, and delivers Hollywood glamour in its plush leather sofas, marble flooring and high-raised ceilings. It softens the dark interior with wooden panelling and slatted windows bringing in beautiful views of Hyde Park and much needed light into the rooms. It has luxurious table arrangements and semi-private booths, suited to the needs of an exclusive business clientle, including Michael Morley , head of wealth management UK at Deutsche Bank.
Cut is an American-styled steakhouse, and each of the starters, side dishes and sauces cluster around steak as the main focus. Guests can expect to spend between 40 190, and can select tasting plates of American, British and Australian sirloin, as well as Shanghai lobster infused with Asian spices and a classic and rich Japanese wagyu steak.
Cut’s prime location in Hyde Park, and its sophisticated and Hollywood inspired cuisine and interior have catapulted this restaurant onto our list of the best restaurants for business lunch in London.
Step back into time and enter one of the grand cafs of old Europe at The Delaunay in Covent Gardens. This up-scale caf is the creation of Chris Corbin and Jeremy Kings, following the success of the Wolseley ; a similarly inspired European caf located in the heart of London.
The opulence featured in classic European style is echoed in The Delaunay’s mix of green leather banquette seating, dark wood panelling, black and white marble floors and antique mirrors. The table arrangements are spaciously divided among the restaurant creating a classy and comfortable environment for business.
The Delaunay is divided into a caf, bar area, main dining room and also has a counter serving savouries, cakes, coffees and takeaways. Each room, as well as the menus have been especially designed to allow for all-day dining. On the menu, guests can select from a variety of European-inspired dishes, with breakfast options including the Viennese with a spread of smoked ham, salami, gouda, boiled egg and rye bread, and the Viennoiserie with strawberries and cream doughnut. Lunch and dinner dishes include four different types of schnitzel, five types of wurstchen, as well as an array of Crustacea dishes.
The Delaunay is a place where guests can experience elegant surroundings, and excellent food at any time of the day, and for this reason it is classified as one London’s best restaurants for client meetings , be it for breakfast, lunch or dinner.
With over a century of experience, Bentley’s Oyster Bar & Grill is one of our top picks for the best restaurants for business lunches and dinners in London. It first opened in 1916, and is still located in the very same old Victorian building in Mayfair, just off Regent street. It has become a favourite of Linda Jackson , the CEO of Citroen, and with its interior and cuisine remaining as sophisticated and polished as ever, it is not difficult to understand her choice.
The atmosphere is classic and celebratory, and is encapsulated perfectly at the original marble oyster bar where oysters are shucked with theatrical speed. Oysters are inherently a must have, whether it be freshly shucked, cooked Vietnamese-style or garlic baked. Oysters start from 2.50, and are recommended to be followed by a classic combination of battered and fried fish and chips. For guests looking for a richer and more refined dish, there is also a selection of caviar dishes to choose from, as well as the perfectly grilled langoustines and scallops served with a plate of broad beans, crispy pork, parma ham, toasted cashew nuts and blood orange.
Two private dining rooms, seating between 14 60 people are also available for private events, and serve as another important reason for why Bentley’s Oyster Bar &Grill is one of the best restaurants for business lunches and dinners in London.
With an iconic South Bank location overlooking St Paul’s Cathedral and the Thames river, OXO Towers is on the list for the best restaurants for business lunch in London. Its stunning city views are only enhanced by the vibrant live Jazz and piano performances, that can be enjoyed both inside the restaurant and outside on its 250-foot terrace.
For quick business lunches and meetings, OXO Tower accommodates with an express lunch menu for as little as 18, available from Sunday Friday. Into the evening, guests can opt for a tasting menu, priced between 85 130, including six courses and a paired glass of wine, expertly selected from their list of over 800 wines. Whether it be a business lunch or dinner, OXO Tower delivers the same level of exquisite cuisine, incorporating delicacies from all across the globe. The Scottish scallops and Chateubriand steak and a Korean-style roast duck leg with spring onion pancake and kimchi are two highlights.
Located in the converted Grade II-listed Westminster Library, is one of London’s most popular and grand restaurants, The Cinnamon Club . It’s old-school members’ club atmosphere, evoked in the bookshelves lining the main dining room as well as upstairs gallery, is one of the iconic features making The Cinnamon Club one of the best restaurants for business lunch in London. The intimate lighting, dark wood panelling and spacious table arrangements add an additional layer of sophistication to the formal dining space, creating the ideal environment for business.
