INDIAN GROCERY STORE DEMYSTIFIED: 1580631436: epub

INDIAN GROCERY STORE DEMYSTIFIED: 1580631436: epub

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A food lover’s guide to all the best ingredients in the traditional foods of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh.
Once upon a time we only had a few choices when it came to fine dining. There was American home-cooked, pretentious French cuisine, practical Italian, and Chinese takeout. These days, Indian restaurants are popping up everywhere, and for good reason. The food is amazing!
But how can you replicate the Indian dining experience at home? There are thousands of Indian grocery stores to shop in, but what should you buy? How do you prepare it? That’s where this Take It With You guide comes in.
With 700 entries and over 200 illustrations, plus traditional stories and personal anecdotes about many of the ingredients unique to Indian cuisine, this guidebook identifies and tells you how to use the vast array of spices, rice, legumes, fruits, vegetables, and prepared foods at over 9,000 Indian grocery stores in America. A bonus section of the author’s favorite recipes will help you create delicious, authentic dishes that will satisfy anyone’s hunger and sense of adventure.
Amazon.com Review
So you want to make a curry. There’s a small Indian grocery store on the way home from work, so you figure you’ll pop in and grab a few items–but when you get there you’re overwhelmed by the pouches of aromatic spices and the jars of pickles and chutneys. Where to begin?
With The Indian Grocery Store Demystified , of course. Author Linda Bladholm walks you through a typical Indian grocery store, aisle by aisle, shelf by shelf. Start with the rice aisle and learn the differences between basmati , gobindavog , red patni , and several others. Learn which rice goes best with what type of recipe, how to prepare it, and what it should taste like. Then head down the flour aisle (here’s where you learn how to bake several variations of naan and the popular pappadum ), to the spices and seasonings. “Without spices,” says Bladholm, “one cannot even imagine Indian food.” Be sure to stock up on the cardamom, cumin, coriander, black pepper, tamarind, and turmeric. Mosey down to the herbs, then on to fruits and vegetables where you’ll be introduced to the sakriya , a small vine-grown yam, and the sweet-and-sour woodapple, indigenous to the Indian jungle. There’s also a chapter on ayurveda , the balancing of mind, body, spirit, and environment, and which foods can help you achieve this balance.
Though a few recipes are included in the back, this is not a cookbook, but rather a preparing-to-cook book. Bladholm thoroughly covers a vast amount of information and makes you feel like you could stroll into your local Indian grocery and make smart, informed purchases. And if you’re still a little timid, The Indian Grocery Store Demystified is small enough to stick in your bag to reference while you’re there. –Dana Van Nest Review
“At last there is a book that takes you by the hand and gives a clear and fascinating tour of these markets. It couldn’t have a better title.” ― Amanda Hesser, New York Times
“[I]t’s a perfectly economical vest-pocket guide that is a real gem.” ― Russ Parsons, Los Angeles Times (also named one of the Times’ Ten Best Cookbooks for 1999)

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Zonin Prosecco Joins Citi Taste of Tennis as Official Sparkling Wine Sponsor

Popular Prosecco Continues Partnership with Unique Event Series
NEW YORK
Zonin Prosecco, of ZONIN1821 , the largest private winemaking company in Italy, is partnering with Citi Taste of Tennis to build excitement ahead of the BNP Paribas Open, the largest WTA and ATP World Tour combined two-week event in the world. The event has grown rapidly over the years, and this will be Zonin Prosecco’s second year as a sponsoring partner.
The Citi Taste of Tennis events take place in four cities, Indian Wells, Miami, Washington, D.C., and New York City where tennis stars and the city’s culinary greats enjoy an evening of mixing, mingling, food, and music. The first event this year is set to take place on March 4th at the Hyatt Regency Indian Wells Resort and Spa where guests will be able to enjoy Zonin Prosecco throughout the evening at the exclusive Zonin Prosecco Wine Bar.
Recognized for being an authentic and contemporary Italian experience, Zonin Prosecco has an exclusive production technique that delivers a wine that is always young and fresh. “Zonin Prosecco is one of the most popular Proseccos on social media (#zoninprosecco), and without any doubt one of the best-selling Proseccos, whose name recalls the roots of the Zonin Family, vintners since 1821, and its historical tradition of winemaking,” says Ana Hernandez, Head of Marketing, Zonin USA.
While Taste of Tennis also takes place in four cities, all of which Zonin Prosecco will be participating in, the NYC event is the largest and most anticipated. Expect appearances from tennis stars John Isner, Mischa and Alexander Zverev, Sloane Stephens, Sam Querrey, Jelena Ostapenko, Kevin Anderson, and many more. Like in years past, the event will include cooking competitions, VIP hours where attendees can hang with the stars, and cuisine prepared by Iron Chefs. This year’s lineup of culinary talent includes some of the world’s leading chefs, among them Masaharu Morimoto, Shorne Benjamin, and Nicole Gajadhar.
For more information, please contact Jelena Meisel ( pr@zoninusa.com ) or Diana Zahuranec ( dzahuranec@colangelopr.com ).
About Zonin USA, Inc.:
Zonin USA, Inc. is the import and marketing division of ZONIN1821, the largest privately-owned vine growing and winemaking company in Italy. Today the Zonin family, seven generations of winemakers, is one of the most important family-owned vinicultural groups in Italy and Virginia, USA and is one of the leading private winemaking companies in Europe.
ZONIN1821’s portfolio includes nine wineries located in the seven most prestigious wine growing areas in Italy and is committed to practicing ecologically sustainable viticulture and ensures that every bottle embodies the philosophy of preserving the local winemaking traditions, land, and culture of their respective regions.
Along with a strategic partnership in Argentina, Chile, and California, the Zonin USA portfolio is distributed in all 50 states and in more than 120 countries around the world.
//www.prweb.com/releases/zonin_prosecco_joins_citi_taste_of_tennis_as_official_sparkling_wine_sponsor/prweb16144191.htm

