Indonesia as London Book Fair Market Focus 2019

Indonesia as London Book Fair Market Focus 2019

The London Book Fair is one of the global marketplaces for publishers. This year’s fair takes place next week. Each year, the fair chooses one country to be the market focus; this year, that country is Indonesia.
UK-based Monsoon Books publishes books about Asia, and has strong links with publishers in Indonesia. Phillip Tatham, publisher of Monsoon Books, here looks ahead to the Indonesian focus at LBF.
Next Tuesday, London’s Olympia will throw open its doors to an expected 25,000 people from the world of book publishing, hailing from more than 100 countries. Unveiling exiting new titles at this year’s London Book Fair will be around 1,700 exhibitors, and none are more eagerly anticipated than the large contingent from Indonesia, which is London Book Fair’s 2019 Market Focus country.
The goal of the Market Focus is to shine a spotlight on the publishing industry of one country or region and to facilitate more business between the chosen territory and the global publishing community. It is hoped that by participating as Market Focus 2019, Indonesia will showcase its publishers, authors and literary content as well as create commercial and cultural partnerships with publishers from around the world.
Indonesia may have the fourth largest population in the world but the country flies below the radar, particularly in terms of its culture and literary heritage. In comparison to India, where there exists a large body of Indian writing in English, and China, where many works of literature have been translated into English (and many other languages) and published globally, Indonesia does not have the same author recognition, perhaps with the exception of Pramoedya Ananta Toer. It is hoped that global events such as London Book Fair, and Frankfurt Book Fair where Indonesia was guest of honour in 2016, will help to put Indonesian literature on the map.
To that end, twelve Indonesian writers have been sponsored by British Council in partnership with Indonesia’s National Organizing Committee to take part in London Book Fair and in satellite events in London and around the UK. The authors’s ages span the generations, and they were chosen to represent the diversity of Indonesia’s literary sector, reflecting the multiple regions, religions, and genres of Indonesian culture and society. They will participate in a variety of events, such as panel discussions, readings, book launches and seminars. The writers are: travel writer Agustinus Wibowo, whose book When Journey Takes You Home is soon to be made into a film; award-winning author of adult fiction and children’s books Clara Ng; bestselling novelist (and popular singer-songwriter) Dewi Lestari, whose six-volume Supernova series has been adapted into several hugely popular films; Sulawesi-based Faisal Oddang who participated in two international residency programmes in 2018; novelist and academic Intan Paramaditha, whose literary work explores gender, sexuality, culture and politics; poet, novelist and short story writer Laksmi Pamuntjak, whose second novel, The Birdwoman’s Palate , was published by Amazon Crossing; Leila S. Chudori, whose bestselling first novel, Home , has been translated into six languages; poet, essayist and esteemed cultural critic Nirwan Dewanto, who has twice won Indonesia’s top literary award for poetry; Norman Erikson Pasaribu, whose first collection of poetry, Sergius Seeks Bacchus , will be published in the UK in March 2019 by Tilted Axis Press; Reda Gaudiamo, whose collections Tentang Kital (About Us) and The Adventures of Na Willa are published in the UK by The Emma Press; Seno Gumira Ajidarma, well known as a consistent advocate for free speech and freedom of expression in Indonesia; and comics artist Sheila Rooswitha Putri, who references everyday urban life in Jakarta.
Satellite events will take place in London and throughout the UK for the duration of London Book Fair. Foyles’, a famous British bookshop with a flagship store in central London, will feature an exhibition of Indonesian books in English. London University’s School of Oriental and African Studies will hold a discussion on democracy in Indonesia and how it affects authors. The National Poetry Library will host an evening of Indonesian poets. At the British Library, Agustinus Wibowo, Dee Lestari and Seno Gumira Ajidarma will talk about turning their islands of imagination into stories, novels and narratives. Beyond London, Reda Gaudiamo will present her works at Norwich and Norfolk Millennium Library.
There are scores of Indonesia-related events taking place at the book fair itself … but not all of the events involve books. In addition to Indonesia’s national pavilion, this year Indonesia will also host a Spice Café where visitors will be able to sample Indonesian food as well as attend events relating to the country’s cuisine. Fancy making tumpeng , a cone-shaped yellow rice dish popular in thanksgiving ( slamatan ) ceremonies? Learn about tea and coffee production in Indonesia over high tea? Or sample Indonesia’s tradition soup broth, soto ? The Spice Café is the place to be.
It is hoped that by participating in London, Indonesian publishers and authors will enjoy fruitful meetings with their counterparts in Europe and further afield. Several UK publishers have already published Indonesian authors in advance of the fair and Monsoon Books is proud to announce the publication in June 2019 of two works of fiction by Indonesian authors, which will be ready for viewing at London Book Fair. The two books are: Not a Virgin, by Nuril Basri, and Harvesting the Storm, by John Waromi.
In Not a Virgin , Jakarta teenager Ricky Satria overhears his parents calling him spoilt and discussing how they will send him to live in a pesantren , an Islamic boarding school, to free up a bedroom for his elder brother. Ricky takes umbrage at being called spoilt and decides there and then to enrol himself in a pesantren, both to challenge his parents’ perception of him and to pre-empt his eviction. In this coming-of-age novel, four Indonesian students seek to discover what their future will bring and look for answers to their questions about sexuality, love, religion and drugs. With characters ranging from cross-dressing hairdressers, drag queens and rent boys to fanatic Muslims and mystical martial-arts teachers, the action of this tragicomedy moves between an Islamic boarding school and a gay bar in Jakarta, and in so doing illuminates the mindset and yearnings of a new generation of Indonesians.
John Waromi’s Harvesting the Storm is set in the coastal regions of West Papua in eastern Indonesia. It tells the story of the Ambai people and their relationship with nature through the friendship of four underwater creatures: Andevavait, the amphibious tidepool blenny; Bohurai, the toadfish; Anggereai, the striped crab and Raukahi, the octopus. When the environment is threatened, the harmony of the creatures that inhabit it is also disrupted. Can the Ambai people stay true to their local wisdom and traditional beliefs in the face of destructive and divisive influences, and protect the balance of nature? In this contemporary fable, Papuan author John Waromi, a member of the Ambai tribe, sheds light on the struggle of Papuans to preserve their ancestral traditions and language, revealing the necessity for man to understand his place in creation. He takes us into a coastal ecosystem where humans, animals and plants must co-exist to maintain the harmonious balance of nature. We witness the dreadful threat of dynamite bomb-fishing upon the underwater environment, and its effect upon all living creatures who depend upon it for survival in this remote part of Indonesia.

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Exploring the Riches of Gluten-Free Dubai

