Indian tiffin servise Blacktown Area – Blacktown | 1215536910

Indian tiffin servise Blacktown Area – Blacktown | 1215536910

OM SAI RAM
SAHIL Tiffin Service
We serve north indian home made food.
Specially punjabi cuisines such as:
Goat Curry, Butter Chicken, Shahi Paneer,
Daal Handi, Baingan ka Bertha, Sarso Ka Saag, kadhi With Crispy Pakora’s…
Its Tiffin Service in Blacktown which includes
1. Curry (veg)
2. Curry( non veg )
3. Vegetable
4. Chapattis
5. Rice
6. Raita everyday new variety
7. Salad with dressing
8. Dessert on weekend
WE ALSO SERVE PACK OF SIX TAWA CHAPATTIS ONLY FOR $ 5
YOU CAN ALSO CONTACT FOR CATTERING FOR BDAY PARTIES OR OTHERS OCCASIONS…
KINDLY CONTACT
SAHIL TIFFIN SERVICE
*

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51 things to do and places to go in Surrey on a cold day

What’s On 51 things to do and places to go in Surrey on a cold day Here are some idea of things to do when it’s chilly outside, other than staying in bed watching Netflix! Share Sit by a roaring log fire when the weather is nippy (Image: The Duke of Wellington)
It may be cold outside but that doesn’t mean you need to miss out on all the fun.
Besides, there’s only so much TV you can watch, especially if you have little ones running around.
Surrey is home to some fantastic days out perfect come rain or shine (or snow!)
Living in a country with such unpredictable weather , even during the summer months we often need a plan B.
To help you make the most of those brisk days, here are some things to do and places to go on your doorstep.
From go-karting and shopping, to bowling and trampolining, take your pick. Read More 1. The Antiques Warehouse
Browse a large and constantly changing collection of beautifully presented antiques, collectibles and memorabilia.
The shop also plays live piano music and home-made cakes and coffee during weekend afternoons and bank holidays.
Opening times: Mon-Sun 10.30am-5pm
Address: Badshot Farm, St George’s Road, Runfold, Farnham , GU9 9HR 2. The Boileroom
The independent venue hosts emerging, national and local music gigs, plus community and creative arts events.
Opening times: Vary
Entry price: Varies. To book tickets online visit theboileroom.net
Address: Stokefields, Guildford , GU1 4LS Wheatus bring 15th anniversary tour to The Boileroom (Image: www.sophiegarrett.co.uk) 3. Gatwick Aviation Museum
The museum has a unique collection of British aircraft from the “golden age” of British aircraft manufacture.
Opening times: Friday, Saturday and Sundays 9.30am-5pm (4pm Nov-Mar)
Entry price: Adults £7.50, child (5-14) £2.50 and under 5 free. To book tickets online visit gatwick-aviation-museum.co.uk
Address: Vallance By-Ways, Lowfield Heath Road, Charlwood, Gatwick, RH6 0BT 4. Guildford Escape Rooms
You have 60 minutes to search for clues, solve the puzzles and beat the room.
Aimed at adults but 11+ allowed as part of an adult team.
Opening times: Thurs 5pm-10pm, Fri 10am-10pm, Sat and Sun 10am-10pm
Entry price: From £85 for the room (2-6 players). To book tickets online visit guildfordescaperooms.com
Address: Jeffries House, Jeffries Passage, Guildford , GU1 4AP 5. Hogs Back Brewery
Book a tour to learn how Hogs Back Brewery brew its beer, sample a generous range of beers and collect a free souvenir half pint glass.
Opening times: Vary
Entry price: £15 each. To book tickets online visit hogsback.co.uk
Address: Manor Farm, The Street, Tongham, GU10 1DE (Image: Hogs Back Brewery) 6. Honeywood Museum
The family-friendly museum is a Grade II listed building next to the picturesque Carshalton Ponds.
There are exhibitions which tell the fascinating history of the house and the people who lived there.
Opening times: Wed-Fri 11am-5pm and Sat-Sun 10am-5pm. Closed on Bank Holidays, between Christmas and the New Year and on Easter Sunday.
Entry price: Free.
Address: Honeywood Walk, Carshalton, SM5 3NX 7. TeamSport Go Karting
For fast, furious and fully adrenalised four-wheeled thrills head to this indoor race track.
Opening times: Daily, various slots available.
Entry price: £35 each. To book tickets online visit team-sport.co.uk/go-karting-farnborough
Address: Invincible Road, Farnborough , GU14 7QU Video Loading Click to play Tap to play The video will start in 8 Cancel Play now 8. Macdonald Frimley Hall Hotel and Spa
We all need a pampering session from time to time and the spa at this hotel will certainly offer you a day of bliss.
From relaxing treatments and luxurious facilities to indulgent cream and afternoon teas, the four star wedding venue has it all.
Opening times: Daily.
Entry price: Vary. To book a spa day online visit macdonaldhotels.co.uk
Address: Lime Avenue, Camberley , GU15 2BG Read More
If you’re looking for something warm and luxurious for an hour or two, treat yourself to a massage, facial or manicure at this town centre day spa.
Entry price: Vary. To book a treatment online visit champneys.com/city-spa/guildford/
Opening times: Mon, Tues, Fri and Sat 9am-6pm, Wed and Thurs 9am-8pm and Sun 10am-5pm.
Address: High Street, Guildford, GU1 3HZ. Reception and retail area at Champneys Guildford (Image: Champneys) 10. Woking Shopping Centre
The shopping mall located in the town centre has more than 170 shops, cinema, theatre, restaurants and car park all under one roof.
You can spend hours there without getting a drop of rain on you.
Opening times: Mon-Sat 9.30am-6pm (until 8pm on Thursday) and Sun 11am-5pm.
Entry price: Car parking charges apply.
Address: Commercial Way, Woking , GU21 6GH 11. Brooklands Museum
The birthplace of British motorsport and aviation with events all year round, Brooklands Museum displays a wide range of exhibits ranging from racing cars, motorcycles and bicycles to an unparalleled collection of Hawker and Vickers/ BAC-built aircraft.
Opening times: Daily 10am-5pm (until 4pm in winter)
Entry price: Online adult £14.50 and child £8. To book tickets online visit brooklandsmuseum.com
Address: Brooklands Drive, Weybridge , KT13 0QN (Image: Les Williams) 12. Hampton Court Palace
King Henry VIII’s favourite palace, families can enjoy an audio guide of the historic building, costumed guided tours, children’s activity trails, the Tudor Kitchens and the Young Henry VIII exhibition.
Opening times: Daily 10am-6pm (until 4.30pm in winter)
Entry price: Adult £21.30 and child (5-15) £10.70, under 5 free. To book tickets online visit hrp.org.uk/hampton-court-palace
Address: East Molesey , KT8 9AU. 13. The Lightbox
Three stunning galleries host a huge range of exhibitions, changing regularly.
The building is home to Woking’s Story, an interactive museum of the town’s history and a canal-side café.
Opening times: Tues-Sat 10.30am-5pm and Sun 11am-5pm
Entry price: General admission is free, but entry to the exhibitions cost £5, pay-and-display car park in Brewery Road.
Address: Chobham Road, Woking , GU21 4AA (Image: (C) Ian Rudgewick-Brown) 14. Spectrum Leisure Centre
With its large swimming pools, bowling, ice skating rink and courts for squash, table tennis and badminton, the Spectrum offers plenty for the active children.
Plus there are places to get food and drink on site early until late.
Opening times: Daily
Entry price: Vary. To book tickets online visit guildfordspectrum.co.uk
Address: Parkway, Guildford , GU1 1UP 15. Grayshott Pottery
Watch how huge chunks of grey clay make their way through the many workshop processes until they finally emerge as pristine plates for your food or as a vibrant vase for a beautiful home or gallery.
Tours last 30 minutes and are free.
Opening times: Tours Mon-Fri at 11am
Entry price: Free but booking is essential. Call 01428 604 404 to enquire about availability.
Address: School Road, Hindhead , GU26 6LR 16. Denbies Wine Estate
The ultimate wine experience is an all weather tour, operating inside the winery building.