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Culture of Sri Lanka Essay

Ceylon TeaThe stopping point of Sri Lanka has been work ond by umteen factors, however has managed to retain much of its past aspects. virtu al matchlessyly it has been influenced by its long tale and its Buddhist heritage. The country has a fecund subterfugeistic tradition, embracing the finely humanities, including music, spring, and visual arts. The Sri Lankan life flair is reflected in the cuisine, festivals, and boasts. south-central Indian influences atomic number 18 overt in many aspects. There is overly some influences from colonization by the Portuguese, the Dutch, and the British. Sri Lankan market-gardening is stovepipe cognize abroad for its cricket, aliment, holistic medicine, spiritual icons worry the Buddhist flag, and heathen exports such as tea, cinnamon and gems. Sri Lankan culture is diverse, as it varies from region to region. Sri Lanka has had ties with Indian subcontinent from ancient successions. Demographics Sinhalese 74.8%, Sri Lank an Moors 9.23%, Indian Tamil 4.16%, Sri Lankan Tamil 11.21%, other 0.6%.History of import condition History of Sri LankaSri Lanka boasts of a authenticated history of over 2000 geezerhood with the first st whiz objects dating subscribe to 500,000 BC mainly collectible to ancient historic scriptures like Mahawansa some(prenominal) centuries of intermittent foreign influence, has transformed Sri Lankan culture to the present outlook. Nevertheless ancient traditions and festivals be celebrated by mostly conservative Sinhalese populate of the island, together with other minorities that make up the Sri Lankan identity. Visual artsA royal palace in Polonnaruwa.Frescoes at Sigiiriya.computer architectureMain obligates Architecture of Sri Lanka and Architecture of ancient Sri Lanka See also List of Sri Lankan architectsThe architecture of Sri Lanka dis satisfys a rich variety of architectural forms and styles. Buddhism had a signifi enkindlet influence on Sri Lankan architecture, since it was introduced to the island in 3rd Century BCE. However techniques and styles developed in atomic number 63 and Asia pass water also consorted a major role in the architecture of Sri Lanka.RitigalaArts and craftsGilded bronze statue of the Bodhisattva Tara, from the Anuradhapura period, 8th century. legion(predicate) forms of Sri Lankan arts and crafts collect inspiration from the Islands long and lasting Buddhist culture which in turn has absorbed and adopted countless regional and local anaesthetic traditions. In most instances Sri Lankan art originates from phantasmal beliefs, and ar represented in many forms such as painting, sculpture, and architecture. One of the most notable aspects of Sri Lankan art are caves and temple paintings, such as the frescoes institute at Sigiriya and religious paintings ensnare in temples in Dambulla and Temple of the Tooth Relic in Kandy. Other frequent forms of art have been influenced by both natives as hale as outside sett lers. For example, tralatitious wooden handicrafts and clay pottery are found around the hill country age Portuguese-inspired lacework and Indonesian-inspired Batik have become notable. Its has many different and beautiful drawings. Performing arts tralatitious Sri Lankan harvesting dance.People in Sri Lanka love the performing arts. The main style of performance is Bollywood. DanceMain article Dances of Sri LankaSee also Kandyan danceSri Lanka is famous around the Indian ocean for Kandyan dancing. MusicMain article Music of Sri LankaThe two single biggest influences on Sri Lankan music are from Buddhism and Portuguese colonizers. Buddhism arrived in Sri Lanka after the Buddhas promise in 300 BC, while the Portuguese arrived in the 15th century, bringing with them potentiometertiga ballads, the ukulele, and guitars, along with African slaves, who nevertheless diversified the musical roots of the island. These slaves were cal conduct kaffrinha, and their dance music was called b aila. Traditional Sri Lankan music allows the hypnotic Kandyan drums drumming was and is actually much a part and ploughshare of music in both Buddhist and Hindu temples in Sri Lanka. Most western split of Sri Lanka follow western dancing and music. CinemaMain article Cinema of Sri LankaThe movie Kadawunu Poronduwa (The broken promise), produced by S. M. Nayagam of Chitra Kala Movietone, heralded the feeler of Sri Lankan cinema in 1947. Ranmuthu Duwa (Island of treasures, 1962) marked the transition cinema from black-and-white to color. It in the recent years has f ejectured subjects such as family melodrama, social transformation, and the years of conflict between the military and the LTTE. Their cinematic style is similar to the Bollywood movies. In 1979, movie attendance rose to an all-time high, but recorded a gradual downfall since then. Undoubtedly, the most influential and revolutionary filmmaker in the history of Sri Lankan cinema is Lester James Peiris, who has direct ed a number of movies which led to global acclaim, including Rekava (Line of destiny, 1956), Gamperaliya (The changing village, 1964), Nidhanaya (The treasure, 1970), and Golu Hadawatha (Cold Heart, 1968).There are many cinemas around Sri Lanka in urban center scene of actions. Media and technologyRadio and TVSee also Telecommunications in Sri LankaSri Lanka was introduced with many technologies.LifestyleCuisineMain article Sri Lankan cuisineKiribath with lunumirisThe cuisine of Sri Lanka draws influence from that of India, especially from Kerala, as well as colonists and foreign traders. Rice, which is usually consumed daily, can be found at any special occasion, while down in the mouth curries are favourite dishes for lunch and dinner. A very democratic strong drink is toddy or arrack, both made from palm tree diagram sap. Rice and curry refers to a range of Sri Lankan dishes. Sri Lankans also eat hoppers (Aappa, Aappam), which can be found anywhere in Sri Lanka. Much of Sri L ankas cuisine consists of boiled or steamed rice served with spicy curry. Another well-known rice dish is kiribath, meaning milk rice. Curries in Sri Lanka are not just limited to meat or fish-based dishes, there are also vegetable and even fruit curries.A typical Sri Lankan meal consists of a main curry (fish, chicken, or mutton), as well as several(prenominal) other curries made with vegetable and lentils. Side-dishes include pickles, chutneys and sambols which can sometimes be fiery hot. The most famous of these is the coconut sambol, made of scraped coconut multiform with chili peppers, dried Maldivian fish and lime juice. This is ground to a scatter and eaten with rice, as it gives zest to the meal and is believed to increase appetite. In addition to sambols, Sri Lankans eat mallung, chopped leaves mixed with grated coconut and red onions. Coconut milk is found in most Sri Lankan dishes to give the cuisine its unique flavor. As noteworthy above many of Sri Lankas urban area s are host to American fast aliment corporations and many of the younger generation have started to take a liking to this new style of cuisine although it is rejected by many, circumstancely the more traditional elder members of the community. SpicesSri Lanka has long been renowned for its spice ups. The best known is cinnamon which is native to Sri Lanka. In the 15th and 16th centuries, spice and ivory traders from all over the world who came to Sri Lanka brought their native cuisines to the island, resulting in a rich diversity of cooking styles and techniques. Lamprais rice boiled in bourgeon with a special curry, accompanied by frikkadels (meatballs), all of which is then cover in a banana leaf and baked as a Dutch-influenced Sri Lankan dish. Dutch andPortuguese sweets also continue to be popular. British influences include roast beef and roast chicken. Also, the influence of the Indian cooking methods and food have played a major role in what Sri Lankans eat. Sri Lankans map spices liberally in their dishes and typically do not follow an admit recipe thus, every cooks curry will gustatory sensation slightly different.Furthermore, spate from different regions of the island (for instance, hill-country dwellers versus coastal dwellers) traditionally cook in different ways. Sri Lankan cuisine is known to be among the worlds spiciest, due to the high use of different varieties of chili peppers