> Exploring the Riches of Gluten-Free Dubai Exploring the Riches of Gluten-Free Dubai By Anna Sonnenberg Published March 8, 2019
Dubai is a city celebrated for its cosmopolitan feel, endless beaches and all-over glamour. A sparkling locale on the eastern edge of the Persian Gulf, Dubai holds a spot on many top 10 tourism lists and even boasts the world’s busiest international airport. It’s hard to believe the city barely warranted mention in travel guidebooks not long ago.
With its impeccable beaches, larger-than-life skyline and world-class cuisine, Dubai is perfect for both urban- and resort-leaning vacationers. But what did this bold, glitzy city have to offer to a history- and culture-loving gluten-free traveler like me? I couldn’t wait to find out and was surprised to find it satisfied all of my needs from the historic to the gluten-free gastronomical. Learn about Emirati culture
The Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Centre for Cultural Understanding is just the place to start, whether you have a little or a lot to learn about the United Arab Emirates and its culture. Located in Bur Dubai, one of the city’s historic districts, the center promotes cultural education with a series of regular events. The cultural breakfasts and lunches are popular but rife with gluten-containing traditional dishes. Gluten-free eaters will likely enjoy the offerings available at the historic tours more.
Sign up for one of the center’s heritage tours, which include a guided walk through Dubai’s Al Bastakiya and Al Fahidi neighborhoods. Cool off with an icy beverage in a shaded café or under the historic wind towers, an early sort of air conditioning in this hot city. Afterward you’ll be treated to Arabic coffee or tea and dates, along with time for questions and answers at the center. If you’d prefer more insight into Dubai’s religious culture, attend one of the center’s daily tours of the Grand Jumeirah Mosque, located on the southern end of the city. Visit the international districts
Dubai is a melting pot in every sense of the term. Only about 15 percent of the population here is native Emirati, while the remaining 85 percent of Dubai’s residents hail from India, Pakistan, the Philippines, Iran, the United Kingdom and the rest of the world. The result is a unique cultural mix that you’ll encounter from the architecture to the music to the food. For a taste of the city’s global appeal, visit Dubai’s international districts centered around Bur Dubai. No matter what’s on your shopping list, there’s plenty of bargaining to be had in Al Satwa and Al Karama. If you’re craving a homelike Indian or Pakistani meal, there are also countless restaurants serving extensive brunches and dinners here. Many are naturally gluten free, but it’s always a good idea to inquire with the restaurant manager.
For a healthy and worry-free lunch in this area, head straight for the modern Dubai International Financial Centre, which towers over the southern end of Bur Dubai. Inside is the Gluten-Free Kitchen & Café, a completely gluten-free shop that focuses on nutrition and wellness. Owner Areej Jomaa has been baking gluten free for many years, and her expertise shines in the wide range of sweet and savory goodies. The quiches and breakfast sandwiches are great for brunch, while the sandwiches and protein-packed salads make for a tasty and healthy lunch. Don’t leave without one of the Gluten-Free Kitchen & Café’s raspberry tarts, chocolate éclairs or my favorite, the raw coconut brownies. Explore the old city
Though Dubai is building a well-deserved reputation for rapid growth and reaching new heights with its awe-inspiring skyscrapers, there’s plenty to see, smell and experience in the old city. Deira, the historic commercial center, is the best place to get a feel for old Dubai.
Here you’ll see alleyways bustling with shoppers, souks or markets, filled with vendors plying their wares and the small blue boats called dhows, moored at the edge of Dubai Creek’s equally blue water. The souks here are the ideal spot to shop for some of Dubai’s traditional goods and test out your haggling chops.
At the Deira Souk, it’s easy to get lost among the narrow passageways, where entire streets are dedicated to particular items such as jewelry or textiles. At the spice and herb souks, for instance, you’ll be greeted by mound after mound of fragrant dried spices, herbs, teas and flowers.
At the gold souk, more than 300 vendors will be ready to sell you everything from gold bracelets to necklaces to crowns. At the textile souk across the creek, you’ll find endless rows of scarves, pashminas and headwear. If you intend to do some serious shopping, it’s best to arrive here with a budget in mind. Of course if you’re just looking, Deira Souk is also a fun place to browse. Marvel at the Burj Khalifa
Though you’ll be able to catch a glimpse of the Burj Khalifa tower from nearly anywhere in Dubai, it’s worth a trip to see the world’s tallest building up close. Get a ticket to go to the top of the tower, and you’ll get to see the city from the world’s highest observation deck.
For a more personal experience, reserve a table at At.mosphere and enjoy a drink at the world’s highest restaurant. You won’t find gluten-free options on the food menu here, so toast with a glass of champagne instead.
The Dubai Mall, a huge shopping center that offers much more than just retail stores, is adjacent to the Burj Khalifa. For a late afternoon nosh, visit Fortnum & Mason, the only international outpost of the U.K. institution that serves a classic afternoon tea.
The gluten-free version comes with your choice of beverage, several tea sandwiches, fresh scones and a selection of gluten-free baked goods. The buttery scones were some of the best I’ve tried, especially with liberal applications of clotted cream and jam.
For a nice sit-down meal after an hour or two of shopping and people watching at Dubai Mall, try Carluccio’s. This Italian chain is based in the U.K. and thankfully has locations all over Dubai. All restaurants have a gluten-free menu featuring everything from antipasti to pasta to grilled meats and fish. The pasta dishes really stand out here, from the Smoky Spaghetti Carbonara to the Frutti Di Mare, with prawns, mussels and calamari in a light garlic sauce.
If you visit later in the evening, you’ll even get to catch the Dubai Fountain’s performance in the mall’s courtyard area, right at the foot of the Burj Khalifa. Yet another superlative, this is the world’s largest choreographed fountain. In the evenings, it puts on an impressive show, complete with music, lights and admiring crowds. Indulge in Jumeirah
Once a quiet expat community in Dubai, Jumeirah has grown into a large coastal area peppered with luxury hotels and white sand beaches. Whether or not you stay in Jumeirah, this is the best place for a swim in the sea or a snooze under a shady umbrella.
Jumeirah Beach features soft sand and crystal clear water, while Kite Beach has plenty of activities for visitors of all ages. Get a kite surfing lesson, join a beach volleyball game or try stand-up paddle boarding. At both beaches there’s also ample space to catch some rays and gaze out at the magnificent sail-shaped Burj Al Arab, a luxury hotel built on its own manmade island just offshore.
Back on land, Madinat Jumeirah is one of the area’s biggest attractions. A sort of contemporary take on an Arab village, this complex has an extensive market that looks like a modern version of the Deira Souk, along with multiple hotels and lush grounds. At the bazaar-like Souk Madinat, you’ll find dozens of shops selling everything from antiques to textiles to handicrafts. In the courtyard you don’t want to miss the sweets at the Gluten-Free Kitchen & Café kiosk or the organic market on the weekends.
One of my favorite Dubai experiences is hidden partway through the maze of Madinat Jumeirah in the Al Qasr hotel. Here you’ll find the hotel’s sumptuous lobby space, Al Fayrooz Lounge.
From the lounge’s outdoor patio there’s a gorgeous view of the sparkling Persian Gulf and the Burj Al Arab. But inside is the real jewel. The atmosphere here is elegant, with local touches like rich fabrics and intricate patterns, gigantic dark-paneled ceiling fans, and comfortable sofas for relaxing with friends and family.
Afternoon tea is a specialty at the lounge, and with just a little advance notice, pastry chef Paul Hayward can prepare a gluten-free tea fit for royalty. From quiches to foie gras tea sandwiches, all of the savory items are perfectly delectable. The sweets, including profiteroles with cream, passion fruit cheesecakes, mango tarts, and scones with cream and rose petal jam, are almost too beautiful to eat.
The absolute star of the show, however, is the miniature chocolate fountain for dipping your fruit, jellies and gluten-free cake pops. For a truly decadent gluten-free time in Dubai, don’t miss the tea at Al Fayrooz Lounge. Ride the dunes
If you’re seeking a little adventure after all that decadence, a trip to Dubai isn’t complete without an excursion into the desert just outside the city.
Opt for one of the extreme dune-bashing rides, which treat the dunes like a natural roller coaster, or book one of the all-encompassing desert safari packages, with camel rides and belly dancing. Some tours are geared toward adults, while others are safe for kids, so if you’re traveling with family be sure to get the scoop beforehand. Take a day trip to Abu Dhabi
If you can spare an extra day during your trip, make Abu Dhabi your destination. Only 90 miles away, the capital of the UAE is a completely different world. While Dubai features nonstop movement, Abu Dhabi moves at a much slower pace.
If Dubai’s speed has taken its toll, Abu Dhabi is the perfect respite. To travel between the two cities, you can easily take a taxi or one of the frequent public buses. For a family, a taxi is the most convenient option, while the bus is a reasonable choice for couples or solo travelers.
The Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque is one of the city’s most fascinating attractions and is the one Abu Dhabi site where I wish I could have spent an entire day. Take a self-guided tour of this massive complex. Your jaw will quite literally drop as you take in the crystal chandeliers, inlaid marble and calligraphy, not to mention the largest carpet in the world. Outside, meditate on the reflecting pools and relax with a wander through the landscaped grounds. Guided tours are also available, and it’s all free.
For lunch head over to one of the nearby hotel restaurants for an upscale gluten-free meal. Inside the Souk Qaryat Al Beri hotel and shopping area, Ushna serves some of the most memorable North Indian cuisine.
Many of the dishes are naturally gluten free, but Chef Sandeep Ail is also well-versed in safe gluten-free preparation. From the almost architectural aloo chaat, a wonderfully fresh potato and chickpea starter, to the dal makhani, a buttery black lentil dish, to the flourless chocolate cake, you’ll have a fantastically flavorful meal with a view of the Grand Mosque.
For an incredible Italian meal try Frankie’s Italian Restaurant & Bar in the neighboring Fairmont Bab Al Bahr hotel. The emphasis here is on deliciously healthy food, and you’ll find separate menus here for gluten-free, vegan and diabetic diners.
Chef Gianluca Cazzin can also easily customize dishes and will wow you with gluten-free versions of creamy polenta with burrata cheese or rich gnocchi with pink sauce. The gluten-free tiramisu is a must for dessert.
In the late afternoon take a stroll along Abu Dhabi’s corniche, the boardwalk that stretches for miles along the beach. It will almost certainly be sunny, but you’ll find shady spots and places to grab a cool drink, along with your choice of beaches. Be sure to take a break and dip your toes into the sparkling waters of the protected bay, just off the Persian Gulf.
For dinner, reserve an early table at Hakkasan, inside the Emirates Palace at the western end of the corniche. An outpost of the original Michelin-starred location, the Abu Dhabi restaurant is an intoxicating mix of traditional Chinese and modern Emirati design. Be sure to ask for the gluten-free menu here, but be assured that Chef Lee Kok Hua is a master at gluten-free Chinese cuisine. Don’t miss the signature Roasted Mango Duck, the marvelously artistic Golden Fried Soft Shell Crab, or the cool Housemade Sorbet. When to go
It should come as no surprise that due to its desert location, Dubai is warm year-round. The temperature is lowest in late fall to early spring, but it’s always warm if not downright hot.
During my February visit the temperature averaged a pleasant 80 degrees. The mercury regularly climbs over 100 degrees from about May to September, though. If you do visit during the summer, rest assured that you’ll find plenty of infrastructure in place to help you stay cool. Dubai’s many shopping malls and Western hotels are well air-conditioned, as is the metro system. How to navigate the city
If Dubai lacks one thing, it’s walkability. While you can wander around in specific neighborhoods, it’s simply not possible to cover very much ground on foot. The city stretches for miles along the Persian Gulf and the Dubai Creek, and neighborhoods either aren’t connected or are just too far apart.
Fortunately transportation in Dubai is affordable. Licensed taxis are plentiful, and you can easily hail one at a hotel or shopping center. The Dubai metro will also take you to all major neighborhoods, and the system is easy to navigate. Where to stay
Dubai has hundreds of hotels, thanks to its booming tourism industry and the city’s preparation for the World Expo in 2020. If you want to experience Dubai at its finest, seek out one of the city’s numerous beachfront resorts, where you’ll find a level of luxury unlike anywhere else. If you’re on a tighter budget, there are plenty of more affordable options, from local inns to international hotel chains.
Live like royalty at Al Qasr, a palatial hotel within the Madinat Jumeirah complex. Designed as a summer abode fit for a sheikh, this hotel is like a luxurious little oasis. Stroll over to the Talise Spa for a beachside massage, take a spin through the waterpark, or do some high-end shopping at the adjacent Souk Madinat. For breakfast request some of the gluten-free delicacies at the hotel’s Al Fayrooz Lounge.
An excellent Western option near Deira, the Hyatt Place Dubai Al Rigga offers friendly and somewhat upscale accommodations with easy access to the rest of the city. The morning breakfast buffet is complimentary for all guests, and you’ll have your choice of about a dozen naturally gluten-free items.
Fuel up for a day of adventures with fresh fruit, raw vegetables, hummus, cheese, scrambled eggs, juice and coffee. Don’t hesitate to inquire with the chef if you have concerns about cross-contamination at the buffet.
Whether you’re traveling for the historical aspects, the futuristic elements, or the luxurious accommodations, Dubai is well worth a visit. You’ll find plenty to keep your family entertained or ample time to relax. With a little advance planning you’ll be able to indulge in Dubai’s multicultural world-class gluten-free cuisine as well.
Learn more about the health and medical experts who who provide you with the cutting-edge resources, tools, news, and more on Gluten-Free Living.

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23 new books by women authors you should read in 2019