Opening times: Mon-Sat 9.30am-5.30pm and Sun 9.30am-5.30pm (until 5pm in winter)
Entry price: Indoor 60 minute tours cost from £11.50 per person. To book tickets online visit denbies.co.uk
Address: London Road, Dorking , RH5 6AA Read More 17. Big Apple
Entertainment all under one roof with ten-pin bowling, soft play, laser quest, a cafe bar and arcade.
Opening times: Daily 10am-late
Entry price: Vary. To book tickets online visit thebigapple.co.uk
Address: Crown Square, Woking , GU21 6HR 18. Mercedes-Benz World
Wandering around Mercedes-Benz World, you’ll find yourself up close to an array of automotive icons past and present.
Afterwards, walk over to Brooklands Hotel to dine at its award-winning 1907 restaurant.
Opening times: Daily 10am-6pm
Address: Brooklands Drive, Weybridge , KT13 0SL Read More (Image: James Lipman) 19. The Atrium
With bowling, a cinema and arcade all under one roof, youngsters will be entertained for hours.
Round off your day with dinner at one of the many restaurants on site including Bella Italia, Nandos and Pizza Express.
Opening times: Daily
Entry price: Vary. Contact individual restaurants to book a table. For more information visit theatrium-camberley.com
Address: Park Street, Camberely , GU15 3PT 20. Gravity Force
Interconnected trampolines with angled edges literally allow you to bounce off the walls.
Whether you’re an adrenaline junkie looking for your next thrill, a parent wanting a fun activity to do with your children, or someone looking for a brand new way to exercise, Gravity Force offers it all.
Opening times: 10am-10pm Mon-Fri, 10am-11pm on Sat and 10am to 9pm on Sun
Entry price: Prices vary. To book tickets online visit https://gravityforce.co.uk/locations/camberley
Address: Admiralty Way, Camberley , GU15 3DT (Image: Chris Whiteoak) 21. Ikea
Ok, so furniture shopping might not be your idea of fun with a little one in toe, but the children’s section is sure to entertain them.
Opening times: Mon-Sat 10am-9pm and Sun 11am-5pm
Entry price: Free entry. To shop online visit ikea.com/gb/en
Address: Pincents Kiln Industrial Park, Theale, Reading, RG31 7SD 22. Haslemere Educational Museum
One of the largest Natural History Museums in central southern England and with three galleries, there are more than 240,000 specimens and around 140,000 human history artefacts from around the World.
Opening times: Tues-Sat 10am-5pm
Entry price: Admission by donation.
Address: High Street, Haslemere, GU27 2LA, tel: 01428 645425 23. Craggy Island Climbing Centre
One of the largest centres of its type with 100 rope lines and more than 300 regularly changed climbing routes on a variety of angles and surfaces, you will not only have fun but improve your fitness too.
Opening times: Mon-Fri 1am-10pm, Sat 9am-7.30pm, Sun 10am-6.30pm
Entry price: Vary. To book tickets online visit craggy-island.com or call 0344 8808866.
Address: Slyfield Industrial estate, Moorfield Road, Guildford, GU1 1RU (Image: Jake Darling) 24. Vue Cinema
Watch the latest blockbuster with a box of popcorn and a Tango Ice Blast in your hand.
Opening times: Daily
Entry Price: Vary. To book tickets online visit myvue.com
Address: The Atrium, Park Street, Camberley, GU15 3PL (Image: Vue)
If you love all things pink, make sure you pay this tearoom a visit, even if it is just to take a photo and grab a slice of cake.
The pretty café serves a huge range of homemade sweet delights plus indulgent afternoon teas.
Opening times: Daily 8.30am-11pm
Entry price: Cream Tea costs £9.35 for one and Traditional Afternoon Tea costs £22.75 for one. To book a table online visit theteaterrace.com
Address: Oakdene Parade, Cobham , KT11 2LR Read More 26. Las Iguanas
Feel like you’re on a tropical island, by making cocktails at this Latin American bar and restaurant .
The venue boasts classic drinks with a twist and new concoctions for you to try.
Opening times: Daily
Entry price: Dishes vary. To book a table online visit iguanas.co.uk
Address: Commercial Way, Woking , GU21 6XR
This gorgeous gastro pub in Farnham town centre has plenty of cosy alcoves and a menu full of home comforts including sausage and mash, pie and chips and slow cooked pork belly in a rich red wine gravy.
Food served: Mon-Thurs 12pm–3:30pm and 5:30pm–9:30pm, Fri-Sat 12pm–9:30pm and Sun 12pm–8:30pm
Entry price: Dishes vary. To book a table call 01252 89997 or visit castleinnfarnham.co.uk
Address: Castle Street, Farnham, GU9 7HR 28. Hatchlands Park
Keyboard instruments fill this Georgian mansion that was built in the 1750s. The family home also has a collection of paintings and fine furniture and there is a delightful historic kitchen tea-room in the cobbled courtyard.
Opening times: Sun-Thurs 2pm-5.30pm
Entry price: Adults from £11.80 and children from £5.90. To book tickets online visit nationaltrust.org.uk
Address: East Clandon, Guildford, GU4 7RT (Image: Jane Thomas Cranleigh Camera Club) 29. The Crafts Study Centre
The centre is a specialist university museum open to the public as well as a research centre and home to internationally renowned collections of modern British craft.
Visitors can wander around the on-site shop, go to one of the changing exhibitions and visit the research library (appointment only).
Opening times: Tues-Fri 10am-5pm and on Sat 10am-4pm
Entry price: Free. For more information visit csc.uca.ac.uk
Address: UCA, Falkner Road, Farnham , GU9 7DS, tel: 01252 891450, free entry 30. Battersea Dogs and Cats Home
Meet and greet cats and dogs that have been rescued by the charity either because they have got lost or been abandoned and unwanted.
Opening times: Daily 10.30am-5pm
Address: Priest Hill, Old Windsor, SL4 2JN Join the Surrey Live ‘Parents of Surrey’ Facebook group
We’ve created a Facebook group for all of the parents in our county and beyond.
We will keep you informed about all of the latest toys, play centres and Ofsted ratings.
We’ll also tell you about things you can do with the kids and parenting tips.
Join the group here . 31. Farnborough Leisure Centre
You may get wet, but at least it’s inside and there’s lots of fun to be had splashing around.
There is a 33m main pool with six lanes and a 12.5m teaching pool.
There is also a gym, soft play and bowling alley on site.
Opening times: Mon-Fri 6am-1pm and Sat-Sun 8am-8pm
Entry price: Vary. To book tickets call 01252 370411 or visit placesleisure.org/centres/farnborough-leisure-centre
Address: Westmead, Farnborough, GU14 7LD 32. Top Golf
Get your mates together and challenge them to addictive point-scoring golf games indoors. While you play you can grab something to eat and drink.
Opening times: Mon-Sat 9am-11pm and Sun 9am-10.30pm
Entry price: Adults £6 per game and juniors £5 per game. To book tickets call 01932 858551 or visit topgolf.com/uk/surrey
Address: Moated Farm Drive, Addlestone , KT15 2DW 33. Giggles Soft Play
This family run business offers a friendly, fun and safe environment for children aged five and under to play.
Based in a large bright hall there is a bouncy castle, ball pool, soft play shapes, slides, ride on toys, roller coaster, musical instruments and cars.
Opening times: Mon-Fri 9.30am-12pm and Sat 9am-12pm
Entry price: £3.95 over 1s, £2.95 additional siblings and £1.25 under 1s, free for adults. To book tickets online visit gigglessoftplay.co.uk or call 07717 862577.
Address: The Harrier Centre, King Georges Recreational Ground, Poole Road, West Ewell, KT19 9RY 34. Glasshouse at RHS Wisley
Explore the huge cathedral-like Glasshouse, covering the area of 10 tennis courts and rising to 12m (40ft) high, home to the RHS’s world-class tender plant collection.
There are various indoor cafés on site selling hot food and drink.
Opening times: Mon-Fri 10am-6pm and Sat, Sun and Bank Holidays 9am-6pm
Entry price: Entry free with admission ticket. To book tickets online visit rhs.org.uk/gardens/wisley