referred to as amu miris (Chili pepper), kochchi miris, and maalu miris (Banana pepper) (capsicum) and in Tamil Milakaai, among others. It is generally accepted for tourists to request that the food is cooked with a lower chilli pepper content to cater for the more sensitive Western palette. Food cooked for globe occasions typically uses less chillie than food cooked in the home, the latter where the food is cooked with the chilli content preferable to the occupants. Tea cultureTea orchard near KandyBeing one of the largest producers of tea in the world, Sri Lankans drink a lot of tea.There are many tea factories around mountainous areas. Many Sri Lankans drink at least three cups a day. Sri Lanka is also one of the best tea-producing countries in the world and the Royal Family of the United Kingdom has been known to drink Ceylon tea. Tea is served whenever a guest comes to a house, it is served at festivals and gatherings or just for breakfast. fetes and holidays red-hot YearMain article Sinhala and Tamil new yearThe Sinhala and Tamil new year (Aluth Avurudhu in Sinhala, Puthiyathandu in Tamil) is a very large cultural event on the island. The festival falls in April (also known as the month of Bak) when the insolate moves from the Meena Rashiya (House of Pisces) to the Mesha Rashiya (House of Aries). Unusually, both the end of one year and the beginning of the next blow over not at midnight but at separate times compulsive by astrologers with a period of some hours between (the nona gathe or apathetic period) being a time where o ne isexpected to refrain from all types of work and instead engage solely in relaxing religious activities and traditional games. During the sore Year, festivities both children and adults will often don traditional outfits. But the clothes must be washed and very impertinent because it should be southam (pure). List of holidaysJanuaryTuesdayDuruthu overflowing Moon Poya twenty-four hours (In honour of churchman Buddhas first visit to Sri Lanka) *JanuaryTamil Thai Pongal sidereal day*4 FebruaryMondayNational twenty-four hour period*FebruaryNavam encompassing Moon Poya twenty-four hours (The Buddha proclaims for the first time a code of fundamental ethical precepts for the monks) * litigateThursdayMaha Sivarathri twenty-four hours*MarchThursdayMilad-Un-Nabi (Muhammads birthday)*MarchMedin extensive Moon Poya Day (Commemorates the visit of The Buddha to his home to preach to his father King Suddhodana and other relatives) *MarchFridayGood Friday*13 AprilDay prior to Sinhala and Tamil New Year Day (the month of Bak) when the sun moves from the Meena Rashiya (House of Pisces) to the Mesha Rashiya (House of Aries) Sri Lankans begin celebrating their National New Year) *14 AprilSinhala and Tamil New Year Day*AprilFriday supererogatory Bank HolidayAprilBak Full Moon Poya Day (commemorates the second visit of The Buddha to Sri Lanka) *1 MayThursdayMay Day*MayVesak Full Moon Poya Day (The Buddhist calendar begins)*MayDay pursual Vesak Full Moon Poya Day*JunePoson Full Moon Poya Day (Commemorates the ledger entry of Buddhism to Sri Lanka) *JulyEsala Full Moon Poya Day (Commemorates the deliverance of the first sermon to the tail fin ascetics and setting in motion the Wheel of the Dhamma by Buddha) *AugustNikini Full Moon Poya Day (conducting of the first Dhamma Sangayana (Convocation)by Buddha) *SeptemberBinara Full Moon Poya Day (Commemorates The Buddhas visit to heaven to preach to his mother and celestial multitude) *OctoberWednesdayId-Ul-Fitr (Ramazan F estival Day)*OctoberVap Full Moon Poya Day (King Devanampiyatissa of Sri Lanka sending envoys to King Asoka requesting him to send his daughter Arahat Sanghamitta Theri to Sri Lanka to establish the Bhikkhuni Sasana (Order of Nuns)) *OctoberMondayDeepavali Festival Day*NovemberIl Full Moon Poya Day (Celebrates the obtaining of Vivarana (the assurance of becoming a Buddha)) *DecemberTuesdayId-Ul-Adha (Hajj Festival Day)*DecemberMondayUnduvap Full Moon Poya Day (Sanghamitta Theri established the Bhikkhuni Sasana (the Order of Nuns)) *25 DecemberSaturdayChristmas Day** Public holiday, Bank holiday, Mercantile holiday All full-moon days are Buddhist holidays referred to as Poya. The actual date on which a particular Poya day will fall changes every year. ReligionMain article Religion in Sri LankaSee also Hinduism in Sri Lanka, Buddhism in Sri Lanka and Islam in Sri LankaA Hindu temple in ColomboSri Lankas culture also revolves around religion. The Buddhist community of Sri Lanka obse rve Poya Days, once per month according to the Lunar calendar. The Hindus and Muslims also observe their own holidays. Sri Lankans are very religious because the history of the island has been involved with religion numerous times. There are many Buddhist temples in Sri Lanka associated with ancient times. The religious preference of an area could be determined by the number of religious institutions in the area.The matrimony and the East of the island has several notable Hindu temples due to majority Tamil population reside in those areas and ethnic conflict has severely affect other communities living on these areas during the times of LTTE strife. Many churches could be found along the southern coast line because of former Roman Catholic or Protestant colonial heritage. Buddhists reside in all parts of the island especially down south and in upcountry and western seaboard. They are the largest religious group in Sri Lanka. Languages of Sri LankaMain article Languages of Sri Lan kaWhile the Sinhalese people speak Sinhala as their mother tongue, the Tamil people speak Tamil. English is also widely spoken. Sinhala is spoken by about 16 million people in Sri Lanka, about 13 million of whom are native speakers. It is one of the constitutionally-recognized official languages of Sri Lanka, along with Tamil, which originates from South India. SportsMain article Sport in Sri Lankacricket in Sri LankaSports plays a very big part in Sri Lankan culture, because the society was quite rich in educated people, therefore the people had found playing a sport is an important thing in life. Sri Lankas main sport is cricket. But after the age of Englishmans cricket, being the most popular sport event in Sri Lanka. Every child in Sri Lanka knows how to play cricket, and there are many cricket fields scattered crossways the island for children and adults to play the sport. The biggest pastime of the Sri Lankan population, after cricket, is watching the Sri Lankan field of stu dy team play cricket. It is common for businesses to shut down, when very big matches are televised. This was the case in 1996, when the Sri Lankan team beat Australia in the finals to win the Cricket World Cup. The in all country was shut down, although there was a curfew imposed upon the whole island. CricketMain article Cricket in Sri LankaCricket is the most popular sport in Sri Lanka. After the 1996 Cricket World Cup, triumph of the Sri Lanka national cricket team, the sport became the most watched event in the country. But in recent years, the politicians and the businessman getting into the sport has raised many concerns. volleyball gameVolleyball is not a popular in Sri-Lanka, because Cricket is one of the popular sport in Sri-Lanka. rugby footballMain article Rugby in Sri LankaNational symbolsMain articles Flag of Sri Lanka, Coat of arms of Sri Lanka and Sri Lankan hymnThis component requires expansion. (January 2012)TourismMain article Tourism in Sri LankaThis section re quires expansion. (January 2012)World Heritage Sites in Sri LankaAnuradhapuraCentral HighlandsGalle and its FortificationsGolden Temple of DambullaKandyPolonnaruwaSigiriyaSinharaja woodland ReserveSri Lankan peopleSri Lankan literatureHenry Parker (author), British engineer who analyze and compiled the oral tradition of Sri Lanka. References1. http//www.statistics.gov.lk/abstract2010/chapters/Chap2/AB2-13.pdf 2. http//bookonsrilanka.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/growing-up-white-in-south-asia.pdf 3. http//mahavamsa.org/4. LANKALIBRARY FORUM View topic Home and family in ancient and medieval Sri Lanka. Lankalibrary.com. 2008-12-21. Retrieved 2012-06-29. External links1Volume 1, Volume 2 and Volume 3 of Village Folk-tales of Ceylon by Henry Parker (Public Domain) Sri Lanka a cultural profileSri Lanka cultureCultural Festivals and Public Holidays in Sri Lanka