23 new books by women authors you should read in 2019 1 of 23
More Than Enough: Claiming Space for Who You Are by Elaine Welteroth Starting at $12.99 ( Release Date: June 11, 2019, available for pre-order ) Becoming the youngest and first black editor of Teen Vogue may be the reason many of you know her name, but it was not the end of her story. After being a transformative force to the publication’s brand, she set out to conquer new goals and any self doubt that tried to convince her she wasn’t enough. Part memoir, part self-help, this read will remind you that you’re enough as well.
The Source of Self-Regard: Selected Essays, Speeches, and Meditationsby Toni Morrison
Starting at $14.99
Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison put her mark on 2019 with the release of her latest book, The Source of Self-Regard. The powerful collection of essays, speeches and meditations is broken down into three parts: a powerful prayer for the victims of 9/11, a searching meditation on Martin Luther King Jr. and a heart-wrenching eulogy for James Baldwin. It even includes some critical commentary on her own works. This is sure to be an excellent addition to any book collection.
Brave, Not Perfect: Fear Less, Fail More, and Live Bolderby Reshma Saujani
Starting at $12.99
The founder of “Girls Who Code,” Reshma Saujani, is back with a book, this time for an older audience. Brave, Not Perfect challenges to women to let go of the quest for perfection they’ve been conditioned to strive for, and learn to embrace failure.
With the Fire on Highby Elizabeth Acevedo
Starting at $9.99 ( Release Date: May 7, 2019, available for pre-order )
Elizabeth Acevedo’s latest book is on everyone’s radar after the success of her first book, The Poet X. In her new book, With the Fire on High, we meet Emoni, a teenager who was forced to go grow up fast after getting pregnant her freshman year of high school and becoming a caretaker for her grandmother.
Queen Bey: A Celebration of the Power and Creativity of Beyoncé Knowles-Carter by Veronica Chambers
Starting at $14.99 (Release Date : March 5, 2019)
Queen Bey celebrates not only the musical contributions, but the cultural shifting power her impact has had on not only women, but society as a whole. The impressive collection of essays includes works from popular cultural critics to outspoken academics.
Zaitoun: Recipes from the Palestinian Kitchenby Yasmin Khan
Starting at $14.87
Food travel writer Yasmin Khan is passionate about sharing people’s stories through food. In this book she explores the complexities and rich tradition of Palestinian cuisine in a way that is at times educational, and at other times relatable to the human core. Feast your eyes on this one.
by Angie Thomas Starting at $7.09
After writing the widely popular The Hate U Give that was turned into a feature film, On The Come Up was highly anticipated by fans. In the book we meet Bri, a sixteen year old aspiring rapper who is the daughter of a late underground rap legend. Unexpectedly she gets a viral hit, which puts her on a controversial roller coaster she never saw coming.
by Helen Oyeyemi
Starting at $13.99 (Released: March 5, 2019)
Londoners may have an appreciation for gingerbread, but for Harriet Lee’s family, gingerbread is like the bridge to their homeland. This lovely book explores a family legacy and shows what happens when the inheritance is not money, but a recipe.
BUY IT NOW>> Gingerbread: A Novel
PHOTO: Amazon
Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversationsby Mira Jacob
Starting at $11.99 (Release Date: March 26, 2019)
Mira Jacob’s latest book tells the story of a half-Jewish, half-Indian six-year-old boy struggling to understand his identity in midst of the tense 2016 election. Acclaimed author Celeste Ng describes this book as, “By turns hilarious and heart-rending, it’s exactly the book America needs at this moment.”
Long Live the Tribe of Fatherless Girls: A Memoirby T Kira Madden
Starting at $11.49
T Kira Madden’s memoir shares what it was like to grow up as a biracial, queer teen in the affluent town of Boca Raton, Florida. Struggling with a host of personal traumas, addictions in her family and destructive behaviors all around her, she finds community in a group of girls who happen to be fatherless.
by Fiona Barton
Starting at $12.99
The bestselling author of The Widow is back with another page-turner. Journalist Kate Waters is on the case when two teen girls go missing in Thailand, creating an international frenzy. As a parent whose son has been missing for two years, this story is closer to home than she thinks. BUY IT NOW>> The Suspect
PHOTO: Amazon
by Arabelle Sicardi (Author), Sarah Tanat-Jones (Illustrator)
$20.69 (Release Date: May 7, 2019)
A bold, beautiful book that celebrates the achievements of LGBTQ artists, writers, innovators, athletes and activists.
BUY IT NOW>> Queer Heroes
PHOTO: Amazon
by Helen Hoang Starting at $9.99 (Release Date: May 7, 2019)
When a mother sees that her son Khai is struggling to find love in America, his mother returns to Vietnam to find the perfect wife. Esme Tran, a poor, mixed-race woman, jumps at the opportunity to come to America but struggles to build a connection with Khai. As their time together slips away, they begin to learn more about each other.
BUY IT NOW>> The Bride Test
PHOTO: Amazon
Where Reasons End: A Novelby Yiyun Li
Starting at $12.99
A heart-wrenching and creative approach to grief, Where Reasons End creates a world where life and death are not limitations, and a mother can engage in poignant conversations with her daughter that took her own life. Acclaimed authors rave that the novel is intelligent, insightful and expansive.
by Sophie KinsellaStarting at $12.49
Bestselling author Sophie Kinsella is back with an irresistible and empowering story about a young woman juggling a complicated family, a handsome suitor and a life-changing IOU.
by Angie Kim
Starting at $13.99
The thrilling debut novel by Angie Kim asks readers how far would they go to protect their families. Set in rural Virginia, the Yoo family is accused of murder when the experimental medical chamber they’re running explodes, killing two people inside. What ensues is a series of twist and turns they never saw coming.
BUY IT NOW>> Miracle Creek
PHOTO: Amazon
You Know You Want This: “Cat Person” and Other Storiesby Kristen Roupenian
Starting at $12.99
The author of the viral New Yorker essay “Cat Person” is back with a collection of stories you’re going to love. Spanning a range of topics from mundane to the supernatural, Kristen Roupenian will no doubt grab your attention, making you feel a times uncomfortable and at other times understood.
The Atlas of Reds and Blues: A NovelBy Devi S. Laskar
Starting at $9.50
The Atlas of Reds and Blues is a both escalating and sobering story that grapples with the complexities of the second-generation American experience.
by Kali Fajardo-Anstine
Starting at $12.99 (Release date: April 2, 2019, available for pre-order)
Undeniable feminine power that sprawls across generations. Indigenous Latina narratives. Deep connection to homelands. Sabrina & Corina has all of that, as Kali Fajardo-Anstine’s words breathe life into the main characters living in Denver.
BUY IT NOW>> Sabrina & Corina: Stories
PHOTO: Amazon
by Esmé Weijun Wang
Starting at $9.99
Wang’s moving, intimate essays on the mental illness will help you not only understand schizophrenia, but also why managing mental health can be such a challenge. A former lab researcher at Stanford, Wang seamlessly balances her analytical leanings with a personal narrative.
by Sarah Moss
Starting at $9.99
This unique book introduce you to a family in Northern England that lives like they’re in the Iron Age. “A story at once mythic and strikingly timely, Sarah Moss’s Ghost Wall urges us to wonder how far we have come from the “primitive minds” of our ancestors.”
Elsey Come Home: A Novelby Susan Conley
Starting at $12.99
Elsey Come Home tells the tale of one woman’s odyssey back to self. A visit to a yoga retreat instigated by her husband’s ultimatum leads her down a journey to confront the root of her pain and bravely heal.
The Care and Feeding of Ravenously Hungry Girlsby Anissa Gray
Starting at $12.99
When the proud matriarch of the family is arrested, the Butler family is in disbelief. This is literally and figuratively the biggest trial they’ve ever faced, and the family is faced to pick up the pieces.
More Than Enough: Claiming Space for Who You Are by Elaine Welteroth Starting at $12.99 ( Release Date: June 11, 2019, available for pre-order ) Becoming the youngest and first black editor of Teen Vogue may be the reason many of you know her name, but it was not the end of her story. After being a transformative force to the publication’s brand, she set out to conquer new goals and any self doubt that tried to convince her she wasn’t enough. Part memoir, part self-help, this read will remind you that you’re enough as well.
The Source of Self-Regard: Selected Essays, Speeches, and Meditationsby Toni Morrison
Starting at $14.99
Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison put her mark on 2019 with the release of her latest book, The Source of Self-Regard. The powerful collection of essays, speeches and meditations is broken down into three parts: a powerful prayer for the victims of 9/11, a searching meditation on Martin Luther King Jr. and a heart-wrenching eulogy for James Baldwin. It even includes some critical commentary on her own works. This is sure to be an excellent addition to any book collection.
Brave, Not Perfect: Fear Less, Fail More, and Live Bolderby Reshma Saujani
Starting at $12.99
The founder of “Girls Who Code,” Reshma Saujani, is back with a book, this time for an older audience. Brave, Not Perfect challenges to women to let go of the quest for perfection they’ve been conditioned to strive for, and learn to embrace failure.
With the Fire on Highby Elizabeth Acevedo
Starting at $9.99 ( Release Date: May 7, 2019, available for pre-order )
Elizabeth Acevedo’s latest book is on everyone’s radar after the success of her first book, The Poet X. In her new book, With the Fire on High, we meet Emoni, a teenager who was forced to go grow up fast after getting pregnant her freshman year of high school and becoming a caretaker for her grandmother.
Queen Bey: A Celebration of the Power and Creativity of Beyoncé Knowles-Carter by Veronica Chambers
Starting at $14.99 (Release Date : March 5, 2019)
Queen Bey celebrates not only the musical contributions, but the cultural shifting power her impact has had on not only women, but society as a whole. The impressive collection of essays includes works from popular cultural critics to outspoken academics.
Zaitoun: Recipes from the Palestinian Kitchenby Yasmin Khan
Starting at $14.87
Food travel writer Yasmin Khan is passionate about sharing people’s stories through food. In this book she explores the complexities and rich tradition of Palestinian cuisine in a way that is at times educational, and at other times relatable to the human core. Feast your eyes on this one.
by Angie Thomas Starting at $7.09
After writing the widely popular The Hate U Give that was turned into a feature film, On The Come Up was highly anticipated by fans. In the book we meet Bri, a sixteen year old aspiring rapper who is the daughter of a late underground rap legend. Unexpectedly she gets a viral hit, which puts her on a controversial roller coaster she never saw coming.
by Helen Oyeyemi
Starting at $13.99 (Released: March 5, 2019)
Londoners may have an appreciation for gingerbread, but for Harriet Lee’s family, gingerbread is like the bridge to their homeland. This lovely book explores a family legacy and shows what happens when the inheritance is not money, but a recipe.
BUY IT NOW>> Gingerbread: A Novel
PHOTO: Amazon
Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversationsby Mira Jacob
Starting at $11.99 (Release Date: March 26, 2019)
Mira Jacob’s latest book tells the story of a half-Jewish, half-Indian six-year-old boy struggling to understand his identity in midst of the tense 2016 election. Acclaimed author Celeste Ng describes this book as, “By turns hilarious and heart-rending, it’s exactly the book America needs at this moment.”
Long Live the Tribe of Fatherless Girls: A Memoirby T Kira Madden
Starting at $11.49
T Kira Madden’s memoir shares what it was like to grow up as a biracial, queer teen in the affluent town of Boca Raton, Florida. Struggling with a host of personal traumas, addictions in her family and destructive behaviors all around her, she finds community in a group of girls who happen to be fatherless.
by Fiona Barton
Starting at $12.99
The bestselling author of The Widow is back with another page-turner. Journalist Kate Waters is on the case when two teen girls go missing in Thailand, creating an international frenzy. As a parent whose son has been missing for two years, this story is closer to home than she thinks. BUY IT NOW>> The Suspect
PHOTO: Amazon
by Arabelle Sicardi (Author), Sarah Tanat-Jones (Illustrator)
$20.69 (Release Date: May 7, 2019)
A bold, beautiful book that celebrates the achievements of LGBTQ artists, writers, innovators, athletes and activists.
BUY IT NOW>> Queer Heroes
PHOTO: Amazon
by Helen Hoang Starting at $9.99 (Release Date: May 7, 2019)
When a mother sees that her son Khai is struggling to find love in America, his mother returns to Vietnam to find the perfect wife. Esme Tran, a poor, mixed-race woman, jumps at the opportunity to come to America but struggles to build a connection with Khai. As their time together slips away, they begin to learn more about each other.
BUY IT NOW>> The Bride Test
PHOTO: Amazon
Where Reasons End: A Novelby Yiyun Li
Starting at $12.99
A heart-wrenching and creative approach to grief, Where Reasons End creates a world where life and death are not limitations, and a mother can engage in poignant conversations with her daughter that took her own life. Acclaimed authors rave that the novel is intelligent, insightful and expansive.