Address: Wisley Lane, Wisley , GU23 6QB 35. Tenpin bowling
Get all the family together for a competitive and classic game of 10-pin bowling. The venue has an arcade and lots of places to get food and drink too.
Opening times: Mon-Thurs 12pm-11pm, Fri 12pm-12am, Sat 10am-12am and Sun 10am-11pm
Entry price: 1 game costs £8.25 for adults and £6.75 for juniors. To book tickets online visit tenpin.co.uk
Address: The Atrium, Park Street, Camberley , GU15 3PT. 36. Creams
Head to Creams for every ice cream flavour and colour you can imagine from blue and pink bubblegum and Dolce Latte to Snickers and coconut.
The dessert restaurant also serves ridiculously sweet waffles, pancakes and sorbets.
Opening times: Daily 10am-11pm
Entry price: Desserts vary in price. No need to book.
Address: High Street, Staines , TW18 4EE. (Image: Chris Whiteoak) 37. Harlequin Theatre and Cinema
This family entertainment venue not only has a programme of great stage productions but also screens movies with a Saturday Morning Cinema Club for chidren.
Opening times: Daily
Entry price: Vary. To book tickets online visit harlequintheatre.co.uk or call the box office on 01737 276500.
Address: Warwick Road, Redhill , RH1 1NN. 38. Toby Carvery
From classic roast beef with Yorkshire puddings to perfect roast potatoes and lashings of gravy, the traditional Sunday lunch is the ultimate family treasure.
We’ve put together a list of restaurants that put on a great roast dinner including the popular roast buffet chain Toby Carvery in Frimley.
Opening times: Mon-Sat 8am-11pm and Sun 8am-10.30pm
Entry price: Vary. To book a table online visit tobycarvery.co.uk or call 01276 691939
Address: Portsmouth Road, Frimley, GU15 1HS. Read More 39. Chertsey Museum
The museum is dedicated to the history of the town and the borough of Runnymede.
You’ll learn what life was like in historic Runnymede and discover the archaeology and history of Chertsey Abbey.
You’ll see displays consisting of fine art, decorative art, social history and an array of photographs.
Opening times: Tues-Fri 12.30pm-4.30pm and Sat 11am-4pm
Entry price: Free. For more information visit chertseymuseum.org
Address: The Cedars, Windsor Street, Chertsey, KT16 8AT. 40. Guildford Museum
For an interesting day out, take the whole family to Guildford Museum.
You will learn everything there is to know about the history of the town, including its links with Lewis Carroll, as well as archaeology and textiles.
Opening times: Mon-Sat 11am-5pm
Entry price: Free. For more information visit guildford.gov.uk/article/17168/Guildford-Museum
Address: Castle Hill, Guildford, GU1 3SX, tel 01483 444751 41. Farnborough Air Sciences Trust Museum
The museum is dedicated to Farnborough’s proud aviation heritage and significant contribution to air science and research, and offers an important educational resource as well as an entertaining and stimulating day out for anyone interested in aviation history and scientific progress.
Opening times: Sat, Sun and Bank Holiday Monday 10am-4pm
Entry price: Free. For more information visit airsciences.org.uk or call 01252 375050
Address Trenchard House, Farnborough Road, Farnborough, GU14 6TF. 42. Army Medical Services Museum
This is a great day out for you and your own little soldiers.
You can learn all about the history of the Royal Army Medical Corps, the Royal Veterinary Corps, the Royal Army Dental Corps and the Queen Alexandra Royal Army Nursing Corps. Displays include uniforms, equipments ambulance and insignia.
Opening times: Mon-Fri 9.30am-3.30pm
Entry price: Free. For more information visit museumofmilitarymedicine.org.uk or call tel 01252 868612.
Address: Keogh Barracks, Aldershot, GU12 5RQ. 43. Woking Library
Pick up and read a book, newspaper or magazine, make use of the free wifi or take home a DVS.
Opening times: Mon, Wed, Fri 9.30am-5.30pm, Tues and Thurs 9.30am-7pm, Sat 9.30am-5pm (Sun closed)
Entry price: FREE. For more information visit surreycc.gov.uk/libraries/your-library/find-your-nearest/woking
Address: Gloucester Walk, Woking GU21 6EP (Image: TMS)
As one of the largest theatres outside London , top West End shows and musicals make their way to New Victoria Theatre.
Opening times: Daily
Entry price: Vary. To book tickets online visit atgtickets.com/venues/new-victoria-theatre
Address: The Ambassadors, Peacocks Centre, Woking, GU21 6GQ (Image: Helen Maybanks) 45. All Bar One
You might already be an expert at drinking cocktails, but wouldn’t it be great if you could craft some concoctions of your own?
Now you can learn to mix, muddle and mash at an All Bar One Cocktail Masterclass.
Opening times: Daily
Entry price: From £25 per person. To book a masterclass online visit allbarone.co.uk
Address: North Street, Guildford, GU1 4AF 46. Esquires Coffee
Located at the top of the high street, the charming café is child and dog friendly and alongside a great range of coffee, serves jacket potatoes and brunch as well as delectable sweet treats.
Opening times: Mon0Fri 7am-5pm, Sat 8am-5pm and Sun 9am-4pm
Entry price: Vary. Just pop in.
Address: Ground Floor, High Street, Guildford, GU1 3JL. Esquires Coffee in Guildford (Image: Laura Nightingale) 47. Coughlans Bakery
This family run village bakery is known for miles for its baked goods, from cakes and cookies to chocolate creations and traditional or artisan bread.
They shop also has an incredibly large selection of vegan friendly products.
Opening times: Mon-Sat 7.30am-5.30pm and Sun 9.30am-4pm
Entry price: Vary. Just pop in. For more information visit coughlansbakery.co.uk
Address: High Street, Godstone, RH9 8DT Coughlans Bakery in Godstone (Image: Grahame Larter) 48. The Chilli Pickle
A meal here will definitely warm you up.
The restaurant serves an inspirational pan Asian menu focusing on regional Indian cuisine that is fresh, vibrant and zingy the likes of which you have never tasted before.
Opening times: Mon-Fri 12pm-2.30pm and 5.30pm-10pm. Sat 12pm-10pm and Sun 12.30pm-7.30pm
Entry price: Vary. To book a table online visit thechillipickle.com or call 01483 388101.
Address: High Street, Guildford, GU1 3BJ. Sigri chilli pickle mixed grill 49. The Square Camberley
The undercover shopping precinct is home to lots of high street shops and places to eat, great for catching up with friends or enjoying some retail therapy.
Opening times: Mon-Wed and Fri-Sat 9am-6pm, Thurs 9am-8pm and Sun 10.30am-4.30pm
Entry price: Free. Just pop in. Car park on site.
Address: Camberley, GU15 3SP 50. Squire’s Garden Centre
Head along to the garden centre and visit the extensive pets and aquatics departments where you will find everything you might need for your pet.
There is a selection of small furry animals as well as an eye-catching array of reptiles such as bearded dragons and snakes.
Opening times: Mon-Sat 9am-6pm and Sun 10.30am-4.30pm
Entry price: Free. Just pop in. For more information visit squiresgardencentres.co.uk
Address: Badshot Lea Road, Badshot Lea, Farnham, GU9 9JX 51. The Look Out Discovery Centre
Located next to vast woodlands (ideal for a dry day), the centre is home to hands-on science and nature exhibits.
There are more than 90 activities on offer which children of all ages can enjoy and learn from.
Kids can launch a hydrogen rocket, play with boats in the indoor stream or build a house with their friends.
Opening times: Daily 10am-5pm
Entry price: From £5.40. To book tickets online visit bracknell-forest.gov.uk/leisure-services/look-out-discovery-centre
Address: Nine Mile Ride, Bracknell, RG12 7QW Join the Surrey Live ‘We Love Surrey’ Facebook group
We’ve created a Facebook group for everyone and anyone who loves our fine county.
We will keep you informed about everything to do with Surrey and its people.
The group is a place to talk, share, live, learn, inspire and enjoy.
Join the group here .