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The spice is right: Prashad delivers a night of flavour and family at The Tetley

0 SHARES Thursday 27 th February saw a very special takeover go down at Leeds’ classic former brewery. For one night only, Prashad, Drighlington’s award-winning North Indian vegetarian restaurateurs, set up shop in The Tetley’s kitchen, serving up a five-course tasting menu of unmissable textures and tastes.
A family business started 20 years ago in a Bradford side street, Prashad has grown to become the only two-star AA and Michelin bib gourmand Indian restaurant in Yorkshire. Today, it’s run by Bobby Patel, who took over the kitchen from his parents back in 2004, and has been running things ever since with his Head Chef wife, Minal. Amuse bouche
At The Tetley, we sit down to enjoy five courses of carefully designed, beautifully delivered cuisine – testament to the true legacy created by Drighlington’s jewel. After a spicy amuse bouche, the first course arrives in the form of a lentil doughball bathing in earthy broth, with a delicately rolled puri on the side for good measure. Despite the unexpected February heatwave, a fiery veggie broth mopped up with pancake-like pastry is just what the doctor ordered. Lentil doughball
Next up, it’s Prashad’s take on the classic onion bhaji, with the aforementioned savoury snack served three ways: a ‘patra’-style rainbow chard roll-up bhaji, a dill-infused fluffy ball bhaji, and a saucy spinach bhaji, adding just the right level of juiciness to the dish. Bhaji 3 ways
What follows is a collection of three tiny semolina puris, filled with classic, tangy, crunchy chaat. We’re firmly instructed that the only way to consume these delights is by stuffing the whole thing in one mouthful, and we’re not disappointed by the flavour explosion that follows: sweet, yogurty, spicy, crispy – the perfect evolution of an Indian classic. Aubergine paneer rice thepla
Three courses down, it’s hard to believe that tonight’s ‘main’ is only just gracing our placemats. Not ones to go halves on portions – or flavour, or welcoming spirit for that matter – Minal and Bobby’s plates are generously yet thoughtfully filled each time. Our fourth dish arrives in the form of paneer, aubergine and rice, accompanied by a pile of soft thepla – traditional Gujarati fenugreek-peppered flatbreads.
As with all of Prashad’s dishes, Bobby has a story for this one, telling us how the recipe traditionally includes peanuts, but that his father decided to leave them out in the name of allergy safety. Today – two decades later – the restaurant’s philosophy remains unchanged, always considerate of allergies, allowing diners to order with confidence wherever possible. All the major allergens are listed on the menu, so you’re clear from the word go what contains what, what doesn’t contain what, and who to ask if you’re not sure. It’s nothing short of refreshing. Googra custard
As more drinks arrive from The Tetley’s ever-well-stocked bar, our pudding materialises in a colourful fusion of flowers, sugary and pastry. Two googras – sweet, coconut-stuffed dumplings – sit on top of tangy fruit jam and a smear of spiced custard. After thinking another bite was impossible one minute, the next I’m using the final morsel of coconutty dumpling to mop up the last bit of custard from the plate – and not sure how any of it happened.
It might have been a one-off at The Tetley, but this won’t be the last you’ll hear of Prashad – the restaurant built on great stories and incredible spices. Tonight marked a feat of imagination and standard-setting for food that puts flavour and friendship above all else. It was an absolute pleasure.
The flagship Prashad restaurant can be found on Whitehall Road in Drighlington, but look out for more city centre events in the pipeline soon. Follow them on Twitter , and make sure you check out The Tetley next time you’re exploring central Leeds.
Photographs by Kluens for Chapter 81.

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What restaurant is it? I live in the Boston area so not far. Maybe not liking onions is a thing in Indian cuisine? The place I went to is Gourmet India in the Burlington Mall food court.