The uniqueness of the interior dcor is complemented by innovative and nouvelle Indian cuisine that focuses on game and fish-based dishes. With a team of 18 chefs, headed by Vivek Singh , the dishes are layered with complex and intricate flavour profiles and stunning presentation, which ultimately justifies the premium price of about 75 per meal. The Cinnamon Club delivers on its promise of curating imaginative dishes with its tender milkfed lamb, which is exclusive to the restaurant. It also displays a knack for re-inventing classic Indian cuisine with its popular tandoori wild Spencer Gulf king prawn dish flavoured with coconut ginger sauce, and also in its Old-Delhi-style butter chicken on the bone.
The Cinnamon Club also prepares feasting plates, making it one of the best restaurants for business lunch in London on a larger scale. At the table, guests are presented with a whole rack of Romney Marsh Lamb which is carved and served table-side. The Cinnamon Club is also an expert with mixology, and with its three-tiered walnut gin trolley, formal business dinners can become more fun with a cocktail or two.
Located in the converted terrace space of The Bloomsbury Hotel, is the elegant and poetic Dalloway Terrace . It is one of the best restaurants for business lunches in London, with its secluded and intimate location hidden behind a line of hedging and just minutes from the bustling Oxford Street and Tottenham Court Road. It is a perfect and cosy indoor-outdoor terrace space, offering a calm oasis, with intimate candlelit rooms decorated with foliage climbing the walls and hanging from the ceilings.
The menu has been devised by head chef, Hans Louis, and offers plenty of British favourites including fish and chips and rabbit stew. The food is simple, yet decadent in flavours and presentation, with daily specials including crayfish mac and cheese and grilled poussin. Other highlights on the menu include the Dublin Bay prawn cocktail with Marie sauce, as well as other fish options including a plate of seared tuna with soy and ginger dressing.
Dalloway Terrace also has a wide selection of meat and vegetarian options seen in its European steak tartar, Aberdeen Angus dry-aged beef and classic burger and club sandwiches.
Dalloway Terrace offers all-day dining, located in a secluded secret garden terrace. It is one of London’s best kept secrets, and offers its clients an intimate and quite break away from the office, making it one of the best restaurants for business lunch in London including meetings and dinners.
London has a plethora of restaurants perfectly suited to business needs encompassing sleek and elegant interior design, private and intimate dining spaces, and complemented perfectly with sophisticated, and world-class cuisine. Here we have delineated the top restaurants in London, that are the best for business, be it for a quick morning business meeting, or a longer business meeting, lunch or dinner.

Read More…

9 Best Restaurants in King’s Cross for 2019 (London)

April 1, 2019
By now, you must’ve heard about the super-gentrification of King’s Cross. I still remember power-walking 10-15 minutes up a very quiet York Way to reach my forever-unfurnished student apartment back in 2009 every night, with every inch of my skin oozing with paranoia. The area was dark and pretty deserted back then – I suppose that’s why I could still afford it.
But so much has changed in the last 10 years. Now there’s so much more to do in King’s Cross. In fact, I could hardly recognise the streets when I ventured up York Way for a fitness class at Frame recently. With that, also comes a portfolio of great restaurants: varying from cheap to expensive, great value to extremely refined . Things to do in King’s Cross
Plus, here are a handful of other activities to keep you busy around King’s Cross: Walk on Regent’s Canal (it’s a short walk to Camden Town or Regent’s Park) Visit the Canopy Market (it’s pretty small, but cute) Shop trending boutique stores at Coal Drop’s Yard Have a quick bite from KERB Markets at Granary Square (Wed-Fri at 12-2pm only) Visit Frame for short/fun fitness classes Check out Rebel Studios if you’re a hardcore yogi (one of my favourite boutique studios in London) Best Restaurants in King’s Cross
I love exploring London in its entirety. But with the abundance of impressive restaurant choices in Kings Cross itself (where I live), it’s hard to overcome the temptation to just stay put in the area.
Here are the restaurants near King’s Cross you need to try. There’s a range of nice and more casual choices. Scroll to the bottom to see them on a map. Kubenedictus – Ox Cheek Eggs Benedict at Coal Office, Kings Cross Seabass Chraime from Coal Office, Kings Cross 1. Coal Office – Refined Food, Israeli (Brunch/Dinner)
Coal Office is one of the newer additions to King’s Cross and it’s definitely one not-to-miss. Their dishes are creative and refined; primarily inspired by the Israeli-Mediterranean cuisine. You can expect a pretty sophisticated brunch meal and I imagine it would be an excellent place for dinner too. It’s also perfect for a small celebration dinner with friends or your partner.