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The Mayo Alumni Association, Delhi (MAAD) organized Mayo Alumni Summit 2019

The Mayo Alumni Association, Delhi (MAAD) organized Mayo Alumni Summit 2019 April 12, 2019 0 194
New Delhi: The Mayo Alumni Association, Delhi (MAAD), a chapter of the Old Boys Society, Ajmer which originates from its prestigious alma mater Mayo College, Ajmer, organized a first of its kind “Mayo Alumni Summit on 30th March 2019” at The Lalit, New Delhi. The themes of the first annual summit compromised of two special sessions, i.e. Startups (“Angel Investment Perspectives”), Foodpreneurs (“Business of Food”) and a talk on Healthcare (“Healthcare Today for Tomorrow”).
The Summit entailed Panel Discussions, Startup Presentations, Annual Talk, Business Exhibition and Networking opportunities. The purpose of the Summit was to provide a unique platform for all Mayoites within India and overseas to come together and analyze real world business scenarios, stimulate meaningful discussions, deliberate ideas, exhibit and showcase products/services and network amongst each other.
Mr. Harmeet Singh, President – Mayo Alumni Association Delhi (MAAD) kicked off the 1st edition of Mayo Alumni Summit 2019 and shared the importance of connecting alumni across industries, geographies and more importantly across business stages from entrepreneurs to established business houses.
Addressing the Mayo Alumni Summit 2019, Lt Gen Surendra Kulkarni, Director Mayo College, spoke about the importance of alumni to engage with current students and inspire them with their experiences and launched an internship program for students of Class 10 to 12 who would get placement across companies run by Mayoites.
Charu Sharma (Mayo Alumni) – star Commentator, Compere & Quizmaster compered the evening and kept the audience is splits sharing interesting anecdotes from the world of cricketing anecdotes. He narrated stories and incidents on the power of networking and how initiatives such as these were critical for the growth of any alumni community.
The first session, Startups (“Angel Investment Perspectives”) comprised of eminent panelists like Mr. Ambarish Raghuvanshi, Ex- CFO, Naukri.com Advisers, Ms. Padmaja Ruparel, Co-Founder, Indian Angel Network, Mr. Pankaj Karna, Managing Director, Maple Capital Advisors, Mr. Siddharth Bindra, Managing Director, BIBA Apparels and Mr. Uday Jhamb, Co-Founder & C.E.O., Roadhouse Hostels. The panelists covered a range of topics from how accepted starting up is today to who to go about funding and importance of picking the right sectors. Mr.Karna shared how today India has become the 3rd largest ecosystem for start-ups and how the environment is ripe for anyone looking to enter the space. With much better access to funds, infrastructure and overall a more mature ecosystem. He also talked about the mobile penetration and over 400 mn digitally connected people are creating huge game changing opportunities that startups are striving to crack. Ms. Ruparel shared how investing themes have changed from once ever popular e-commerce to newer focus areas of Agritech, Enviro Tech and Health Tech. She shared how it was interesting to see the space of medical devices take shape and that any new tech focusing on Bharat will get a lot of credence. Mr.Raghuvanshi shared how his decision to join Naukri was derided in 99 and on how it was considered amongst the three big career mistakes. He shared how they stuck through and created one of India’s most successful startups. He shared how Entrepreneurship was a risky career option and remains so but clearly also has its rewards. Speaking on raising funding Siddharth shared how they were lucky to find investors because they were reached out to than actively seeking funding and why therefore it was important to build something scalable and popular that would lead to your start up getting noticed. He also shared the importance of timing and raising the right amount of money at the right time – he shared how founders should be careful of how much they dilute and that they should only pick as much as their growth rates require. Uday shared how his experiences of raising funds and closing down his start up was a tough yet great learning experience. He advised that startups should look to actively engage with mentors and find Angel investors who can act as bounding boards and to remain in active touch with them. He shared how important it was to consider being in a startup city as being critical to being in touch with the funding circuit. The panelists closed the discussion with a piece of advice for the budding entrepreneurs that, ‘stay persistent, reimagine how you are going to really change the world.’
The second session, Foodpreneurs (“Business of Food”) saw industry stalwarts like Mr. Jiggs Kalra, Author, Gastronome & Food Consultant, Mr. Kabir Advani, Managing Partner, Berco’s, Mr. Rahul Singh, Founder & CEO, The Beer Café and Mr. Goumtesh Singh, Partner, Eminent Entertainment (Raasta), taking the center stage. The speakers deliberated on the transformation that has taken place in the food industry thanks to growth of food aggregators. Mr. Advani shared how dine-in food brands that were once garnering only 5% of their business via the delivery model today get in excess of 30% from it, with an annual growth rate of 40% for delivery orders. Panelists shared how Food aggregator brands are now offering cloud kitchen facilities for restaurant start-ups to experiment and try out the space making it easier for budding chefs to more easily create their ventures with asset light models. In this context Mr.Rahul Singh asked Mr.Jiggs Kalra to share his views on how it was easy for fast food chain like McDonald’s to scale given standardized processes but how should one scale restaurants that are gourmet or cuisine based – to this Mr.Kalra shared that there were only two secret ingredients – find a person who can get things done in a city and find the best chef there is and pay him his due. Getting these two elements cost top dollar but get the job done.
The final session of the evening was the Annual Talk on Healthcare (“Healthcare Today for Tomorrow”) which was addressed by Dr. Ameet Kishore, ENT Head, Apollo Hospitals Nutri Health, Mr. Ashish Gupta, CTO and Business Head, Policybazaar, Dr. Rachna Khanna Singh, TQIW (The Quantum Institute of Wellness) and Dr. Shikha Sharma, Founder & Managing Director, Dr. Shikha’s. The annual talk put emphasis on complete wellness or holistic wellness. Modern urban lifestyle and lack of physical activities were identified as the biggest killers in today’s time, accounting for over 80% deaths worldwide. There is also a gap in the modern medicine. There is no custom-tailored treatment as most of the diseases are treated with a uniform approach. The experts believed that integrated medication is the way forward as this best form of treatment to deal with growing health concerns. They also stressed on the fact that intake of organic food can help reducing the growing risk of fatal diseases like cancer, as the pollution in air, water and food poses to be one of the major factors behind this. However, one must be ready to deal with any health contingencies at any point of time by insuring themselves against any unforeseen health issues. Modern lifestyle diseases can drain one out both emotionally and financially; such health insurances at least provide the consumers with a cushion to deal with difficult time. But one must ensure that the declarations are done well.
Besides these panels, there were presentations by six start-ups by Mayo founders. Of these two were in the space of social entrepreneurship, two in technology and two in Food. In the social entrepreneurship we saw Pradyut Voleti, Founder, DribbleAcademy.Org share his story on establishing an initiative that helps underprivileged kids excel through basketball. Next was MastiKiPaathshala.Org by Gautam Khandelwal an initiative in the Alwar District of Rajasthan that aims to empower Children through skills & livelihood-based training & education. In the tech space we saw Buildingblox.in by Abir Chopra, an internet platform to help customers design, plan and visualize their homes using AR/VR and an AI recommendation engine. There was also Mesh a business networking on chat product for alumni networking by Anurag Singh. The food space saw presentations by Tasha & Girl – India’s first zero-synthetics condiments and breakfast foods brand by Natasha Singh-Gadgil and EatWithIndia by Sonal Saxena which is India’s largest community of home chefs and royal families providing authentic food experiences at their homes and palaces.
Mr. Kirit Javali , MAAD Committee Member, ended the evening with a thank you note to sponsors such as IIFL, Cox & Kings and others who made the evening so successful. SHARE

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North Indian Restaurant in Gachibowli Hyderabad

North Indian Restaurant in Gachibowli Hyderabad Cheeryal, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh Show Map – Today Type READ SAFETY TIPS Description
Best North Indian Restaurant in Gachibowli. SkyNest is top one Restaurant it provides all variety of north India food available, Multi-cuisine are available, hygienic food, yummy & tasty. For more details, visit our site. Website:http://www.skynestindia.com/south-indian-restaurant-in-gachibowli

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Bizarre, Bawdy and Brave: The Survivors’ Tales of Magellan’s Round the World Horror Story