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Unmissable Things To Try In London This Spring

by The Wordrobe Posted on From mouth-watering menus and fun workouts to bottomless brunches and brand new supper clubs, here’s The Wordrobe’s pick of the best things to try in London this spring 1 Meet your perfect Matcha at Tombo
If you can’t get enough of all things matcha, pull up a pew at Tombo in South Kensington. A fully-fledged matcha bar and café, this chic hotspot serves up everything from marble matcha cheesecake to green-hued chai lattes and even ‘flat greens’.
There’s also a range of ice creams to try on warmer days, plus an impressive tea selection. Where: 29 Thurloe Pl, Kensington, London SW7 2HQ How: Click here to find out more or make a booking. 2 Try Nancy Silverton’s Guest Bowl at Island Poké If you’re a poké fan, listen up (and grab your chopsticks). Grab-and-go Island Poké is teaming up with food royalty for the latest creation in its Guest Bowl series. Known internationally for her restaurants and cookbooks, Nancy Silverton has created the delectable Salmon Poké Nicoise bowl, treating foodies to a silkily fresh bite. Since launching in 2015, Island Poké has spearheaded the runaway popularity of Hawaiian- style poké bowls in London and in working with Silverton, it’s declaring ever-larger culinary ambitions.
Named ‘Outstanding Chef’ by New York’s James Beard Foundation, the chef has written eight cookbooks spanning three decades, worked with the likes of Wolfgang Puck and is a long-established name on the LA food scene. The Salmon Poké Nicoise draws on the cuisine served at Silverton’s Osteria Mozza and Pizzeria Mozza restaurants in Los Angeles, by being dressed with both lemon and anchovy vinaigrettes and incorporating olive tapenade. Enjoy a salad leaf base and layers of sliced new potatoes, cherry tomatoes, edamame beans, green olive ciabatta croutons, sashimi-grade salmon, capers and what Silverton describes as ‘the perfect set egg’. When: From Wednesday 13th March until the end of May. Where: Island Poké’s limited-edition Salmon Poké Nicoise bowl will be available at each of its six London locations for £8.95. How: Visit islandpoke.co.uk to make a reservation. 3 “Treat Yo’self” at the World’s Best Pastry Chef’s London dessert café If you’re partial to pastry, don’t miss out on a treat at this luxuriant new opening. After his successful pop up at Hotel Café Royal in 2016, famed chef Albert Adrià – who built a gastronomic revolution alongside his brother, Ferran, at the legendary Michelin three-star elBulli and runs Barcelona’s hottest restaurant ‘Tickets’ – has launched ‘Cakes and Bubbles’. Adrià, who was voted The World’s Best Pastry Chef by The World’s 50 Best Restaurants, is offering a parade of exceptional desserts set to wow diners; from his signature ‘cheese cake’ to his egg flan, air waffle and doughnut creations. No cake could be complete without Champagne – pair your pastry with a curated selection of champagnes and sparkling wines. Where: 70 Regent St, Soho, London W1B 4DY Website: Click here to find out more or make a booking. 4 Join New Street Grill for the launch of The Secret Diary of a Farm Girl series New Street Grill is championing female farmers with the launch of an exciting dinner series, The Secret Diary of a Farm Girl for International Women’s Day. D&D London are introducing the new series of dinners in order to raise awareness of women in the farming industry. The first will take place at New Street Grill and will welcome Caroline Wheatley-Hubbard as resident farm girl for the evening, where she will speak on her experiences working as a female in the farming industry while guests are treated to tasty dishes. On the menu, expect tasty starters of curried pigs head terrine with crackling apple sauce served beautifully with a glass of Ali Boit Boit et les 40 voleurs , a natural sparkling wine from Aligote and created by winemaker Agnès Paquet. For the main course, a crispy pork belly with black pudding hash a nd Josper grilled hispi cabbage is paired with a crisp glass of Arianna Occhipinti Il Frappato from Sicily, a natural wine produced by females in Italy’s Sicilian wine region. Treat yourselves to a decadent dessert of chocolate truffles and salted caramel fudge , while sipping on a stunning glass of Blandy’s 10-Year-Old Malmsey Madeira with its rich caramel and honey flavours.
The next dinner in The Secret Diary of a Farm Girl series will take place during British Beef Week (1st-7th April) at Butlers Wharf Chop House. More information to be announced soon.
When: Tuesday 12th March at 6:30pm Cost: £25pp including three courses and wine pairing How: Find out more and make a booking here . Where: 16A New St, London, EC2M 4TR 5 Eat well at by CHLOE.
Guac save the queen! New York’s hippest casual vegan restaurant has finally arrived in Covent Garden, serving delicious and hearty vegan dishes, by CHLOE. aims to redefine what it means to eat well. Even better, they’ll do so in style.
Referred to as ‘the best vegan restaurant in town, maybe the world’ by Infatuation and awarded ‘best veggie burgers in NYC’ by Time Out New York, by CHLOE. doesn’t compromise on flavour, taste or satisfaction.
On the menu, you’ll find locally-sourced ingredients and fresh dishes, including the Guac Burger, Quinoa Taco Salad, and Avocado Pesto Pasta, which are all free of animal products and contain no preservatives or artificial flavours.
Pop by at the weekend for brunch to enjoy a spread of morning oats, smoothie bowls, and pancakes, along with cold-pressed vegetable and fruit juices – perfect for a lazy weekend.
Where: Drury House, 34 – 43 Russell Street, WC28 5HA How: Click here to find out more and make a booking. 6 Try an Amazonian brunch party at COYA Angel Court Brunch, exotic flavours and bottomless cocktails – what more could a foodie wish for? COYA Angel Court are launching an Amazonian party brunch every Saturday from the 9th of March, where guests can enjoy a three hour affair of bottomless pisco sours and other cocktails, Champagne, vibrant Peruvian dishes, music and special performances. With a different theme each month, jungle foliage will fill the space as guests are invited to sample unlimited COYA signatures from the decadent starter stations filled with ceviches; beef tataki; kingfish tiradito with truffle oil to name a few and salads including kale with candied walnuts and manchego. The DJ will set the tone throughout the experience, playing a mix of tribal beats and uplifting house music. A selection of spirit and mixers, wines or NV Perrier-Jouët Grand Brut Champagne are served at the table for each guest as they choose their main course. Dishes include corn fed baby chicken, aji panca, coriander; spicy beef, crispy shallots, aji rocoto, star anise and sea bream, pink fir potatoes, fennel salad. For dessert, devour chocolate brownies; churros with dulce de leche and chocolate; yuzu meringue pie and vegan chocolate chip cookies – all with an even sweeter party atmosphere. When: Launching 9th March 2019 Cost: Starting from £65 per head. How: Click here to make a booking. Where: 31-33 Throgmorton St, London EC2N 2AT 7 Have fun with Cinnamon Kitchen’s House of HOLI Back for its fifth year running, #HouseofHOLI makes its return to Cinnamon Kitchen in Devonshire Square from Wednesday 6th March – Thursday 21st March 2019. Leave the drab and dreary City at the door, don your protective white suit and step into the madness at the House of HOLI for thirty minutes of paint-pelting friends, family and colleagues to mark the Indian festival of colour. Sitting amongst the skyscrapers of London’s financial district, Cinnamon Kitchen will bring a vivacious dose of colour to the urban environs of the Square Mile. The perfect excuse to escape the office, workers can kick off their heels, loosen their ties and experience a half hour of launching colourful powdered paint at each other to celebrate the renowned festival. No Indian celebration would be complete without a feast of delicious dishes and Cinnamon Kitchen will be serving up a spirited five-course #HouseofHOLI menu to enjoy after a round of paint-throwing. Cost: Prices start from £22 per person. Click here to make a booking. Where: 9 Devonshire Square, London EC2M 4YL When: 6 – 21 March 2019 8 Hone your butchery skills with temper Sharpen up your butchery skills with an exciting butchery class at temper. Taking place at Neil Rankin’s award-winning restaurant each month, join the venue for a special class featuring bottomless drinks, expert butchery demonstrations and a delectable 3-course feast. When: 1st Wednesday of each month. Cost: £75 per person. Bookings: Visit temperrestaurant.com to find out more and book your space. 9 Sip on The Connaught’s new cocktail menu In the mood for a spot of decadence? Drop by the Connaught Bar and step into another world. Conversation flows over sparkling glasses and candlelit tables – and the award-winning venue has just launched a brand new cocktail menu. Tipples include the Connaught Martini and The Good Fellas – two unmissable sips of suaveness. Where: Carlos Pl, Mayfair, London W1K 2AL How: Phone 020 7499 7070 or click here to make an enquiry. Please note, this bar operates a no booking policy. 10 Try a sustainable tipple at The Court Drink in style at the brand new private members’ club, The Court. Newly opened at 9 Kingly Street, The Court will be supporting the Wild at Heart foundation which funds and supports animal welfare projects worldwide. The former Kingly Street site of Bag O’Nails – the music venue where Jimi Hendrix, The Beatles and The Rolling Stones were regulars both on and off stage – is a place of both chic art, enticing dishes and delectable drinks. Order the ‘Wild at Heart’ cocktail, of which 20% of proceeds will go to the foundation. Designed by award-winning mixologist Ryan Chetiyawardana (and his Mr Lyan Studio team) it’s the perfect sustainable sip.