Spend per person: GBP30 per person (for brunch, without alcohol) Ricotta Hotcakes – Granger & Co Kimchi Fried Rice w/ Soft Shell Crab – Granger & Co 2. Granger & Co – Australian Brunch (Brunch/Coffee)
With all the new areas developed in King’s Cross, Granger & Co still manages to remain top of mind for me. This brunch spot is one of the older-new restaurants in the area, but still manages to constantly attract a queue (30-45 min wait) on the weekends. They make the most unforgettable ricotta hotcakes (featured in 5 Exceptional Pancakes You Need To Try in London ) and also an irresistible kimchi fried rice with soft shell crab.
Honestly anything I’ve ordered here has always been really good.
Spend per person: GBP20 for brunch/lunch Vegetarian Full English Breakfast at Half Cup, London Brunch spread at Half Cup, featuring Smashed Avocado and Smoked Salmon on Charcoal Sourdough 3. Half Cup – Brunchy Coffee Shop (Brunch/Coffee)
For something a little more unique to King’s Cross, try out this independent cafe’s very extensive (also very “Instagrammable”) brunch offerings. Half Cup is a cozy coffee shop, which is very casual. Their full breakfast is full of everything you’d ever want for breakfast – they also do a truly excellent vegetarian version . It’s satisfying and so delicious. It’s just that the wait on weekends can also be 30-45 minutes.
Spend per person: GBP15 for brunch and coffee Spanish Croquetas – Barrafina Spanish Tortilla – Barrafina 4. Barrafina – Spanish Tapas (Dinner)
“What’s your favourite restaurant?” is the king of hard questions. But I never hesitate to mention Barrafina as one of them. It’s one of the restaurants I’ve re-visited the most number of times in London – in fact, I first mentioned it almost 3 years ago in 8 of London’s Must-Visit Restaurants for first timers. They impress with: 1) delicious food (obviously), 2) use of excellent quality ingredients, and 3) extremely consistent standards.
Their new outlet in Coal Drops Yard, King’s Cross, definitely lived up to expectations, and comparable to their original Soho branch.
Spend per person: GBP30-40 for dinner All-you-can-eat Chinese Hot Pot – Chilicool Restaurant 5. Chillicool Restaurant – Legit Chinese Food and Hot Pot (Dinner)
Chinese food is the cure to my homesick-ness. While Chinatown is an obvious answer, given the abundance of choice there, Chillicool in King’s Cross is so underrated.
The place is so authentically Chinese , they refuse to take card (haha) – so make sure you bring cash. But honestly, the food is excellently legit. They make great comfort food dishes like ma-po tofu. They also offer an all-you-can-eat hot pot for just GBP22 per person, and the ingredients are pretty good. (Because it’s so legit, it’s also extremely casual.)
Spend per person: GBP15-20 for regular dinner, GBP25-30 for hot pot Lamb Chops – Dishoom Chicken Tikka – Dishoom 6. Dishoom – Casual Indian (Lunch/Dinner)
There’s also a Dishoom in King’s Cross! Dishoom is a chain of very affordable, good quality Indian food . I think it’s hard to go wrong here – almost everything I’ve tried has been simply flavourful and delicious. My only frustration is that they don’t take reservations and you have to wait in line.
Spend per person: GBP15-20 Burrata with Seed Pesto – Casa Tua Ragu Pasta – Casa Tua 7. Casa Tua – Cozy Italian (Lunch/Dinner)
This small Italian restaurant is tucked away on a much quieter street, but surprisingly still very close to King’s Cross station (3-min walk). You can expect a cozy wine-bar ambience . They serve simple shared plates and pastas. It’s nothing overly fancy, but great for a laid back dinner for a small group or casual date.
If you venture a teeny bit further, another Italian restaurant I love is actually in Highbury & Islington: Trullo (click for the full review).
Spend per person: GBP20 Lunch at Pitted Olive, Kings Cross 8. Pitted Olive – Authentic Greek Cafe (Lunch only)
Pitted Olive is more of a cafe than restaurant, but they serve an epic and authentic Greek lunch . They usually have a range of main dishes (think stuffed peppers, grilled chicken leg etc), which is served with their delicious selection of mezze sides and rice. They also home make their pastries, which are equally irresistible. A huge lunch meal here would cost about £8-9. They also only take cash.