QUINTESSENTIAL QUINCENTENNIAL Bizarre, Bawdy and Brave: The Survivors’ Tales of Magellan’s Round the World Horror Story The 500th anniversary of the first circumnavigation of the globe puts new light on the shocking testimonies of those who took part in the voyage that changed the world forever. Itxu Díaz 04.13.19 11:51 AM ET
M ADRID—Probably you’ve never tried to eat a rat. Every now and then rodents, roasted or raw, turn up as gruesome cuisine in horror films, but they’ve never established themselves on modern menus. Five hundred years ago, however, survivors of the voyage of Fernando Magallanes, as we call him in Spain (Fernão de Magalhães in his native Portugal, Ferdinand Magellan in English) had to resort to eating rats to avoid the greater evil of eating each other, a practice with which they’d grown rather familiar on their travels.
Such was the very bitter end of the first circumnavigation of the globe.
Right now is a good time, with all the acts of quincentennial commemoration that have cropped up in Spain and Portugal, to look back on a what was, in truth, una aventura de locos . It’s also important to realize that Magellan’s expedition was the birth of what we now call “globalization.”
Let’s see. April 2019. It took me fewer than 10 seconds to circle the world on Google Earth . If King Charles I of Spain had had such a tool in the year 1519 it would not have been necessary to charter five ships and subject 239 men to all kinds of misfortunes. But of course it was necessary. Spain needed to discover a way west to the Far East to facilitate its trade routes—if that could be done—and the world needed to know once and for all its true identity as a sphere.
In 1519 that fact still was far from clear. Christopher Columbus had tried to sail west to China 27 years earlier, but he didn’t get there. Not even close. As P.J. O’Rourke once put it, “Columbus discovered Caribbean vacations.”
Magellan knew what the Far East really looked like. He had sailed previously around the tip of Africa on an eastward heading that took him to the Malay Peninsula. Now he intended to come at it from the other side if—a big if—the globe really was a globe. “ They completed the first circumnavigation of the globe. Only fools, fantasists or fanatics would deny it. ”
Of the five ships and 239 men that sailed from Seville in southern Spain in 1519, only one ship and 18 men returned. They were 18 heroes, no doubt, but above all 18 witnesses.
A few months ago, crossing the waters of the Atlantic in a small boat and amazed by the spectacle of the dolphins playing in her wake, I could not stop thinking about the things those first explorers might have seen and experienced.
Once back on land, I gathered all the available direct documentation I could find. There was the detailed account in the diary of the Venetian Antonio Pigaffeta , one of the survivors; there was the chronicle of the trip made by another of them, the pilot Francisco Albo; there was the letter to King Carlos from Juan Sebastián Elcano, who completed the voyage after Magellan himself was killed. I read the interview Maximilian Transyvanus conducted with the crew of the Victoria ; the book of Ginés de María about the discovery of what’s now called the Strait of Magellan; and the General Archive of the Indies, which is a hugely valuable source for reconstructing the darker side of that history, because its accounts are hugely human. Death as Destiny
Reading the documents that are preserved, there is only one thing certain: those men were sailing toward death. Most knew it. Most were sure of it. Survival would be a miracle.
In this 21st century, that level of incalculable risk is hard to fathom. Today’s entrepreneurs gamble with their money not their lives. Half a millennium ago, the Spanish Crown played with its money, to be sure, but the heroes of the Magellan expedition gambled with their existence.
It was an expedition financed by the monarchy in Madrid but it was also an international enterprise: the two leaders were a Portuguese (Magellan) and a Spaniard (Juan Sebastián Elcano) while the crews of the five ships were made up of men from 10 different nationalities, including Spaniards, Portuguese, Italians, French, and Greeks.
The vessels that originally set sail were Magelllan’s flagship, the Trinidad ; the slightly larger San Antonio , the Concepción , the Victoria , and the Santiago.
Four months after leaving Spain they touched the Americas, specifically South America, where today we’d find Rio de Janeiro. There the Venetian, Pigaffeta wrote in his diary of a place plagued by “an infinite number of parrots.” The locals were fascinated by the steel axes and knives offered by the Europeans, technology they had never seen, and promised the adventurers “one and even two of their daughters” in exchange.
This led to some observations that were both bawdy and bizarre.
“The young women often came on board to offer themselves to the sailors in order to obtain some present: one day one of the prettiest also went up, undoubtedly with the same objective, but having seen a nail the size of a finger and believing that nobody was watching, she took it and very quickly placed it between the two lips of her sexual organs.” The chronicler recalls that an anthropological debate was unleashed among the crew: Did the girl do it to try to hide it and steal it or simply to decorate herself in some fashion?
That would not be the last of Pigafetta’s sexual observations.
The Brazilian chiefs known as caciques allowed the adventurers to celebrate mass on land and many of the locals ended up converting to Christianity, which was as alien to them as the axes and the knives. More importantly, they heard about the the dignity of human life and the concept of mercy, both of which, according to the chroniclers, were scarce in those parts (and subsequently scarce as well under the regimes of the Iberian colonizers).
The first attempt to find entry to the South Sea failed. The passage was not really an open road: it turned out to be the estuary of the Río de la Plata, the silver river, which led to some considerable, and dangerous, frustration among the mariners.
In March 1520, near the southern tip of South America after eight months of navigation, when we now know they only needed a few days to reach Antarctica and pass through the strait there before bad weather would set in, Magellan decided to winter in the Bay of San Julián.
Food was growing scarce. The cold grew severe. Morale was bad and getting worse. Many of the crews in Magellan’s little armada were tired of the voyage, complaining about the distribution of food, but Magellan, who had decided to keep to his westward course or die trying, demanded that they show the courage needed to carry the expedition forward.
This was a delicate moment. Magellan had ordered that food be rationed as much as possible, but he gathered his men and harangued them, telling them they still had plenty on board. They had good fishing and good hunting, firewood, water, as well as supplies of “biscuits and wine.”
They didn’t trust him, didn’t believe him, and his speech did little to calm the mutinous atmosphere. At night, the cabals and conspiracies grew. The captains of all the ships except the Santiago , which was oblivious to what was happening, rose up against Magellan and demanded that he return to Spain.
The Portuguese admiral knew that on the flagship Victoria there were many crewmen on his side and decided to charge that ship, kill its mutinous captain, and recover the obedience of the crew. He condemned to death Quesada, the captain of the Concepción , and banished and abandoned Juan de Cartagena, who was in charge of the San Antonio , the epicenter of the uprising.
Magellan finally settled the matter by judging the mutineers in a court martial and pardoning some 50 of them. This was less a matter of Christian mercy than maritime pragmatism. He needed them to continue the expedition successfully.
Days later, Magellan lost the ship Santiago , wrecked among the rocks at the mouth of what is now known as the Santacruz River near the southern tip of South America. The crew managed to save themselves but they stayed two months at the site of the wreck trying to collect the supplies that floated up.
Two castaways from the Santiago had made it back to the rest of the expedition to deliver news of the ship’s sad end. They walked for a week, eating wild plants and raw seafood and were in rough shape. “They arrived so disfigured by hunger and their travails that their friends did not recognize them,” says Ortega. Expeditions were mounted taking food to the survivors of the Santiago, writes Pigaffeta, but the trip was exhausting. Even though the distance was only about 100 miles, the path was full of thorns and weeds and they “had nothing to drink but ice.” Giants and Rats
In the middle of winter the Magellan expedition discovered on the coast “certain Indians” of “great stature.”
“We saw a giant who was on the shore, quite naked, and who danced, leaped, and sang, and while he sang he threw sand and dust on his head,” writes Pigafetta. “Our captain sent one of his men toward him, charging him to leap and sing like the other in order to reassure him and show him friendship. Which he did. Immediately the man of the ship, dancing, led this giant to a small island where the captain awaited him. And when he was before us, he began to marvel and to be afraid, and he raised one finger upward, believing that we came from heaven. And he was so tall that the tallest of us only came up to his waist.”