How: Click here to find out more. 11 Work up a serious sweat at Barry’s Bootcamp If you fancy a serious calorie burn, book a class at Barry’s Bootcamp for the ultimate high-intensity work out. It burns up to 1,000 calories in one class, tones muscle, maximizes fat loss, and even helps to increase your metabolism. The instructors push you to do what you didn’t even know you were capable of doing. The music, the signature red lights, the energy in the room… it’s an explosion of exercise that’ll change the way you look at working out. Post-class, don’t miss a pitstop at the Fuel Bar for a delectable smoothie fix.
When: Classes throughout the week. How: From £22 per class. Click here to make a booking. 12 Tuck into Town House at The Kensington’s ‘London Landmarks’ Afternoon Tea Afternoon tea fans, you’re in for a treat. Town House at The Kensington has launched a new London Landmarks Afternoon Tea, drawing inspiration from London’s most recognisable landmarks to take diners on a tour of the capital’s most famed structures. Featuring a skyline of sandwiches and sweet treats, tributes featured on the landmark inspired menu include architectural triumphs such as The Gherkin crafted from White Chocolate with a Dark Chocolate Ganache and The Shard made of Carrot Cake & Milk Chocolate. Bite into an iconic London Telephone Box imagined in Rhubarb Mousse and Big Ben-inspired Lemon Curd Tart, as well as the afternoon tea essential, Scones served with Heather Hills Strawberry Jam & Clotted Cream. Where: 109-113 Queen’s Gate, Kensington, London SW7 5LP When: Available now. Click here to book. Wallet: £42 per person or £54.50 with a glass of Perrier-Jouët, Grand Brut NV Champagne 13 Master cocktail making at K West Hotel Take your party hosting skills to the next level with K West Hotel’s Cocktail Masterclass. Led by the expertise of the mixologists at Studio Bar, the 1.5 hour masterclass includes a guide on how to perfect the art of the Strawberry Daiquiri or Lavender Lychee Martini and become an expert mixologist overnight. By the end of the session you will have learned how to mix; shake and serve like a professional – perfect for impressing at your next dinner party. When: The Cocktail Masterclass can be booked between 4pm and 7pm from Monday to Sunday. Cost: £30 per person, the masterclass is suitable for groups of between 4 and 8 people. The package includes the 1.5 hour session and appetizing bar nibbles. How: Click here to make a booking. 14 Enjoy a spot of pampering at Primrose Hill A spot of city spa paradise courtesy of the Cowshed team, enjoy the leafy and laid-back nature of Regents Park Road for an urban spa with the feel of a country escape. The farmhouse kitchen café is straight out of Ambridge, complete with rustic wood table and vintage milk churns, and leads through to four mani-pedi stations, which boast squashy leather armchairs and mini TVs. Enjoy a range of pampering treatments used with all-natural products before finishing with an expert product prescription. Where: 115-117 Regent’s Park Rd, Primrose Hill, London NW1 8XP How: Click here to find out more and make a booking. 15 Sink your Teeth into Supper Tales at Plateau
Hold on to your forks! Plateau are launching Supper Tales, a new series of immersive dinners inspired by some of the world’s most loved novels including The Great Gatsby, Willy Wonka and The Chocolate Factory and Harry Potter. Launching on Thursday 7th March – World Book Day – with The Great Gatsby, Head Chef Frederick Forster has created a stunning four-course Art Deco menu complete with Champagne to transport guests to the glitz and glamour of the 1920s. Re-live the roaring twenties with Champagne and canapés of smoked salmon and caviar on toast, duck liver pate and oysters on arrival. Surrounded by decadent interiors and music from the jazz era, expect a chic and stylish evening with a starter of tender warm new season asparagus with Hollandaise sauce followed by Forster’s mouth watering herb-crusted lamb rack with artichokes and rosemary-infused sauce. Inspired by the decadent afternoon tea laid on to woo Daisy Buchanan, be tempted with a delicious caramelised lemon tart with Champagne poached rhubarb to finish. When: Launching on Thursday 7th March (World Book Day) at 7pm with The Great Gatsby Cost: £45pp, with 1920s inspired dress code. How: To make a reservation and find out more, please click here . 16 Join Six Acclaimed Chefs For a Watercress-themed Dinner The event held at Grace Hall, Central London on Monday 25 March will see six acclaimed chefs create an 8-course dinner for guests starting with a canapé reception with a welcome cocktail (designed especially for the event by Camm & Hoopers’ Patrick Hobbs, Chief Booze Engineer) and finishing with bespoke chocolates by chocolatier David Frear. Chefs Louisa Ellis, Daniel Britten, Robbie Lorraine, Hari Ghotra, Chris Wheeler and Eddie Kilty will be showcasing the great flavour and versatility of watercress, with this nutritious leafy vegetable being the critical ingredient in every course. The dining event will also showcase produce from Quality Standard Mark Beef and Lamb. The dinner will follow the successful interactive format London Kitchen Social Live is now synonymous with, where each chef plates their dish in front of the guests, with members of the audience being able to connect with the chefs and ask questions on the dishes and techniques used. When: 25 March 2019, 18:30 – 22:00. Where: Grace Hall, 147 Leadenhall Street, London, EC3V 4QT Cost: £79 per person. Click here to make a booking. 17 Try The Jukebox Brunch at 100 Wardour St Brunch addicts, enjoy your next fix with a musical twist at 100 Wardour St. Launching on Saturday 2nd March,The Jukebox Brunch series concept features roaming bands touring the restaurant, taking requests and mixing up guests’ favourite tunes. On the 2nd March, enjoy a brunch spread with music courtesy of ‘Acoustik’, a young and modern band with a fast growing reputation and global performances. Other upcoming brunches include: Sat 9th March –‘Juke Joints’ – their will perform everything from Motown to R&B classics, 60s Rock & Roll to current chart hits. Sat 16th & 23rd March ‘Barberpop’ – featuring big party hits performed unplugged by the band with their beatboxing skills and acoustic guitars Sat 30th March – ‘Acoustik’ On the menu, guests can tuck into enticing brunch treats such as ‘ Egg’s Florentine, grilled brioche, sautéed spinach, poached eggs, Hollandaise with truffle’ and ‘Warm waffle, fresh berries, cherry ripple ice cream. ’ Where: 100 Wardour St, Soho, London W1F 0TN How: Click here or phone 020 7314 4000 to make a booking. 18 Sample smooth jazz at Bibendum Oyster Bar Spend your Sunday evenings in style at Bibendum Oyster Bar. Michelin two-starred chef Claude Bosi has recently launched his Sunday Jazz Sessions, providing the perfect way to unwind before the start of a new week. Taking place at Bibendum every Sunday evening from 5pm-8pm, guests will now be able to experience the smooth sounds of jazz from a variety of musicians. What’s more, attendees can also enjoy their first R é my Martin Winter 1738 cocktail with the compliments of the restaurant. Seafood-oriented dishes, fillet steaks and the supple sounds of smooth jazz – what more could a bon vivant wish for? When: Every Sunday, 5pm – 8pm. Where: Michelin House, 81 Fulham Rd, Chelsea, London SW3 6RD Bookings: To find out more, please phone 020 7589 1480 or click here. Share this:

