Indo-Chinese food fest

Indo-Chinese food fest

Prakriti Kandel April 10, 2019
With five outlets all over the Kathmandu, Bawarchi is popular for its Indian food. But lesser known is the Tangra Chinese cuisine that the restaurant also offers. At the Tangra Chinese fest in Bawarchi at Baber Mahal, you can now go Indo-Chinese in style.
The Tangra region in East Kolkata was famous for its Chinese migrant settlement since the British days. Tangra’s cuisine thus evolved to become an amalgamation of Indian and Chinese taste, much like Pernakan is an amalgam of Malay and Chinese cuisine in Singapore and Penang. Bawarchi’s new menu offers items like Hakka noodles, originally Chinese noodles made with a twist of Indian spices.
“We found that Tangra-Chinese really suits the Nepali palae, since people here have always enjoyed items such as Chicken Chilli,” says Marcia Adhikari of Bawarchi. She says the idea of the festival is to make food fun.
Even though Chinese cuisine may be meat-heavy, the menu in Bawarchi has been specially designed to provide equal vegetarian and non-vegetarian options. Vegetarians have a delicious range to choose from, such as the Nimbu Mirch Babycorn, Salt n Pepper Mushroom and Veg Dim Sum. And while Indian food can be heavy and rich, the fest’s menu is a refreshing change for those looking for light on oil snacking options like the Nimbu Mirch Babycorn. The babycorns are fried with a soft texture, with the natural taste oozing through with each bite. They say what is tasty cannot be healthy, this dish proves that adage wrong. A variety of sauces add spark to the dish, with sweet and spicy options, ensuring that these babycorns are not like anything you have partaken of before.
The Salt n Pepper mushroom is another classic spicy, and fun dish, bursting with Indian spice and sauce flavours, a sharp contrast to the babycorn. This variety, however, is a pleasant reminder of the origins of Tangra-Chinese as a mixture of two distinct cuisines.
Bawarchi has offered Tangra Chinese for a while, but this time there are new items such as the Tandoor Bun. Another new dish, the Macher Fingers with Tartar sauce is designed to resemble Chinese stick food for an authentic experience.
The chef also plates all dishes so that they look exquisite. There are delightful desert options to end your dining on a sweet note. Bawarchi’s signature kulfi’s have been elevated with almond and chocolate dust. The Strawberry Phirni, a strawberry flavoured version of the Indian desert khir is a new addition.
Let us raise a toast at the Tangra Chinese food fest so that Hind and Chin are bhai-bhai .
Until 16 April

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Malice Domestic Anthology 14: Mystery Most Edible Interview by E. B. Davis

If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com . April Interview Schedule: 4/10 Malice Domestic Anthology 14 Authors 4/17 David Burnsworth Saturday Guest Bloggers: 4/6 Edith Maxwell, 4/13 Ellen Butler WWK Satuday Bloggers: 4/20 Margaret S. Hamilton, 4/27 Kait Carson Congratulations to our writers for the following publications: Please read Margaret S. Hamilton and Debra Goldstein’s short stories (don’t ask about their modus operandi) in a new anthology, Cooked To Death Vol. IV: Cold Cut Files Congratulations to Shari Randall for her nomination for the Agatha Award for Best First Novel. Her book, Curses, Boiled Again was published by St. Martin’s last year. Read the interviewabout the book here . Yay, Shari! The Malice Domestic conference participants have nominated Annette Dashofy for an Agatha Award for her Zoe Chambers mystery Cry Wolf , published in 2018 by Henery Press. Read E. B. Davis’s interview with Annette about Cry Wolf here . Will four nominations be the charm? Warren Bull’s Abraham Lincoln: Seldom Told Stories was released. It is available at: GoRead: https://www.goread.com/book/abraham-lincoln-seldom-told-stories or at Amazon: http://a.co/d/jdSBKdM Grace Topping’s mystery, Staging is Murder , which will be released April 30, is available for pre-order. KM Rockwood’s new short story, “Map to Oblivion,” has been included the anthology Shhhh…Murder! edited by Andrew MacRae and published by Darkhouse Books. It was released on Sept. 12. Warren Bull also has a story in Shhh…Murder! Look for “Elsinore Noir,” Warren’s short story, in this anthology. Shari Randall’s third Lobster Shack Mystery, Drawn and Buttered , was published February 26, 2019. Available for sale . Wednesday, April 10, 2019 Malice Domestic Anthology 14: Mystery Most Edible Interview by E. B. Davis Malice Domestic Mystery Most Edible is the newest anthology released by Wildside Press. The stories are chosen by a panel of judges, who are not on the Malice Board, but are normally regular attendees of the convention. The panel of judges don’t see each other’s scores. It’s a fair and blind method of choosing the stories included in the anthology . Most anthologies contain about 20-24 short stories. This anthology includes 36 stories. I asked some of the authors questions about their stories. All the stories involve food one way or another. It’s quite a treat (sorry) and a bargain. Welcome authors to WWK. E. B. Davis “The Extra Ingredient” by Joan Long What’s in the purple cannister? Three Egg Kitchen takes its “rat” problems seriously, so the purple canister contains rat poisoning. “A Death in Yelapa” by Leslie Budewitz Is there some chemical in cilantro that makes it distasteful to some people? Food researchers say that roughly 15% of the population think cilantro tastes like soap. Why? That 15% apparently have an increased sensitivity to bitterness, with receptor genes that react negatively to the naturally-occurring aldehydes in cilantro—which also occur in some soaps. There is a slight geographic component to the sensitivity or tolerance – people of Central American or Indian ancestry rarely have problems with cilantro, which makes sense as it is native to those regions and is common in regional cuisines, while people of East Asian ancestry tend to be more cilantrophobic. As for me? Bring it on! “Pie Sisters” by Richard Cass Is there a real tale about rhubarb leaves? Rhubarb leaves are toxic: they contain oxalic acid and sennoside. A person in good health would have to eat several kilos of leaves to die. In 1919, a doctor in Helena, Montana reported to the Journal of the American Medical Association that a young woman in his care had died, bleeding from the nose, after ingesting rhubarb leaves and stems for dinner. “Too Many Cooks Almost Spoil the Murder” by Lynne Ewing Have you ever competed in a cooking or baking contest? Years ago, I loved baking chocolate cakes and often entered my recipes in competitions. My cakes have never won but creating new recipes was always fun. “Pig Lickin’ Good” by Debra H. Goldstein How did the cake get its name? Did you pull on your Alabama roots for this story? The South is known for pig roasts. At these barbecue events, guests would pick or pull the tender meat off the cooked pig. Consequently, these events became known as Pig Pickin’s. The cake recipe featured in “Pig Lickin’ Good“ is a moist cake often served at these barbecues because of its simplicity and the way its taste compliments the barbecued pig. At the end of the meal, the event’s success was noted by the licking clean of one’s fingers. The name, Pig Lickin’ Cake, originally was used in the Carolinas, but later adopted throughout the south. As a transplanted Yankee, it was research rather than roots that brought me to the recipe. “Quiche Alain” by Marni Graff Have you ever eaten Puffer fish? I’ve never eaten pufferfish, and would run like the dickens from it on a menu! But it was used in an episode of Alfred Hitchcock I saw decades ago, and it made an impression on me. When I was looking for an unusual way to kill someone for this story, the memory came to me from the depths of my memory bank. “Diet of Death” by Ang Pompano “We all sold our souls one way or another in the cooking industry.” Loc. 1435 In what ways? Publicity-hungry diet guru Alan Tolzer is willing to set aside his feud with super star food columnist Betty Ann Green so she can promote his book. But Betty doesn’t exist. The editor of On-Topic Magazine has secretly hired a cooking-challenged man, Quincy Lazzaro, to write the “Cooking with Betty” column. And Quincy, desperate for a writing job, accepted the invitation to deceive the public by impersonating Betty. Now he’s feeling guilty about compromising his values and wondering how long before he gets caught. “Death at The Willard Hotel” by Verena Rose I’ve eaten many times at the Old Ebbitt Grill, but I didn’t know it started out as a hotel. When did the hotel close? Thanksgiving Day was celebrated in April? The Old Ebbitt Grill began in 1856 when William Ebbitt bought a boarding house. I couldn’t find when it actually stopped being a boarding house. But its best distinction is being Washington’s first known saloon. While looking at the calendar for 1860 I discovered that Thanksgiving Day was indeed celebrated on April 13. However, during Lincoln’s presidency it was changed to November. “Dining Out” by Rosemary McCracken Do restaurant critics really have the power to close a restaurant? I don’t believe that a single newspaper, magazine or radio review has the power to close a restaurant. But, combined with word of mouth from restaurant-goers, a review can add to the negative buzz about a restaurant that can impact its business. The restaurant business is precarious, with huge overhead costs. If its tables are empty, a restaurant can go out of business in a matter of months. “Snowbirding” by Kristin Kisska How do people get hemlock? Does it have to be distilled or can the needles be placed in food or drink? Poisonous hemlock–a highly toxic and invasive plant species–grows all over North America and can be found along roadsides and thick clusters of weeds. In fact, hemlock leaves can be confused for parsley and the stem for parsnip! In my story, I assumed the alcohol was laced with bits of the plant floating inside the silver flask. Since the story takes place in the thick of Maine’s winter, the hemlock would’ve been collected months before and stored for later (nefarious) use. “Up Day Down Day Deadly Day” by Ellen Larson You made up the acronym “WOE,” didn’t you? Your story does have a lot of humor in it. Are you worried that readers will think you were making fun of overweight people and be offended? All the acronyms and weight-loss language are real and well known to the dieting community. It’s funny because it’s true! Not at all. Fat-shaming—and looksism in general—is abhorent to me, and you won’t find it in this story. In fact, I think readers might be surprised at how normal all the characters are—especially when they are being very, very silly. “The Secret Blend” by Stacy Woodson Did you ever work at KFC? I never worked at KFC, but I was a frequent customer when I was stationed at Fort Bragg. “First of The Year” by Gabriel Valjan What is the Spanish word for “stew?” Why is it scary? Are octopuses smart? El guiso is Spanish for stew, and it’s also a gruesome method the Los Zetas cartel uses on their victims. Recipe: live person, 55-gallon of acid, and the person is either boiled alive or set on fire. An octopus can escape its aquarium, open jars and halve coconuts. A city of octopuses was found in the waters of Jervis Bay, off the coast of eastern Australia in 2017. “The Cremains of The Day” by Josh Pachter Is there really a Bossa Nova donut? I really hope there’s a Bossa Nova donut somewhere — maybe in Rio de Janeiro? — but I’m sorry to admit that there isn’t one in Cedar Falls, Iowa. I made up the Mojo Donuts shop, too, although Cup of Joe on Main Street is real, and I spent a lot of time there when my wife Laurie and I lived in the Cedar Valley from 2008 to 2010. (If you ever find yourself next door in Waterloo, try the Texas donut at Johnson’s Bakery. It’s as big as your head, and every bite is delicious!) “Killer Chocolate Chips” by Ruth McCarty Most abused women are passive. What are triggers that make them act? I think the most important trigger is when an abused woman reaches the lowest point in her relationship and realizes that taking action, even if it threatens her life, is better than staying in an abusive relationship. “Sushi Lessons” by Edith Maxwell Have you spent time in Japan? I lived in the greater Tokyo-Yokohama area for two years in the seventies, when my American boyfriend was in the US Navy and worked on a small base. We lived in a drafty little house (not on base) in Minami Rinkan, on the Okakyu train line. I taught conversational English to businessmen and studied Japanese. We drank at a local bar in the neighborhood with a Mama-san just like in the story – where I felt comfortable going alone as a woman – and we learned how to make sushi from the old woman at the fish shop. You will recognize all of that from the story. Nothing else in “Sushi Lessons” is true – I swear! This is my third short story set in Japan (see https://edithmaxwell.com/short-fiction/ for the others). “The Missing Ingredient for Murderous Intent” by Elizabeth Perona Who is Joy? Joy is one of our main characters, another of the “skinny dipping grandmas” who in the first book in the Bucket List mystery series, chronicled the elderly sleuths’s escapades attempting to solve the murder mystery. She ended up becoming a correspondent for Good Morning America reporting occasionally on issues facing older Americans. She also became a reporter for a local news station, which is how she was able to track down the information Francine needed in the short story. “It’s Canning Season” by Adele Polomski Why are there alligator farmers? Who wants alligators? Alligator farmers in Florida can legally sell as many alligators as they can raise. There are lucrative markets for both the meat and skins of these creatures, and farm raising alligators is a lot less complicated than producing cattle. Unlike other farm-raised animals, alligators don’t need vaccinations, live on undevelopable swampy land and can survive with little food. It’s not easy to get alligators to nest in captivity. To restock their enterprises, farmers depend on collecting eggs in the wild, a costly and heavily regulated activity. To cut corners, some alligator farmers turn to poachers. “The Gourmand” by Nancy Cole Silverman Have you found life ironic? What a cool question. I chose to use a food critic as one the principal characters in the story, because after working in talk radio for many years, I’d known a few. Ironically, most were never what their fans might expect. Irony? You bet! “The Last Word” by Shawn Reilly Simmons “The thermostat was set at a perfect seventy-two, the ambient air providing comfort and the ideal environment for both entrees and desserts to maintain their integrity for up to seven minutes after they left the service window.” Loc. 3577 Has someone really studied this stuff? Like many things related to the culinary world, this concept is a mixture of study and practice. Once a dish is prepared, the clock starts ticking, and it must get to the diner before it “dies in the window” meaning it won’t maintain its integrity or taste as good as it did in the first few minutes after cooking. Kitchens can reach up to 115 degrees or more, especially in front of a busy grill, and if the dining area is too cold, it will chill the food down too quickly and throw the dish out of balance. I chose 72 as the temperature for my story’s chef because that’s my favorite temp to dine in to keep my food tasty–and he’s as particular about these things as I am! “Murder Takes the Cupcake” by Kate Willett Are you going to develop a series based on these sisters? Yes! I’ve been loosely outlining another story about the mystery surrounding the sisters’ mother. Right now, I’m in the very early planning stages, but I think this one might be novelette length. Polly and Kaitlyn surprised me, and I don’t think their story is finished yet. When I began writing “Murder Takes the Cupcake,” I had no idea who they even were. I hadn’t done any character work beforehand; I just dove head first into writing based on a vague idea about a girl visiting a psychic. Then Polly and Kaitlyn suddenly took hold of the plot and wouldn’t let go. Their dynamic is fascinating, and I’m excited to explore it more. So, yes, my plan is for a series! “Morsels of The Gods” by Victoria Thompson Were the original marshmallows flavored by mallow? What are mallows? Are they grown in marshes? Mallow plants are herbs and grow in marshy areas. Marshmallows were originally made from the mallow plant as far back as 2000 B.C. and were used medicinally. French confectioners added ingredients and made them into confections, for which we will always be grateful. “Mrs. Beeton’s Sausage Stuffing” by Christine Trent Was Florence Nightingale really a proponent of adding raw eggs to food for patients? Indeed she was! Egg mixed into beef broth, eggs in wine…any way she could get an egg into a patient (or inmate, as they called hospital patients in those days) was fine by Florence. She considered an egg to not only be very nutritious, but an item that could be easily slipped into any meal, whether cracked open and stirred into a drink or served poached with toast. Florence Nightingale was an early proponent of using nutrition to help speed recovery along, although most health care professionals today might question serving beer and wine to hospital patients! “Bring It” by Terry Shames How did Jenna get Alain to go along with her plan? It wasn’t my intent that Alain would know what Jenna was ultimately up to. She paid him to waltz in just long enough to lend his charm, good looks, and French accent to her plan to upend Marcia’s control of the potluck. He is gone before the real action begins. “Gutbombs ‘N’ Guinness” by Lisa Preston Why did you make the central character a young woman horseshoer? When I developed my horseshoer mystery series, I wanted to create an unusual world that readers aren’t already seeing in another series featuring a protagonist who has room to grow. Rainy Dale, the high school dropout turned horseshoer, who pursued her childhood horse to another state fit the bill. Then I was delighted when my publisher gave me permission to use Rainy and her boyfriend in this story to explore their early days together. {Note: spellcheck will not like “horseshoer” as one word–but it’s one word.} “Carne Diem” by Sharon Lynn Is your main character hypoglycemic? Since my main character lives on a boat she is constantly in motion. Boatlife requires cleaning of mold, keeping saltwater from eating away metal, and making sure sealife isn’t attaching itself to the hull. Also, there is an unintentional core workout of keeping balanced when the boat moves on the tide. Add all of that to the sunshine and fresh air and my character always needs to stay nourished to keep up her energy. “Turn the Sage” by Stephen D. Rogers Do you like puns and word play? Yes, I do enjoy word play, and have to resist including more in order to highlight the emotional journey of the characters. A dash of dialogue, a sprinkle of setting, a pinch of pun. Voila! “Bad Ju-Ju” by M.A. Monnin Can anyone buy bottles of nicotine? Yes! Liquid nicotine is shockingly easy to buy online. Pure nicotine requires an FDA registration number, but to purchase strong dilutions, all that is needed is that buyers meet their state age requirements to purchase tobacco. Here are additional stories included in the anthology! “A Cup of Tea” by Parnell Hall “Brown Recluse” by Marcia Adair “A Slice of Heaven” by Laura Brennan “Sticky Fingers” by L. D. Masterson “Honor Thy Father” by Harriette Sackler “The Blue Ribbon” by Cynthia Kuhn “Murder Takes the Cupcake” by Kate Willett “Bull Dog Gravy” by Mark Thielman “Deadly In-Flight Dining” by Sara Rosett Posted by