Read More…

23 new books by women authors you should read in 2019

23 new books by women authors you should read in 2019 1 of 23
More Than Enough: Claiming Space for Who You Are by Elaine Welteroth Starting at $12.99 ( Release Date: June 11, 2019, available for pre-order ) Becoming the youngest and first black editor of Teen Vogue may be the reason many of you know her name, but it was not the end of her story. After being a transformative force to the publication’s brand, she set out to conquer new goals and any self doubt that tried to convince her she wasn’t enough. Part memoir, part self-help, this read will remind you that you’re enough as well.
The Source of Self-Regard: Selected Essays, Speeches, and Meditationsby Toni Morrison
Starting at $14.99
Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison put her mark on 2019 with the release of her latest book, The Source of Self-Regard. The powerful collection of essays, speeches and meditations is broken down into three parts: a powerful prayer for the victims of 9/11, a searching meditation on Martin Luther King Jr. and a heart-wrenching eulogy for James Baldwin. It even includes some critical commentary on her own works. This is sure to be an excellent addition to any book collection.
Brave, Not Perfect: Fear Less, Fail More, and Live Bolderby Reshma Saujani
Starting at $12.99
The founder of “Girls Who Code,” Reshma Saujani, is back with a book, this time for an older audience. Brave, Not Perfect challenges to women to let go of the quest for perfection they’ve been conditioned to strive for, and learn to embrace failure.
With the Fire on Highby Elizabeth Acevedo
Starting at $9.99 ( Release Date: May 7, 2019, available for pre-order )
Elizabeth Acevedo’s latest book is on everyone’s radar after the success of her first book, The Poet X. In her new book, With the Fire on High, we meet Emoni, a teenager who was forced to go grow up fast after getting pregnant her freshman year of high school and becoming a caretaker for her grandmother.
Queen Bey: A Celebration of the Power and Creativity of Beyoncé Knowles-Carter by Veronica Chambers
Starting at $14.99 (Release Date : March 5, 2019)
Queen Bey celebrates not only the musical contributions, but the cultural shifting power her impact has had on not only women, but society as a whole. The impressive collection of essays includes works from popular cultural critics to outspoken academics.
Zaitoun: Recipes from the Palestinian Kitchenby Yasmin Khan
Starting at $14.87
Food travel writer Yasmin Khan is passionate about sharing people’s stories through food. In this book she explores the complexities and rich tradition of Palestinian cuisine in a way that is at times educational, and at other times relatable to the human core. Feast your eyes on this one.
by Angie Thomas Starting at $7.09
After writing the widely popular The Hate U Give that was turned into a feature film, On The Come Up was highly anticipated by fans. In the book we meet Bri, a sixteen year old aspiring rapper who is the daughter of a late underground rap legend. Unexpectedly she gets a viral hit, which puts her on a controversial roller coaster she never saw coming.
by Helen Oyeyemi
Starting at $13.99 (Released: March 5, 2019)
Londoners may have an appreciation for gingerbread, but for Harriet Lee’s family, gingerbread is like the bridge to their homeland. This lovely book explores a family legacy and shows what happens when the inheritance is not money, but a recipe.
BUY IT NOW>> Gingerbread: A Novel
PHOTO: Amazon
Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversationsby Mira Jacob
Starting at $11.99 (Release Date: March 26, 2019)
Mira Jacob’s latest book tells the story of a half-Jewish, half-Indian six-year-old boy struggling to understand his identity in midst of the tense 2016 election. Acclaimed author Celeste Ng describes this book as, “By turns hilarious and heart-rending, it’s exactly the book America needs at this moment.”
Long Live the Tribe of Fatherless Girls: A Memoirby T Kira Madden
Starting at $11.49
T Kira Madden’s memoir shares what it was like to grow up as a biracial, queer teen in the affluent town of Boca Raton, Florida. Struggling with a host of personal traumas, addictions in her family and destructive behaviors all around her, she finds community in a group of girls who happen to be fatherless.
by Fiona Barton
Starting at $12.99
The bestselling author of The Widow is back with another page-turner. Journalist Kate Waters is on the case when two teen girls go missing in Thailand, creating an international frenzy. As a parent whose son has been missing for two years, this story is closer to home than she thinks. BUY IT NOW>> The Suspect
PHOTO: Amazon
by Arabelle Sicardi (Author), Sarah Tanat-Jones (Illustrator)
$20.69 (Release Date: May 7, 2019)
A bold, beautiful book that celebrates the achievements of LGBTQ artists, writers, innovators, athletes and activists.
BUY IT NOW>> Queer Heroes
PHOTO: Amazon
by Helen Hoang Starting at $9.99 (Release Date: May 7, 2019)
When a mother sees that her son Khai is struggling to find love in America, his mother returns to Vietnam to find the perfect wife. Esme Tran, a poor, mixed-race woman, jumps at the opportunity to come to America but struggles to build a connection with Khai. As their time together slips away, they begin to learn more about each other.
BUY IT NOW>> The Bride Test
PHOTO: Amazon
Where Reasons End: A Novelby Yiyun Li
Starting at $12.99
A heart-wrenching and creative approach to grief, Where Reasons End creates a world where life and death are not limitations, and a mother can engage in poignant conversations with her daughter that took her own life. Acclaimed authors rave that the novel is intelligent, insightful and expansive.
by Sophie KinsellaStarting at $12.49
Bestselling author Sophie Kinsella is back with an irresistible and empowering story about a young woman juggling a complicated family, a handsome suitor and a life-changing IOU.
by Angie Kim
Starting at $13.99
The thrilling debut novel by Angie Kim asks readers how far would they go to protect their families. Set in rural Virginia, the Yoo family is accused of murder when the experimental medical chamber they’re running explodes, killing two people inside. What ensues is a series of twist and turns they never saw coming.
BUY IT NOW>> Miracle Creek
PHOTO: Amazon
You Know You Want This: “Cat Person” and Other Storiesby Kristen Roupenian
Starting at $12.99
The author of the viral New Yorker essay “Cat Person” is back with a collection of stories you’re going to love. Spanning a range of topics from mundane to the supernatural, Kristen Roupenian will no doubt grab your attention, making you feel a times uncomfortable and at other times understood.
The Atlas of Reds and Blues: A NovelBy Devi S. Laskar
Starting at $9.50
The Atlas of Reds and Blues is a both escalating and sobering story that grapples with the complexities of the second-generation American experience.
by Kali Fajardo-Anstine
Starting at $12.99 (Release date: April 2, 2019, available for pre-order)
Undeniable feminine power that sprawls across generations. Indigenous Latina narratives. Deep connection to homelands. Sabrina & Corina has all of that, as Kali Fajardo-Anstine’s words breathe life into the main characters living in Denver.
BUY IT NOW>> Sabrina & Corina: Stories
PHOTO: Amazon
by Esmé Weijun Wang
Starting at $9.99
Wang’s moving, intimate essays on the mental illness will help you not only understand schizophrenia, but also why managing mental health can be such a challenge. A former lab researcher at Stanford, Wang seamlessly balances her analytical leanings with a personal narrative.
by Sarah Moss
Starting at $9.99
This unique book introduce you to a family in Northern England that lives like they’re in the Iron Age. “A story at once mythic and strikingly timely, Sarah Moss’s Ghost Wall urges us to wonder how far we have come from the “primitive minds” of our ancestors.”
Elsey Come Home: A Novelby Susan Conley
Starting at $12.99
Elsey Come Home tells the tale of one woman’s odyssey back to self. A visit to a yoga retreat instigated by her husband’s ultimatum leads her down a journey to confront the root of her pain and bravely heal.
The Care and Feeding of Ravenously Hungry Girlsby Anissa Gray
Starting at $12.99
When the proud matriarch of the family is arrested, the Butler family is in disbelief. This is literally and figuratively the biggest trial they’ve ever faced, and the family is faced to pick up the pieces.
More Than Enough: Claiming Space for Who You Are by Elaine Welteroth Starting at $12.99 ( Release Date: June 11, 2019, available for pre-order ) Becoming the youngest and first black editor of Teen Vogue may be the reason many of you know her name, but it was not the end of her story. After being a transformative force to the publication’s brand, she set out to conquer new goals and any self doubt that tried to convince her she wasn’t enough. Part memoir, part self-help, this read will remind you that you’re enough as well.
The Source of Self-Regard: Selected Essays, Speeches, and Meditationsby Toni Morrison
Starting at $14.99
Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison put her mark on 2019 with the release of her latest book, The Source of Self-Regard. The powerful collection of essays, speeches and meditations is broken down into three parts: a powerful prayer for the victims of 9/11, a searching meditation on Martin Luther King Jr. and a heart-wrenching eulogy for James Baldwin. It even includes some critical commentary on her own works. This is sure to be an excellent addition to any book collection.
Brave, Not Perfect: Fear Less, Fail More, and Live Bolderby Reshma Saujani
Starting at $12.99
The founder of “Girls Who Code,” Reshma Saujani, is back with a book, this time for an older audience. Brave, Not Perfect challenges to women to let go of the quest for perfection they’ve been conditioned to strive for, and learn to embrace failure.
With the Fire on Highby Elizabeth Acevedo
Starting at $9.99 ( Release Date: May 7, 2019, available for pre-order )
Elizabeth Acevedo’s latest book is on everyone’s radar after the success of her first book, The Poet X. In her new book, With the Fire on High, we meet Emoni, a teenager who was forced to go grow up fast after getting pregnant her freshman year of high school and becoming a caretaker for her grandmother.
Queen Bey: A Celebration of the Power and Creativity of Beyoncé Knowles-Carter by Veronica Chambers
Starting at $14.99 (Release Date : March 5, 2019)
Queen Bey celebrates not only the musical contributions, but the cultural shifting power her impact has had on not only women, but society as a whole. The impressive collection of essays includes works from popular cultural critics to outspoken academics.
Zaitoun: Recipes from the Palestinian Kitchenby Yasmin Khan
Starting at $14.87
Food travel writer Yasmin Khan is passionate about sharing people’s stories through food. In this book she explores the complexities and rich tradition of Palestinian cuisine in a way that is at times educational, and at other times relatable to the human core. Feast your eyes on this one.
by Angie Thomas Starting at $7.09
After writing the widely popular The Hate U Give that was turned into a feature film, On The Come Up was highly anticipated by fans. In the book we meet Bri, a sixteen year old aspiring rapper who is the daughter of a late underground rap legend. Unexpectedly she gets a viral hit, which puts her on a controversial roller coaster she never saw coming.
by Helen Oyeyemi
Starting at $13.99 (Released: March 5, 2019)
Londoners may have an appreciation for gingerbread, but for Harriet Lee’s family, gingerbread is like the bridge to their homeland. This lovely book explores a family legacy and shows what happens when the inheritance is not money, but a recipe.
BUY IT NOW>> Gingerbread: A Novel
PHOTO: Amazon
Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversationsby Mira Jacob
Starting at $11.99 (Release Date: March 26, 2019)
Mira Jacob’s latest book tells the story of a half-Jewish, half-Indian six-year-old boy struggling to understand his identity in midst of the tense 2016 election. Acclaimed author Celeste Ng describes this book as, “By turns hilarious and heart-rending, it’s exactly the book America needs at this moment.”
Long Live the Tribe of Fatherless Girls: A Memoirby T Kira Madden
Starting at $11.49
T Kira Madden’s memoir shares what it was like to grow up as a biracial, queer teen in the affluent town of Boca Raton, Florida. Struggling with a host of personal traumas, addictions in her family and destructive behaviors all around her, she finds community in a group of girls who happen to be fatherless.
by Fiona Barton
Starting at $12.99
The bestselling author of The Widow is back with another page-turner. Journalist Kate Waters is on the case when two teen girls go missing in Thailand, creating an international frenzy. As a parent whose son has been missing for two years, this story is closer to home than she thinks. BUY IT NOW>> The Suspect
PHOTO: Amazon
by Arabelle Sicardi (Author), Sarah Tanat-Jones (Illustrator)
$20.69 (Release Date: May 7, 2019)
A bold, beautiful book that celebrates the achievements of LGBTQ artists, writers, innovators, athletes and activists.
BUY IT NOW>> Queer Heroes
PHOTO: Amazon
by Helen Hoang Starting at $9.99 (Release Date: May 7, 2019)
When a mother sees that her son Khai is struggling to find love in America, his mother returns to Vietnam to find the perfect wife. Esme Tran, a poor, mixed-race woman, jumps at the opportunity to come to America but struggles to build a connection with Khai. As their time together slips away, they begin to learn more about each other.
BUY IT NOW>> The Bride Test
PHOTO: Amazon
Where Reasons End: A Novelby Yiyun Li
Starting at $12.99
A heart-wrenching and creative approach to grief, Where Reasons End creates a world where life and death are not limitations, and a mother can engage in poignant conversations with her daughter that took her own life. Acclaimed authors rave that the novel is intelligent, insightful and expansive.