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An Indian Restaurant From An Overseas Celebrity Chef Heads to Plano

An Indian Restaurant From An Overseas Celebrity Chef Heads to Plano The Yellow Chilli will debut at The Shops at Legacy this summer The Yellow Chilli/Facebook The Yellow Chilli, an Indian food chain that actually originated in India, will arrive at Plano’s Shops at Legacy this summer for its first Texas location. The eatery will debut at 5700 Legacy Drive, becoming only the fourth stateside location for the brand which operates mostly in India and the Middle East. Founded by Indian celebrity chef Sanjeev Kapoor who also created the menu, The Yellow Chilli offers a “gastronomic tour” across India, according to a press release announcing its local arrival. Diners will find a rather lengthy menu with dishes like shaam savera (spinach koftas filled with creamed cottage cheese, served floating on a tomato butter gravy) alongside puran singh da tariwala murgh (a chicken gravy), plus a long list of curries, soups, salads, rice dishes, Indian flatbreads, and entrees featuring chicken, fish, lamb or vegetarian options. Legacy West, the newer development across the tollway has arguably had more attention as of late , however, The Shops at Legacy is still considered a dining destination. Stalwarts like The Village Burger Bar and Cru Food & Wine Bar are holding it down, plus there are the new additions of Houston’s health-conscious Bellagreen , Olivella’s Neapolitan pizzas , as well as Shumi Japanese Cuisine ,the buzzy 21-course omakase restaurant from a couple of renowned sushi chefs. The Yellow Chilli will arrive sometime this summer, stay tuned for the exact date of its Plano debut.

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LOTI EATS | FARZI CAFE

LOTI EATS | FARZI CAFE Eat + Drink
Just when we thought the influx of Indian restaurants opening in London had come to a standstill it seems there’s a whole load more on the horizon. The latest is Farzi Cafe, which already has ten places in India and one in Dubai. It offers up an Indian menu with a British twist bordering more on the fine dining end of the spectrum than the likes of Kricket , Tandoor Chop House et al.
Located on Haymarket the place is buzzing on a Monday evening, we suspect due to its reputation in India where the founder has celeb status. The food menu is vast and it’s all for sharing. We kicked off with a couple of glasses of English sparkling rose wine – unexpected? Yes. Delightful? Absolutely. There’s a section called #FARZIFIED, which is bastardised English dishes and from there we tried a very good ground beef Indian scotch egg. It’s nice to see a restaurant not taking itself too seriously.We skipped the fish and chips and shepherds pie in favour of the punchy venison irrachi pepper fry with fluffy paratha; tender lamb chops coated in fennel and maple; and the wagyu seekh kebab. We also enjoyed a chicken tikka masala served with Cornish cruncher naan and speckled with pickled onions. There’s no denying it, the food is a mash-up not just of Indian and English but many other cuisines, although each dish seems to work not just as a plate but also to fit with the others.
Go with a group – even better on your work’s tab – you’ll get to try more of the menu and given it’s busy throughout the week, it’s loud enough to add atmosphere even to the driest group dinner.
8 Haymarket, London SW1Y 4BP

