Indian food and film festival to begin in Saudi

Indian food and film festival to begin in Saudi

Indian food and film festival to begin in Saudi Wed, Apr 24 2019 08:03:21 AM
Riyadh, Apr 24 (IANS): The Consulate General of India, in association with the Saudi Indian Business Network (SIBN), is organising an Indian Food and Film Festival in Jeddah. The two-day event will kick off on Thursday evening on the consulate premises on Prince Muhammad Bin Abdulaziz (Tahliah) Street.
Mir Gazanfar Ali Zaki, General Secretary of SIBN, said that the fourth edition of the food festival would be organised along with the first film festival. Indian Consul General Md Noor Rahman Sheikh will inaugurate the event at 7 p.m. Thursday and consuls general and diplomats of several countries, as well as prominent Saudi officials and business leaders will attend the inaugural ceremony, reports Saudi Gazette.
“Since assuming the office as the Consul General and Vice Patron of SIBN, Sheikh has been extending full support to SIBN enabling it to organise more than 100 events and activities within a short span of time,” Zaki said.
“More than 15 popular Indian restaurants based in Jeddah have confirmed their participation to offer their unique and mouth-watering array of delicacies at one venue,” Zaki said.
Along with the delicious cuisine, entertainment will be adding flavour to the evening. Bollywood blockbusters Tiger Zinda Hai, Bahubali 2 and Raazi will be screened as part of the film festival.
There will also be a musical fiesta on both days of the festival.
The event will be open to Saudi and Indian nationals (families only) on April 25 and 26 from 6:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Top Stories

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Books and Cooks

Yukari Sakamoto reviews the best new cookbooks for gourmands and oenophiles By Yukari Sakamoto | Posted on April 24, 2019 Tokyo Vege Guide Space Shower Books The cover says it is aimed at vegans, vegetarians and everyone who loves vegetables. This compact book is rich with colorful photos of about three dozen restaurants. It is divided into three main sections: vegetarian and vegan, vegetarian-friendly and salad restaurants. It includes vegetarian classics such as Ain Soph.Ginza and Nagi Shokudo, and newer players to the scene such as Revive Kitchen Three Hibiya. Many of the restaurants serve brown rice and colorful vegetable side dishes. Some are Japanese teishoku (Japanese set meal) inspired, while others are more Western in influence. The book includes an Indian restaurant, Vege Herb Saga in Ueno; Falafel Brothers in Ebisu for Middle Eastern cuisine; and even a Taiwanese vegetarian spot in Kinshicho. It also introduces a shop for Vietnamese banh mi sandwiches and reimen noodles. The book is in Japanese with a short paragraph describing each restaurant and notes on the photos. Do not let that deter you. The photos of the dishes and restaurant exterior or interior will give readers a general idea of the restaurants. Prices are listed with the photos of the dish. Six local markets are also introduced. Each restaurant listing includes the name in Japanese and English, address, phone number, hours, holidays, number of seats, closest station and the restaurant’s home page. Tokyo Stories: A Japanese Cookbook Tim Anderson Chef Tim Anderson of Nanban restaurant in London has released his much-anticipated third cookbook, “Tokyo Stories.” There are 90 recipes that cast a wide net including traditional dishes such as tempura, sushi, ramen, yakitori and tempura as well as non-Japanese bites such as pizza, pasta and yakiniku. The book is divided into chapters beginning with a guide to Japanese ingredients and covering different food categories such as the depachika (department store food halls) or conbini (convenience stores), home-style cooking and traditional cuisine. The recipes are made for home cooks with ingredients that of course will be easy to source here in Japan. The recipes are easy to follow with simple instructions. Omuraisu (omelette rice) prepared traditionally can be complicated as the rice is put into the omelette while it’s still in the pan and the pan is gently tapped so that the omelette gently covers the rice. Anderson’s version has the ketchup-seasoned rice put onto a plate and simply topped with the omelette. Much easier and it still tastes the same. Tokyoites will enjoy the introduction to specific restaurants that inspired the recipes like the Totoro choux creme or Ginza Nair for Indian cuisine. The Concise Guide to Wine and Blind Tasting Neel Burton The Japan-EU free trade pact has eliminated 15 percent tariffs on wine imported from Europe so there is no better time to learn about it. This book is a resource that covers the basics of winemaking and viticulture — the vineyards, geography, climate and soils. It also gives precise tips on tasting wines blind to guess where the wines are from and what kind of grapes are used. Most of the book looks at wine regions from around the world and delves deep into the typicity of the style of wines from that area. Beginners will be able to glean information on grape varietals and the names of significant producers. Wine aficionados will appreciate the great amount of detail including percentages of plantings in certain regions, differences in the soil types and the effect on wines, and notes on labelling — which vary depending on the country. There is so much information in here from discussions on soil, harvest yields and the history of wine that even savvy wine connoisseurs will be impressed. The book guides readers on what to look for when they’re looking at color, acidity, tannins and volatile compounds. The section on wine faults will help readers to better understand why some wines are flawed. There are even a few appendices with practical information, including website links to major wine regions’ organizations throughout the world. This is a reference book that wine lovers will go back to time and time again.