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Celebrations Party Planner – The Best Catering Service Provider in Gurgaon

Caterers in Gurgaon , catering services Leave a comment caterersservicesgurgaon Catering in Gurgaon Celebrations Party Planner – The Best Catering Service Provider in Gurgaon Are you living in Gurgaon and planning a party for your loved ones or going to organize a grand wedding? Have done all the arrangements but not finding the right catering in Gurgaon? Don’t worry, Celebrations Party Planner is there to save the day for you. We are a dependable and trustworthy name among the caterers in Gurgaon and other regions of NCR that has been delivering top class catering in Gurgaon. We are working steadfastly for more than a decade to provide catering service to your home. Celebrations Party Planner has a large team of well-trained chefs and service staff who can prepare and serve any mouth-watering Indian or international cuisine. The taste of the food will be cherished by your guests for a long time. Besides catering in Gurgaon we also offer to provide decoration service to aggrandise the atmosphere of your party. Whether you have arranged a conventional birthday party, wedding reception or any other type of theme party we will be decorating it to your satisfaction. All we need is a visit to the location and voila! We are ready with the plan to do the required decoration. Our expert team of interior designers will get it done in no time. Celebrations Party Planner settle everything so amazingly that the atmosphere of your event attains the highest standard. We do it faster and more professionally than any other service provider. We have tie-ups with the material suppliers for both catering and decoration. As soon as you book our service we get in touch with them and arrange everything promptly without delay. If you are looking for an excellent catering in Gurgaon for your forthcoming occasion all you need to do is to give a call to Celebrations Party Planner. We will reach you fast with a quotation.

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Beyond Pad Thai Finding LA’s Best Regional Thai Food : LAist

Beyond Pad Thai — Finding LA’s Best Regional Thai Food by Quincy Surasmith in Food on April 10, 2019 8:10 AM Thailand’s regional cuisines. (illustration by Dan Carino)
Among Thai people living in the United States, the phrase “Thai food” might inspire pride but it’s the country’s regional specialties that evoke yearning. Thankfully, Los Angeles has more Thai residents than anywhere in the world, except for Thailand. That means we’ve got a wealth of options beyond the usual soups and stir-fried noodle dishes. Not that there’s anything wrong with those. We wouldn’t kick a bowl of tom kha kai or a mound of pad see ew to the curb. They’re delicious. But they represent only a sliver of Thailand’s four major regional cuisines: central, southern, northern and Isaan (in the northeast).
Fortunately, a trip to Thai Town in East Hollywood or to North Hollywood in the San Fernando Valley (yes, newcomers, they’re nowhere near each other and yes, we do that just to confuse you) offers endless possibilities for pleasing your palate.
Before we get into it, let’s be clear: This is NOT a comprehensive list. Any list would be complicated by the fact that most Thai restaurants offer foods from multiple regions, especially when line cooks sneak a few signature dishes from home onto the menu. Consider this a nudge to try some northern chili dip, a spicy southern fish curry or some fermented sour pork. CENTRAL THAI FOOD
America’s most popular Thai dishes — pad thai, tom yum, the red/yellow/green curries — originate in Thailand’s central region, home to the culinary wonderland that is Bangkok. The cuisine here features steamed jasmine rice, stir fried vegetables, seafood, soups and the frequent use of coconut milk and other sweet flavors, as well as the aforementioned noodles and curries. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Soraya Tantipipatpong (@soraya8888) on Jul 12, 2015 at 11:57pm PDT Yai on Hollywood
When it opened in the 1970s, Yai was one of the first Thai restaurants in the neighborhood that would become Thai Town, and it remains one of the oldest surviving Thai restaurants in L.A. A central Thai meal here should feature a balance of stir-fries and soups, meats and vegetables. As your vegetable, try the stir-fried Chinese broccoli, either with crispy pork or salted fish. Pair that with a duck or boar red curry and a beef tendon soup or the lighter gaeng jeud, with clear broth. Make sure to scoop plenty of steamed jasmine rice onto your plate. Located off the Hollywood Blvd. exit on the 101, Yai is the epitome of SoCal cuisine: a strip mall gem that shares space with a donut shop and a 7-Eleven. 5757 Hollywood Blvd., Thai Town. 323-462-0292. View this post on Instagram A post shared by celebspoon (@celebspoon) on Feb 22, 2019 at 7:27pm PST Hollywood Thai
Hollywood Thai — in Thai, its name is “Khao Tom Hollywood” aka “Hollywood rice soup” — is a popular late night spot with younger Thai American immigrants. Follow their lead and order rice soup or rice porridge with sides of cha-om (acacia leaf) omelette curry soup, preserved turnip omelette, duck stew, or stir-fried morning glory with crispy pork. Whether you’re trying to prevent a hangover, already nursing one or just chowing down, Hollywood Thai will nourish you with salty, soupy, stir-fried goodness. 5241 Hollywood Blvd., Thai Town. 323-467-0926. Thai people buy food on a street near in the northern Thai city of Chiang Rai on July 11, 2018. (TANG CHHIN SOTHY/AFP/Getty Images) NORTHERN THAI FOOD
In contrast to the sweet, mild and creamy foods of central Thailand, Northern Thai cuisine embraces more of the bitter flavors found in herbs and offal. These ingredients are reflected in northern style laab (which seasons minced pork with spices like nutmeg, cardamom and star anise), sausages, salads and chili pastes. Sticky rice features much more prominently. The north also borders Burma (Myanmar), and that influence can be seen in dishes such as khao soi, a curry-like soup with both boiled and deep fried egg noodles. An assortment of dishes at Spicy BBQ, a Thai restaurant in East Hollywood. (Quincy Surasmith/LAist) Spicy BBQ
Just a couple blocks south of Thai Town, Spicy BBQ occupies a strip mall so tiny you have to leave the restaurant to use the bathroom. It’s also the place to sample northern Thai style nam phrik chili dips, which you can eat as an appetizer or as part of a larger meal. Grilled green chiles go into nam phrik num while pork and red chiles go into nam phrik ong. They’re listed on the menu as “grilled serrano dressing” and “ground pork chili paste,” respectively, and served with fresh green vegetables and giant pork rinds. Spicy BBQ also offers northern Thailand’s greatest hits including tam khanun, the spicy jackfruit salad, pounded in a mortar and pestle with pork, shallots, chiles and makrut lime leaves; sai ua, a northern style herbal pork sausage seasoned with lemongrass, chiles and turmeric; khao soi noodles; and gaeng hanglay curry, pork stewed in a blend of Indian-style spices brightened with the sweetness of pineapple and the tartness of tamarind. 5101 Santa Monica Blvd., East Hollywood. 323-663-4211. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Felix Fang (@felixfang217) on Sep 30, 2016 at 1:58pm PDT Pailin
On the western edge of Thai Town, Pailin keeps its northern cuisine secret and off-menu except for a few hints in the “chef’s recommendation” section. Ask politely and you’ll discover that they offer chili dips, jackfruit salad, northern style sausage and khao soi. Their kanom jeen nam ngiao, a savory pork and tomato soup with fermented rice noodles (the fermentation only affects the texture), almost evokes an Italian pasta — if it were lined with flavor bombs comprising pork blood cubes, fried garlic, and pickled mustard greens. 5621 Hollywood Blvd., Thai Town. 323-467-6775. View this post on Instagram A post shared by NIGHT+MARKET (@ntmrkt) on Sep 5, 2018 at 11:52am PDT Night + Market
Chef Kris Yenbamroong is a native son of Los Angeles, a second generation Thai American whose parents started the restaurant Talesai. In 2010, he spun off his own concept, Night+Market , which now has three locations: Silver Lake, Venice and West Hollywood’s Sunset Strip (the location names “Song” and “Sahm” are Thai for “two” and “three”). Although Yenbamroong has no formal culinary training and doesn’t aim for a rigorous sense of regional purity, his menu bleeds northern Thai cuisine, especially at the WeHo location. While his food reflects diverse regional influences, his Chiang Rai style larb lanna, sai uah sausage and khao soi noodles are quintessentially northern. You can smell those herby aromas in his sai uah and taste it in the subtle bitterness of the pork blood and spice mix in his larb lanna. Night + Market WeHo: 9043 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. 310-275-9724. Night + Market Song: 3322 W. Sunset Blvd., Silver Lake. 323-665-5899. Night + Market Sahm: 2533 Lincoln Blvd., Venice. 310-301-0333. SOUTHERN THAI FOOD
Southern Thai cuisine features seafood, tamarind and coconut milk as well as a spicy “wet” heat that’s common in its curries and stews. It also glows gold thanks to spices like turmeric, which came eastward from South Asia with the Muslim communities who now live along Thailand’s southern peninsula. View this post on Instagram A post shared by JitladaLA (@jitlada_la) on Dec 12, 2017 at 7:04pm PST Jitlada
One of the best known Thai spots in Los Angeles thanks to Jonathan Gold’s adoring reviews, Jitlada has a ridiculously deep menu with a lengthy section dedicated to southern Thai classics like khua kling, a dry-roasted curry with ground meat; khao mok gai, Thailand’s version of chicken biryani; and khao yam, a rice salad mixed with dried shrimp, mango and shredded coconut. Order at least one of Jitlada’s stellar curries, which are so hot they might melt your face off. Their famous jungle curry is an herbacious brew tinged with grachai (a root related to ginger and galangal) and makrut lime leaves while the gaeng tai pla, a curry made with fish innards, delivers a complicated salty and savory flavor that comes from fermenting the fish before simmering it with Thai eggplants and long beans. The crab curry and southern curry are also great choices. Round out your meal with pork or eel with sator beans, also known as stink beans , a signature ingredient in southern Thai cuisine. As a bonus, look around the restaurant and you might spot sketches by The Simpsons creator Matt Groening, who’s another major Jitlada fan. 5233 Sunset Blvd., Thai Town. 323-667-9809. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Luv2eat Thai Bistro (@luv2eat.thaibistro) on Nov 21, 2014 at 2:42pm PST Luv2eat
Chefs Fern Kaewtathip and Noree Pla of Luv2eat both hail from Phuket, which — aside from its role as a tourist destination and punny t-shirt fodder — is a province and island in southern Thailand. Two of their signature dishes: the Phuket style crab curry (served with rice noodles), and the Hat Yai style fried chicken (served under a mountain of fried shallots). It’s a great place to go if you’re in mid-Hollywood and you need to head in a direction other than east to Thai Town. 6660 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood. 323-498-5835. ISAAN FOOD (NORTHEAST)
The Isaan region, in Northeastern Thailand, shares a border, a language and a culture with Laos. You can see the way the two countries influence each other in dishes like laab and papaya salad. Fermented sausages, grilled meats and sticky rice are all quintessentially Isaan foods. The spiciness here is more of a dry heat, derived from dry-roasted and crushed chiles. Strong, funky and savory flavors from fermented fish pastes are cut with the acidity of limes, creating the salty/sour/spicy symphony that’s at the heart of Isaan cuisine. An assortment of dishes at Isaan Station, a Thai restaurant in L.A.’s Koreatown neighborhood. (Quincy Surasmith/LAist) Isaan Station
Located on the northeastern edge of Koreatown, Isaan Station offers one of the best selections of Isaan-style grilled meats. Their grilled chicken, dad diew-style jerkies and crying tiger grilled beef go well with the tart and salty nam jim jaew dipping sauce, made with fish sauce, lime, tamarind, palm sugar, shallots, toasted rice and chili flakes. Isaan pork sausages, fermented pork spare ribs and nam tok beef or pork come saturated in those sour and salty flavors. Isaan Station also serves laab with glass noodles that soak up any leftover lime and fish sauce. Pair their meats with sticky rice and a papaya salad for a classic Isaan meal. There’s valet parking in the shared lot and lots of street parking nearby. They’re closed on Mondays and between 3 and 5 p.m. on other days. 125 N. Western Ave., #111-112, Koreatown. 323-380-5126. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Quincy (@quincetessence) on Jan 16, 2017 at 12:50pm PST Lacha Somtum
Som tum is Thai papaya salad and, as the name Lacha Somtum suggests, it’s their speciality. Papaya salad, which you can get with all sorts of add-ins — salted crab vermicelli, crisp pork, salted duck egg — is the star of the show. The deep-fried papaya salad is a decadent papaya hash brown that arrives as one large, golden mass with peanuts, long beans and sauce on the side, so the dish stays crisp. You can also try the som tum with nam khao tod (sour sausage tossed with crisp, fried rice) or yum pla dook fu (fried ground catfish seasoned with lime and fish sauce). If you’re driving, give yourself ample time to find street parking. The adjacent Thai Town lots are quick to tow anyone who shouldn’t be there. 5171 Hollywood Blvd., Thai Town. 323-486-7380. Sausage, sticky rice and papaya salad at Kim Thai, a restaurant in North Hollywood. (Courtesy of Kim Thai) Kim Thai Food
The restaurant’s Thai name, Song Fung Khong, roughly translates to “both sides of the Mekong River” and alludes to the language, culture, and cuisine shared by Thailand’s Isaan region and neighboring Laos. At Kim Thai, that means leaning into the savory funk of padaek, a fermented fish sauce made from freshwater fish and the spicy heat of dry roast chilis. Their Lao style papaya salad incorporates that darker briny fish paste instead of fish sauce while their duck laab is served with duck cracklings. Beyond those standouts, Kim Thai Food has a nearly endless menu with bamboo shoots, savory soups and even ant eggs. Find them inside the food court at La Fiesta Swap Meet. 12727 Sherman Way, Ste. B-07, North Hollywood. 818-765-5584. Contact the author of this article or email with further questions, comments or tips.