The friendship with these Indians allowed the explorers to stock up on firewood and food—including the meat of the llama-like guanacos—and thus alleviate their suffering. These huge Indians were called Patagonians. “ I believe that nevermore will any man undertake to make such a voyage. ” — Antonio Pigafetta, survivor
In October 1520, after wintering, Magellan ordered the ships San Antonio and Concepción to advance along a route “that looked like an arm of the sea.” They had found the strait but they did not know it. Once again, despair and dissension set in. The San Antonio , the biggest ship in the fleet, left the expedition in secret.
Meanwhile, Magellan had sent a boat through the canal to discover if it had an outlet to the sea. It did. Euphoric, they baptized the point at which they entered the strait the Cape of 11,000 Virgins, after the legend of Saint Ursula and her martyred companions. Her feast day was October 21. The westernmost point of land they called the Cape of Desire. Then they set sail across the vast ocean they called “the peaceful sea,” the Pacific.
Now the true horrors set in. After sailing for “three months and 20 days without taking on board provisions or any other refreshments,” Pigafetta tells us, they “ate only old biscuit turned to powder, all full of worms and stinking of the urine which the rats had made on it, having eaten the good. And we drank water impure and yellow. We ate also ox hides which were very hard because of the sun, rain, and wind. And we left them four or five days in the sea, then laid them for a short time on embers, and so we ate them. And of the rats, which were sold for half an écu apiece, some of us could not get enough.”
A strange disease–scurvy–was spread among the crew: their gums swelled to the point of overwhelming the teeth in both jaws, preventing them from eating. A score of sailors died of the disease, as did a Patagonian giant who had joined them and was cared for by Pigaffeta.
Such was the harshness of that part of the journey that the chronicler wrote, “I believe that nevermore will any man undertake to make such a voyage.” Death of Magellan
In the spring of 1521 the expedition landed on the island of Zubu (now Cebu) and reached an alliance with its king, who converted to Christianity and swore allegiance to the king of Spain. With that, all the inhabitants of the island were baptized, they demolished their idols and put an end to their “strange ceremonies.”
Among those rituals, the Italian chronicler notes, when a chief died in Zubu, he was watched over at home accompanied by “the most respected women of the place.” The main wife “sets her mouth, her hands and her feet to those of the dead man. And while the other woman is cutting off the hair, the latter one weeps. And when she has ceased cutting, the latter one sings.” The ritual lasted five days.
It also surprised the adventurers that the natives of these islands had their foreskins “closed with a small cylinder of gold” and “never remove this ornament, not even during intercourse.” As one of the chroniclers wrote with unusual humor, given the harsh circumstances: “Despite such a strange device, all women preferred us over their husbands …”
Later in the voyage, Pigafetta listened to the many tales told by Moro pilots helping steer the Victoria through shallow seas. From them he learned that, “When the young men of Java are in love with any gentlewoman, they bind certain little bells with thread under their foreskin.” That is, between the penis and the foreskin. “They go beneath their loved ones’ window and, making pretense to urinate and shaking the member, they ring the little bells until their loved ones hear the sound. Then they come down immediately, and they take their pleasure, always with those little bells, for their women take great delight in hearing those bells ring within.”
But before they could leave Zubu, a new and devastating tragedy befell them.
Magellan wanted to seal the alliance with the king of Zubu by attacking the neighboring island of Mactan, whose king was an enemy of Zubu and would not convert to Christianity.
Magellan led his men ashore, where they burned some 30 houses belonging to the locals, who vastly outnumbered them and who counter-attacked relentlessly. Forced back into the water, Magellan and his men continued fighting knee-deep in the sea, but the artillery on board their ships was out of range and useless. A poisoned arrow hit Magellan in the leg, then a spear caught him in the arm, then another spear, and he went down surrounded by the enemy, according to Pigafetta. “All at once rushed upon him with lances of iron and of bamboo and with these javelins, so that they slew our mirror, our light, our comfort, and our true guide. While those people were striking him, he several times turned back to see whether we were all at the ships. Then, seeing him dead, as best we could we rescued the wounded men and put them into the boats which were already leaving.” On April 27, 1521, Magellan died at the age of 41, but his body was never recovered.
Afterward several more the men were lost when they were offered a friendly feast only to be betrayed and killed.
Having reduced the number of survivors, those who remained decided to reduce the number of ships to two, setting fire to the Concepción , sailing on aboard the Trinidad and the Victoria . On the way to the Moluccas, they chose Juan Sebastián Elcano as their leader.
In November 1521 they arrived at the spice islands, the Moluccas, which the Portuguese had reached earlier via the Indian Ocean, and which had been Magellan’s goal all along. They had sailed west, halfway around the world on uncharted seas, to reach them, and they received honors from King Almanzor.
The following month, with the ships loaded with cloves, they were preparing to return to Spain but the Trinidad began taking on water, and had to stay behind for repairs, eventually turning back east across the Pacific toward Panama. The Victoria continued west toward Africa and beyond, to Spain.
In the midst of strong winds, it took Victoria seven weeks to get past the Cape of Good Hope. Seven weeks in which a good part of the crew, sick and hungry, demanded Elcano land in Mozambique, where the Portuguese had established themselves. But despited Magellan’s nationality this was not a Portuguese expedition and Elcano was not about to let himself, his men and his hugely valuable cargo fall into their hands. He forced everyone to continue the route to the west.
After two months without seeing land and a score of deaths on board, they were forced to land on one of the Cape Verde islands, another Portuguese outpost, in search of water. Elcano sent 13 men to try to move the Portuguese governor by telling them of his extreme situation. They were arrested and the Portuguese tried to attack the Victoria . Elcano, who was following the negotiations, then ordered the anchor raised, abandoned the 13 men, and sailed on “with imponderable despair,” according to one of the chroniclers.
On September 6, 1522, emaciated, hungry, sick and exhausted from fatigue, after a voyage of almost three years, the Victoria with Elcano in command arrived back in Spain at the port of Sanlúcar de Barrameda with the 18 survivors on board.
They had completed the first circumnavigation of the globe in history, of that there was now no doubt. Only fools, fantasists or fanatics would deny it.
They did not disembark until the next day when they were towed up the Guadalquivir River to Seville. As crowds gathered to receive them, the 18 walked, “each carrying a candle in his hand,” to the chapel of the Virgin in the old Cathedral of Seville to whom they had pledged their faith during the worst moments of the voyage. The Beginning of Globalization
That September of 1522 the world changed forever. The expedition had established the dimensions of Earth, had discovered the Strait of Magellan, had crossed for the first time the largest ocean in the world, which they called Pacific because in its waters they did not suffer storms, had confirmed the spherical nature of the planet and discovered there were different zones of time, had found archipelagos of the Pacific large and small, including the Philippines, and had revealed that all the seas are connected to each other in a global world. They had broken the endurance record on the high seas, had traveled half the planet without stopping, and they had opened the way for communication on a planetary scale.
The fifth centenary of the adventure is a good time to remember the solemnity and transcendence with which Juan Sebastián Elcano wrote the day of his return in a letter addressed to the king who had funded the adventure, and who had become in the meantime Holy Roman Emperor Carlos V, the most powerful sovereign in Europe or, indeed, on Earth:
“Your Majesty will know better than anyone that what we ought most to value and hold on to is that we have discovered and sailed the whole roundness of the world, that going to the West, we have returned from the East.”
Translated from the Spanish and edited by Christopher Dickey. Some of the quotations are extracted from R.A. Skelton’s translation of Magellan’s Voyage: A Narrative Account of the First Circumnavigation, by Antonio Pigafetta.