Read More…

English Essay

Culture polity, traditions, language, food, costume, belief system, computer architecture, arts, craft, practice of medicine, dance, and touts which go a counselling be discussed in this article to conk you an indication of Fijis innate community but as swell the versatile communities which make up Fiji as a modern culture and keep. The indigenous culture is an active and living part of everyday life for the studyity of the population. However, it has evolved with the introduction of vibrant and h cardinalst-to-god cultures including Indian, Chinese and European culture, and respective(a) cultures from the Pacific neighbors of Fiji in particular the Tongan and Rotuman cultures.The culture of Fiji, including language, has created a unique communal and theme identity. Tradition and hierarchy Fijian indigenous society is very communal, with salient importance attach to the family unit, the village, and the vanua (land). 1 A hierarchy of chiefs presides over villages, cl ans, and peoples. Chiefly positions argon hereditary a deceased chief is invariably followed by a kinsman or kinswoman, though non necessarily his own son or daughter. This consults Polynesian crop in almost otherwise Melanesian societies, chiefs be appointed on merit.The large-scalest neighborly unit for Fijians is the Yavusa, defined by R. A. Derrick as the direct agnate descendants of a single kalou-vu (deified ancestor). Chiefly succession was from older brother/ child to younger brother/ sis, after the death of their father/mother. When the youngest brother/sister died, the eldest son/daughter of the eldest brother/sister became chief. This tradition notwithstanding influences Fijian society today, though less(prenominal) rigidly at that place is more(prenominal)(prenominal) of a tendency instantlyadays towards primogeniture. 23 Each brother/sister in the family then complianceed his own branch of the yavusa, c every(prenominal)ed the Mataqali.Each mataqali beca me the custodian of a specific task. A fully developed Yavusa has several mataqali * Turaga This mataqali descends from the headmaster ancestor through primogeniture inheritance of the eldest son in to each one succeeding generation. The chief of a village is always chosen from the Turaga mataqali. 14 * Sauturaga These ar next in rank to the chiefs, support him, and enforce his commands and besides thrust final say in the installation of a Chief1 * Mata ni vanua These level the official heralds of the village.They ar also in charge of ceremonial functions. 5 * Bete This was the tralatitious priestly class. The kalou-vu was believed to speak through the Bete. 16 * Bati This mataqali forms the handed-down warrior class. 6 * Dau (skill) and Matai these atomic numerate 18 the crafts hoi polloi and specialized skilled people of the tribe e. g. Dau ni vucu (Poet/choreographer/composer), Dau ni yau (treasurer), Mataisau (carpenter/or boat builder)1 The mataqali atomic numbe r 18 subdivided into Tokatoka, each comprising well-nigh re latishd families.Several mataqali cost a village, several of which form a yavusa or district. The British compound rulers amalgamated the districts into Yasana, or Provinces. The districts also form three Matanitu, or Confederacies. These argon a lot said to be agglomerations of provinces, but as the latter were a colonial imposition, the boundaries do not coincide exactly, and the Provinces of Tailevu, Ra, Naitasiri, Lomaiviti and parts of Yasawa and Ba makes the Kubuna compact. This Confederacy in modern Fiji is considered to be the most senior.The other two are Burebasaga (covering the rest of Viti Levu), and Tovata, covering Vanua Levu, Lau archipelago and Rotuma. Despite its isolation and relatively small size, Tovata has been politically dominant since Fiji gained its independence in 1970. Language The official language is side while the national indigenous language is Bauan which is only one of the umpteen dia lects that exist in the Fiji Group, each of the fourteen provinces more or less bear their own dialect though there is a perish distinction between the dialects of the West, Central and Eastern parts of the country.Other languages verbalise in the country are Fiji Hindi, Cantonese, Rotuman, Gilbertese (Rabi Island), and Tuvaluan (Kioa Island). The Fiji Islands are traditionally linked to their island neighbours Rotuma, Tonga and Samoa, and this is intelligible in the culture and dialects of the Northern and Eastern provinces being Cakaudrove, Bua, Macuata, and Lau. The many dialects intercommunicate in these four provinces consistently use intemperates that are heard in Tongan and Samoan, but not so with dialects from the horse opera and South Western parts of Fiji.The Fijian language uses a Latin first rudi manpowert. However, the Fijian alphabet is dissimilar from the English alphabet. Fiji English The existence of many dialects within the Fijian language as well as exposu re to the other languages talk run through contributed to many Fiji Islanders being bilingual. For general communication in an promiscuous environment, a very interesting cross use of the languages has developed, resulting in horse some now ordinarily referred to as Fiji English. In formal settings, of course, correct work is adhered to.Fiji English comprises aspects of Fijian, English and Hindi, which reflects the history and identity of the people of Fiji. Fiji English is non-rhotic. . cultural arts and social polity In culture, its versatile crafts and music give it an identity along with it traditional etiquette and varying forms of clothing attire, its unique architecture also tells a story of a culture and its evolution, the following pull up stakes discuss these aspects of culture in Fiji. Arts and crafts Fijis arts and crafts reflect topical anaesthetic adaptations of their Polynesian and Melanesian heritage.By tradition, the mens and womens crafts are separate. W omens crafts The village of Na lotu on Kadavu Island is famous for its pottery, the making of which is soothe governed by strict rituals. Nadroga and Rewa also produce fine pottery. Each field has its own unique style in the making of pottery. Tapa from the Lau Islands in Fiji. The making of Tapa cloth, or (masi), is another(prenominal) craft associated with women. Tapa is do from the bark of the paper mulberry tree and decorated in wood coal with symbolic motifs and various patterns.In modern times, it has become fashionable for a masi to bear the name of the person who make it. Masi are often transfer as gifts on formal make. The island of Vatuelele of the southern coast of Viti Levu is famous for its masi products. virtually Fijian mats are made from the leaves of the pandanus tree. The long process of sum up includes scraping and boiling the leaves, and drying them in the sun. There are different mats utilise for different occasions, and few are made as gifts for for mal occasions such(prenominal) as weddings.Most mats are bordered with highly ornamental and brightly coloured wool. genius well-known Fijian mat is the kuta, made by women in Vanua Levu, particularly Bua. Weaving using various materials was another craft generally mastered by the women but also aspects of weave were mastered only by the men, various types of weaving practice were and button up are basket weaving, coconut rope weaving, and coconut leaves weaving. Mens crafts Carving was practiced by the men carving would be use for items of pragmatical use and simple shapes and aspiration were employ.A lot of bowel movement was put into well adorned weapons and items for the home and watching, today carving is practiced for its use in tourism and no longer plays a major role in Fijian society and life except in the case of the Tanoa used from drinking Kava. Drua, the most dramatic Fijian canoe. canoe Building was another art practiced only by the men, canoes were not only the major form of communication, but were important in all aspects of Fijian society, from the gathering of food and transporting of crops to use in presentation ceremonies and they were slavish in wars and politics which were rife in Fiji. 9 The art of boat make was varied across the radical and had several different types but of a similar design, the Camakau was a small twin hulled canoe for fishing or small transportation purposes, the most impressive of Canoes in Fiji were that of the Drua. In Fijis early history originally European involvement, Control of the seaway was a major and decisive objective disrupting or cutting off the enemies supply and reinforcements gave bulky advantage in battle and would ensure victory.Sea battles involving hundreds of canoes were frequent. The canoe, which shake fear and awe and so often held the balance was the tycoony Drua. One of the most elaborate and beautiful artifacts of Oceania, the Drua was a product of considerable group effort s and human sacrifice. Double hulled and of gigantic proportions, the Drua was a masterpiece of design and craftsmanship, requiring thorough community involvement in its construction and human sacrifice in its launching. 10 Its speed out at sea would be in excessiveness of twenty knots and lock in remained highly manoeuvrable, it was capable of carrying upward of 150 warriors and took some 6 to 7 years to build and would vary in duration from 100 feet to 118 feet and have a mast height of 60 to 70 feet, in the mid-19th century the following accounts were recorded Up went the huge sail, down went the great steering oars, splashing into the sea, and away we shot same(p) a racehorse.owe to the great rate at which we were going, the sea was like a let out cauldron on either side of our course, and the vessel, instead of having time to bestride over the smaller waves, cut its way through them. (West, 1869). It had a brainy appearance with its immense sail of white mats its veloci ty was almost inconceivable. (Wilkes, 1840). Ratu Seru Cakobau commanded an impressive fleet which had Several Drua with armed warriors ready for battle the led Canoe was named Rusi I Vanua or Cursed is the land. 11 Much of the art of Canoe building has been illogical and only a small few still practice the art on a very small descale as its use in this modern era seems to have lost its place. The craft of Canoe building was traditionally reserved for the male. Performing arts Fijian Rugby Team Performing a Traditional fight Dance before their Rugby encounter against Canada. The Meke An indigenous art form is the Meke, which may incorporate the seasea (womens fan dance) or a meke wesi (mens spear dance).It is usually a narrative of an important event such as a war, a chiefly installation, or even a scandal. Some mekes are generations old, and form an important part of Fijis unwritten history. In olden times, the meke was considered to be an oracle from the gods, and the Dau ni vucu, or composer, would often go into a trance before a performance. Others are modern, compose for a particular event, some(prenominal) as a poet laureate might write a poem to celebrate an event in a Western country. Each district of Fiji has its own form of meke, performed in the local dialect.Other forms of Polynesian and Melanesian dance art forms exist with most astray known being dances of Rotuma and Tonga. There are also various Indian dances and Chinese dances which are performed at relevant festivals marking important times for these communities which are now a part of Culture in Fiji. symphony Music of experienced Fiji consisted of various chants which often told a story or preserved information to be passed on from generation to generation, these songs used various traditional instruments.With the introduction of European and Asiatic cultures music in Fiji has evolved and songs birdsong in the Fijian vernacular are popular but so also are songs in Indian and Engli sh, some local artists change integrity all three languages and traditional instruments from each culture making for a very interesting musical experience. A distinct Indian sound has evolved in Fiji that some see as influencing modern Indian music and even jazz. Clothing and costume The traditional attire was loin cloths for men and grass skirts for women.Skirts were short for single women, and long for married women, with girls bankrupting virginal locks before marriage. Most ladies of rank had the lower parts of their bodies decorated with tattoos. Chiefs dressed(p) more elaborately. sophisticated Fijis national dress is the sulu, which resembles a skirt. It is putting surfacely wasted by both men and women. One type worn by both men and women is the Sulu va Taga pronounced Sulu vah Tanga which is a wrap around piece of rectangular material which is elaborately decorated with patterns and designs of varying styles this is for more casual and informal occasions.Many men, e o ddly in urban areas, also have Sulu va taga which is a tailored sulu and can be tailored as part of their suit. Many will wear a shirt with a western-style collar, tie, and jacket, with a matching Sulu va taga and sandals, this type of sulu can be worn to a semi formal or formal occasion. Even the military uniforms have incorporated the Sulu va taga as part of their ceremonial dress. Women usually wear a multi-layered Tapa cloth on formal occasions. A blouse made of cotton, silk, or satin, of often worn on top. On special occasions, women often wear a tapa sheath across the chest, rather than a blouse.On other occasions, women may be dressed in a chamba, also known as a sulu I ra, a sulu with a specially crafted top. There are many regional variations throughout Fiji. Residents of the village of Dama, in Bua Province and Cakaudrove i Vanua (Province), Fiji wear finely woven mats called kuta, made from a reed. While traditional and semi-traditional forms of dress are still very much in use amongst indigenous Fijian culture, there is a greater influence for Western and Indian Fashion in urban areas as in neighboring developed nations. Traditions and ceremoniesEtiquette in indigenous Fijian notice is rather intricate depending on the function as various formalities and presentations which do several things firstly it shows respect between two communal groups, strengthen tribal and family ties and reinforce social, tribal and family ties. Various items are used in ceremony and surrounded by ceremony, Kava, known in Fiji as yaqona, is Fijis national drink. Traditionally, it was used only in important ceremonies. Nowadays, it is a social beverage. There is a strict protocol associated with yaqona drinking.One should lay once, clasping the hands, take the cup, and drink the yaqona in a single draft before returning the cup to the bearer. Another highly prized item in ceremony is the tabua or Whales tooth, other items also the use of mats (masi) are also used tradi tionally in ceremony also various regions have tradition that has been passed down generation to generation for centuries one typesetters case are the firewalkers of beqa. The Sawau tribe of Beqa are noted for their ability to walk on white hot stones without being burned. 12 Strict rituals have to be observe before the firewalking ceremony. There is an ancient myth about how an ancestor of the Sawau tribe was given this power by a tactile sensation god in exchange for his life, after the god was captured by the man who was fishing for eels. cuisine The cuisine of Fiji in pre-colonial times consisted of root crops, vegetables, and fruits, as well as various land animals such as wild pig, human, and various birds. The coastal tribes would have had the same, but also had a large amount of local seafood.These would have been prepared with local herbs and spices on wood fire argument ovens. Most cooking areas were located in the center of dramaturgy so the smoke would repel insects and strengthen the jacket crown thatching. Another popular method acting of cooking, which is still used today, is the lovo which is an earth oven13 a fire made on in a pit in the ground lined with heat-resistant stones. It closely resembles the hangi of the New Zealand Maori. When the stones are hot, food wrapped in (banana) leaves, is placed in the pit, covered with soil and left to cook before being exhumed and eaten.Dishes cooked this way include palusami, parcels of taro leaves saturated with coconut milk, onions, and sometimes tinned meat. Modern Fijian Cuisine is rather diverse with great influence from Indian cuisine and spices. When these are applied to local traditional dishes, it makes for interesting eating. European, Indian, and Chinese variants of cuisine, along with traditional foods, are common place in most, if not all households in Fiji. Architecture A bure kalou, a sketch through in the early 1800s.In Old Fiji, the architecture of villages was simple and practi cal to meet the physical and social need and to provide communal sentry go the houses were square in shape and with pyramid like shaped detonators,14 and the walls and roof were thatched and various plants of practical use were planted nearby, each village having a meeting house and a Spirit house. The spirit house was lordly on a pyramid like base built with large stones and earth, again a square building with an elongated pyramid like 14 roof with various scented flora planted nearby.The houses of Chiefs were of similar design and would be set higher than his subjects houses but instead of an elongated roof would have similar roof to those of his subjects homes but of course on a larger scale. With the introduction of communities from Asia aspects of their cultural architecture are now unpatterned in urban and rural areas of Fijis two main Islands Viti Levu and Vanua Levu. A village structure shares similarities today but built with modern materials and spirit houses (Bure Kal ou) have been replaced by churches of varying design.The urban landscape of early compound Fiji was reminiscent of most British colonies of the 19th and 20th century in tropical regions of the world, while some of this architecture remains, the urban landscape is evolving in leaps and bounds with various modern aspects of architecture and design becoming more and more evident in the business, industrial and domestic sector, the rural areas are evolving at a much slower rate. Literature The emergence of Fijis literature (as distinct from oral literature) coincides with the countrys transition to independence in 1970.Among the first published works of Fijian literature, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, were Raymond Pillais short stories (in English) and Pio Manoas poetry (in English and in Fijian). More recent notable Fiji writers include Satendra Nandan (poet and novelist), Sudesh Mishra (poet), Larry Thomas (playwright), and Joseph Veramo (novelist). worship Religion is quite div erse with Christianity being the dominant faith in Fiji. Many Christian denominations are present in Fiji, the most prevalent of which is Methodist.Of the other Asian trusts the Hindu faith is dominant, followed by Islam. There are other belief systems observed by Fijians as well. The meeting of Christianity The impact of Christianity in the 19th century resulted in certain traditions being proscribed. In the pre-Christian era, human sacrifice was practiced. Men were buried alive to hold the pillars to the house of a chief. Cannibalism was practiced, too16 the bodies of enemies slain in battle, or in sacrifice, were piled up and cooked for festivals, such as the installation of chiefs or the launching of a great canoe. 16 Seru Epenisa Cakobau. The Bauan warlord who united the disparate tribes of Fiji and proclaimed himself King in 1871, renounced cannibalism on his passage to Christianity in 1854. A bure kalou, a pre-Christian Fijian religious Building. Old religion Fijis old re ligion is no longer practiced by the majority in the indigenous community who have adopted Christianity. Old deities are still acknowledged and respected, but not worshipped. Fijian rituals still exists in private. Demographics Of the various faiths, Christianity is the dominant belief system and ncluding all the various denominations of the Christian faith they number in total 449,482. Hindus, with their various denominations, number in total 261,097. Muslims make up 54,324 of Fijis population. Followers of other belief systems make up 10,166 of Fijis population. Sports Sports culture is unique as different racial mixes and cultures come together in a common interest. Fiji is fanatical about sports and the two most dominant being rugby and soccer. Traditional sports Sports in older times had a practical place, unconnected from recreation, helping to train young warriors.One such practice would have the older men bring the male children a severely wound captive of war, allowing t he boys to practice their archery skills against this living target. There were other sports that were practiced in older times which are not practiced now. Notable traditional sports used to be played were tiqa, ulutoa, veisaga, and veisolo. Modern sports The Fiji sevens team at the 2006 Commonwealth Games in Melbourne. Sports have developed greatly over the ago two cristals in Fiji with a wide variety of sports undertaken. Fiji is most well known for its prowess in the game of rugby union and in particular rugby sevens.Rugby union Rugby union is the most popular sport in Fiji. The highest level of competition is the Colonial Cup. The Fiji national rugby union team has competed in five Rugby being Cup competitions. The Fijian Rugby Sevens team is constantly one of the top two or three teams in the world, often the phase modulation team. Rugby league Rugby league is a popular team sport played in Fiji. The Fiji national rugby league team is known as Fiji Bati, with the team comp eting in three Rugby fusion World Cup competitions. They made it to the semi-finals of the 2008 Rugby League World Cup. football gameFootball was a minor sport, but over the last decade with further international funding from FIFA and sound local management of the sport has grown in popularity amongst the Indian community initially but now also the Fijian community. Other sports Many sports exist in Fiji and in many ways has its own cultural following, sports such as golf which has been made famous by Fiji jockstrap Vijay Singh. Sports such as play and surfing which was brought to prominence by former world champion and Fiji athlete Tony Philips. Sailing in varying forms, various adventure sports, athletics, various Asian martial arts, boxing, and the list goes on.