Spend per person: GBP10 for lunch Vegetarian Pizza – Pizza Union 9. Pizza Union – Cheap/Fast Pizzas (Lunch/Dinner)
Finally, another impressively cheap but delicious meal in King’s Cross can be found at Pizza Union. Their pizzas cost about £4-5. They’re made with a thin crust, freshly baked and not-too-greasy . It may not be the best pizza in London , but it’s simple and great value-for-money. I also love the hip industrial decor and bright lights during the day. At night, it draws in a very student-centric crowd – I guess thanks to their also-very-affordable cocktails!
Spend per person: GBP5-8 for lunch What’s your favourite restaurant near King’s Cross?
I’m sure I missed many other great options in this area, and I would love to try more. Which restaurants would you recommend?
Leave a comment below!

Read More…

Israel’s tourism triumphs BDS: The air bridge – Israel National News

Main OpEds Israel’s tourism triumphs BDS: The air bridge Israel’s tourism triumphs BDS: The air bridge
Traditional Jewish-American travelers from Miami to Seattle must now compete with Silicon Valley techies, Chinese students, Indian tourists, East European Christian pilgrims, and diverse businessmen from across the planet. Edwin Black, 02/04/19 08:39 | updated: 08:27 Edwin Black INN:EB Edwin Black The writer is the New York Times best selling investigative author of “IBM and the Holocaust”, and his just released book, “Financing the Flames: How Tax-Exempt and Public Money Fuel a Culture of Confrontation and Terrorism (Dialog Press).” He can be reached at www.edwinblack.com. More from the author ►
The virulently anti-Israel movement known as Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions—BDS—is roiling through campuses, overflowing into city councils, encroaching into corporate boardrooms, and now chomping at the essence of Israel’s special niche in the world: its travel and tourism industry. Everywhere, the boycotters have been asking to isolate Israel. BDS even convinced Airbnb to stop listing Jewish locations in Judea and Samaria—also known as the’ West Bank’ (a term invented after Jordan invaded in 1948, when the UN’s partition suggestion failed to create two states). In Ireland, a bill advancing through Parliament may criminalize visiting the old city and even purchasing lunch or a keepsake.
Whereas similar boycotts against other countries have inflicted withering effects on national economies, in Israel—it simply hasn’t worked. The opposite is true. Yes, boycotters are busy demonizing Israel. Yet despite this, Israel’s tourism industry has rocketed to a singular triumph and now employs tens of thousands. Flights are packed and new non-stops are being added across the globe. Even though new luxury hotels are going up as fast as the Mideast sun will dry concrete, rooms remain in high demand and, thus, are scarce and expensive. Israel has become world famous for creative cuisine and trendy eateries; so if you want to get a table at the most popular restaurants, you’ll need to book weeks in advance.
Travel and tourism to Israel have dramatically changed. It’s not just synagogue sisterhoods and Jewish organizations. Swelling up from Israel’s “Start-up Nation,” world famous top chef culture, and hard-won penetration of markets beyond America and West Europe, as well as its sophisticated travel industry burnishing, Israel is now a destination for the entire world. Traditional Jewish-American travelers from Miami to Seattle must now compete with Silicon Valley techies, Chinese students, Indian tourists, East European Christian pilgrims, and diverse businessmen from across the planet. The numbers are multiplying.
In 2016, 2.9 million total worldwide visitors visited Israel. By the close of 2018, that number had boomed to 4.1 million —and the totals keep climbing. Within the coming decade, Israel expects to employ 98,000 people in its tourism sector.
When Israeli tourism prospers, so does the Palestinian Arab community. Christian pilgrims make a beeline for Bethlehem. Thus, tourism breeds economic interdependence and strengthens co-existence. When Israeli tourism prospers, so does the Palestinian Arab community. Christian pilgrims make a beeline for Bethlehem. Thus, tourism breeds economic interdependence and strengthens co-existence.
Arrivals stream in from everywhere.
Today, most North American travelers to Israel are not Jewish; they are Christian, often seeking Biblical discovery. From North America, Jews comprise about 40 to 45 percent of the travelers, while Christians generally hover at about 60 percent year to year, according to official estimates. While the Jewish-Christian percentages remain the same, the growth spurt for North America has seen the overall numbers increase by 42 percent since 2016.
In 2009, only 20,000 Indians visited Israel, reports Israel’s tourism office in New Delhi. Some years ago, Israel hosted Indian travel agents knowing that in India, such agents book most of the travel. Reciprocal travel programs tapped such markets as India’s Kerala Christians . Dramatically improved diplomatic relations between New Delhi and Jerusalem combined with thrice-weekly direct Air India Boeing 787 Dreamliner service—which was granted special Saudi flyover permission, saving more than two hours—has created a steady flow of Indian visitors. This year, Israel expects more than 80,000 Indian arrivals, with travel officials working to achieve a further 65 percent increase . That may happen if, as planned, the Israeli film industry entices Bollywood producers to use Israeli locations.