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The Great Courses – Native Peoples of North America

The Great Courses – Native Peoples of North America MP4 | Video: AVC 1280 x 720 | Audio: AAC 48 KHz 2ch | Duration: 12:47:35 | 8.93 GB History, for all its facts and figures, names and dates, is ultimately subjective. You learn the points of view your teachers provide, the perspectives that books offer, and the conclusions you draw yourself based on the facts you were given. Hearing different angles on historical events gives you a more insightful, more accurate, and more rewarding understanding of events – especially when a new viewpoint challenges the story you thought you knew. Code: Now, The Great Courses has partnered with Smithsonian to bring you a course that will greatly expand your understanding of American history. This course, Native Peoples of North America, pairs the unmatched resources and expertise of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian with the unparalleled knowledge of Professor Daniel M. Cobb of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to provide a multidisciplinary view of American history, revealing new perspectives on the historical and contemporary experiences of Indigenous peoples, and their significant impact on the history of our country. Professor Cobb brings his experience as an author and teacher to recount an absolutely fascinating, larger-than-life story across a timespan of more than 500 years. This insightful and unique 24-lecture course is filled with images and rare artifacts from Smithsonian’s famed collections, and informed by fascinating insights from Smithsonian historians. The National Museum of the American Indian, headquartered on the National Mall and visited by millions of Americans every year, is dedicated to the life, languages, literature, history, and arts of the Native Americans of the Western Hemisphere. Museum input into this course-both in helping to shape the riveting curriculum as allowing use of their spectacular collections-has allowed us create a truly engaging course that will thoroughly change your understanding of American history. Unlearn What You Thought You Knew One of the first myths Professor Cobb dispels is the Eurocentric view of the “Old World” and the “New World.” Noting that this terminology is the root of many narrow views, he proceeds to challenge stereotypical representations of American Indian history in each lecture. Many of the topics he shares will initially appear familiar until he presents the components and perspectives you were likely not taught. Showcasing rare, historic artifacts and images from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, National Anthropological Archives, National Portrait Gallery, American Art Museum and Smithsonian Institution Archives, every lecture of this fascinating course helps disprove myths and stereotypes that many people take as fact. Narrating along with these dazzling visuals, you’ll hear Professor Cobb present a different account-or some new perspectives on-the Seven Years’ War, the American Revolution, the War of 1812, Cherokee removal, the Civil War, and the Indian Wars. You’ll delve into the seemingly familiar story of Westward Expansion-the pioneer trails, the Gold Rush, the Transcontinental Railroad-to discover the stories of the American Indian people who fought and negotiated to preserve their ancestral lands. Professor Cobb debunks many of the myths that you’ve taken as fact by providing the alternative side of the story: You’ll learn that the impression many of us were given about European “discoverers” conquering and controlling the Native Americans was grossly exaggerated. Native Americans remained in positions of power from the beginning and through succeeding centuries. You’ll hear the truth behind the many-times misinterpreted story of Pocahontas. She did not save John Smith’s life, nor did she and John Smith fall in love (and it is unclear whether she fell in love with her colonial husband John Rolfe). Professor Cobb dismisses these fairy tale versions and provides the (much more interesting) true story behind this supposedly well-known Native American heroine. You’ll explore how Native Americans viewed, participated in, and used the Revolutionary War to form strategic alliances. Thought to be simply a clash between colonists and the British, Native American nations pushed back against a peace treaty that didn’t involve them in order to have a seat at the table. The Impact of Colonization The early colonial period introduced the Columbian Exchange, which created “new worlds for all” by transforming the lives of Indigenous peoples and Europeans alike. The Columbian Exchange refers to the transference of plants, animals, and diseases between the Americas and Eurasia and Africa that began with Christopher Columbus. It is quite an understatement to say the Columbian Exchange changed everything. In fact, the processes and consequences of this convergence are overwhelming in their complexity and their ramifications can still be felt today. Consider the following: Coffee, pears, bananas, flour, queso, pilsners, peaches, apples, and cream are just a few of the staples we take for granted that wouldn’t become part of the modern American diet until they were introduced from abroad as a result of the Columbian Exchange. On the flip side, Native Americans introduced colonials (and thus the world) to maize or corn, white potatoes, sweet potatoes, and manioc or cassava, as well as peanuts, tomatoes, cocoa, squash and pumpkins, pineapples, papaya, and avocados. These commodities then helped define the cuisines of other countries. As Professor Cobb asks, can you imagine Italian food without tomatoes? Dandelions, sow thistle, shepherd’s purse, clover, and turf grass wouldn’t exist in North America unless the colonials had brought them. Without turf grass, football, soccer, and baseball and America’s lawns would be quite different. When Columbus returned to the new world in 1493, he brought a host of animals that Indigenous people had never seen before, including donkeys, goats, sheep, chickens, pigs, cattle, and horses – none of which would exist in America otherwise. It may be surprising to discover that “Horse Nations,” such as the Lakota, Comanche, and Apache-portrayed as the stereotypical horse-riding Indians of the Plains-were a product of the Columbian Exchange. This period of exchange was responsible for much of what we consider staple foods of America, as well as introducing the rest of the world to commodities they would never have accessed otherwise. As you journey through this course, you’ll be introduced to the many ramifications-both positive and negative-of a myriad of historical events that have long been told from only one side. Discover the Unsung Heroes There are countless stories of Native Americans whose achievements, sacrifices, or contributions have long been unacknowledged. With Professor Cobb’s knowledge and gift for storytelling, and aided by the hundreds of historical artworks and artifacts provided by the Smithsonian, you’ll get to know dozens of names and stories that previously went unrecognized. You’ll see that one of the marines in the iconic image of the American flag being lifted over Iwo Jima was Native American. The Carlisle Indian Industrial School was a dominant football team by the early 20th century, routinely crushing such big-school opponents as Army, Navy, Penn, Harvard, Chicago, and Yale. The Choctaws used their language to great effect during the final campaign of World War I, creating an unbreakable code for military communications. Twenty-nine Navajo men were recruited to devise a way to send and receive coded messages, creating an unbreakable codebook of 200 Navajo words used during combat in World War II. Throughout this course, your eyes will be opened to legendary historical figures such as Pontiac, Tecumseh, John Ross, Black Kettle, Sitting Bull, and Geronimo-individuals you may already be familiar with, but may be surprised to find out what you didn’t know as Professor Cobb delivers their detailed biographies. You’ll also hear about lesser-known Native Americans who made significant contributions to the America we know today, such as Tecumseh and Tenskwatawa, or artists such as Wohaw and Fritz Scholder. And explore the role of women throughout Native American history, looking at the contributions of Laura Cornelius Kellogg, Sarah Winnemucca, Wilma Mankiller, Lili’uokalani, Alberta Schenck, and Zitkala-Ša. Going Beyond Wounded Knee Native American history is often treated as though it ended in the late 19th century. Professor Cobb remedies this misconception by dedicating a full third of the course to the challenges and achievements of Native Americans in the late 19th and 20th centuries, as well as current events. Together, with evocative items and information straight from the collections and archives of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, you’ll hear the story of modern Native Americans, the people, challenges, and diverse cultures that came out of the 20th century and beyond. Professor Cobb unpacks well-known events and practices such as Wounded Knee and the Ghost Dance while also delving into the implications of lesser known incidents. For example, you’ll investigate the impact of World War I and World War II, reform movements such as the New Deal, and also many persistent issues including repatriation, gaming, religious rights, tribal jurisdiction, and more. You’ll discover how in the 1960s and 1970s, Native American activism mirrored the mainstream protest movements of the era, first finding expression in literature, music, art, and higher education, and eventually making real change through legislative and judicial reform. Calling again on the Smithsonian’s exclusive archive of art, portraits, and artifacts, you’ll see key examples of how the counterculture both reflected and influenced the struggle for Native American recognition and rights. Through these dazzling visuals, and Professor Cobb’s narration, you will come to understand that we are still in the midst of an era of Indigenous recovery and revitalization-one that has tested the limits of individual rights and tribal sovereignty. He’ll outline a few of the critical sites of contemporary struggle, including gaming, which has been the single most successful means of promoting economic development in reservation communities since it took off in the late 1980s. The first Native American operated casino opened in 1979 and shortly thereafter more than 120 tribes had followed suit. Although state governments reacted defensively, the concept of tribal sovereignty emerged victorious, which has not only helped the infrastructure of the Native American communities to grow and thrive, but has helped to revitalize depressed economies by providing jobs, business opportunities, and development. Native Peoples of North America recounts an epic story of resistance and accommodation, persistence and adaption, extraordinary hardship and survival across more than 500 years of colonial encounter. As the Smithsonian curators stated, “The past never changes. But the way we understand it, learn about it, and know about it changes all the time.” Be prepared – this course is going to change how you understand American history. And no matter how much you know about this subject, at the conclusion, you will be surprised at how much you’ve learned. 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MANY TRIBES, ONE SPIRIT: AGNI SPIRIT FESTIVAL

FESTIVALS MANY TRIBES, ONE SPIRIT: AGNI SPIRIT FESTIVAL
Agni Spirit Festival is a co-creative gathering that celebrates mindful living; yoga, arts, creativity and conscious community in a beautiful land north of Barcelona. Festival info:
The Lake:
The festival enjoys access to the Santa Ana Lake that is located just 1 minute from the centre of the festival and the water is pure and crystalline.
Camping:
There will be a specific area to camp with your tent where you will be able to enter with your car. Remember that you must bring all your camping equipment with you!
Water:
The element of water is very present at the land and the festival has the good fortune to have natural sources of drinkable mineral water throughout the property. Bring your own bottle to refill whenever you like at the points indicated. Stay hydrated!
Leave No Trace:
The Own Land is natural treasure, and the proposal of Agni is not to be detrimental to the state of the land or water.
Food:
There will be a range of food options available at the festival from morning to night. In the mornings vendors will offer a fresh, natural superfood smoothie at their stand and through the day you’ll be able to get main meals ranging from Italian, Moroccan, Middle Eastern, Indian all the way to fusion cuisine.
When: June 21 – 24, 2019
Where: Baldellou, Spain
Why: It’s a festival that celebrates mindful living.
The vibe from previous editions:
Photos: © Agni Spirit

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The INCREDIBLE $1 STREET FOOD CHALLENGE in MUSCAT, OMAN!