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Some sessions from the Society of American Archaeologists Annual Meeting in Albuquerque, New Mexico, April 10 – 14, 2019

Tuesday, April 9, 2019 Some sessions from the Society of American Archaeologists Annual Meeting in Albuquerque, New Mexico, April 10 – 14, 2019 SAA 84th Annual Meeting FORUM PRESIDENT’S FORUM:LEARNING FROM THE PAST, LOOKING TOWARDS THE FUTURE:ARCHAEOLOGICAL ETHICS AND THE SAA (SAA President’s Sponsored Session) Time: Wednesday, April 10th, 6:30 PM–8:30 PM Moderators: Alex Barker, Gordon Rakita and John Douglass Participants: APPLYING ETHNOGRAPHY AND ETHNOHISTORY TO IMPROVE ARCHAEOLOGICAL UNDERSTANDING, PART I Room: 130 Cimarron Time: Thursday, April 11th, 8:00 AM–9:30 AM Chair: Brea McCauley Participants: 8:00 Ronald Lippi—A History of the Yumbos, Barbacoan Peoples of Northwestern Ecuador 8:15 Enrique Moral—The Seraglio of the Great Turk: Ethnosexual and Engendered Violences in the Mariana Islands 8:30 Juliana Machado and Jozileia Daniza Kaingang—Women’s Territorialities within Indigenous Societies in Brazil: Past Discourses, Present Relations 8:45 Marcia Bezerra Almeida and Clarice Bianchezzi —Flowers and Sherds: The Practice of Collecting Artifacts in Brazilian Amazon 9:00 Brea McCauley, David Maxwell and Mark Collard—Upper Paleolithic Handprints with Missing Fingers: An Ethnological Perspective 9:15 Patrick Lee, Jamie Inwood, Samson Koromo, Lucas Olesilau and Julio Mercader—Quantitatively and Qualitatively Evaluating the Impact that PalaeoanthropologyMakes on the Lives of the Maasai People of Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania [7] Forum CONTROLLING THE NARRATIVE: ADDRESSING THE NEED FOR AN INDIGENOUS VALUES-FOCUSED NATIONAL REGISTER CRITERION When the National Register (NR) eligibility criteria were crafted several decades ago, very little consideration was given toincorporating the cultural and spiritual values that indigenous peoples—more specifically, Native Americans, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians—attach to their respective significant places. These places include, but are certainly not limited to sites, features and landscapes. As a result, despite changes to the National Historic Preservation Act in 1992 and the publication of NR Bulletin 38, the evaluation and determination of eligibility for such places remains extremely problematic. Because the existing NR criteria do not, and cannot, encompass indigenous values and traditional knowledge, attempts to apply these criteria to indigenous significant places often contribute to adversarial relationships among consulting parties and place these criticalresources at increased risk of damage or destruction because they cannot be appropriately evaluated or determined eligible using the existing NR criteria. The forum will focus on the critical need for indigenous peoples to control the narrative when it comes to evaluating and determining the significance of their places of importance and why an Indigenous Values-Focused National Register (NR) eligibility criterion is therefore warranted. Room: 60 Chaco Time: Thursday, April 11th, 8:00 AM–10:00 AM Moderators: Stephanie Stoermer and Jeani Borcher Participants: [16] Symposium TRANSCENDING BOUNDARIES AND EXPLORING PASTS: CURRENT ARCHAEOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE ARIZONA-SONORA BORDERLANDS The International Border between the United States and Mexico is a region fraught with political, economic, and social tensions—perhaps never more so than at our present point in history. In an effort to momentarily transcend those tensions (the byproduct of comparatively recent geopolitical boundaries), this symposium showcases recent explorations of the deep culture history of a portion of that border region, specifically that encompassing southwest Arizona and northern Sonora. For millennia this magnificent, yet austere, part of the Sonoran Desert has been a crossroads of numerous groups and cultural traditions—Hohokam, Patayan, Trincheras, O’odham, Apache, and others. Today, archaeologists and cultural preservationists on both sides of the Arizona-Sonora border continue to uncover and decipher facets of this deep and complex culture history, as this symposium demonstrates. Room:17 Apache Time: Thursday, April 11th, 8:00 AM–10:45 AM Chair: Andrew Veech Participants: 8:00 Andrew Veech—American Periphery, Sonoran Heartland: Recent Archaeological Explorations of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument 8:15 John Carpenter and Guadalupe Sanchez Miranda—Resilience in an Arid Environment: Long-Term Climate Change and Human Adaptations in Sonora8:30Adrianne Rankin—Prehistoric and Historical Period Agricultural Strategies in the Western Papagueria: Archaeological and O’odham Perspectives 8:45 Elisa Villalpando and James Watson—Early Mortuary Traditions in the Arizona-Sonora Borderlands 9:00 Maren Hopkins, Michael Spears and T. J. Ferguson—O’odham Travel in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands: Identifying Travel Routes on Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument 9:15 Jupiter Martinez—The Cocospera Valley in the Prehistoric, Protohistoric and Missión Period: A Corridor of Cultural Exchange? 9:30 Cheryl Blanchard—Transcending Boundaries and Exploring Pasts: Conservation Efforts on Public Lands near the Borderlands 9:45 César Villalobos—Los que viven donde sopla el verdadero viento: Bahía Tepoca, Sonora, Archaeology of the Coast in the Gulf of California 10:00 Jared Renaud—Developing a Condition Monitoring Plan for Archeological Sites at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument 10:15 Lauren Kingston—Discussant [18] Symposium BEYOND THE ROUND HOUSE: SPATIAL LOGIC AND SETTLEMENT ORGANIZATION ACROSS THE LATE ANDEAN HIGHLANDS This session examines the socio-spatial logic of late Andean settlements, where architectural preservation is often excellent, and considers how these logics varied across the highlands. These sites are typically large villages and towns of round houses that appear to have grown organically without apparent “order,” and they are sometimes described in terms of what they lack (public architecture, plazas, central planning, etc.) Here, we focus on how these spaces actively structured social, political, and economic organization. For example, what was the size and arrangement of social building blocks such as families, lineages, and largergroups? Over time, where did new generations and new arrivals settle and build? How did people move through the settlement as they went about daily tasks? What did they see, and what did they know about their neighbors? How were the dead placed in relation to the spaces of the living? Did communities continue previous traditions of socio-spatial organization and architectural construction, or did the foundation of new settlements entail the creation of new forms of order? What changed with the transition to Inca rule? This session aims to achieve a better understanding of these continuities and contrasts across late Andean societies of the highlands. Room: 16 Acoma Time: Thursday, April 11th, 8:00 AM–10:45 AM Chairs: Elizabeth Arkush and Anna Guengerich Participants: 8:00 Elizabeth Arkush—Behind the Walls: LIP Architecture and Settlement Organization across the Peruvian Titicaca Basin 8:15 Alejandra Sejas Portillo—Conflict, Spatial Organization and Group Identity during the Late Intermediate Period in the Bolivian Southern Altiplano 8:30 Ryan Smith—An Alternative Pattern of Coalescence: A Study of Architecture and Organization at a Non-fortified, Pre-Inca Town in the Southern Highlands of Peru 8:45 Lauren Kohut—Constructing Difference: Defense, Sensory Experience, and Social Difference at a Late Prehispanic Hillfort (Arequipa, Peru)9:00Steve Kosiba and Bruce Mannheim—Ancient Andean Scalarity 9:15 Darryl Wilkinson—Neither Up nor Down? The Late Intermediate Period Occupation of the Andes-Amazonia Frontier in Southern Peru 9:30 Manuel Perales—Where Are the Cinchecona? Mortuary Architecture and Socio-political Organization in Jauja, Peru, during the Late Intermediate Period9:45Alexis Mantha—Contrasting Use of Space among Neighbors: Puna versus Quechua/Suni Residential Settlements of the Rapayán/Tantamayo Region during the LIP 10:00 Anna Guengerich—Houses and the Puzzle of “Public Space” in Ceja de Selva Communities of Northeastern Peru 10:15 Jerry Moore—Discussant [33] Symposium HUMAN BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY AT THE COASTAL MARGINS: GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES ON COASTAL & MARITIME ADAPTATIONS Coastlines and islands are hypothesized to have been critical in our species’ earliest migrations out of Africa as well as the initial colonization of the New World. A wealth of archaeological evidence reflects the importance of these dynamic environments for past human societies, yet interpretation of behavior continues to rely on theoretical models developed based on terrestrial foraging behavior. In this session, we ask discussants from around the world to consider if/how human behavioral adaptations may vary with respect to the unique conditions, constraints, and context of Coastlines. Local case studies presented will offer insight on current conceptualizations of coastal and maritime adaptations. Participants will collaboratively take on development of theoretical concepts that engage the unique trajectory of social, political, and demographic feedbacks connected to coastal settings such as settlements, procurement, and exchange. Our goal is to identify and remedy potential conceptual gaps in the application of existing theoretical models when applied to habitation of coastal settings and use of their resources. Critical topics include the unique challenges faced by coastal and maritime societies, including: ecological risks and resilience of coastal environments, economic balance between coastal and terrestrial resource needs, technological innovation and transmission of knowledge, among others. Room: 115 Brazos Time: Thursday, April 11th, 8:00 AM–12:00 PM Chairs: Heather Thakar and Carola Flores-Fernandez Participants: 8:00 Catherine F. West and Ben Fitzhugh—Human Behavioral Ecology and the Complexities of Arctic Foodways 8:15 Hiroto Takamiya, Takeji Toizumi and Taiji Kurozumi—Coastal Resource Use during the Prehistoric Times in the Amami and Okinawa Archipelagos, Japan8:30Shannon Tushingham—Archaeology and Behavioral Ecology of Maritime Hunter-gatherers of the Northeast Pacific Rim 8:45 Jessi Halligan—Coastal Paleoindians in the Southeastern US? Envisioning Early People on the Now-Drowned Continental Shelves 9:00 Javier Fernanddez-Lopez De Pablo and Elodie Brisset—Central Place Foraging Models and Early Holocene Coastal Adaptations in the Western Mediterranean 9:15 Genevieve Dewar and Brian Stewart—Foragers, Herders and Harvesters: Modeling Shifts in Late Holocene Subsistence Strategies on South Africa’s West Coast 9:30 Colin Wren, Curtis Marean, Eric Shook, Kim Hill and Marco Janssen—What Makes a Forager Turn Coastal? An Agent-Based Approach to Coastal Foraging on the Dynamic South African Paleoscape 9:45 Questions andAnswers 10:00 Douglas J. Kennett—Discussant 10:15 John Crock—Maritime to the Max: The Keys to Success for Small Island Populations in the Caribbean 10:30 Hector Neff—Holocene Human Adaptations on the Pacific Coast of Central America 10:45 Paulo DeBlasis and Maria Dulce Gaspar—The People of the Lagoon: Sambaquis and Ecological Management on the Southern Brazilian Coast 11:00 César Méndez and Amalia Nuevo Delaunay—Assessing Shellfish Discard for Discerning between Field Processing or Residential Relocation in the Subtropical Pacific Coast of South America 11:15 Diego Salazar and Carola Flores-Fernandez—Swordfish Hunting as Prestige Signaling within Middle Holocene Fishing Communities of the Atacama Desert Coast? 11:30 Manuel J. San Román, FlaviaMorello Repetto, Victor Sierpe, María José Barrientos and Jimena Torres—From the Forest to the Steppe: Mobility Strategies of Late-Marine Hunters (Alacaluf) in the Strait of Magellan, Chile 11:45 Daniel H. Sandweiss—Discussant [38] Symposium THE LEGACIES OF THE BASIN OF MEXICO:THE ECOLOGICAL PROCESSES IN THE EVOLUTION OF A CIVILIZATION, PART 1 This year (2019) marks the 40th anniversary of the publication of the seminal work by William Sanders, Jeffrey Parsons, and Robert Santley, The Basin of Mexico: Ecological Processes in the Evolution of a Civilization. The seminal nature of the book lies in its innovative approaches to understand the linkages between demographic growth, settlement location, social and political complexity, and both anthropogenic and nonhuman induced environmental processes. The paradigms and approaches that the book proposed framed the way archaeologists and other scientists have approached the evolution of society and environment is approached in the Basin of Mexico. This symposium aims at bringing together archaeologists and scientists devoted to the study of paleoenvironments to discuss the book’s legacy and to share subsequent and recent advances in the understanding of the processes that The Basin of Mexico tackled at its time. It intends to build on the multi-disciplinary spirit of the book to bring together archaeologists, anthropologists, ethnohistorians, and scholars working on environmental reconstructions of the basin. We also encourage researchers whose scope of study has sought to go even deeper into the past and to more recent periods in the area’s history. Room: 270 Ballroom C Time: Thursday, April 11th, 8:00 AM–12:00 PM Chair: Carlos Cordova Participants: 8:00 Deborah Nichols—The Evolution of a Revolution: “The Basin of Mexico: Ecological Processes in the Evolution of a Civilization” 8:15 Silvia Gonzalez, Samuel Rennie and David Huddart—Paleoindians from the Basin of Mexico: How Do They Fit in the Early Peopling of the Americas? 8:30 Elizabeth Solleiro-Rebolledo, Georgina Ibarra and Sergey Sedov—The Role of Pedogenesis in Palaeosols of Mexico Basin and Its Implication in the Paleoenvironmental Reconstruction 8:45 Carlos Cordova—Long and Short-term Lacustrine and Fluviolacustrine Dynamics in Relation to Prehistoric Settlements: The Case of Lake Texcoco 9:00Isabel Rodríguez López and Aleksander Borejsza—From Tlacolol to Metepantle: A Reappraisal of the Antiquity of the Agricultural Niches of the Central Mexican Symbiotic Region 9:15 Mari Carmen Serra Puche—“The Basin of Mexico: Ecological Processes in the Evolution of a Civilization” y nuestras excavaciones en el Sur de la Cuenca de Mexico 9:30 Dan Healan—Interaction between the Basin of Mexico and West Mexico in the Prehispanic Era 9:45 Charles Kolb—In the Beginning: TVP and TMP—Reflections on the Classic Teotihuacan Period Survey in the Teotihuacan Valley, 1962-1964 10:00 Sarah Clayton and Michelle Elliott—Urban Growth and Land Use at Chicoloapan, an Epiclassic Town in the Southern Basin of Mexico 10:15 Guillermo Acosta-Ochoa, Emily McClung de Tapia, Laura Beramendi-Orosco, Diana Martinez-Yrizar and Galia Gonzalez-Hernandez—Prehispanic Chinampas at El Japón, Xochimilco: Structure and Chronology 10:30 Kristin De Lucia—Household Lake Exploitation and Aquatic Lifeways in Pre-Aztec Central Mexico 10:45 John K. Millhauser—Slow Violence and Environmental Inequality in the Valley of Mexico 11:00 Larry Gorenflo—Twentieth Century Settlement Patterns in the Basin of Mexico: In Search of Pre-Colombian Roots for Regional Demography and Land Use 11:15 Patricia Fournier and Cynthia Otis Charlton—Basin Enterprise: The Next Generations 11:30 Jeffrey Parsons—Discussant 11:45 Emily McClung de Tapia—Discussant [41] General Session: APPLYING ETHNOGRAPHY AND ETHNOHISTORY TO IMPROVE ARCHAEOLOGICAL UNDERSTANDING, PART II Room: 130 Cimarron Time: Thursday, April 11th, 10:00 AM–12:00 PM Chair: Matthew Rooney Participants: 10:00 Jonathan Roldan, Makayla Whitneyand Taylor Picard—Language as a Cultural Resource: A Case Study with the Tolowa and Hupa Languages 10:15 Paul Reed—Pueblo of Acoma Ethnographic Study of the Greater Chaco Landscape 10:30 Christina Bisulca, Marilen Pool and Nancy Odegaard—Indigenous Use of Mesquite Exudates in Arizona 10:45 Matthew Rooney—Chickasaws and Presbyterians: What Did It Mean To Be Civilized? 11:00 Kong Cheong—The Pickett’s Mill Farmstead: An Archaeology of the Inarticulate Whites 11:15 Grant McCall and Russell Greaves—The Ethnogeology of Sedimentation and Land Formation in the Lower Mississippi Delta of Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana 11:30 Niklas Schulze and Luis Barba —Pyrotechnology in the Ethnohistoric and Archaeological Record of Prehispanic Mexico 11:45 Erik Stanley—Indigenous Interpretations of the Past [51] General Session CLOVIS: NEW RESEARCH, NEW DEBATES Room: 60 Chaco Time: Thursday, April 11th, 10:45 AM–12:00 PM Chair: Heather Smith Participants: 10:45 Michael Faught—Some Thoughts on “Clovis”: Where Were They From, Where Did They Go, Where Do They Fit in the Peopling of the Western Hemisphere 11:00 David Thulman and Brendan Fenerty —Clovis Points Were Likely Knives: An Evaluation of the Evidence 11:15 James Norris and Metin Eren—Early-and Middle-Stage Fluted Stone Tool Bases: Further Evidence they are not Diagnostic of Clovis 11:30 Hannah Robinson—Clovis Technology on the Southern Colorado Plateau: AnAnalysis of the Glen Quarry Locality 11:45 Heather Smith and Brendon Asher —Variability in Clovis Biface Morphology from the Type-site, Blackwater Draw Locality 1 [56] Symposium THE LEGACIES OF THE BASIN OF MEXICO:THE ECOLOGICAL PROCESSES IN THE EVOLUTION OF A CIVILIZATION, PART 2 Room: 270 Ballroom C Time: Thursday, April 11th, 1:00 PM–2:45 PM Chairs: Christopher Morehart and Charles Frederick Participants: 1:00 Destiny Crider—Advances in theStudy Archaeological Ceramics of the Epiclassic-Early Postclassic Basin of Mexico 1:15 Joaquín Arroyo-Cabrales, Eduardo Corona-Martínezand Felisa J. Aguilar-Arellano—Late Pleistocene-Early Holocene Archaeozoology and Paleontology at the Basin of Mexico:A Reappraisal 40 Years after Early Views 1:30 Abigail Meza-Peñaloza and Federico Zertuche—Comparison by Non-Metrical Traits of Xaltocan’s Shrine vs. Teotihuacan in Mexico by Using a Non-metric Multidimensional Scaling Method 1:45 Philip Arnold and Wesley Stoner—Taking It to the Tuxtlas: How the BoM Survey Shaped Gulf Lowland Settlements 2:00 Christopher Morehart, Angela Huster, Dean Blumenfeld, Rudolf Cesaretti and Megan Parker—Between Two Empires: Conflict and Community during the Epiclassic Period in the Northern Basin of Mexico 2:15 Charles Frederick—What Lies between the Dots: Exploring the Archaeology of the Broader Basin of Mexico Landscape 2:30 Deborah Nichols—Discussant [70] Symposium COMPLEX FISHER-HUNTER-GATHERERS OF NORTH AMERICA This symposium presents current research on the social and political organization of fisher-hunter-gatherer communities that occupied coastal and riverine locations in North America. In particular, papers focus on groups that were politically complex, maintained institutional inequality, or organized themselves in unexpected ways. Archaeology, ethnography, and historic records have all documented instances of such non-agrarian coastal groups, and while these developments are not entirely unique to coastal foragers, access to aquatic resources and avenues of transportation can have dramatic effects on social trajectories. Paradigms for evaluating complexity and social organization can vary regionally because of substantive differences among casestudies, and because of the influence of distinct research traditions. This session brings scholars of North American fisher-hunter-gatherers in conversation with one another, with the broader aims of examining those paradigms we use for investigating social organization, untangling criteria of categorization, and comparing regional histories. Room: 25 Navajo Time: Thursday, April 11th, 1:00 PM–3:45 pm Chair: Christina Sampson Participants: 1:00 William Marquardt—Are the Calusa Unique? Environmental Stewardship and Historical Contingency in the Pacific Northwest and Southwest Florida 1:15 Scott Sunell and Christopher Jazwa—The Development of Sociopolitical Complexity among Chumash Hunter-Gatherer-Fishers on California’s Northern Channel Islands 1:30 Christina Sampson—Trade, Tradition, and Rivalry: Late Pre-Columbian Craft and Exchange on the Central Peninsular Gulf Coast of Florida 1:45 Chris Springer and Dana Lepofsky—Conflict and Territoriality: An Archaeological Study of Ancestral Northern Coast Salish-Tla’amin Defensiveness in the Salish Sea Region of Southwestern British Columbia 2:00 Thomas Pluckhahn, Victor Thompson, Isabelle Lulewicz, Trevor Duke and Matthew Compton—Selfish for Shellfish, or Magnanimous about Mollusks? The Transformation of Cooperation across the First Millennium CE at Crystal River and Roberts Island, Florida, USA 2:15 Nathan Goodale, Anna Prentissand Alissa Nauman—Bayesian Models for the Occupational History of Complex Hunter-Gatherer-Fisher Communities in the Interior Pacific Northwest 2:30 Matthew Sanger, Mark Hill, Gregory Lattanzi and Brian Padgett—Networks of Exchange in the Late Archaic Southeast: Copper and Crematory Practices= 2:45 Jennifer Perry and Mikael Fauvelle—Inter-Island Material Conveyance and Exchange on California’s Channel Islands 3:00 Ginessa Mahar and Kenneth Sassaman—Stop Seeing Like a State: Relational Complexity among Small-Scale Societies of Gulf Coastal Florida (Who Routinely Gathered in Large Numbers) 3:15 Colin Grier—Discussant3:30Questions and Answe [73] Symposium DATING IROQUOIA: ADVANCING RADIOCARBON CHRONOLOGIES IN NORTHEASTERN NORTH AMERICA With the increasing accessibility of AMS radiocarbon dating and Bayesian chronological modeling, archaeologists working in Northeastern North America have increasingly shifted focus toward testing long-held understandings about the timing and tempo of the profound cultural changes enacted by Iroquoian and other Woodland-period societies. This session brings together scholars whose work aims to revise chronological understandings of socio-cultural change, migration, and exchange throughout the northeast in the Precolumbian and contact periods. Members of Dating Iroquoia, a multi-year, NSF-funded project, present in detail the methodology, results, and implications of more than 200 new AMS dates on six community relocation sequences in Southern Ontario and New York State. Participants are specifically asked to consider the impact of these new radiocarbon-based chronologies on current understandings of sociocultural transformation in the study region as it relates to processes of settlement aggregation and community coalescence; inter- and intra-group conflict; the formation of ethnohistorically-known nations and confederacies; and interaction and exchange between Indigenous peoples and between Indigenous groups and Europeans. This session intentionally bridges American and Canadian research traditions, as well as prehistoric and historic archaeologies, to arrive at new, absolute chronologies that permit enhanced understandings of the lived experience of cultural change in the northeastern woodlands. Room: 19 Isleta Time: Thursday, April 11th, 1:00 PM–3:45 PM Chairs: Megan Conger and Samantha San Participants: 1:00 Sturt Manning—Radiocarbon and Historical Archaeology in Iroquoia: Bringing Near-Calendar Dating Precision to Iroquoian Chronology with Radiocarbon –Methods, Issues and Potential 1:15 Jennifer Birch—Major Implications of the Dating Iroquoia Project: Rethinking Coalescence, Conflict, and Early European Influences in the Lower Great Lakes Region 1:30 Megan Conger—Telling Localized Indigenous Histories of Trade through AMS Dating and Bayesian Chronological Modeling in Southern Ontario, Canada1:45Samantha Sanft—Timing the Circulation of Nonlocal Materials in Seneca-and Onondaga-Region Sites 2:00 Timothy Abel, Jessica Vavrasek and John Hart—Radiocarbon Dating the Iroquoian Occupation of Northern New York 2:15 Roland Tremblay and Christian Gates-St-Pierre—Struggling with Radiocarbon Dates at the Dawson Site in Downtown Montréal 2:30 Ronald Williamson and Peter Ramsden—Time, Space and Ceramic Attributes: The Ontario Iroquoian Case 2:45 James Conolly and Daniel Smith—An Updated Radiocarbon Chronology of the Middle to Late Woodland Transition in Southern Ontario: Regional Variation in the Dynamics of Cultural Change 3:00 Questions and Answers CURRENT ISSUES IN JAPANESE ARCHAEOLOGY (2019 ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH IN ASIA SYMPOSIUM) (SPONSORED BY ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH IN ASIA [ELSEVIER]) For the past several decades, rapidly increasing amounts of excavation data and new interpretations have characterized Japanese archaeology. Numerous rescue excavations throughout the Japanese archipelago during and after the 1970s have produced a large body of archaeological data, based on which scholars can test new hypotheses and assert the importance of studying the past. Interest in archaeology among the general public is strong. The flip side of the popularity of Japanese archaeology is a large-scale destruction of many important archaeological sites. It is also clear that there will be fewer rescue excavations in the future. With these sociopolitical contexts in mind, the 2019 Archaeological Research in Asia Sponsored Symposium highlights new developments and challenges in Japanese archaeology and evaluates its contribution to the international scene. Papers presented in this session present new data and interpretations and address the questions of the relevance of archaeological studies in contemporary Japanese society. The session also proposes how archaeologists working on Japan might engage themselves with current sociopolitical and environmental concerns through their research. Case studies include those dealing with the Paleolithic, Jomon, Yayoi, Kofun and later historic periods. Geographic coverage includes from Hokkaido to the Ryukyu Islands. Room: 22 San Juan Time: Thursday, April 11th, 1:00 PM–4:00 PM Chair: Junko Habu Participants: 1:00 Junko Habu—Long-Term Perspectives on the Resilience of Food and Socioeconomic Systems in Prehistoric Japan: Examples from the Early and Middle Jomon Periods 1:15 Fumiko Ikawa-Smith—Changing Perspectives for the Palaeolithic Research of the Japanese Archipelago 1:30 Simon Kaner—Stories from the Riverside: Metastability in the Shinano-Chikuma River System, Central Japan 1:45 Liliana Janik—New Approaches to Jomon Dogu: Case Studies from Eastern and Western Japan 2:00 Gary Crawford and John Whitman—New Research Directions in the Archaeology and Linguistic History of the Hokkaido Ainu 2:15 Kaishi Yamagiwa and Hiroto Takamiya—Transition from Hunting-Gathering to Agriculture in Amami and Okinawa Archipelagos, Japan 2:30 Scott Lyons—Historical Ecology and