In 2015, only 30,000 tourists visited Israel from China. But when direct flights between Ben Gurion airport and numerous Chinese cities were added, the number more than trebled to 100,000-plus annually. Today, China is Israel’s greatest growth market. Celebrity Chinese chefs are now flown in, and Chinese-speaking guides are easily found.
Air connections are the lifeblood of Israel’s tourism as well as its international viability. Nowadays you can fly nonstop to Israel from numerous North American cities. From New York’s JFK, Delta is launching a twice daily nonstop. From Newark’s Liberty, United also flies nonstop twice daily. From Washington, D.C.’s Dulles, United will soon inaugurate thrice weekly non-stop service. From Toronto, Air Canada offers daily non-stops. From Montreal, Air Canada will fly twice weekly during the summer. From San Francisco, United flies daily, primarily for the surging nexus to Silicon Valley.
North American carriers all compete with El Al , which is by far the dominant carrier linking our continent with Israel—boasting 45 nonstop flights weekly that carry more than 50,000 passengers per month. For many Israel-bound travelers, El Al is the one and only carrier. With the exception of the Jewish sabbath and holidays, Israel’s star-emblazoned national carrier flies day or night, rain or shine, good news or bad news, rockets or not. Its unique extra security, where young security staffers at the airport ask invasive personal questions to evaluate risk, are sometimes viewed as a mix between reassurance, ritual, and a Jewish guilt trip. “You’re coming to Israel? Why now?” Or the classic: “Who do you know in Israel?” Answer: “Everyone.”
Not only can you fly El Al nonstop direct from New York, Newark, and Miami, but now also from Boston, Los Angeles, Toronto, and this summer, from Las Vegas and San Francisco. In spring 2020, Chicago service starts. Most of all, El Al predominantly offers Dreamliner service. On its 747 and 777 fleet, El Al offers Economy Seat PLUS , relatively affordable, spacious, and comfortable—especially in the bulkhead row . What’s more, you can purchase business class check-in at either JFK or Newark for $35–$45, and your travel experience will be delightful. The lounge is restful and stocked with good food and beverages, allowing you await departure in luxury.
Israel’s tourism triumph would not have been possible without airline triumphs as well. That triumph in the skies has finally happened.
Edwin Black is the author of IBM and the Holocaust and a syndicated columnist, who travels extensively, frequently reviewing the hotels he stays in. He personally and independently paid for all aspects of travel mentioned in this series. The author can be found at www.edwinblack.com . ©Copyright 2016 Edwin Black

Read More…

Cuisine Iran Cultural

Cuisine Iran CulturalThe cuisine of Iran is diverse, with each province featuring dish aeriales, as well as culinary traditions and styles, distinct to their regions. It includes a wide admixture of regimens ranging from chelow kabab (barg, koo stick aroundh, joojeh, shishleek, soltani, chenjeh), khoresht (stew that is dispensed with white Basmati or Iranian sift ghormeh sabzi, gheimeh, and others), aash (a thick soup), kookoo (vege disconcert omellettes), pollo (white sift whole or with addition of meat and/or vegetables and herbs, including loobia pollo, albaloo pollo, zereshk pollo, and others), and a diverse motley of salads, pastries, and drinks specific to divergent parts of Iran. The list of Persian recipes, appetizers and desserts is extensive.Herbs ar employ a lot, as is fruit from plums and pomegranates to quince, prunes, apricots, and raisins. The main Persian cuisines are combinations of sift with meat, chicken or fish and or so onion, vegetables, nuts, and h erbs. To achieve a equilibrate taste, characteristic Persian spices such as saffron, diced limes, cinnamon, and parsley are immix delicately and used in some special dishes.RiceIt is believed that rice (berenj in Persian) was brought to Iran from southeast Asia or the Indian subcontinent in ancient times. Varieties of rice in Iran include champa, rasmi, anbarbu, mowlai, sadri, khanjari, shekari, doodi, and others. Basmati rice from India is precise similar to these Persian varieties and is in addition readily available in Iran. Tradition whollyy, rice was most prevalent as a major staple item in northern Iran, patch in the rest of the country bread was the dominant staple.Methods of cooking riceThere are four primary methods of cooking rice in IranChelow rice that is carefully prepared through soaking and parboiling, at which tear down the water is drained and the rice is locomoteed. This method results in an exceptionally fluffy rice with the grains separated, and non stic ky, and in like manner results in a golden rice crust at the bottom of the pot