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Meet 9 Indigenous women who are following their passions in 2019

Meet 10 Indigenous women who are following their passions in 2019 Social Sharing Meet 10 Indigenous women who are following their passions in 2019 Indigenous women are on the frontlines of change for their communities. To celebrate International Women’s Day, here are 10 Indigenous women who are following their passions and making a difference. Social Sharing ‘If you fail or hit a bumpy road, keep pushing forward,’ says hockey player Brooke Stacey Lenard Monkman · CBC News · Posted: Mar 08, 2019 6:00 AM ET | Last Updated: March 8 Amanda Reid Rogers has been named UNB’s Piluwitahasuwin, or assistant vice-president of Indigenous engagement.(Jordan Gill/CBC)
Indigenous women are on the frontlines of change for their communities. To celebrate International Women’s Day, here are 10 Indigenous women who are following their passions and making a difference. Amanda Reid Rogers
Dakota Sioux, Birdtail Sioux First Nation and Woodstock First Nation
Amanda Reid Rogers has been a fancy shawl and jingle dress dancer her whole life. She was born and raised in Woodstock First Nation and in December, she stepped into a leadership role as the University of New Brunswick’s assistant vice-president of Indigenous engagement or Piluwitahasuwin.
Reid Rogers is also working on her master’s degree in nursing at UNB, with her thesis focusing on Wolastoqey women and their lived experiences of being descendants of residential school survivors.
She credits her mother, Gail Paul, as being the most inspirational person in her life.
“I’m advocating for Indigenous people and specifically Indigenous women’s rights and I remember her doing that work my whole life,” she said.
“She sure she gave me a a foundation from which to do my passion and work.” Chief Lady Bird
Chippewa and Potawatomi, Rama First Nation and Moosedeer Point First Nation Chief Lady Bird is an Anishinaabe artist based in Toronto. Her work can be seen across the city as public murals.(Submitted by Chief Lady Bird)
Chief Lady Bird sits with the Eagle Clan and is a freelance artist based in Toronto. She is also co-facilitating Our Stories Our Truths, which is an art as healing program that connects urban Indigenous youth to mentors in the community.
“I make work about ceremony, stories, reclamation, tattoos, sex, sexuality, language, fashion, cultural appropriation,” she said.
“I hope that my work can be a catalyst for reimagining our relationships to the land, each other, and ourselves.”
She just finished illustrating her first full-length printed children’s book with Scholastic, Nibi’s Water Song , written by Sunshine Tenasco.
What advice would you have for young Indigenous women in your community?
I want young Indigenous women to know that they are allowed to be whoever they want to be. It’s OK to be sexual, sensual, loud, demanding, dark, hungry, poetic, messy, fat, makeup-less, fluid, hardened, softened, sad. Resilience doesn’t have to always be packaged as soft, gentle, easily-consumed. Healing is messy. We love you for who you are and will support you on your journey. Melissa Brown
Ojibway-Jamaican ​ Melissa Brown studied pyschology and sociology at the Unversity of Winnipeg. She took some time off school to chase her dream of getting involved in the cooking game. She is the head chef and owner of Brownee’s Urban Bistro(Submitted by Melissa Brown)
Melissa Brown has been cooking since she was seven. The mother of two boys is an emerging entrepreneur who just started a catering company that blends Caribbean and Indigenous cuisine.
She said her company, Brownees Urban Bistro in Winnipeg, is filling a gap by introducing clients to traditional Indigenous cuisine.
“I notice a lot of these agencies that serve Indigenous people and youth, they talk about holistic health, but the one thing they’re missing is food and nutrition,” said Brown.
While her business right now focuses on catering, Brown is hoping to open a restaurant this year where she will be able to train Indigenous students to cook.
Can you name an Indigenous woman who inspired you?
“My mom, she has shown a lot of strength,” she said.
“She taught me everything that I know about cooking. That’s where my Indigenous cuisine comes from. She just retired last week. She was a nurse for 20 years.” Nicole Akan
Nehiyaw, Muskowekwan First Nation Nicole Akan’s work is grounded in ceremony. She has been leading a team of Indigenous researchers that are focusing on health related issues and water governance.(Candy Fox)
Nicole Akan is the research manager for the Morning Star Lodge in Regina, a community-based research lab that promotes new Indigenous research methodologies. Akan is responsible for connecting Indigenous researchers with knowledge keepers and people in the community.
She graduated from the Indian Communications Arts program at First Nations University of Canada and worked at CBC Saskatchewan’s communications department for four years. She is a mother to a 13-year-old son. One thing that she is proud of is her sobriety for more than eight years.
What advice would you have for young Indigenous women in your community?
“To love one another, pray for one another, lift each other up. Look for those role models in your community who are very supportive and loving.” Kelly Fraser
Sanikiluaq, Nunavut Kelly Fraser was one of 12 winners at this years Indspire awards.(CARAS/iPhoto)
Kelly Fraser has been covering pop songs since she was 15 and is using her platform to let the world know that Inuit culture “is still strong and deserves to be heard.”
The artist gained a following after uploading a video in of herself singing Rihanna’s hit song Diamonds in Inuktitut. Fraser, who now lives in Winnipeg, has performed all over Canada and her second album, Sedna , was nominated for a 2018 Juno. This year, she was also one of 12 people to take home an Indspire award.
She gives credit to the success of artists like Tanya Tagaq and Susan Aglukark for paving the way for artists like her.
Her advice to young Indigenous women who want to make music?
“Keep practising, “no matter if people say it’s not good enough.”
Her third album, Decolonize , is set to come out this spring. Brooke Stacey
Mohawk, Kahnawake ​ Brooke Stacey is a professional hockey player in the Swedish Women’s Hockey League. Stacey said she hopes to play closer to home in the Canadian women’s hockey league (CWHL) or the National Women’s Hockey League in the United States. (Submitted by Brooke Stacey)
Brooke Stacey is a 22-year-old professional hockey player currently lacing up her skates for Linkoping Hockey Club in the Swedish Women’s Hockey League.
Prior to moving to Sweden earlier this year, Stacey played for the University of Maine Black Bears and competed in several international tournaments with Canada’s national development team.
Stacey’s contract with Linkoping ends at the end of their playoff run. The team is currently preparing for finals, a five-game series, that starts on Wednesday against Lulea. When she returns to Kahnawake, Stacey said hopes to play closer to home in the Canadian women’s hockey league (CWHL) or the National Women’s Hockey League in the United States.​
“It’s very important to go after what you want,” said Stacey.
“It’s hard sometimes because family is always at home but they will always be there when you come back. If there’s an opportunity to pursue a dream away the reserve or even on the reserve, always strive to reach it and if you fail or hit a bumpy road, keep pushing forward.” Elaine Alec
Syilx and Secwepemc ​ Elaine Alec is the UBCIC women’s representative and a partner in an Indigenous community planning firm, Alderhill. (Deborah Kuhl)
Growing up, Elaine Alec didn’t fashion herself a feminist. But today, the Syilx and Secwepemc community planner and mother dedicates much of her energy toward creating spaces safe for women so they can rise to their full potential.
Alec has been volunteering as the women’s representative for the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs since 2017. She said at the core of what she does is listening to people in community and taking direction from what they share with her.
She said what she’s heard across the board is “we need to start in community and do this in community.”
Today Alec is working on creating a women’s council within the union. The vision, she said, is to provide a link between what women in communities want to see happen and the work on the chiefs’ council.
Alec is also working on finishing an Indigenous-focused guide to addressing sexual harassment and sexual violence.
She said her passion for women’s safety is based on her lived experience with sexual violence, trauma and her subsequent healing journey. She said she has seen firsthand the power of sharing her personal story and how that can create a safe space for other women to disclose their own.
“When you see women finally feel OK about sharing their story and the relief that they have, that they’re not alone… what it opens up for them — that look of hope in their eyes — that’s what drives me,” she said.
What advice does she have for other women on International Women’s Day?
“Push past the fear,” she said.
“There’s going to be a lot of things that are really scary, a lot of times where you’re really unsure and your hands are shaking and your guts are all tightened up… When you feel that, … that’s when you have to stand up and say something, no matter how scary it is.” Kluane Adamek
Kluane First Nation Kluane Adamek is the Yukon regional chief of the Assembly of First Nations.(Submitted by Kluane Adamek)
When Kluane Adamek, 32, became regional chief for Yukon at the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) last year, she become one of the youngest women to ever sit on AFN’s executive committee.
Adamek is a citizen of the Kluane First Nation, with Tlingit, Southern Tutchone, German and Irish ancestry. And though she’s young, she’s got a wealth of leadership experience.
In 2013, she founded “Our Voices,” a collective aimed at revitalizing cultural identity and fostering leadership skills among young Indigenous Yukoners. She also served as an advisor to former AFN national chief Shawn Atleo.
Adamek said Indigenous people in Canada are facing many challenges, but persistence is key.
“I think about my former colleague Shawn Atleo [who] would often say, ‘we need to smash the status quo’ … we know this doesn’t happen overnight,” Adamek said. Jacquelyn Cardinal
Nehiyaw, Sucker Creek First Nation Jacquelyn Cardinal splits her time between three organizations. But all of the work remains the same – build bridges between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Edmonton. (Amy Kennedy)
Jacquelyn Cardinal is the co-founder and managing director of Naheyawin, an Edmonton-based consulting agency that serves as a bridge between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people. She is also the co-president and director of Social Awareness, a group of companies that aim to promote Indigenous prosperity through technology platforms.
“The question of how do we grow up side by side with non-Indigenous peoples as brothers and sisters is one that’s very close to my heart,” said Cardinal.
While her work is primarily focused on reconciliation, Cardinal would love to work more with Indigenous youth in the future.
“I’m really excited to invite others to fall in love with our Indigenous systems, with us,” said Cardinal.
“Working with First Nations people on reserve as well as in the cities and trying to bring in non-Indigenous people so that they can understand their role in the treaty relationship that we have, and and be excited to imagine the future with us in a good way.” Catherine Lafferty
Yellowknives Dene First Nation Northern Wildflower is a memoir by Catherine Lafferty.(Fernwood Publishing)
Catherine Lafferty is a councillor with the Yellowknives Dene First Nation in N.W.T., a communications officer for the Akaitcho Treaty 8 Negotiations, a mother and she sits on the Det’on Cho Corporation’s board.
She also published a memoir this year: Northern Wildflower .
“I am very passionate about empowering my community and the youth especially and bringing back our culture and our pride in our culture, and our pride in ourselves that’s been lost through colonization,” said Lafferty.
She said growing up she thought that there were certain things “only men were supposed to do.” But that’s not the case.
“Don’t be afraid to speak up and speak out and stand up for yourself,” said Lafferty. “Once you do it a few times it gets easier.”
Her grandmother, Alice Lafferty, raised her.
“She taught me patience. She taught me unconditional love,” said Lafferty, who cites her grandmother as her greatest influence.
“She grew up in the bush. She was tough.”
Lafferty’s second book, this time a work of fiction called Land, Water, Sky , will be available in spring 2020.
With files from Chantelle Bellrichard, Jessica Deer, Rhiannon Johnson, Sidney Cohen, Paul Tukker and Jamie Malbeuf