Archaeometallurgy on the 5th and 6th century Osaka Plain 2:45 Kazuaki Yoshimura—A Study of the Armor Production System in the Middle Kofun Period 3:00 Carl Gellert—From the Earthly to the Celestial: Material Culture and Funerary Practice at Fujinoki Kofun 3:15 Marjorie Burge—The Study of Excavated Documents in Japan 3:30 Koji Mizoguchi—Collapse, or Drastic Socio-cultural Transformation?: Some Cases from Japanese Prehistory [92] General Session ARCHAEOLOGICAL METHOD AND THEORY IN PRACTICE, PART II Room: 220 Ruidoso Time: Thursday, April 11th, 3:00 PM–4:30 PM Chair: Heather Smith Participants: 3:00 Cornel Pop—Lithics3D: An R Package for Lithic Analysis 3:15 Neil Dixon, M. Kathryn Brownand Leah McCurdy—RTI Photography Part of a Greater Whole in Archaeological Documentation Methodology 3:30 Sjoerd Van Der Linde—Putting the Soul into Archaeology—Integrating Interpretation intoPractice 3:45 Oliver Boles, Emily Hammer and Kathy Morrison—Pastoralism and Anthropogenic Land Cover Change (ALCC) Mapping 4:00 Robin Skeates—Sensory Archaeology: Key Concepts and Debates 4:15 Heather Smith and Metin Eren—Rock Music: The Sounds of Flintknapping [93] Forum PARTNERSHIPS IN REPATRIATION: WHAT’S WORKING AND WHAT ISN’T? Successful repatriation processes require partnerships between descendant communities and the museums and/or agencies that have custody and/or legal control of Native American human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, and objects of culturalpatrimony. This is true whether repatriation is pursuant to federal law or state statutes. In Arizona, partnerships born of ongoing dialog and based on mutual trust and respect have resulted in many successful repatriations. In this forum, representatives of Arizona tribes and museums, as well as a federal agency, will discuss the results of recent repatriation work, from their different perspectives, focusing on how they have worked together in the past to solve problems and highlighting the major stumbling blocks that remain. Discussants will examine the role of flexibility and the importance of prioritizing outcomes in balancing legal requirements with the needs and values of descendant communities. In some cases, the way forward has necessitated a re-examination of the spirit of the law relative to the letter of the law, and novel approaches have emerged. The discussants hope to share their experiences and also to learn from those in attendance who choose to engage. Room: 270 Ballroom C Time: Thursday, April 11th, 3:00 PM -5:00 PM Moderators: Patrick Lyons and Vernelda Gran Participants: [96] Symposium MEDICINE AND HEALING IN THE AMERICAS: ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND ETHNOHISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES Ancient medicine and healing is a robust field of study which, in many parts of the world, combines archaeological data with the analysis of ancient texts from contemporaneous periods. In the Americas, however, archaeologists often rely on the work of ethnohistorians, ethnographers, and colonial historians to interpret archaeological data related to medicine and healing. The aimof this session is to foster a dialogue among archaeologists and ethnohistorians who study diseases, healing, and medical care in past societies. It is our hope that such discussion will reinforce the mutually beneficial potential of archaeological and ethnohistorical collaboration on the topic of ancient medicine. Topics of interest include the relationship between the healer and the healed, the material culture of healing and its interface with the human body, the etiology of disease and sickness, and indigenous cosmologies and perspectives on healing and medicine. This multi-regional and interdisciplinary session will also critically appraise the multiple meanings attributed to “healing” at both macro and micro social scales. Although Pre-Columbian and historic periods in the Americas are the primary focus, the diversity of perspectives, methods, and theories applied here impacts understandings of illness, its treatment, the human body, and healing-based practices across the globe. Room: 235 Mesilla Time: 3:15 PM–5:00 PM Chairs: Joshua Schnell and Mark Agostini Participants: 3:15 Joshua Schnell—Patients and Practitioners: Archaeological and Ethnohistorical Approaches to Ancient Medicine and Healing Practices in the Americas 3:30 Mark Agostini and Robert Weiner—When Is Healing?: An Archaeological Case Study of the Chacoan and Post-Chacoan American Southwest 3:45 Nicholas Laluk and Mae Burnette—We Know Who We Are and What Is Needed: Achieving Healing, Harmony and Balance in Ndee Institutions 4:00 William Whitehead—Medicinal Plant Use in Southeast New Mexico: Botanical, Ethnobotanical and Archaeological Evidence 4:15 Sarah Watson, Joshua Schnell, Shanti Morell-Hart and Andrew Scherer—Health Care in the Marketplace: Exploring Medicinal Plants and Practices at Piedras Negras 4:30 Ryan Hechler—Born This Way, Becoming That Way: Difference, Disability and Sicknessin Inka Society 4:45 Ryan Kashanipour—Discussant [144] Symposium PENINSULAR SOUTHERN EUROPE REFUGIA DURING THE MIDDLE PALEOLITHIC Neanderthals faced environmental and climatic instability during the Pleistocene that may have influenced their subsistence, technology, behavior and survival. Research assessing the effect of climate and environment on the Middle Paleolithic has often turned to southern Europe, specifically peninsular southern Europe. These are regions typically regarded as refugia during periods of unfavorable climatic conditions, inspiring numerous paleoenvironmental studies at Neanderthal sites and hypotheses on late Neanderthal survival in locations with relatively ameliorated conditions. This session will focus on assessing the peninsulas of southern Europe as refugia during periods of unfavorable climate during the Middle Paleolithic and transition to Upper Paleolithic. Contributors to this session will address questions such as: did Southern European peninsulas (Iberia, Italy, Balkans) really act as refugia during periods of deteriorating environmental change? Were those peninsulas active refugia or “sanctuaries” (locations with favorable environmental conditions and rich in resources that were actively procured) or just passive refugia (areas of species retention or survival relative to surrounding regions)? Overall, this session will shed light on Neanderthal adaptations to environmental change and contribute to a better understanding of southern European peninsulas as refugia during . Room: 210 Tijeras Time:Thursday, April 11th, 6:00 PM–8:00 PM Chairs: Milena Carvalho and Nuno Bicho Participants: 6:15 Effrosyni Roditi and Britt Starkovich—Were Neandertals the Original Snowbirds? Zooarchaeological Evidence from Greece 6:30 Keiko Kitagawa, Dario Massafra and Filomena Ranaldo—Neanderthals in Porto Selvaggio, Southern Italy 6:45 Cristina Real, Carmen María Martínez-Varea, Yolanda Carrión and Ernestina Badal—Human Adaptability to Fauna and Flora Changes during MIS 5-3. Is the Iberian Mediterranean Region a Refuge? 7:00 Pedro Horta, Joao Cascalheira and Nuno Bicho—Neanderthal Ecological Niche in Iberia’s Southwestern Edge: New Data from the Gruta da Companheira Site 7:15 Jonathan Haws—Late Pleistocene Refugia and Neanderthal Extinction in Southern Iberia 7:30 Milena Carvalho, Emily Lena Jones, David Meiggs and Jonathan Haws—A Stable Isotopes Analysis of Ungulate Remains from Lapa do Picareiro: An Assessment of Refugia Concepts during the Middle Paleolithic and Transition to Upper Paleolithic 7:45 Joao Cascalheira, Célia Gonçalves and Nuno Bicho—Assessing the Spatial Patterning of Middle Paleolithic HumanSettlement in Westernmost Iberia [147] General Session THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE GREAT PLAINS Room: 25 Navajo Time: Thursday, April 11th, 6:00 PM–8:00 PM Chair: Andrea Kruse Participants: 6:00 Luc Litwinionek, Stance Hurst and Eileen Johnson—Islands on the Plains Revisited: GIS-Based Predictive Models of Playa Use on the Southern High Plains 6:15 Douglas MacDonald and Matthew Nelson—The Role of Geomorphology and GIS in the Identification of Paleoindian Archaeological Sites at Yellowstone Lake, Wyoming, U.S.A. 6:30 Kelly Morgan—The Significance of Stone Features on the Northern Plains: Criteria A-D and Other Issues 6:45 Andrea Kruse—A Great Plains Early Archaic Site Understanding from Lithic Debitage Analysis 7:00 Shannon Koerner and BrettonGiles—An Assessment of Central Plains Tradition Ceramic Variation in the Flint Hills Region of the Eastern Plains, USA 7:15 Jason LaBelle—Of Hearth and Home: Investigating Site Structure at the Fossil Creek Site, an Early Ceramic Camp in Larimer County, Colorado 7:30 Travis Jones—Huff Village Revisited: A New Radiocarbon Chronology for a Pivotal Time 7:45 Reid Farmer, Jon Kentand Allan Koch—Current Research at Cherokee Mountain Rock Shelter, Douglas County, Colorado [149] Symposium WHAT HAVE YOU DONE FOR US LATELY?: DISCRIMINATION, HARASSMENT, AND CHILLY CLIMATE IN ARCHAEOLOGY The conjunction of social justice and anti-discrimination movements like Black Lives Matter and #MeToo has been hailed as a watershed moment for historically marginalized people. Archaeology has likewise felt the reverberations of these broader political movements. Consider, for example, recent discussions of fieldwork and harassment, as well as meditations on the potential impact of the current political climate on archaeology worldwide and efforts to define inroads made by—and future avenues for—social justice in archaeology. This session builds upon this moment in time by considering the current status of underrepresented groups—women, queer people, people of color, disabled people, low-income people, &c. (as well as those whose identities cross-cut these categories)—in archaeology, both academic and professional. Papers will touch upon various forms of discrimination and harassment, including bias in the workplace, intimidation and/or assault in the field, inequities in publication practices, ethical public engagement, the role of activism in archaeology, and other related topics. We are particularly interested in concrete solutions to discrimination at a variety of scales—from day-to-day interactions to fieldwork best practices, in addition to the little-explored (but exceedingly important) topic of structural and institutional discrimination. This session dovetails with the round table discussion on #metoo in archaeology. Room: 280 Ballroom A Time: Thursday, April 11th, 6:00 PM–8:15 PM Chairs: Lindsay Der, Anne Duray and Thea De Armond Participants: 6:00 Dillon Gisch—Images of Aphrodite, Sexual Desire, and the ‘Chilly Climate’ of Classical Archaeology 6:15 Thea De Armond—Drawing the Line: Does Sexual Harassment Training Work? 6:30 Rebecca Gibson—Representation Matters: Disabled Professorship and a Move Toward a Higher Standard of Accessibility in the Office and the Field 6:45 Elizabeth Hannigan and Laura Heath-Stout—Affording Archaeology: How the Cost of Field School Keeps Archaeology Exclusive 7:00 Kate Kreindler—Having It All in the Field: Families, Inclusivity, Career Development, and Archaeological Fieldwork 7:15 Catherine Jalbert—“The Chilly Climate Is Not Warming as the Old Guys Leave”: Identity-Based Discrimination in Archaeology, an Example from Canada 7:30 Lindsay Der, Thea De Armond and Anne Duray—From Margin to Center: Bias and Discrimination in Archaeology 7:45 Chelsea Blackmore—Discussant [150] Symposium NAT’AAH NAHANE’ BINA’JI O’HOO’AH: DINÉ ARCHAEOLOGISTS & NAVAJO ARCHAEOLOGY IN THE 21STCENTURY Navajo people have been directly involved in archaeology since Richard Wetherill hired his first excavation workers at Chaco Canyon in the late 1800s. More than a century later, however, it’s clear that relatively few studies have attempted to incorporate the Navajo archaeological record into broader anthro-historical discussions. Indeed, “mainstream” Puebloan-focused Southwestern archaeology has long promoted a marginalized view of Navajo culture/history with little input from Diné people themselves. Developing archaeological projects that look beyond acculturation and migration in order to highlight the complexity of Diné society prior to and following the onset of Euro-American colonialism in the Southwest is the only way to correct this imbalance. As this session demonstrates, such a movement is underway. Where once non-Native archaeologists working within CRM frameworks conducted the majority of Navajo-focused research, a new generation of Diné archaeologists are now conducting their own studies. Drawing upon diverse methodological and theoretical influences, these projects combine earlier research with traditional Diné knowledge and new archaeological data to explore a variety of questions. These papers showcase current research by Diné archaeologists who are committed to understanding past Navajo experiences in the Southwest and extracting lessons relevant to the continuation of Diné culture in the 21st century. Room: 240 La Cienega Time: Thursday, April 11th, 6:00 PM–8:15 PM Chair: Wade Campbell Participants: 6:00 Kerry Thompson—Held Hostage by a Paradigm 6:15 Timothy Wilcox—Diné łe’saa łitsxo bik’ah dash chá’ii dajíi la: Navajo Gobernad Polychrome Pottery 6:30 Alicia Becenti—A Zooarchaeological Analysis of Diné Hunting Traditions 6:45 Wade Campbell—Na’nilkad béé na’niltin: The Early Navajo Pastoral Landscape Project (Phase 1) –Experimental Ethnoarchaeology on the Navajo Nation 7:00 Davina Two Bears—ResearchingMy Heritage: The Old Leupp Boarding School Historic Site and Navajo Survivance 7:15 Rechanda Lee—’ASHŁ’Ó YÓHOOŁ’AAH (Learning to Weave): The Cultural Transmission of Technological Style in Navajo Textiles 7:30 William Tsosie—Discussant [156] Symposium NEW EVIDENCE,METHODS,THEORIES, AND CHALLENGES TO UNDERSTANDING PREHISTORIC ECONOMIES IN KOREA Increasing data from archaeological fieldwork coupled with interdisciplinary analytical and theoretical applications have opened new discourses on hunter-gatherers, agriculturalists, egalitarian and complex societies in prehistoric Korea. As both a receiving end of the agricultural dispersal and a possible center of some crop domestication, Korean archaeology can contribute to the global discussions of hunter-gatherers and farmers’ interactions leading to the emergence of state-level societies. The papers in this session broadly cover South Korea from the beginning of the Neolithic to early historical periods. Cross-disciplinary research applications present new data and perspectives on diet changes, human-environment interactions, labor cooperation, commodity exchange, and early agricultural development in prehistoric Korea. The goals of the present session are to synthesize recent understandings on diversity and dynamics of economic strategies among various prehistoric societies in Korea, and then discuss the new challenges and future direction of research Room:120 Dona Ana Time: Thursday, April 11th, 6:00 PM–8:15 PM Chair: Ha Beom Kim Participants: 6:00 Seungki Kwak—Subsistence Strategy, Pottery Use, and the Role of Animal Hunting on the Neolithic Korean Peninsula 6:15 Hyunsoo Lee—Early-Middle Holocene Resource Use and Niche Construction in Jeju Island, Korea 6:30 Geun Tae Park, Chang Hwa Kang and Jae Won Ko—Subsistence Economy and Paleoenvironment of Neolithic Islanders in Jeju, Korea 6:45 Gyoung-Ah Lee—Sustained Farming in the Nam River Valley, South-central Korea, through the Mumun/Bronze to Early Historical Periods 7:00 Questions and Answers 7:15 Ha Beom Kim and Sook-Chung Shin—Examining Recent Archaeological Findings at the Bronze Age Korean Settlement of Jungdo Using an Economic Perspective 7:30 Rachel Lee, Martin Bale and Jade D’Alpoim Guedes—Assessing Agricultural Strategies in Prehistoric Korea through Climate and Landscape Models 7:45 Rory Walsh—Mahan Political Economy: Evidence from Ceramic Geochemistry8:00Sungjoo Lee—Technological Transmission between Different Levels of Specialization in Proto-historic NE Asia [163] Forum WOMEN MEMBERS IN SAA, FROM 17% TO OVER 50% During the 22 years Tobi Brimsek was executive director of SAA, the Society changed radically from male-dominated to the tipping point of now slightly over half women, with a fast-moving trend toward more women. How much of this shift may be simply an international trend? Or may some of the lessening of the chilly climate have been influenced by Brimsek? Or, has the rise of CRM employment been a factor favoring women in archaeology? Has the shift toward First Nations participation in archaeology, challenging conventional power structure, lessened prejudice against women? This Forum, with full participation by audience members, will open questions and seek a clearer understanding of the present and future of SAA’s women members. “Why was it only when a critical mass of women entered their respective fields, bringing a gendered and in some cases an explicitly feminist perspective to bear, that pervasive androcentric and sexist omissions and distortions were identified?”– Alison Wylie 2016 Room: 140 Aztec Time: Friday, April 12th, 8:00 AM–10:00 AM Moderator: Alice Kehoe [171] Poster Session FIRST FLORIDIANS TO LA FLORIDA: RECENT FSU INVESTIGATIONS Florida is home to some of the oldest Pleistocene and Colonial period archaeological sites in the Americas. This rich record demonstrates that past Floridians actively engaged with major long-term environmental shifts, hurricanes, and neighboring cultures in nuanced and complex ways that were accentuated by the arrival of European populations. However, Floridian archaeology is challenging due to poor organic preservation, poor separation of components, poor site visibility, and modern site destruction from looting, development, and sea level rise. Further, much of the early cultural record was submerged offshore by the more than 130m of sea level rise from approximately 21,000-5,000 years ago, meaning that we know little about how early people may have used the coasts. New methods of modeling and analysis hold great promise for mitigating these challenges and providing insight about how past Southeasterners lived and adapted to their changing worlds. The archaeologists in this session ask new questions of curated assemblages, analyze and interpret materials from recent excavations, and use new methods and techniques to shed light on some of Southeastern archaeology’s most enduring problems. Room: La Sala Time: Friday, April 12th, 8:00 AM–10:00 AM Chairs: Tanya Peres and Jessi Halligan Participants: 171-a Laylah Roberts—Social Significance of Glass Beads at San Luis de Talimali (8Le4) 171-b David Wilson and Jessi Halligan—It’s the Faunal Countdown! Analysis of Faunal Remains from the 2017 Excavations at the Ryan-Harley Site, Wacissa River, Florida 171-c Nicholas Bentley—Paleostorms and Precolonial Societies: Hurricane Deposits in Inundated Archaeological Sites in Northwest Florida 171-d Cameron Walker and Tanya Peres—Looking beyond the Mission: Insights from a Multicomponent Site 171-e Austin Cross—At What Expense? An Expended Utility Study of Bolen ProjectilePoints in Northern Florida 171-f Taylor Townsend—An Analysis of Garbanzo Bean Remains at Mission San Luis de Talimali 171-g Alison Bruin—Supply and Demand: Colonoware Creation and Spanish Ideals at San Luis de Talimali [186] Symposium MORE THAN SHELTER FROM THE STORM: HUNTER-GATHERER HOUSES AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT The central role of the built environment and the importance of architecture for structuring cultural patterns and behaviors are well known for complex societies. In contrast, hunter-gatherer’s relationship to the built environment, particularly mobile hunter-gatherers, is not often discussed outside of utilitarian shelters. This session explores the diversity of hunter-gatherer interaction with the built environment including how structures are constructed, used, and the social and symbolic importance of architecture within these communities. This session takes a broad, crossl approach to understanding hunter-gatherer houses, exploring the use of architecture across time and space. Room: 29 Sandia Time: Friday, April 12th, 8:00 AM–11:00 AM Chairs: Danielle Macdonald and Brian Andrews Participants: 8:00 Amy Clark—Built Environments in the Middle and Early Upper Paleolithic 8:15 Kathleen Sterling and Sébastien Lacombe—Why Build When There Are Caves? Investigating the Construction and Use of a Stone Structure in Pleistocene France 8:30 Danielle Macdonald and Lisa Maher—A Space for Living and Dying: The Life-History of Kharaneh IV Structures 8:45 Lisa Maher and Danielle Macdonald—Built Environments of Epipalaeolithic Southwest Asia: A Life History of Place 9:00 Brooke Morgan and Brian Andrews—Architecture and Human Behavior at a Folsom Period Residential Camp 9:15 Mark Stiger—Archaic and Paleoindian Houses in the Southern Rocky Mountains9:30Lauren Norman—Early Thule Inuit Architecture in the Arctic: An Anchor in Migration and Movement 9:45 Christopher Morgan, Dallin Webb, Kari Sprengeler, Marielle Black and Nicole George—Experimental Construction of Hunter-Gatherer Residential Features, Mobility, and the Costs of Occupying “Persistent Places” 10:00 Matthew O’Brien, Todd Surovell and Randy Haas—Five Seasons with the Dukha: House Structure among Nomadic Herders 10:15 Klint Janulis, Cory Stade and Mansoor Ahmad—Give Me Shelter: Reverse Engineering a Paleolithic Home10:30Questions and Answers 10:45 Margaret Conkey—Discussant [187] Symposium THE PALEOINDIAN SOUTHWEST The North American Southwest looms large in American archaeology. It is characterized by a distinctive range of ecological conditions, formation processes, and preservation contexts that sets it apart from other regions. Its expansive landscapes, well -preserved architectural sites, and connections to modern people have enabled the region to serve as a laboratory for the development of archaeological methods and ideas. The pre-agricultural record of the Southwest is somewhat less conspicuous, but it has played a comparably critical role in the archaeology of early hunter-gatherers. The Clovis and Folsom archaeological cultures were both initially defined in New Mexico, and additional sites and surveys throughout the Southwest have contributed significantly to understanding them and their successors. The environmental diversity that characterizes the region coupled with the wetter and cooler climate of appears to have sustained generations of foragers, and the resulting record traces initial colonization through the development of regionally distinct cultural patterns. The Southwest continues to contribute new discoveries, as well as new information from known sites, localities, and landscapes, that broadens our understanding of the earliestAmericans. The papers in this symposium present current archaeological research from across the Greater Southwest. Room: 210 Tijeras Time: Friday, April 12th, 8:00 AM–11:00 AM Chairs: David Kilby and Bruce Huckell Participants: 8:00 David Kilby—The Hunters Were Here First: Paleoindian Research in the Greater Southwest 8:15 Christopher Merriman—Paleoindian Settlement and Mobility in the Northern Jornada del Muerto 8:30 Brendan Fenerty, Vance Holliday, Allison Harvey and Matthew Cuba—Paleo-lake Otero, Playas, and Paleoindian Land-Use in the Tularosa Basin, New Mexico 8:45 David Bustos, Matthew Bennett, Daniel Odess, Tommy Urban and VanceHolliday—Widespread Distribution of Fossil Footprints in the Tularosa Basin: Human Trace Fossils at White Sands National Monument 9:00 Guadalupe Sanchez Miranda, Ismael Sánchez-Morales and John Carpenter—Current Paleoindian Research in Sonora 9:15 Marcus Hamilton—The Paleoecology of the Mockingbird Gap Clovis site, New Mexico and Surrounding Region 9:30 Jacob Tumelaire, Samuel H. Fisher and Francis Smiley—Clovis in the Petrified Forest 9:45 Meghann Vance—Questioning Clovis in Southeast Utah: Late in the Game or Transitional? 