called tah-deeg (literally bottom of the pot).Pollo rice that is cooked precisely the same as chelow, with the exception that after draining the rice, other ingredients are added in layers or sections of the rice, and and then steamed together.Kateh rice that is cooked until the water is absorbed. This is also the traditional dish of Gilan (described in detail below).Damy cooked almost the same as kateh, except that the heat is reduced just before boiling and a towel is placed between the lid and the pot to prevent steam from escaping. Damy literally means simmered.Lunch and dinner (naahaar or shaam)Traditional Persian cooking is done in stages, at times needing hours of preparation and attention. The outlet is a well-balanced mixture of herbs, meat, beans, dairy products, and vegetables. Major staples of Iranian food that are usually eaten with every repast include rice, various herbs (mint, basil, d ill, parsley), high mallow (feta or Persian panir, derived from goat or sheeps milk, and sometimes cows milk), a variety of direct breads, and some type of meat (usually poultry, bang, lamb, or fish). hatch over rice is by far the most popular dish, and the typography of these vary by region. Tea (chai) is the drink of choice on intimately every occasion, and is usually served with dried fruit, pastries, or sweets.You can usually learn tea brewing throughout the day in most Iranian homes. Doogh, a yogurt drink, is also quite popular. One of the oldest recipes, which can decipher its existence back to the time of Persian empire, is khoresht-e-fesenjan, consisting of duck or sometimes chicken in a rich pomegranate-and-walnut sauce that yields a distinctive brown color, most a good deal served with white rice.Chelow kabab (Persian ) is a national dish of Iran. The meal is simple, consisting of steamed, saffroned basmati or Persian rice (chelow) and kabab, of which on that poi nt are some(prenominal) distinct Persian varieties. This dish is served everywhere throughout Iran today, but traditionally was most closely associated with the northern part of the country.It is served with the basic Iranian meal accompaniments, in addition to grilled tomatoes on the side of the rice, and butter on top of the rice. It is an old northern tradition (probably originating in Tehran) that a fond egg yolk should be placed on top of the rice as well, though this is strictly optional, and most restaurants will not serve the rice this way unless it is specifically requested. Somogh (powdered sumac) is also made available, and if desired, only a dash should be sprinkled upon the rice.In the old bazaar tradition, the rice (which is cover with a tin lid) and accompaniments are served first, immediately followed by the kababs, which are brought to the table by the waiter, who holds several spews in his left hand, and a piece of flat bread (typically nan-e lavash) in his right . A skewer is placed directly on the rice and while holding the kabab down on the rice with the bread, the skewer is quickly pulled out. With the two most common kababs, barg and koobideh, two skewers are endlessly served. In general, bazaar kabab restaurants only serve these two varieties, though there are exceptions.The traditional beverage of choice to accompany chelow kabab is doogh, a Persian sour yogurt drink, flavored with salt and mint, and sometimes made with carbonated mineral water.Kabb-e Barg (Persian ) is a Persian style barbecued lamb or beef kebab. The main ingredients of Kabab Barg are fillets of beef tenderloin, onion and olive oil.Kbide (Persian ) is an Iranian minced lamb kebab/kabab which is made from ground beef (usually sirloin), often mixed with parsley and chopped onions.To cook Koobideh, first the meat is minced finely, then onion, salt, and pepper is added. These ingredients should be mixed well together for 15 proceeding until the mixture become smooth a nd sticky. By keeping hands wet, indentations all the way down the skewer are made. At both ends should be pressed firmly to the skewer. The kebabs should be 20 cm (7-8 in) longKhoresht (Persian ), also called Khoresh (Persian ), is the common name of different stews in Persian cuisine which is typically served beside Polow (rice dish). In Persian cuisines there are lots of different Khoreshs found on the different ingredients which are used. In comparison with Kebabs, typically it takes more than time to prepare one of these Khoreshs and for most of them, the key components are their vegetables and not their meat, therefore they can be cooked for the vegetarian people also. Persian Khoreshs have some similarities with typical Indian curries, in terms of prepartion. Iranian stews are different in that they use liberal amounts of saffron to give a very unique and fragrant taste. The most popular Khoreshs are Khoresh Gheymeh, Khoresh Ghormeh Sabzi and Khoresh Fesenjaan.

Read More…