The INCREDIBLE $1 STREET FOOD CHALLENGE in MUSCAT, OMAN! By 47
From the traditional Omani Cuisine to Indian street food I explored Muscat, Oman’s best $1 street food. This was one of my favorite ultimate food tour’s because I discovered all different types of cuisines (Arab street food, Indian street food, and overall omani street food). Comment below on things to do in Oman and Dubai or any must try foods in Oman or Dubai! This video is the 4th in my food challenge to eat $1 street food all around the world for my travel series (Living on $1 Street Food Around The World). Comment the next city / country I should travel to and subscribe to follow the journey of discovering the best $1 street food food pov from around the world! To follow the behind the scenes – Insta: iAmLivingBobby
MY GEAR: Cheap camera (still awesome ones in the used department): https://bhpho.to/2NcTjZS Main Lens – https://bhpho.to/2xNiquO

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The best way to explore Singapore’s living history

The best way to explore Singapore’s living history Craig Osment The Clarke Quay entertainment district flanks the Singapore River. Photo: Getty Images Share on twitter
Raffles Hotel has been synonymous with Singapore since the 19th century. Having been there on numerous occasions, I can only assume it’s going to be more of the same – but better – when it reopens this August after a major renovation.
I love the colonnaded courtyards, the circular driveway, the white liveried and turbaned doormen, the Long Bar, the Tiffin Room and the must-drink Singapore sling, the towering Livistona palms, the shopping arcade and the gift shop, where you can buy an affordable souvenir to prove you’ve been there. See Also Singapore travel guide
To suggest that Raffles is iconic is a cliché, but it is also iconic of Singapore in a less flattering way. The building was threatened with demolition in the 1980s, when the government wasn’t noted for its conservation policies, prior to gaining recognition as a national monument in 1987. In a quest for modernisation, much of Singapore’s colonial heritage was bulldozed before the realisation that a bit of history was essential as a tourist attraction. SHARE Chinatown offers culture, food and shopping. Photo: Alamy
While vast swathes of this island nation are now reflected in the glass walls of skyscrapers, there are still enough genuinely interesting remnants of the old “raffish” Singapore to make up an itinerary for the visitor looking for something a little bit deeper.
BOAT QUAY AND CLARKE QUAY
Just inside the mouth of the Singapore River is Boat Quay, the original Port of Singapore, which operated until its demise in the 1980s. Now you’ll find a row of riverfront Victorian buildings, or “shophouses” and “godowns”, repurposed as restaurants fronting outdoor dining spaces with an amazingly varied range of cuisines: Japanese, Chinese, Italian, American, Thai, Indian, Vietnamese, Malaysian and plenty of Nonya dishes.
Further upriver is Clarke Quay, also once home to traders in bumboats, but now featuring a distinctive array of dome-shaped umbrellas suspended from hoops in front of more bars, restaurants and nightclubs.
LITTLE INDIA
Aside from the subcontinental dining options, there are several Hindu temples, a mosque dating from 1859 and a variety of colourful Indian shops. And it does light up during Diwali season. Definitely worth a visit. Advertisement
TANGLIN VILLAGE
Another area steeped in history, this land was sold to British forces in 1850 as the site of Tanglin Barracks. After being leased to the private sector in the 1990s, the area developed a reputation as a bohemian enclave and was rebranded.
The 40-hectare site is now a foodie destination with a great selection of sophisticated shops and galleries offering antiques, epicurean products, design items and a pet hotel. Among the food offerings is Candlenut, the world’s first Malaysian Peranakan restaurant to be awarded a Michelin star. There’s also a curry house, a tapas buffet and a farm-to-table diner. SHARE

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Top Asian News 4:56 a.m. GMT

Reblog PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said he is open to a third summit with President Donald Trump, but set the year’s end as a deadline for Washington to offer mutually acceptable terms for an agreement to salvage the high-stakes nuclear diplomacy, the state-run media said Saturday. Kim made the comments during a speech Friday at a session of the North Korea’s rubber-stamp parliament, which made a slew of personnel changes that bolstered his diplomatic lineup amid stalemated negotiations with the United States. His speech came hours after Trump and visiting South Korean President Moon Jae-in met in Washington and agreed on the importance of nuclear talks with North Korea. WASHINGTON (AP) — Finance officials from the world’s major powers acknowledged Friday that the global economy is in a slowdown, but they forecast that growth will pick up by the second half of this year, thanks to interest-rate policies from the Federal Reserve and other central banks. Officials of the Group of 20 major economies said at the conclusion of their talks that growth had slowed at the end of last year and the beginning of this year due to factors such as turbulent financial markets and heightened tension over trade and interest rates. But with a switch led by the Federal Reserve to looser monetary policy this year, the stage has been set for a rebound in growth. SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Friday that China’s financing of President Nicolás Maduro’s government is prolonging the crisis in Venezuela. Pompeo kicked off a four-country tour of Latin America in Chile, where he met with President Sebastián Piñera to discuss the U.S.-China trade war and the Venezuelan crisis. Hyperinflation, shortages of food and medicine and other hardships have forced more than 3 million Venezuelans — about one-tenth of the population — to flee the country in the last few years. “China’s bankrolling of the Maduro regime helped precipitate and prolong the crisis in that country,” Pompeo said, adding that China invested over $60 billion, “with no strings attached.” “It’s no surprise that Maduro used the money to use for tasks like paying off cronies, crushing pro-democracy activists, and funding ineffective social programs,” he said. A New York City restaurant owner who touted her “clean” American-Chinese cuisine and derided Chinese dishes as swimming in “globs of processed butter,” sodium and MSG is renewing the long-simmering debate about stereotyping and cultural appropriation in the restaurant world. Arielle Haspel, who is white and a certified health coach, told the dining website Eater that she wanted to offer modified, “clean” versions of typical Chinese menu items. In a now deleted Instagram post, Haspel said that a Chinese noodle dish, lo mein, can make people feel “bloated and icky.” Online critics pounced, including New York Baohaus restaurateur and author Eddie Huang who dismissed Lucky Lee’s as “the Fyre Fest of food & ‘wellness,'” on the restaurant’s Instagram page. SYDNEY (AP) — Australia said on Friday it would oppose the death penalty for Julian Assange if he’s extradited to the United States, as protesters in Sydney called for his release and Australia’s journalists’ union voiced its strong support for him. The Australian WikiLeaks founder was arrested Thursday in London’s Ecuadorian Embassy and the judge found him guilty of breaching his bail conditions. He faces a U.S. charge of conspiring to reveal government secrets. Prime Minister Scott Morrison said any extradition plans had “nothing to do with Australia,” and that Assange would receive only standard assistance from Australian consular officials. Tthe 47-year-old would have to face the consequences of any breach of the law in foreign jurisdictions, Morrison said. KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Malaysia’s government said Friday it has decided to resume a China-backed rail link project, after the Chinese contractor agreed to cut the construction cost by one-third. The deal follows months of vacillating over the East Coast Rail Link, which connects Malaysia’s west coast to eastern rural states and is a key part of China’s Belt and Road infrastructure initiative. It should also help bolster ties between China and Malaysia that were strained when Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad suspended the project after his election last May. The prime minister’s office said in a statement that the construction cost of the first two phases of the project will be cut to 44 billion ringgit ($10.7 billion), down from the original cost of 65.5 billion ringgit ($15.9 billion). Story continues BRUSSELS (AP) — In a decision decried as “deeply flawed” and a “devastating blow for victims,” International Criminal Court judges on Friday rejected a request by the court’s prosecutor to open an investigation into war crimes and crimes against humanity in Afghanistan and alleged crimes by U.S. forces linked to the conflict. In a lengthy written ruling, judges said an investigation “would not serve the interests of justice” because an investigation and prosecution were unlikely to be successful, as those targeted, including the United States, Afghan authorities and the Taliban, are not expected to cooperate, the court said in a statement. Election officials sailed boats and ships, trekked through dense forest and summited mountains to carry voting machines to even the most remote parts of India for national elections. The mammoth vote that began on Thursday ends May 19, and counting will he held on May 23. Four people were killed in election-related clashes in three Indian states. Still, in most places, the atmosphere was festive with men and women in colorful traditional attire heading to voting stations to cast ballots on electronic voting machines. Voting also took place in parts of troubled Kashmir where insurgents fighting against Indian rule called for a boycott. JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Indonesia’s geophysics agency said it has ended a tsunami warning that was triggered by a strong earthquake Friday east of Sulawesi island. The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake, which was centered at a depth of 17 kilometers (10.5 miles), had a magnitude of 6.8. The epicenter of the quake was far from the central Sulawesi city of Palu, which was devastated by an earthquake and tsunami in September, but it was felt there and and people ran into the streets in panic. Disaster agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said the quake was felt in different areas for 4-6 seconds. SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The World Trade Organization has upheld South Korea’s import ban on Japanese seafood from areas affected by the 2011 nuclear disaster in Fukushima, overturning a ruling by a lower panel last year that said Seoul was unfairly discriminating against Japanese products. The decision is a setback for Japan, which has promoted Fukushima’s recovery from the nuclear disaster and the safety of its agricultural and fisheries products ahead of next year’s Summer Olympics in Tokyo. South Korea on Friday welcomed the decision and said it will continue to block all fishery products from Fukushima and seven neighboring prefectures to ensure “only foods that are confirmed as safe are put on the table.” Japan said the WTO ruling was “extremely regrettable” and vowed to get the import ban reversed through bilateral talks with South Korea.

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