10:00 Nicholas Hlatky—Folsom Technological Organization at the Martin Site, Central New Mexico 10:15 Anne Parfitt and Kathryn Cross—Archaeological Investigations at the Double Flute Folsom site (LA178142), New Mexico 10:30 Robert Dello-Russo and Vance Holliday—Paleoindians Beyond the Edge of the Great Plains: The Water Canyon Site in Western New Mexico 10:45 Bonnie Pitblado—Discussant THE ROLE OF ROCK ART IN CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING: A SYMPOSIUM IN HONOR OF POLLY SCHAAFSMA (SPONSORED BY SAA ROCK ART INTEREST GROUP) Polly Schaafsma’s pioneering work on the rock art of the American Southwest in the 1960s not only helped establish her as theauthority in this region, but also as one of the first American scholars to focus on rock art research. The themes of place, style, and tradition recur in her work, and by her commitment to analysis of style and imagery, she has demonstrated the value of rock art as a major resource in reconstructing past cultures and traditions. She has utilized rock art to chronicle cultural change, and in collaboration with Curtis Schaafsma, she investigated the origins of the Pueblo Kachina Cult. In the 1980s she wrote on theory and method in rock art studies, and this work is still indispensable, reaching far beyond the Southwest to guide those working with rock art worldwide. Schaafsma continues to bring contemporary issues to the attention of the wider research community, as shown with her recent book on rock art and ethics. Thus, as we honor her many significant contributions to rock art studies, we invited papers on these topics from the general standpoint of rock art research with special reference to the legacy of this highly influential scholar. Room: 18 Cochiti/30 Taos Time: Friday, April 12th, 8:00 AM–11:15 AM Chairs: Mavis Greer and Patricia Dobrez Participants: 8:00 Radoslaw Palonka, Vincent MacMillan, Katarzyna Ciomek and Magdalena Lewandowska—Cultural Landscapes and Migrations in Sandstone Canyon, Southwestern Colorado through Pueblo and Ute Rock Art 8:15 Kirk Astroth, T. J. Ferguson and Caitlin McPherson—Footsteps of Hopi History or Inscriptions by Spanish Priests? The Elusive and Enigmatic Labyrinth Glyphs of the American West 8:30 Jennifer Huang—Out From the Center: Rock-Art of the Chaco World 8:45 Richard Vivian—Polly -Rock Art -and Understanding Chaco 9:00 Lawrence Loendorf—Rock Art Sites in the Permian Basin, New Mexico 9:15 Jessica Christie—Finding Context for Rock Art Images in the Southwest 9:30 Kelley Hays-Gilpin, Robert Mark and Evelyn Billo—Mural Ecology: Walls That Bring People Together 9:45 Carlos Rodriguez-Rellan and Ramón Fábregas Valcarce—Search Beneath theRock Surface: Legend Chasers, Treasure-hunters and Rock Art in NW Spain 10:00 Livio Dobrez and Patricia Dobrez—The Uses of Stylistic Analysis in Rock Art Studies 10:15 Linea Sundstrom—Polychrome Perplexities: The Painted Rock Art of the Southern Black Hills 10:30 Mavis Greer and John Greer—Arriving at a Meaningful Rock Art Interpretation 10:45 Katharine Fernstrom—Can We SeeTravelers in Rock Art? 11:00 Polly Schaafsma—Discussant [197]Symposium THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF OAXACAN CUISINE One of the virtues of doing archaeology in Oaxaca is that we get to enjoy Oaxaca’s world-renowned cuisine. Mexico’s cuisine was the first to receive UNESCO’s culinary heritage status and, among the culinary traditions of Mexico, the one from Oaxaca reigns supreme among gourmands. This bilingual session will focus on recent finds and ongoing research that investigates the development of the Oaxacan prehispanic diet and the history of the region’s cuisine. The topic of food can be studied through different approaches: as an adaptation to our physical and social environments, as a response to our material needs and a reflection of our social complexity, or as foodways, which are symbolically charged and meaningful practices that reinforce social ties, cultural identity, and beliefs. Session participants, using any combination of these approaches, are generating data stemming from diverse methodologies, from paleoethnobotanical and zooarchaeological studies to the study of cooking implements and vessels, from stable isotope studies of human remains to the study of ethnohistorical records and linguistic evidence. By bringing together a wide range of perspectives, methodologies, and scholars the session will contribute to our growing understanding of how this rich food tradition came into existence. Room: 235 Mesilla Time: 8:00 AM–11:45 AM Chair: Veronica Perez Rodriguez Participants: 8:00 Aleksander Borejsza, Arthur Joyce and Jonathan Lohse—Food from the Barranca: A 13,000-Year Perspective from the Yuzanú Drainage of the Mixteca Alta 8:15 Shanti Morell-Hart andÉloi Bérubé—Archaic Period MRG-6 and the Deep Culinary Roots of Oaxacan Cuisine 8:30 Jeffrey Blomster and Victor Salazar Chavez—Foodways and Human-Animal Relations at Early Formative Etlatongo: An Ontology of Differentiation 8:45 Sarah Barber, Arthur Joyce, Petra Cunningham-Smith and Shanti Morell-Hart—Constituting the Divine: Coastal Cuisine and Public Places in the Formative-period Lower Río Verde Valley 9:00 Alicia Gonzales, Shunashi Soledad Victoria Bustamante, Jeffrey Blomster, Veronica Perez Rodriguez and Ricardo Higelin Ponce De Leon—The Impact of Diet and Dental Health among the Mixtec Urban Societies from the Formative Period of Oaxaca, Mexico 9:15 Lacey Carpenter and Jonathan Paige—Tools for Change: Food Preparation Techniques during State Formation at the Tilcajete Sites 9:30 Questions and Answers9:45Ronald Faulseit and Heather Lapham—Cuisine Choices in Mundane and Ceremonial Contexts at a Late Classic Palace Compound in the Valley of Oaxaca, Mexico 10:00 Robert Markens and Cira Martínez López—Nourishing the Ancestors among the Zapotecs, Valley of Oaxaca 10:15 Jennifer Saumur—Foodways and Diet in the Prehispanic Mixteca Alta: Ceramic and Isotope Analyses in the Specific Case of the Tomb 1 Burial in Nduatiucu (San Felipe Ixtapa, Teposcolula) 10:30 Marc Levine and Kathryn Puseman—Foregrounding Food: Mixtec Cuisine, Identity, and Household Ritual at Late Postclassic Tututepec, Oaxaca 10:45 Stacie King and Shanti Morell-Hart—Preserving Oaxacan Foodways in the Face of Conquest: The Seed Bank at Cerro del Convento 11:00 Éloi Bérubé and Jamie Forde—The Oaxacan Cuisine at Achiutla during the Early Colonial Period: A Story of Resilience 11:15 Andrea Cuellar—Discussant 11:30 Veronica Perez Rodriguez—Discussant [207] Poster Session Time: Friday, April 12th, 10:30 AM–12:30 PM Participants: 207-a Alexander Craib and Robert L. Kelly—Alm Shelter: A Preliminary Report on a Deeply Stratified Rockshelter in the Bighorn Mountains of Wyoming 207-b Susan Vehik—A Fourteenth-Century Southern Plains Star Chart 207-c Justin Williams and Matthew Landt—Raw Material Use though the Archaic at the Aught-Six Site: Northwestern Colorado 207-d Nicole Jacobson—Mobility in the Big Horns: GIS Analysis of Upper and Lower Canyon Creek and the Implications for Prehistoric Movement 207-e Kristen Carlson, Haley Sherwood, Dagny Anderson, Amelia Cisar and Andrew Kracinski—Ethnogenesis at the Lynch Site (25BD1), Nebraska through Pottery Analysis 207-f Jennifer Banks—Dismal River Housing: A Comparative Study of Apache Housing Structures [210] Poster Session Time: Friday, April 12th, 10:30 AM–12:30 PM Participants: 210-a Walter Dodd andRoger LaJeunesse—Implications of Stable Isotope Values from the Skyrocket Site (CA-Cal-629/630) 210-b Paul Gerard and ReneVellanoweth—Testing the Efficacy of Methodologies for the Estimation of Body Size of California Mussel Based on Shell Fragments 210-c Shelby Medina, Jessica Rodriguez, Paul Gerard and ReneVellanoweth—Were Large Mammal Limb Bones Processed to Extract Marrow and Render Grease at the Danielson Ranch site (CA-VEN-395)? 210-d Karimah Kennedy Richardson, Hugh Radde, Wendy Teeter and Desiree Martinez—Examining Site Functions and Relationships: The Value of Small Ridgeline Sites on Pimu/Catalina Island. [211] Poster Session SETTLEMENT, SUBSISTENCE, AND SOCIETY IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST COAST Room: La Sala Time: Friday, April 12th, 10:30 AM–12:30 PM Participants: 211-a Christopher Donnermeyer, Trent Skinner,Michelle North and Nicholas Guest—Bridal Veil Lumbering Company: A Glimpse into an Intact Early Logging System in the Columbia River Gorge 211-b Brandi MacDonald, Rudy Reimer, Catherine Klesner and David Stalla—Insights into Rock Art Pigment Provenance and Microenvironment at Ashlu Rockshelter, British Columbia, Canada 211-c Christina Conlee, Bryan Heisingerand Nora Berry—Prehistoric and Historic Settlement in the Pine Creek Drainage, North-Central Oregon 211-d Yoli Ngandali—Communities of Art Practices on the Lower Columbia River: Technical Photography Using Infrared, UV, and Visible Light 211-e Molly Carney—Alternative Recipes: Exploring the Diversity of Foods Prepared in Prehistoric Earth Oven Cooking 211-f William Damitio, Shannon Tushingham, Korey Brownstein and David Gang—Tobacco Smoking in Northwestern North America: Synthesizing the Results of Organic Chemical Residue Analyses 211-g Sarah Nowell—Feature Content Analysis: Comparing Trends in Tool Use and Storage Strategies at Bridge River (EeRl-4), British Columbia 211-h Renae Campbell—Introducing the HJCCC: A Digital Collection of Japanese Ceramics Recovered from Archaeological Sites in the American West 211-i Florencia Pezzutti, Naomi Brandenfels and Austin Pratt—Willamette Valley Project: Recreating the Landscape of the Willamette Valley through GIS Mapping of Historic Documents [239]Symposium SILENCED RITUALS IN INDIGENOUS NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY This session explores archaeological understandings of indigenous rituals practiced just prior to and after European colonialism in North America. Many of the papers in this session explore the ways that indigenous rituals evolved and/or persisted despite colonial pressures to silence them. Other papers in this session broaden archaeological explorations of ritual in North America through contributions from locations historically underexplored in typical treatments of this topic. Through these contributions, this session aims to illustrate the depth, endurance, change, and diversity of indigenous ritual across North American late prehistory and early history and provides tools for identifying and expanding understandings of ritual in archaeological contexts. Room: 25 Navajo Time: Friday, April 12th, 1:00 PM–3:30 PM Chair: Madeleine McLeester Participants: 1:00 Anna Prentiss and Alysha Edwards—Scrambles, Potlatches, and Feasts: the Archaeology of Public Rituals amongst the St’át’imc People of Interior British Columbia 1:15 Martin Gallivan—Algonquian Landscapes and Multispecies Archaeology in the Chesapeake 1:30 Michelle Pigott and Christopher Rodning—Archaeology of Ritual in Cherokee Towns of the Southern Appalachians 1:45 John Scarry—Purification Ritual and the Creation of Place in the Mississippian Southeast 2:00 Madeleine McLeester and Mark Schurr—Ritual Traces and the Challenges of Detecting Late Precontact Rituals at Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie, IL 2:15 Meghan Howey—Great Lakes Enclosures and Un-silencing the Midewiwin Ceremonial Complex 2:30Sandra Hollimon—Silenced Undertakers 2:45 Maria Zedeno—What Is ‘Good Hair’? –Personhood, Ritual, and Resurgence of Bodily Adornment among the Equestrian Blackfoot 3:00 Mark Schurr and Madeleine McLeester—Native Voices: Contributions by John Low, Alysha Edwards, Denise Pouliot, Paul Pouliot, andOthers 3:15 Ian Kuijt—Discussant [240] Symposium PALAEOECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL RECONSTRUCTIONS IN ISLAND AND COASTAL ARCHAEOLOGY Coastal and island environments have long been important habitats for humans and their fossil ancestors. However, these environments are also delicate ecosystems that are susceptible to damage or alteration from a myriad of natural and cultural forces. The influence of environmental change and anthropogenic forces on island and coastal settings has long been a topic of interest in archaeology. Shifts in environmental conditions and intensive exploitation of nearshore habitats by humans can have a dramatic and damaging impact on ecosystems. Conversely, these changes in environmental conditions can also lead to the proliferation of natural resources, and the repeated, long-term use of these habitats by groups can result in unique management systems that build and maintain stable and productive ecosystems. Finally, researchers must also consider the ecological limitations of the taxa in their assemblages, as these variables can also significantly affect the way an ecosystem adapts to external pressures. It is therefore clear that to properly understand the use and evolution of island and coastal settings, researchers must take a holistic approach that integrates all these variables into their interpretations. This session will broadly focus on the impacts that environmental and anthropogenic forces have on island and coastal settings. Room: 17 Apache Time: Friday, April 12th, 1:00 PM–3:30 PM Chairs: Katherine Woo and Christopher Jazwa Participants: 1:00 Jonathan Benjamin, Peter Moe Astrup, Claus Skriver, Chelsea Wiseman and Geoff Bailey—Investigations of a Submerged Prehistoric Midden on Hjarnø, Denmark: Climate, Sea Level and Culture 1:15 Katarina Jerbic—Connecting Survey and Fieldwork: Archaeology of the Core 1:30 Jessica Cook Hale—“…As the Waves Make Towards the Pebbled Shore”: Site Formation Processes on Drowned Coastal Sites and Implications for Preservation, Discovery, and Interpretatio 1:45 Tam Smith—Coastal Southeast Queensland, Australia: An HistoricalEcology Model of Mid-to Late Holocene Settlement and Subsistence 2:00 Kristin Hoppa—Human Adaptations to Environmental Change on the California Channel Islands 2:15 Katherine Woo—Shifting Palaeoeconomies in the East Alligator River Region: An Archaeomalacological Perspective 2:30 Amira Ainis, Jon Erlandson and ReneVellanoweth—Resilience and Stable Shifts: Historical Ecology at Bay Point, San Miguel Island, California 2:45 Carola Flores-Fernandez, Sandra Rebolledo, Jimena Torres, Diego Salazar and Bernardo Broitman—Nearshore Paleoceanographic Conditions and Human Adaptation on the Coast of the Atacama Desert (Chile, 25°S) During the Early and Middle Holocene 3:00 Ryan Anderson and Christopher Jazwa—Natural and Anthropogenic Effects on Coastal Environments along the East Cape of Baja California Sur, Mexico 3:15 Rene Vellanoweth, Amira Ainis, Santos Ceniceros-Rodríguez, Jessica Rodriguez and Paul Collins—Using Barn Owl (Tyto alba) Pellets to Build Environmental Profiles: A 1,500-Year-Old Record from Barn Owl Cave, Santa Barbara Island, California, USA [249] Symposium CURRENT PERSPECTIVES ON THE WESTERN STEMMED TRADITION-CLOVIS DEBATE IN THE FAR WEST Western Stemmed Tradition (WST) artifacts, not Clovis, dominate the Paleoindian record in the Intermountain West. As such, this symposium aims to: (1) provide an overview of WST chronology, technological organization, and subsistence; (2) assess the relationship between WST and Clovis; and (3) place this evidence within the broader context of the peopling of the Americas. Papers will highlight the most recent research in WST and fluted point studies throughout the Intermountain West, with a focus on chronology, morphology, and distribution. In order to create dialogue and research exposure across geographical space, speakers include both WST and Clovis researchers. Room: 10 Anasazi Time: Friday, April 12th, 1:00 PM–4:45 PM Chairs: Katelyn McDonough, Jordan Pratt and Richard Rosencrance Participants: 1:00 Michael Rondeau and Nicole George—Paleoindian Projectile Points in the Far West 1:15 Todd Surovell—The Ages of Stemmed and Fluted Points in the Northwestern Plains and Rocky Mountains 1:30 Dennis Jenkins—Dating the Western Stemmed Tradition in the Northern Great Basin1:45Bryan Hockett—Subsistence Diversity During the Western Stemmed Tradition in the Intermountain West 2:00 Richard Rosencrance—Assessing the Chronological Variation Within the Western Stemmed Tradition 2:15 Daron Duke and Daniel Stueber—Haskett and Its Clovis Parallels 2:30 Geoffrey Smith—The First Centuries after Clovis: A Review of Younger Dryas Western Stemmed Tradition Occupations in the Great Basin with a Focus on What They Can Tell Us about How and When Humans Colonized the Western United States 2:45 Katelyn McDonough—The Western Stemmed Tradition During the Younger Dryas: The Newest Evidence from Connley Caves, Oregon 3:00 Jordan Pratt—Exploring Open-Air Western Stemmed Sites in the Harney Basin, Oregon: A Technological and Chronological Analysis 3:15 Patrick O’Grady, Scott Thomas, Thomas W. Stafford Jr., Daniel Stueber and Margaret Helzer—The View from the Trenches: Tying Paleoenvironment to Archaeology at Rimrock Draw Rockshelter (35HA3855) 3:30 Edward Knell—Current Perspectives on the Western Stemmed Tradition and Clovis in the Mojave Desert 3:45 Jon Erlandson—Western Stemmed Technology on California’s Channel Island 4:00 Ted Goebel, JoshuaLynch and Caitlin Doherty—Stemmed Points from Nevada Caves 4:15 Robert L. Kelly—Discussant 4:30 Charlotte Beck—Discussant [253] Symposium ANCIENT DNA IN SERVICE OF ARCHAEOLOGY This session examines how ancient DNA can best support archaeological research. The “ancientDNA revolution” is transforming our understanding of the human past – an understandingmeticulously built through decades of archaeological research. While the first ancient genomewas published only in 2010 and the number only reached 100 in 2015, more than 1,000 ancientgenomes were published within the last year alone. The proliferation of ancient DNA and itsinherent dependence on archaeological material for analysis requires collaborative effortsbetween archaeologists and geneticists, balancing the grand narratives of demographic historyover space and time with finer-grained research questions in archaeology. To properly integrate these two fields however –to move toward a true science of “archaeogenetics”–ancient DNA must be made more accessible to archaeologists and be more tuned to questions posed byarchaeologists. Papers in this session provide examples of how ancient DNA can enrich ourunderstanding of the archaeological record, explain the techniques used in ancient DNAresearch, provide case studies of integrative archaeogenetics projects, and explore howarchaeologists and geneticists can establish a symbiotic relationship in the years ahead. Time: Friday, April 12th, 1:00 PM–5:00 PM Chair: Kendra Sirak Participants: 1:00 Elizabeth Sawchuk and Mary Prendergast—How to Choose Samples for aDNA: Bioarchaeological Best Practices for Sampling Human Remains 1:15 Jakob Sedig—Building a More Precise Understanding of the Past by Merging Techniques from Archaeology and Ancient DNA Analysis 1:30 Sterling Wright, Nihan Kilic, Karissa Hughes, Nawa Sugiyama and Courtney Hofman—Biomolecular Preservation in Dental Calculus from the Teotihuacan Ritual Landscape1:45Rachel Summers, Meradeth Snow and Michael Searcy—MtDNA Analysis of the Paquimé (Casas Grandes), Mexico, Population 2:00 Marlen Flores Huacuja, Humberto Garcia-Ortiz, Angelica Martinez-Hernandez, Lorena Orozco-Orozco and Meradeth Snow—Identification of Mitochondrial Haplogroups in Native Mexican and Mestizo Populations 2:15 Paige Plattner and Meradeth Snow—Ancient DNA Analysis of Orton Quarry 2:30 Hannah Moots, Margaret Antonio, Ziyue Gao and Jonathan Pritchard—An Archaeogenetic Approach to Studying the Demographic History of Rome 2:45 Kendra Sirak, Dennis Van Gerven, Jessica Thompson, Ron Pinhasi and David Reich—Genetic Variation and Sociocultural Dynamics in Two Early Christian Cemeteries from Kulubnarti 3:00 Lars Fehren-Schmitz, Kelly Harkins, John Krigbaum, Regulo Jordan and Jeffrey Quilter—Beyond the Big Picture: An integrative Paleogenomic Study to Address Regional Dynamics and Political Organization in the Peruvian Moche Culture 3:15 Tre Blohm, Jordan Karsten, Ryan Schmidt and Meradeth Snow—Presence of the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Complex (MTBC) in Ancient Skeletal Samples from Ukraine 3:30 Johannes Krause—Ancient Pathogen Genomes from Pre-and Early Colonial Epidemics in Mesoamerica and the Evolution of Paratyphi C 3:45 Oliver Smith, Glenn Dunshea, Robin Allaby and Tom Gilbert—Beyond the Genome: Unravelling Life Processes Using Epigenomes and Ancient RNA 4:00 Alexander Kim, Tatyana Savenkova, Svetlana Smushko, Yevgenia Reis and David Reich—Genome-wide Ancient DNA from Historical Siberia as a Lens on Yeniseian Population History 4:15 Mark Lipson, Mary Prendergast, Isabelle Ribot, Carles Lalueza-Fox and David Reich—Ancient Human DNA from Shum Laka (Cameroon) in the Context of African Population History 4:30 John Lindo, Randall Hass, Christina Warinner, Mark Aldenderfer and Anna Di Rienzo—The Genetic Prehistory of the Andean Highlands 7,000 Years BP though European Contact 4:45 Vagheesh Narasimhan—The Genomic Formation of Central and South Asia [322] Poster Session PALEOINDIAN ARCHAEOLOGY IN THE GREAT PLAINS Room: La Sala Time: Saturday, April 13th, 10:30 AM–12:30 PM Participants: 322-a Leland Bement, Kristen Carlson and Dakota Larrick—Discard, Stockpile, or Commemorative Cairn: Interpreting the Bison Skull Pile at the Ravenscroft Late Paleoindian Bison Kill, Oklahoma Panhandle 322-b Robert Lassen and Sergio Ayala —Is Fluting Exclusive to Paleoindians? A Comparison ofPaleoindian and Archaic End-Thinning Techniques 322-c Barbara Crable and Jack Hofman—Paleoindian Intercept Hunting in the Bethel Locality, Western Oklahoma 322-d Daniel Dalmas and Matthew G. Hill—Assessment of Late Quaternary Bison Diminution Using Linear Discriminant Analysis 322-e Joseph McConnell—Evaluating “Folsom” Points in the Blackwater Draw Museum’s Calvin Smith Collection 322-f Molly Herron—Camping with Mammoths? Identification of Ivory Fragments at the La Prele Mammoth Site Using Microscopy [323] Poster Session PALEOINDIAN ARCHAEOLOGY IN CALIFORNIA AND THE GREAT BASIN Room: La Sala Time: Saturday, April 13th, 10:30 AM–12:30 PM Participants: 323-a Megan Donham, Richard Rosencrance and Katelyn McDonough—A First Look at Western Stemmed Tradition Lithic Reduction and Procurement Strategies at Connley Cave 4, Oregon 323-b Shelby Saper, Richard Rosencrance, Katelyn McDonough and Dennis Jenkins—Cascade Phase Context and Chronology at the Connley Caves, Oregon 323-c Andrea Ogaz—Revisiting the Archaeology ofDry Lake Cave, California (CA-INY-1898) 323-d Erik Martin, Robert G. Elston, D. Craig Young, Brian Codding and David Rhode—Theoretically Based Investigations of the Paleo-Indian Occupation of Grass Valley, Nevada 323-e Caitlin Doherty and Ted Goebel—Discerning Paleoindian Mobility in the Eastern Great Basin: A Geochemical Analysis of Lithic Artifacts from Bonneville Estates Rockshelter and Smith Creek Cave 323-f Noel Jones—Land Use in the High Desert of Northwestern Nevada: Analyzing Settlement Patternsof the Bare Allotment 323-g Anthony Morales—Rose Valley Site (CA-INY-1799): Applying an Interdisciplinary Approach to a Western Great Basin Paleoindian Site 323-h Lydia Sykora, Justin Tackney, R. Kelly Beck, Dennis H. O’Rourke and Jack Broughton—Reconstruction of Late Holocene California Tule Elk Populations Using Ancient DNA and Stable Isotopes: An Update on Ongoing Analyses 323-i Escee Lopez, Jessica Morales and Rene Vellanoweth—Zooarchaeological Analysis of Fish Remains from the Thousand Spring Site (CA-SNI-11), San Nicolas Island, California [327] Poster Session NEW MULTIDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH AT 48PA551: A MIDDLE ARCHAIC (MCKEAN COMPLEX) SITE IN NORTHWEST WYOMING This poster symposium presents results of new research at 48PA551, a Middle Archaic (McKeanComplex) site in the Sunlight Basin of NW Wyoming. The Middle Archaic is recognized as a time of continent wide cultural innovation and experimentation that included the appearance of villages and sedentism to ritualized behavior and complex earthwork construction. Within the Rocky Mountain region, the Middle Archaic is poorly understood though scholars have long recognized it as time of cultural diversity. Posters in this symposium illustrate multi-disciplinary research designed to assess alternative models of McKean Complex socio-economic adaptations. Specific studies focus on geophysical investigations, dating and stratigraphy, lithic technological organization, paleoethnobotany, and faunal analyses. Room: La Sala Time: Saturday, April 13th, 10:30 AM–12:30 PM Chairs: Ethan Ryan and Emma Vance Participants: 327-a Lawrence Todd and Rachel Reckin—Archaic Period Obsidian Use in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem: The 48PA551 Assemblage in Regional Context 327-b Kelsi Kaviani, Anna Prentiss, Emma Vance, Ethan Ryan and Haley O’Brien—The McKean Complex Occupation in the Sunlight Basin, Northwest Wyoming: An Updated Assessment of Cultural and Geological Stratigraphy at Site 48PA551 327-c Ethan Ryan—Know Before You Dig: Using Comparative Geophysical Exploration and Ground-Truthing for Surgical Excavation 327-d Haley O’Brien, Anna Prentiss, Ethan Ryan and Emma Vance—Re-examining Site 48PA551 in Sunlight Basin, Northwest Wyoming: The Faunal Remains from the 2018 Field Season 327-e Nicole Herzog, Liz Dolinar and Anna Prentiss—Using Micro and Macrobotanical Analyses to Assess Socio-economic Strategies at 48PA551, the McKean Occupation in the Sunlight Basin, Wyoming 327-f Emma Vance, Ethan Ryan and Anna Prentiss—Connecting Lithic Technology to Socio-economic Organization at Site 48PA551 [328] Poster Session NEW RESEARCH INTO THE OLD CORDILLERAN In 1961, B. Robert Butler proposed the concept of the Old Cordilleran Culture on the basis of relatively standardized lanceolate projectile points. Since 1961, archaeological research into Olcott sites, the Puget Sound manifestation of the Old Cordilleran Culture, has largely been focused on artifact descriptions and site-scale questions. Developments in technology, broadening in the number of well-studied sites, and new theoretical approaches have added to our understanding of the Old Cordilleran Culture. This session examines recent archaeological studies of Olcott sites in western Washington that expand on previous investigations to diversify our understanding of the period and make meaningful connections between the artifacts of the past and descendants of the people respon sible for those materials. Room: La Sala Time: Saturday, April 13th, 10:30 AM–12:30 PM Chair: Christopher Noll Participants: 328-a Christopher Noll—A Perspective on Olcott from the Banks of the Elwha River, Clallam County, Washington 328-b Caitlin Limberg and Christopher Noll—Lithic Technological Organization at Three Olcott Sites along the Elwha River, Clallam County, Washington 328-c Julia Furlong—Geochemical Analysis of Crystalline Volcanic Rock Artifacts from Three Olcott Sites along the Elwha River, Clallam County, Washington 328-d Sean Stcherbinine—Geoarchaeology of Three Olcott Sites along the Elwha River, Clallam County, Washington 328-e Jennifer Ferris and Kerry Lyste—Come Together Over Olcott: Recent Collaborative Investigation [332] General Session ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE PALEOINDIAN PERIOD IN NORTH AMERICA Room: 230 Pecos Time: Saturday, April 13th, 10:45 AM–12:00 PM Chair: Angela Gore Participants: 10:45 Robert Rowe—Megafauna 101 for Archaeologists 11:00 C. Hemmings—Late Pleistocene Faunal Utilization: Some Current Thoughts on Paleoindian Diet and Tool Source Selection 11:15 Angela Gore—From Source to Site: Investigating Diachronic Toolstone Procurement and Land-Use in the Nenana Valley, Interior Alaska 11:30 Amanda Carroll—Perspectives onPits of the Western Stemmed Tradition: An Analysis on the Contents of Feature 59 at the Cooper’s Ferry Site 11:45 Ciprian Ardelean—The Human Presence in the Americas during and before the Late Glacial Maximum under the Light of New Investigations at Chiquihuite Cave, the Older-Than-Clovis Site in Mexico [341] Forum ELIMINATING CULTURAL RESOURCE CRIME FROM INDIAN COUNTRY THROUGH INTEGRATED PREVENTION, INVESTIGATION, AND PROSECUTION (SPONSORED BY ARCHAEOLOGY SOUTHWEST & FORT APACHE HERITAGE FOUNDATION) The forum seeks to be the beginning of the end of cultural resource crime (CHC) in Indian Country—the reservation lands and American communities most directly and harmfully affected by looting, vandalism, grave robbing, and other irrevocable forms of CHC. CHC means unauthorized alteration, damage, removal, or trafficking in materials possessing combinations of communal, spiritual, aesthetic, and archaeological or other scientific values. CHC is a colonial legacy and tentacle of transnational criminality with nefarious links to drug and weapon trafficking, cultural genocide, and terrorism. Despite persistent opposition by victimized communities and heritage and law enforcement professionals, CHC continues to undermine global-scale heritage stewardship and local senses of place, identity, and security. CHC’s sinister ‘glocality’ demands broadly integrated yet precisely targeted research and outreach to curb, document, investigate, punish, remediate, and reconcile. Results from the 2018, Wenner-Gren sponsored workshop on forensic sedimentology on White Mountain Apache Tribe lands at Fort Apache, Arizona, provide the point of departure for dialogue to build consensus among community leaders, heritage stewards, archaeological scientists, and law enforcement professionals on how to extirpate CHC from Indian Country in the next decade then apply lessons learned to thwart CHC elsewhere and forevermore. Room: 120 Dona Ana Time: Saturday, April 13th, 1:00 PM–3:00 PM Moderator: John Welch