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What to do this week: Take part in Parramasala, celebrate at the Africultures festival and more.

Close Africultures 2:17
Saada cooks Somali Fried Rice and shares why the dish is so important to her. She’ll be one of the cooks at the Africultures festival in Lidcombe on March 9.
February 28th 2019 9 days ago Africultures Lifestyle Sydney events: Parramasala, Africultures festival Angira Bharadwaj, The Daily Telegraph March 8, 2019 1:00pm Why cruising is a great value holiday for families Aussies start a flexible workplace revolution
One of the state’s biggest multicultural celebrations — Parramasala — is back for another year and African food, art and music is on display at the Africultures festival. Here is your event guide for Sydney this week.
FAMILY
PARRAMASALA
One of the state’s largest multicultural celebrations, Parramasala is back for another year from March 15 to 17.
Dive into a melting pot of culture, celebrating South-East Asia, the Middle East, South America, indigenous Australia and more through food, films, music and arts all on offer at Prince Alfred Square in Parramatta.
The free event will open on Friday with a world food market, welcome parade and the First Nations Concert.
Information on the rest of the jam-packed program is available on the event website.
Parramasala, discoverparramatta.com
media_camera The Parramasala festival is back for another year to celebrate Australia’s multicultural culture. Picture: AAP Image / Angelo Velardo CHALLENGING THE DEEP
Having already delighted more than 120,000 people since opening last year, deep-sea explorer James Cameron’s exhibition has been extended until May 5. See the sea through Cameron’s underwater lens with cinema-scale projections, various artefacts and specimens from his expeditions, including mementos from the design and construction of Deepsea Challenger — the vessel designed by Cameron and built in Sydney. Tickets $12-$50.
James Cameron — Challenging The Deep, sea.museum
AFRICAN CULTURE
The 11th annual Africultures Festival is on today at Wyatt Park in Lidcombe, offering people a chance to enjoy the food, dance, music and fashion of Africa.
There will be more than 45 stalls selling African products, including clothing, homewares and accessories. Take part in dance workshops, or watch performances across two stages by singers, dancers and drummers.
For the athletically inclined, there will be a one-day soccer tournament and a sports zone for AFL, soccer, netball, rugby and wheelchair basketball activities. Bring the young ones alone to the Watotos Corner where there will be face painting, mask making, rock climbing and a jumping castle.
The volunteer-run event aims to acknowledge the diversity of each of the 53 countries on the continent and celebrate their cuisine, art, culture and music.
Africultures Festival 2019, africultures.com.au
media_camera Africultures Event is on this weekend to celebrate the diversity of the continent. Pictured: Supplied TASTE, SHOP, PLAY
Westfield malls around NSW have a host of activities this weekend as part of Taste. Shop. Play. There will be cake demonstrations with celebrity baker Katherine Sabbath in Burwood, painting with wine at Hurstville, Miranda and Penrith, fermentation classes in Tuggerah and paper flower workshops with Jennifer Tran in the CBD.
Check out the website for all activities and costs. Registration is required.
Taste. Shop. Play. at Westfield, westfield.com.au
FOOD + DRINKS
SEASIDE MEAL
Get a taste of the sea while you relax beachside at Coogee Bay Hotel Brasserie, which has just added four new seafood dishes to its menu: salt and chilli calamari, market fish, prawn pappardelle and tuna poke bowls.
Coogee Bay Hotel, coogeebayhotel.com.au
media_camera Coogee Bay Hotel has added a range of new seafood dishes to its menu. Picture: Supplied FABULOUS FUSION
Mexican-Korean fusion restaurant Vecino in Canterbury has a new menu. Known for its KFC — Korean Fried Chicken — it is now offering a limited edition fried chicken platter inspired by K-Pop band BTS.
And in keeping with the theme of combining Tex-Mex with traditional Korean cuisine, the new menu also boasts kalbi tacos with Korean honey soy marinated pork, along with kimchi fried rice mozzarella balls, and more.
Vecino, 9718 0343
TASTE OF THAILAND
Chapayom Australia has brought the taste of Thailand’s vibrant streets to Sydney, in a new venue offering traditional street stall staple Thai ice milk tea, along with delicious street bites and desserts.
Chapayom Australia, chapayom.com.au
STAGE
FANTASM
Get immersed into the world of Arabian folklore with the newest production to hit the Chatswood Concourse tonight. Created by Bellydance Evolution, it pulls together more than 20 dancers performing contemporary and traditional Middle Eastern dance styles. Tickets $39-$79.80.
Fantasm, ticketek.com.au
media_camera Fantasm will entertain audiences with a diverse range of dance performances at the Chatswood Concourse. Picture: Supplied SHAKESBEER
It’s Shakespeare but not as you know it. Bar’d Work produces “Shakesbeer” sessions — short, sharp interpretations of classics performed at the city’s favourite pubs.
Catch Much Ado About Nothing at The Shakespeare Hotel in Surry Hills today. Tickets $25-$30.
Shakesbeer Sessions, bardwork.com
SHORT & SWEET
It’s Women’s Week in this five-week festival featuring 12 short plays of 10 minutes today and tomorrow, plus wildcard showings in which audiences don’t know what they are about to see. Tickets $24-$27.
Short + Sweet Theatre, shortandsweet.org
ART
JANET LAURENCE
This Museum of Contemporary Art exhibit of the work of leading Sydney-based mixed media artist Janet Laurence features sculptures, installations, photography and video capturing her love for nature.
A highlight is the MCA- commissioned Theatre Of Trees illustrating the artist’s knowledge of plants and their medicinal properties. Free until June 10.
Janet Laurence: After Nature, mca.com.au
media_camera Artist Janet Laurence preparing for her exhibition at the MCA. Picture: Jacquie Manning. WOMEN IN COLOUR
Curated by Mirri Leven, this exhibition features more than 60 selected works by female contemporary indigenous artists from across the nation — both urban and remote — of all ages, at Cooee Art Gallery in Paddington.
Women In Colour, cooeeart.com.au
THE OTHER ART FAIR
Returning for its fifth year, this art event combines 120 independent artists, selected by a committee of global art experts, with live performances, food and plenty of champagne at the Australian Technology Park in Eveleigh from March 14 to 17. Tickets $15-$30.
The Other Art Fair Sydney, sydney.theotherartfair.com
media_camera The Other Sydney Art Fair celebrate 120 works from independent artists. Picture: Supplied MUSIC
ORIGINAL GIPSY KINGS
Three of the founding members of 1980s flamenco, salsa and pop band The Gipsy Kings will be live at the Enmore Theatre on March 13. Brothers Paul and Canut Reyes together with brother-in-law Chico Bouchikhi will perform with a 12-piece band, including eight guitarists.
The Gipsy Kings were celebrated for their ability to bring Catalan rumba music to worldwide audiences. They will play their classic flamenco tunes such as Bamboléo, Bem Maria, Volare, Djobi Djoba, A Mi Manera along with songs from their new album. Tickets are $90-$125.
The Original Gipsy Kings, ticketek.com.au
SILKROAD ENSEMBLE
The Grammy Award-winning Silkroad Ensemble has its first Sydney performance tonight at Sydney Opera House. The group brings together musicians from more than 20 countries to create music that combines international traditions and styles.
The talented group has recorded seven albums, including the award-winning Sing Me Home. Expect a mixture of traditional Vietnamese, Chinese and Kazakh music, Finnish folk songs, Indian classical jugalbandi and popular jazz. The one-night only show costs $85-$130.
Silkroad Ensemble, sydneyoperahouse.com
media_camera Grammy Award-winning Silkroad Ensemble are set to perform at Sydney Opera House. Picture: Supplied CELEBRATING RIHANNA
The Oxford Art Factory dedicates the night of March 15 to pop queen Rihanna’s most popular R’n’B tracks. DJ Dusty will be in charge, playing the singer’s best hits all night. Entry is free for this 18+ event.
RIHANNA Appreciation Night, oxfordartfactory.com
PLAN AHEAD
LANO AND WOODLEY
Australian comedy duo Colin Lane and Frank Woodley bring their sketch comedy and slapstick theatre to Sydney in Fly.
The production won the People’s Choice Award at last year’s Melbourne Comedy Festival and has been dubbed the pair’s finest show yet. It’s on March 23 at Sydney Opera House and tickets are on sale now.
Lano and Woodley: FLY, sydneyoperahouse.com
media_camera Lano and Woodley’s new show FLY is inspired by the Wright brothers. Picture: Jason Edwards HARVEST FEAST
Enjoy lunch with vineyard views at the Wine Harvest Feast on March 23 at the award-winning Far Ago Hill Vineyard in Canyonleigh.
The cost of $175 per person gets you a delicious lunch made with locally grown produce, plus wine and acoustic music by Lou Bruce and Craig Hooper. Booking early is recommended.
Wine Harvest Feast
Originally published as Dive into a melting pot of culture at the Parramasala festival
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Labour Day Melbourne 2019: What’s open, what to do, events, Moomba | Cairns Post

Things to in Melbourne on the Labour Day long weekend Staff writers, Herald Sun March 6, 2019 12:51am
Looking for things to do this long weekend? Here’s your guide to what’s open, the special events held in our city and where to find a decent feed during the Melbourne Food and Wine Festival.
WHAT’S ON IN MELBOURNE
MOOMBA FESTIVAL
Make the most of the carnival atmosphere at Moomba Festival this long weekend starting Friday 8 until Monday 11 March. Aside from the rides, there’s plenty to eat and drink at the family event. Don’t forget the Birdman Rally on Sunday March 10 at 11.30am and the Moomba parade at 10.45am on Monday March 11.
www.moomba.melbourne.vic.gov.au
SLICE OF SPICE
Two of your favourite cuisines come together for A Slice of Spice event during the Melbourne Food and Wine Festival this long weekend. 400 Gradi’s Johnny Di Francesco and Babu Ji NYC’s Jessi Singh have joined forces to create wood-fired pizzas topped with aromatic curries and Indian spices. Choose between a 6pm or 8pm sitting at 400 Gradi Brunswick. Tickets: $63
https://www.melbournefoodandwine.com.au/program/a-slice-of-spice-7183
OH HONEY
Take advantage of The Langham’s Heavenly Honey High Tea at Aria Bar and Lounge from Monday 11 to Friday 22 March, as part of the Melbourne Food and Wine Festival. Satisfy your sweet and savoury toothes on a selection of treats, including a gianduja, macadamia and honey tart with whipped cream and 24-carat gold leaf and Milawa chicken pinwheel sandwich with pomegranate and almond. Available weekdays from 10.30am until 8pm. Cost: $69.00 per person and includes a glass of sparkling wine on arrival.