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In the Kitchen With: Paul Natrall, Mr. Bannock, Vancouver

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Attending the 2012 World Culinary Olympics was an eye opener for Indigenous chef Paul Natrall. The B.C. native was part of Canada’s Aboriginal Culinary Team — the first Aboriginal Culinary Team since 1994 — that travelled to Erfurt, Germany and turned heads with unique dishes that showcased his culinary style. It also gave him the opportunity to promote and preserve his Indigenous heritage through food.
Natrall’s version of Indigenous food was shaped by watching his grandmothers cook for a large family as a child. The Squamish-First-Nation chef grew up in a family of chefs who prided themselves on preparing traditional Indigenous cuisine. His great grandfather, Andrew Natrall, was a trained chef in the army; his uncle was a hunter who brought home wild moose, elk and deer.
Natrall has been specializing in Indigenous food since 2009, after graduating from Vancouver Community College, where he studied classic French and Aboriginal cooking methods. He sharpened his skills working at Vancouver’s Capilano University, Lonsdale Quay Hotel and the Edgewater Casino.
Following his appearance at the Culinary Olympics, where he prepared barbecued and wind-dried salmon for an audience unfamiliar with Indigenous flavours, Natrall came home to B.C. and started Mr. Bannock — Vancouver’s first Indigenous-fusion food truck — based on family recipes and using traditional ingredients and cooking methods.
In 2017, he started a catering company, the PR Bannock Factory, offering Indigenous cuisine and specialty dishes.
“I take a lot of pride and joy in sharing Indigenous-fusion cuisine, using traditional ingredients from the Squamish First Nation — such as juniper berries, smoked wild salmon and meats — and traditional methods, such as clay and stone baking,” he says. “For the stone baking, I did a baked bannock and it’s a lot healthier than the fried version; the taste and texture are different.”
On Mr. Bannock’s menu, pan-fried bannock with cinnamon and brown sugar ($5) is a staple, but Natrall also puts his creative spin on classic combos such as the Indigenous Chicken and Waffles, which features juniper berry, dry-rubbed chicken smoked with applewood and fresh apple-and-cranberry slaw on a waffle bannock ($12) and a Bannock Burger — a beef patty topped with cheese, apple and cranberry, with fresh-fried bannock as the bun ($10). Other favourites include the bison smokie topped with fried onions and a choice of sauces and the award-winning Indian Taco with house-made chili, sharp cheddar, lime, sour cream, salsa and spicy chips on top of freshly fried bannock (both $9).
With this latest venture, Natrall is once again turning heads. In fact, in 2018, the Mr. Bannock brand boasted roughly $80,000 in sales, sharing Indigenous food culture across B.C.’s lower mainland and creating jobs for people in the Squamish First Nation. TAGS

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Bicentennial edition of Singapore Heritage Festival heads to Kranji, Bedok and Telok Blangah

Fancy hopping on and off a bus to explore the farms at Kranji? How about staying put inside one to catch a theatre show – or checking out a musical about hawkers at Bedok Hawker Food Centre?
This year’s Singapore Heritage Festival (SHF) will be a special Singapore Bicentennial edition held over four weekends from Mar 15 to Apr 7.
Advertisement The popular annual event organised by the National Heritage Board will be featuring tours, performances, trails and open houses all around Singapore, with Kranji, Bedok, Telok Blangah, the new Armenian Street Park and Kampong Glam as the main highlighted locations.
Makan Dreaming will be a new musical about hawker culture by Cake Theatrical Productions. (Photo: Singapore Heritage Festival) There will also be a series of light projections called Find Your Place In History, which will be located around the city centre and will explore lesser-known stories. The festival is also introducing an islandwide exhibition called Ride And Discover, where bus stop panels at over almost 100 bus stops across four routes are set to become mini-exhibition spaces.
“2019 is a special year for Singapore. As we commemorate our bicentennial, it is natural that as the heritage festival of Singapore, we tell the stories that have collectively brought us to where we are today,” said Jervais Choo, programmes director for the festival.
Among the events during the first weekend is the Rentak Budaya cultural festival at the Malay Heritage Centre. (Photo: Singapore Heritage Festival) “Our exhibitions and programmes show that heritage is all around us if you know where to look. We have continued to partner organisations, communities and fellow Singaporeans to uncover these lesser-known tales, and to re-discover places and stories and make the connections between our people and spaces.”
Kicking things off on the first weekend are a two-day cultural festival at Kampong Glam and the new Armenian Street Park, with a cultural fest at the former’s Malay Heritage Centre and a street party by Peranakan Museum at the latter. There will also be guided tours of Alexandra Hospital, and a theatrical production titled Buses And Roads – which will take place inside a bus. There will also be art installations around NHB’s various institutions such as the Sun Yat Sen Nanyang Memorial Hall and Indian Heritage Centre.
Bedok – and food – take centrestage on the second weekend, which includes Cake Theatrical Productions’ Makan Dreaming, a musical that looks at hawker culture from the 1960s to the present and will be performed at Bedok Square. Elsewhere, there’s a photo exhibition on hawker culture; Peranakan cuisine sampling and a guided food tour by Fat Fuku (aka regular CNA Lifestyle contributor Annette Tan) and Johor Kaki, respectively; and a Teochew opera performance by the Nam Hwa Opera and Teochew Musical Ensemble.
A scene from A Black And White Voyage performance at Temenggong House. (Photo: Singapore Heritage Festival) The maritime history of Singapore will be the focus of the third weekend around Telok Blangah, including a 1920s-themed A Black And White Voyage performance at the Temenggong House; an exhibition about Telok Blangah itself at Harbourfront Centre; and guided tours of the Danish Seamen’s Church at Mount Faber Park. Closer to town, Asian Civilisations Museum is holding a festival and an exhibition on Singapore’s tea culture.
To round up SHF on the final weekend, visitors can drop by the National Museum to check out an exhibition on food packaging, which will also include a food and craft market and film screening. Alternatively, they can head up north for guided tours of Sungei Buloh or take advantage of Foodpass, a self-guided tour of the farms in Kranji via shuttle buses.
The Singapore Heritage Festival will run from Mar 15 to Apr 7. Online registration for programmes start on Mar 5. For more details visit www.heritagefestival.sg .
Source: CNA/mm

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