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Top five trends that will shape the fast-food restaurant industry this year

Opinion Top five trends that will shape the fast-food restaurant industry this year From ghost restaurants and online food delivery to hyperlocal marketing, the QSR (Quick Service Restaurants) trend is fast picking up and is now expanding to smaller cities to drive growth. Comments Share Evolving lifestyles, urbanisation, and growing nuclear families have long supported the upward trend of the restaurant market in India. The QSR’s (Quick Service Restaurants) and the casual dining restaurants together constitute over 74 percent of the market and are growing exponentially. The QSR industry has spearheaded restaurant trends such as expansion to small cities in India, and different formats such as dine-in, in-mall outlets, and drive-thrus, which has provided the customers an easy access to eating out. Additionally, due to the growing exposure to the international cultures and lifestyles, Indians have started experimenting with food. They are developing their tastes for different cuisines, apart from traditional Indian cuisine. The last year witnessed the QSR industry growing at over 6 percent CAGR, and year 2019 seems even more promising. The following trends are expected to drive this growth and make 2019 a remarkable year for the industry. Ghost restaurants Ghost restaurants only deliver food and do not have a dining area, which makes their operations nimble and more sustainable. These are on the rise, and their numbers will continue to increase in 2019. Ghost restaurants offer a vast variety of cuisines, are quicker, and one can pick anything – from biriyani and burger to pasta. Online orders, food delivery, and take away food is going to take a huge bite out of the food industry’s revenue this year. Food delivery apps Food delivery applications have been a major success in the metros, and are gaining popularity in other cities as well. Students and working class, who don’t have enough time on their hand for a home cooked meal, make up the vast majority of users. The popularity of food delivery services in tier-II and tier-III cities are on the rise as more and more people are opting to eat outside food in the comfort of their homes, instead of going out. Better penetration in tier-II/III cities Unlike the metro cities, where one can place an order regardless of their location, only users from select areas of tier-II and tier-III cities have been enjoying such services. Service providers are now preparing to roll-out food delivery services in more and more areas of tier-II and tier-III cities in order to grow their operations. Therefore, we can expect to see a much better penetration of food delivery services in these places in the coming months. Pickup counters There’s a growing demand for pickup and take away counters. Customers can pick up the food from the place they ordered online, or have a food delivery agent pick it up for them. Such options save a great deal of time for those who are in a hurry. Hyperlocal marketing Hyperlocal marketing also has a huge part to play in the QSR industry. A lot of restaurants want to know what the people prefer eating, as it helps them to gain more customers while reducing wastage of unordered food items. Restaurants do not want to prepare items that people don’t like to eat. They want to serve what’s popular and trending. By gathering data on hyperlocal trends, restaurants will be able to create a menu where everything is ordered, and nothing is left out. This will enable them to utilise their complete inventory and reduce the overall cost of business at the same time. With rising GDP and disposable incomes, eating out isn’t a luxury anymore, but has become a part of the daily routine for most executives. 2019 is determined to become a year where the industry, at the least, expands its services to double the customers in India, and cater to the underserved, thereby leading the food industry with an exponential growth. (Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of YourStory.)