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10 Phoenix-Area Restaurants With the Best Desert Views

Different Pointe of View North Seventh Street Perched atop the North Mountain Preserve within the Pointe Hilton Tapatio Cliffs Resort, Different Pointe of View has been a go-to special occasion restaurant for many Phoenicians for more than 30 years. The restaurant’s featured attraction is its spacious outdoor Terrace Room, which affords sweeping panoramic views of the Salt River Valley. The kitchen has been on solid culinary footing since executive chef Anthony DeMuro joined the restaurant in 2008. The menu, which straddles the line between New American and Continental fine dining with a modern Mediterranean twist, changes around three times a year to reflect the season. Discover how much you like Carefree in the Discovery Lounge. Courtesy of Boulders Resort & Spa
Discovery Lounge 34631 North Tom Darlington Drive, Carefree You’re not going to find a bad view anywhere on the grounds of the Boulders Resort & Spa, but if you’d like to pair the scenery with food and drink, we recommend the Discovery Lounge. Upon entry, it’ll be a dead giveaway as to why they call the place Boulders. More of a reception area, Discovery Lounge has cushy furniture, a crackling fire, and lengthy bar adjacent to floor-to-ceiling windows. The short menu offers shrimp ceviche, fish and steak tacos, and the The Bobby Slayer steak torta for those who care. There’s also a patio and waterfall you’ll have to see. Sanctuary Camelback Mountain Resort will always host dinner at Elements. Courtesy of Sanctuary Camelback Mountain Resort
Elements 5700 East McDonald Drive, Paradise Valley Views of the Valley from Camelback Mountain are in your future if dinner plans are being made for Elements. The dining gem of the Sanctuary Camelback Mountain Resort & Spa, this spot blends seasonal American staples with Asian accents under the supervision of chef Beau MacMillan. But it’s also the heavily windowed dining room with panoramic views of Paradise Valley that sets this place apart. Elements often hosts special dinners and holiday sittings, or you can visit the neighboring Jade Bar for similar views of the Valley. Jackie Mercandetti
Geordie’s 2501 East Telawa Trail Tucked behind Biltmore Fashion Park, William Wrigley’s 1930s-era mansion is known as much for its views of the Phoenix skyline below and Phoenix Mountains Preserve above than it is for the history and food. They only serve Arizona-raised Cedar River Farms prime beef, a killer Sunday brunch, and distinct dishes like the Wrigley House Smoked Salmon, Black River Caviar, and Jamie’s Whole Roast Chicken (for two). And if you can steal yourself away from the view, do have a drink in Jamie’s Wine Bar. The view from the table. Courtesy of J&G Steakhouse
J&G Steakhouse 6000 East Camelback Road, Scottsdale Sometimes, you just want a really good steak. J&G Steakhouse at The Phoenician resort recently celebrated its 10th anniversary by undergoing a redesign that included a desert-inspired color scheme and improvements to the patio area. Fortunately, the stunning views, outstanding food, and impeccable service haven’t changed. Beef is the restaurant’s raison d’etre, but it’s by no means the only good choice on the menu — there’s fresh seafood, craveable sides, and a beverage menu that ranges from domestic beers to bottles of wine that cost more than a mortgage payment. When an Arizona menu meets an Arizona view. Courtesy of Kai
Kai 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Boulevard, Chandler As a AAA Five Diamond and Forbes Five Star restaurant, Kai at the Sheraton Grand at Wild Horse Pass Resort is one of the most highly praised restaurants in Arizona. What really makes Kai uniquely Arizonan, though, is its singular menu of Native American-influenced fare. Chef de cuisine Ryan Swanson’s menu weaves elements of Pima and Maricopa culture and tradition into an uncommon menu that you won’t find anywhere else in the country. Many of the dishes feature heirloom Arizona ingredients, game, and vegetables that have been sourced locally from the Gila River Indian Community. The menu changes seasonally, but don’t miss staples like the grilled tenderloin of buffalo, a gorgeously cooked, lean steak paired with a saguaro blossom syrup. And the view of the Valley its enclosing mountain ranges is spectacular. Bad a bad seat in the house. Courtesy of Orange Sky
Orange Sky 9800 East Talking Stick Way, Scottsdale Some impressive, 360-degree views of the Valley await from the 15th floor of Talking Stick Resort. You get a little bit of a colorful flicker from Top Golf, a little bit of Scottsdale’s city lights, but a whole lot of mountains and desert sky views. The dinner-only menu covers surf and turf, including popular order like the agave-chile beef tenderloin, shrimp and scallop steaks, grilled elk loin, and foraged mushrooms with sunchoke risotto. Reserve a spot in the dining room or grab a drink in the lounge and see why the whole operation is called Orange Sky. The scene from the Rooste. Lauren Cusimano
Rustler’s Rooste 8383 South 48th Street One the most carefree cowboy bar you’ll ever visit, this massive restaurant offers steak dinners, fish options, ribs, and rattlesnake, plus, every table gets a hearty post-dinner serving of cotton candy. Inside, you can wander around two stories and head down the famous slide. Outside, you can catch a nice view of Arizona’s mountains and — if you time it right — a breathtaking sunset that will slowly dim the Valley below. It’s a family-friendly spot and can be reserved for private parties or receptions. The saloon opens at 4 p.m. and stays open late; the steakhouse serves from 5 to 10 p.m. If you like this story, consider signing up for our email newsletters. SHOW ME HOW

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Sydney events: Parramasala, Africultures festival

One of the state’s biggest multicultural celebrations — Parramasala — is back for another year and African food, art and music is on display at the Africultures festival. Here is your event guide for Sydney this week. FAMILY PARRAMASALA One of the state’s largest multicultural celebrations, Parramasala is back for another year from March 15 to 17. Dive into a melting pot of culture, celebrating South-East Asia, the Middle East, South America, indigenous Australia and more through food, films, music and arts all on offer at Prince Alfred Square in Parramatta. The free event will open on Friday with a world food market, welcome parade and the First Nations Concert. Information on the rest of the jam-packed program is available on the event website. Parramasala, discoverparramatta.com Camera Icon The Parramasala festival is back for another year to celebrate Australia’s multicultural culture. Picture: News Corp Australia, AAP Image / Angelo Velardo CHALLENGING THE DEEP Having already delighted more than 120,000 people since opening last year, deep-sea explorer James Cameron’s exhibition has been extended until May 5. See the sea through Cameron’s underwater lens with cinema-scale projections, various artefacts and specimens from his expeditions, including mementos from the design and construction of Deepsea Challenger — the vessel designed by Cameron and built in Sydney. Tickets $12-$50. James Cameron — Challenging The Deep, sea.museum AFRICAN CULTURE The 11th annual Africultures Festival is on today at Wyatt Park in Lidcombe, offering people a chance to enjoy the food, dance, music and fashion of Africa. There will be more than 45 stalls selling African products, including clothing, homewares and accessories. Take part in dance workshops, or watch performances across two stages by singers, dancers and drummers. For the athletically inclined, there will be a one-day soccer tournament and a sports zone for AFL, soccer, netball, rugby and wheelchair basketball activities. Bring the young ones alone to the Watotos Corner where there will be face painting, mask making, rock climbing and a jumping castle. The volunteer-run event aims to acknowledge the diversity of each of the 53 countries on the continent and celebrate their cuisine, art, culture and music. Africultures Festival 2019, africultures.com.au Camera Icon Africultures Event is on this weekend to celebrate the diversity of the continent. Pictured: Supplied Picture: News Corp Australia TASTE, SHOP, PLAY Westfield malls around NSW have a host of activities this weekend as part of Taste. Shop. Play. There will be cake demonstrations with celebrity baker Katherine Sabbath in Burwood, painting with wine at Hurstville, Miranda and Penrith, fermentation classes in Tuggerah and paper flower workshops with Jennifer Tran in the CBD. Check out the website for all activities and costs. Registration is required. Taste. Shop. Play. at Westfield, westfield.com.au FOOD + DRINKS SEASIDE MEAL Get a taste of the sea while you relax beachside at Coogee Bay Hotel Brasserie, which has just added four new seafood dishes to its menu: salt and chilli calamari, market fish, prawn pappardelle and tuna poke bowls. Coogee Bay Hotel, coogeebayhotel.com.au Coogee Bay Hotel has added a range of new seafood dishes to its menu. Picture: Supplied FABULOUS FUSION Mexican-Korean fusion restaurant Vecino in Canterbury has a new menu. Known for its KFC — Korean Fried Chicken — it is now offering a limited edition fried chicken platter inspired by K-Pop band BTS. And in keeping with the theme of combining Tex-Mex with traditional Korean cuisine, the new menu also boasts kalbi tacos with Korean honey soy marinated pork, along with kimchi fried rice mozzarella balls, and more. Vecino, 9718 0343 TASTE OF THAILAND Chapayom Australia has brought the taste of Thailand’s vibrant streets to Sydney, in a new venue offering traditional street stall staple Thai ice milk tea, along with delicious street bites and desserts. STAGE FANTASM Get immersed into the world of Arabian folklore with the newest production to hit the Chatswood Concourse tonight. Created by Bellydance Evolution, it pulls together more than 20 dancers performing contemporary and traditional Middle Eastern dance styles. Tickets $39-$79.80. Fantasm, ticketek.com.au Camera Icon Fantasm will entertain audiences with a diverse range of dance performances at the Chatswood Concourse. Picture: Supplied SHAKESBEER It’s Shakespeare but not as you know it. Bar’d Work produces “Shakesbeer” sessions — short, sharp interpretations of classics performed at the city’s favourite pubs. Catch Much Ado About Nothing at The Shakespeare Hotel in Surry Hills today. Tickets $25-$30. Shakesbeer Sessions, bardwork.com SHORT & SWEET It’s Women’s Week in this five-week festival featuring 12 short plays of 10 minutes today and tomorrow, plus wildcard showings in which audiences don’t know what they are about to see. Tickets $24-$27. Short + Sweet Theatre, shortandsweet.org ART JANET LAURENCE This Museum of Contemporary Art exhibit of the work of leading Sydney-based mixed media artist Janet Laurence features sculptures, installations, photography and video capturing her love for nature. A highlight is the MCA- commissioned Theatre Of Trees illustrating the artist’s knowledge of plants and their medicinal properties. Free until June 10. Janet Laurence: After Nature, mca.com.au Camera Icon Artist Janet Laurence preparing for her exhibition at the MCA. Picture: Supplied, Jacquie Manning. WOMEN IN COLOUR Curated by Mirri Leven, this exhibition features more than 60 selected works by female contemporary indigenous artists from across the nation — both urban and remote — of all ages, at Cooee Art Gallery in Paddington. Women In Colour, cooeeart.com.au THE OTHER ART FAIR Returning for its fifth year, this art event combines 120 independent artists, selected by a committee of global art experts, with live performances, food and plenty of champagne at the Australian Technology Park in Eveleigh from March 14 to 17. Tickets $15-$30. The Other Art Fair Sydney, sydney.theotherartfair.com Camera Icon The Other Sydney Art Fair celebrate 120 works from independent artists. Picture: Supplied MUSIC ORIGINAL GIPSY KINGS Three of the founding members of 1980s flamenco, salsa and pop band The Gipsy Kings will be live at the Enmore Theatre on March 13. Brothers Paul and Canut Reyes together with brother-in-law Chico Bouchikhi will perform with a 12-piece band, including eight guitarists. The Gipsy Kings were celebrated for their ability to bring Catalan rumba music to worldwide audiences. They will play their classic flamenco tunes such as Bamboléo, Bem Maria, Volare, Djobi Djoba, A Mi Manera along with songs from their new album. Tickets are $90-$125. The Original Gipsy Kings, ticketek.com.au SILKROAD ENSEMBLE The Grammy Award-winning Silkroad Ensemble has its first Sydney performance tonight at Sydney Opera House. The group brings together musicians from more than 20 countries to create music that combines international traditions and styles. The talented group has recorded seven albums, including the award-winning Sing Me Home. Expect a mixture of traditional Vietnamese, Chinese and Kazakh music, Finnish folk songs, Indian classical jugalbandi and popular jazz. The one-night only show costs $85-$130.

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