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Indian Accent retains title as India’s best restaurant

Indian Accent retains title as India’s best restaurant Asia Pacific Indian Accent retains title as India’s best restaurant Posted on April 10, 2019 SHARE ON
Chef Manish Mehrotra is delighted as Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants names Indian Accent India’s best for another year
For the fifth consecutive year, Indian Accent restaurant in New Delhi has been named India’s top restaurant in the list of Asia’s 50 Best restaurants, as it took 17th place on the list in the annual celebrations that took place last month.
“We work 365 days a year towards this and are thrilled to be recognised as one of the best 50 restaurants in Asia, and the best in India for the fifth consecutive year,” says Manish Mehrotra, corporate chef of Indian Accent Restaurants in New Delhi, London and New York.
He points to the restaurants unique interpretation of Indian food – described by the organisers of Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants as “Indian cuisine with a contemporary spin… or perhaps modern food with an Indian accent” – as its major strength.
“Over the years we have tried our best to be true to our philosophy and stick to it. We have always strived to present something new, while also ensuring that each experience is special for our guests,” he explains. These experiences have included historical revivals, playful nostalgia, and an openness to global techniques and influences. Exciting times for India’s food scene
The chef describes Indian diners as increasingly open to experimenting and keen to have a new experience on each visit – “it is no longer about just good food and flavour, but service and ambience play a big part too,” he says. “This new demand is allowing chefs and restauranteurs to explore different regional cuisines and culinary styles.”
The recently opened sister restaurant to Indian Accent within Old World Hospitality, Comorin, is testament to this – a unique all-day restaurant and concept store in Gurugram (Delhi/NCR), offering a menu of comfort dishes and unusual food combinations from across the country. The space includes a cocktail bar, coffee bar, and a uniquely arranged market space with a selection of items for purchase.
“These are exciting times for the food industry in India and we’re glad to be contributing towards its evolvement. We hope to keep bringing the very best to our diners and look forward to many such achievements in future,” says Mehrotra.
Tina Nielsen
Photo: Indian Accent’s Manish Mehrotra (centre) and Mukta Kapoor of Old World Hospitality More Stories Asia In pictures: HOTELEX Shanghai 2019 The show, which took place on 1-4 April, is the #1 industry trade fair in China. Mario Sequeira FCSI, chair of FCSI Asia Pacific, took shots from the show Asia Energy boost: offsetting coffee’s carbon footprint Growing diverse crops alongside coffee can significantly reduce the carbon footprint of the coffee industry, as a study of Vietnam’s coffee farms has found Asia Singapore’s Odette takes top spot in Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants 2019 Chef Julien Royer’s Odette is the first Singapore restaurant to be named the best in Asia

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The Subversive, Surprising History of Curry Powder

Mmm, curry. Natasha Breen / The Picture Pantry In the 2001 romantic comedy Bridget Jones’s Diary , the iconic meeting of the film’s lead couple begins with a voiceover as Bridget trudges through the snow down her mother’s driveway: “It all began on New Year’s day, in my 32nd year of being single. Once again I found myself on my own and going to my mother’s annual turkey curry buffet. Every year she tries to fix me up with some bushy-haired, middle-aged bore, and I feared this year would be no exception.” The presence of turkey curry—a hybrid Indian and British food—as the background to this budding British romance reveals how much curry has become synonymous with British culture. This love of curry, a dish adopted and adapted after the colonization of India, is a relic of when the sun never set on the British Empire. But the term “curry” reflected a willful ignorance of the diversity of Indian food. Lizzie Collingham, who mentions the Bridget Jones scene in her book Curry: A Tale of Cooks and Conquerors, writes that curry was something “the Europeans imposed on India’s food culture.” While their Indian cooks served them rogan josh , dopiaza , and qorma , the British “lumped all these together under the heading of curry.” Domesticating curry also aided in Britain’s colonizing mission. Susan Zlotnick, a professor of English at Vassar College, has written about how the memsahibs of the British Raj were doing the work of empire by incorporating Indian elements into British cooking and making curry, in essence, culturally British. Cookbooks of the time were “self-conscious cultural documents in which we can locate a metaphor for nineteenth-century British imperialism,” writes Zlotnick. “By virtue of their own domesticity, Victorian women could neutralize the threat of the Other by naturalizing the products of foreign lands.” Taking the culinary wisdom of the colonized, and making it their own, was part of the grand imperial project. Currying things, with fresh or tinned curry powder, became synonymous with British cookery. Isabella Beeton’s Book of Household Management (first published in 1861) and Eliza Acton’s Modern Cookery in all its Branches (1845), both bestsellers of their time, with several reprints, contained an abundance of curry recipes that called for curry powder. Some, such as Mrs. Beeton’s “fricasseed kangaroo tails,” revealed the multiple threads of colony in a single dish. This became an enduring legacy of the British Empire and colonization—it sent native foods between colonies and around the world. Much of Indian cuisine today comprises ingredients from the Americas introduced by colonists, such as chilies, potatoes, and tomatoes. Likewise, the spice trade was formative to European colonial conquest, fostering global connections between continents. This was at a time when “Europe was clearly not in the center, but on the margins of a world system centered around Asia and the Middle East,” writes anthropologist Akhil Gupta in the book, Curried Cultures: Globalization, Food, and South Asia . And so, curry powder’s popularity in England ensured its journey to America with early settlers. Map of the British Empire in 1886. Forgemind ArchiMedia/CC BY 2.0 According to culinary historian Colleen Taylor Sen, author of Curry: A Global History , Indians arrived in North America almost immediately after the founding of the Jamestown colony in 1607. “The British from the East India Company made great fortunes and came to America, where they had these big estates,” she says. They brought servants and indentured laborers from India for their estates. “India and America were like sister colonies.” Curry made the trip too. Through the 1800s, curry was a common dish, and curry powder a familiar flavor, in the United States. One of the earliest quintessentially American cookbooks, The Virginia Housewife by Mary Randolph, has at least six recipes that call for curry powder, including one to make the powder. Eliza Leslie’s bestselling Directions for Cookery, in Its Various Branches (1837) contains a “genuine East India receipt for [chicken] curry,” including recipes for mulligatawny soup with freshly ground curry powder. Mrs. Hill’s New Cook-Book (1870), which proclaimed itself “especially adapted to the Southern States,” contained recipes for curried meat stews and roasts, a “rice chicken pie” in a curry powder gravy, several ways to curry a calf’s head, and Mrs. Hill’s own curry powder recipe, made of pounded coriander seed, turmeric, ginger, black pepper, mustard, allspice, cumin, and cardamom. Some recipes, such as Mrs. Beeton’s “fricasseed kangaroo tails,” revealed the multiple threads of colony in a single dish. The expense of shipping spices to the colonies, and to Britain, was probably the primary reason why blended, pre-made curry powder became common. Although there has never been a set combination of spices that goes into curry powder, the British commercialized and sold spice blends under that broad rubric since at least 1784. Not everyone could afford to buy the individual spices and make their own blends. And while Brits in colonial India had servants to freshly grind spices and select the right combinations for each dish, the average home cook in London or Virginia often leaned on one commercial curry powder (and swapped in more familiar techniques and ingredients, such as butter in place of ghee) for all their curries. As soon as Indians had a voice in the British and American food worlds, they would denounce the use of curry powder, which reduced the region’s rich and varied cuisine to a few mass-produced mixes. In the United States, this denunciation came strongly after the Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1965, which abolished quotas based on national origins and encouraged high-skilled immigration. The influx of newly-arrived South Asians led to an increase in restaurants catering to these migrants. The face and flavor of curry changed from recipes written by white Americans to ones by South Asian chefs who voiced concerns about authenticity and appropriation while introducing their own versions of Indian food. “What you don’t need is curry powder,” Madhur Jaffrey, the high priestess of Indian cooking in America, wrote in 1974 in An Invitation to Indian Cookery . “To me the word ‘curry’ is as degrading to India’s great cuisine as the term ‘chop suey’ was to China’s.” She added that “no Indian ever uses curry powder,” nor would they mix their own, since then every dish would taste the same. “If ‘curry’ is an oversimplified name for an ancient cuisine,” she charged, “then ‘curry powder’ attempts to oversimplify (and destroy) the cuisine itself.” A magazine advertisement from 1910. The Advertising Archives / Alamy The rage felt toward curry powder was also fueled by the association between curry and racial slurs. While Britain had embraced curry—and Americans followed suit—anti-immigrant sentiments transcended a shared love of food. When Indians migrated to England and sister colonies, the racial epithet “curry-muncher” was the xenophobic response. After the East India Company’s trade monopoly in India ended in 1813, and the British government set up a more solid presence in India, the colonizing mission necessitated a separation from “natives.” Within India, an archetypal colonist discourse around disgust, backwardness, and mistrust set in, along with a need to establish the Englishness of the rulers. Still, the term curry and Westerners’ taste for it was too strong to ignore. Jaffrey’s early readers were primarily Euro-American, and she went on to write bestselling cookbooks with such names as Madhur Jaffrey’s Ultimate Curry Bible , 100 Essential Curries , and Madhur Jaffrey’s Curry Nation . Later Indian-origin chefs in the U.S. and England, such as Meera Sodha, Raghavan Iyer, and Julie Sahni, had the benefit of writing and cooking for a more diverse audience that included diasporic Indians. Over time, they reclaimed the word curry by offering traditional or family recipes and introducing a more nuanced view into the diversity and range of Indian cuisine. One of the earliest quintessentially American cookbooks, The Virginia Housewife by Mary Randolph, has at least six recipes that call for curry powder. None of these authors would be caught dead using store-bought curry powder, but South Asian home cooks began to exert ownership over these products. By the 21st century, South Asian Americans were the fastest growing immigrant group in the United States. Both in the homeland and in the diaspora, double income South Asian households with little time to freshly grind spices and prepare jhalfrezi, qorma, kalia, bhuna , or dopiaza (different forms of dry and gravy-laden Indian dishes that typify curry) reached for commercial spice mixes—the equivalent of the curry powder of yore. Countless food forums include discussions on how best to use these premade blends, which, notably, are never called curry powder, the Hindi term masala (etymologically rooted in Urdu and Arabic) being preferred. Today the Indian premade packaged spice blend is an industry that, by some accounts , is worth a billion dollars. “Biryani masala,”“pav bhaji masala,”“goat curry masala,” and an assortment of masalas to marinate kebabs have become staples of the South Asian pantry. Curry endures, but now in the kitchens of South Asians, and at South Asian restaurants whose fare became considered “ethnic food.” The decline in the popularity of curry in America—relative to the days when it featured prominently in American cookbooks—can be accorded in part to its reclamation by diasporic South Asians. “Our tastes are probably more racialized than we are willing to acknowledge,” said Krishnendu Ray, Chair of the Department of Food and Nutrition Studies at New York University, in an interview with WNYC . Most of the cuisines that have achieved “elite” status in the U.S. belong to ethnicities now considered white, such as Italian, French, and New American food. “Poor immigrants coming into the country—their food can become popular, but it is very difficult for their cuisine to acquire prestige.” And so, much of Indian, Chinese, and Mexican cuisine today gets relegated to a niche. Food is often tied to national identity, but the contribution of curry powder to the global kitchen is a noteworthy instance of the early forces of globalization. An invention of a colonial empire, it epitomized Britishness—under the guise of being authentically Indian—and graced the tables of white southerners in America, ultimately drawing the ire of South Asians until it was reclaimed, reinvented, and rebranded under its current avatar as “masala.” The history of this humble kitchen ingredient is the history of empire and its aftermath.
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Masala Library by Jiggs Kalra Review

Masala Library by Jiggs Kalra Review Tradition meets modern-day cooking techniques at Dubai’s latest establishment Print Nick Rego Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Whatsapp
The newest contender on Dubai’s food scene comes in the form of Masala Library by Jiggs Kalra at the JW Marriot Marquis. Taking over what was formerly Rang Mahal, the restaurant’s décor has been left intact, which features bold splashes of red and large murals dotted around the restaurant.
Masala Library offers an à la carte menu, but their 12-course chef’s tasting menu is what most diners will be interested in trying out. Available in both vegetarian (AED 215) and non-vegetarian options (AED 245), it highlights several of Masala Library’s signature creations that can be comfortably enjoyed in a little under two hours. Theatrics is not what Masala Library is about – the focus here is on bringing classical cooking techniques and flavors to a more modern setting.
The menu consists of a few snacks to whet your appetite, followed by a soup course, appetizers, a choice of main course, and finally dessert. We opt for the non-veg menu, and the first to arrive as an amuse-bouche is an ‘egg’ of coconut water and mango. This is followed by a deconstructed samosa which consists of a thin and crispy base of samosa wrapper lightly topped with piped potato and tamarind and coriander chutney. It’s beautiful to look at and evokes all the flavors and textures that you’d come to expect from a samosa. The dahi bada is next – lightly whipped yogurt served with a soft and savory sponge that elevates its street-food status. The ‘farmer’s staple’ appears as a finale, comprising of an impossibly thin dough stuffed with caramelized onion and served with a tiny fragment of homemade butter. It’s light yet incredible moreish, and we sheepishly ask for a second serving which promptly arrives at the table.
While theatrics are kept to a minimum at Masala Library, a few tableside dishes do appear from time to time. The first is the masala chai, which is prepared first with powdered white truffle, followed by a sprinkling of dried assorted mushrooms, which is finally topped with a hearty mushroom consomme. The rich, earthy mushroom flavors aren’t overpowered by the white truffle, and overall it’s a very pleasing dish to have.
The appetizers are next, starting with beautifully grilled prawns served with pink peppercorns, braised lamb chops with a chutney glaze, a small portion of chicken tikka, and lastly a portion of thinly sliced wagyu that’s prepared tableside. The prawn was supple with a great charred flavor, and the lamb chops were a luscious pink color with a mildly sweetened smear of chutney. The chicken tikka is –as expected – a familiar and enjoyable dish; nothing you couldn’t find in any decent Indian restaurant. The wagyu is seared quickly on a hot stone before being plated with radish chutney and walnut fragments, with the tenderness of the meat pairing well with the sharpness of the radish.
The mains were are more complicated affair, both in terms of presentation and flavor. You’re given a choice of either mutton, fish, or scallops, though the chef sent all three to our table to try out. The mutton curry was rich and creamy, with bold and deep flavors of roasted spices like cumin and coriander permeating throughout. The toothfish has a much firmer texture than other white fish, resulting in a more enjoyable bite when paired with its creamy curried base. The scallop is lightly seared and served with a coconut curry and charcoal tuile – an elegant yet seemingly ordinary dish.
Dessert signals the end of our meal, but brings with it a slight disappointment. The ‘jalebi caviar’ is served playfully in a transparent clam shell, alongside a light saffron foam and pistachio condensed milk. When mixed together the flavors barely seem to come through, and all you’re left with is crunching on the jalebi. The next dessert is a saffron aerated buttercream, topped with a crispy leaf of filo pastry. This is something you’ll want to scoop up almost immediately as the dessert quickly starts to deflate, leaving behind just a yellow puddle on your plate. There’s also the ashen kulfi on the same plate, which while tasting like an ordinary kulfi, is almost impossible to cut with a spoon as it’s so cold. So dessert for us, was a bit of a miss overall.
Masala Library does have a few dishes worth savoring, but its overall appeal will depend solely on people wanting to be seen at Dubai’s latest hotspot before moving on to the next. By comparison, Farzi Café over at City Walk offers appetizing fare in an equally playful manner, so only time will tell whether or not Masala Library will be able to charm diners with its take on Indian cuisine.
Masala Library by Jiggs Kalra, JW Marriot Marquis Dubai – for details click here

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Catering Tips for Indian Weddings in This Summer

Posted on the 10 April 2019 by The Wedding Cards Online @theweddingcards
You probably have read a lot of hacks over wedding invitations, tips to look good on your wedding, ideas for bridal outfits and what not. Just to have a perfect wedding, we do everything but have you given enough attention to the most “ anticipated element of Indian wedding ”– FOOD? Believe it or not, it is very substantial and people look forward to it for most of the times.
So for this post, we bring you the catering tips for your Indian wedding for this summer. These tips will help you in choosing the right menu and choosing the best ways in which you can serve these delicacies to your guests. So, let’s get started: Appetizing starters
Indian weddings are all about food. Yes, it is one thing that all of us love at every Indian wedding. So why not welcome your guests for your summer wedding with splendid starters. Everybody will totally drool over some light and savoury snacks like Pani patashi, samosa, idli dosa, paneer tikka, kebabs, etc. Believe us the list is never ending as we have got speciality of every state as well we are excelling in tweaking other cuisines with Indian flavours as well.
The pro tip is like you use fancy envelope liners for accentuating your Indian wedding cards , you can use some pretty looking kiosks even quirky designed cars and food trucks to present them in front of your guests. What’s an Indian wedding without whole tweaks and twists? Beverages to the rescue
Summers are “extreme” in India. So if you don’t want your guests’ brain top gets roast up in the summer heat, calm their nerves down with cool beverages. The good thing is that you have got it in both-alcoholic as well as non-alcoholic categories.
From nimbu-pani to watermelon punch, from soft drinks to wine, from fruit juices to Mocktails, you have got a whole deck of variety in beverages. Obviously, the presentation here is important as well. From classic shots to fancy bottles, serve your guests their favorite drink. Sumptuous meals for the main course
The meals for the main course are very substantial and hence you need to pay attention to every detail. You can stick to one cuisine or even have the best delicacies of multiple cuisines. Though there is an extensive range of gourmet meals in Indian cuisine too, your choices are simply based on your likings and budget. Make sure you have a set buffet along with necessary sitting arrangements. Delectable desserts
Every meal is incomplete without desserts. And when it comes to Indian weddings, it is the most anticipated part of the menu. From kids to the oldies, everyone here has a sweet tooth. And apart from their rich sweet flavours, if you present them in an attractive manner, then they become no less than mouth-watering.
From traditional Indian sweets to contemporary desserts like puddings and cakes and mousse, you can have a lot of options to go for. Most popular as desserts in Indian weddings among Indian sweets are Gulab Jamun, Moong dal ka halwa, ras malai, shahi tukda , etc.
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