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Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi will be opening on July 1

Fuvahmulah Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi will be opening on July 1 luxury brand, Waldorf Astoria Hotels & Resorts, will soon welcome guests to the heart of the South Malé Atoll with the opening of Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi. Set to debut on July 1, the all-villa resort spans three private islands, providing secluded enclaves and a tranquil escape. Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi will offer a sophisticated and serene retreat just 30 minutes from Malé International Airport via the resort’s private yacht. An escape for families and couples in search of space and exclusivity, the resort boasts 122 luxuriously appointed villas, each equipped with a pool and uninterrupted views of the Indian Ocean in its own private enclave. Each reef, beach and overwater villa will open onto an indoor and outdoor deck featuring a swinging daybed, dining gazebo, an infinity pool, in-water lounge and an outdoor shower.
“We are thrilled to bring this unforgettable property and best-in-class experience to the Maldives,” said Dino Michael, Global Head, Waldorf Astoria Hotels & Resorts. “The resort’s inspirational environment, refined culinary offerings and thoughtfully designed family options, combined with the brand’s unparalleled commitment to personal service, will give every guest the freedom to create memories that last a lifetime.” In line with Waldorf Astoria’s legacy of culinary expertise, Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi will offer 11 exceptional, specialty dining venues. Each venue will deliver distinctive, immersive dining experiences – the variety of which is a first in the Maldives. Guests can enjoy an elevated treetop-dining concept at Terra, featuring spectacular views of the ocean and horizon, as well as exquisite food and wine pairings in a tranquil setting seemingly chiselled out of the face of a boulder at The Rock. Yasmeen will boast authentic Middle Eastern flatbreads and mezzes, impeccably prepared crispy Peking duck fresh out of the first wood-fired oven in the Maldives, and embracing the garden-to-table concept, Glow will serve healthy and holistic cuisine made from the freshest ingredients harvested from the resort’s herb garden. To further elevate Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi’s culinary offerings, the hotel will be announcing a partnership with a world-renowned chef and restaurant in the coming weeks. “As the fifth Waldorf Astoria to open in the region, Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi represents a significant milestone in the brand’s continued growth in Asia Pacific following the successful opening of Waldorf Astoria Bangkok last year,” said Daniel Welk, Vice President, Luxury and Lifestyle Group, Asia Pacific, Hilton. “We are extremely proud to bring the brand to a destination as synonymous with luxury as the Maldives, and we look forward to delivering unforgettable experiences that reflect Waldorf Astotia’s unique sense of place and iconic service standards.” For those seeking the ultimate in exclusivity, the Ithaafushi Private Island features a two-bedroom overwater villa as well as a three-bedroom beach villa. The 32,000 square foot island sanctuary – accessible by yacht – comes complete with a dedicated chef and personal concierge team, as well as its own spa, gym, five swimming pools, entertainment center and pristine beaches. Two Stella Maris Ocean Villas, inspired by a celestial charm – accessible only by boat – will also allow discerning guests to enjoy unrivalled privacy. Floor-to-ceiling windows, chef service, a jacuzzi and direct ocean access will make for an unforgettable and memorable escape. “We are delighted to bring the illustrious brand heritage and the world-renowned True Waldorf Service to the Maldives,” said Etienne Dalançon, General Manager, Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi. “Our brand has redefined the hospitality experience for the modern, luxury traveler in landmark locations around the world, and we look forward to transforming the Maldives experience for our guests.” For additional pampering, guests can visit the Waldorf Astoria Spa, comprised of 10 idyllic overwater or garden treatment villas, which will offer an extensive menu of treatments and Asian-inspired therapies focusing on relaxation and rebalance. The Waldorf Astoria Young Discovery Park, a water park for young guests, and the Lagoon Pool, are ideal for families looking to enjoy a variety of activities with ease. Other facilities include the beachfront, 40-meter Mirror Pool; the Ocean Pavilion, which will host a range of wellness activities; a fully-equipped fitness center; and a combined water sport and PADI dive center. Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi is part of Hilton Honors, the award-winning guest-loyalty program for Hilton’s 17 distinct hotel brands. Members who book directly through preferred Hilton channels have access to instant benefits, including a flexible payment slider that allows members to choose nearly any combination of Points and money to book a stay, an exclusive member discount and free standard Wi-Fi. To celebrate the hotel’s opening, Hilton Honors members will earn an additional 5,000 Points per minimum stay of three nights, for bookings from July to September 2019, when booking directly with Hilton. Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi will be begin taking bookings from July 1, 2019, and is located at Ithaafushi Island, South Malé Atoll, Republic of Maldives. Advertisements

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Pull Into This I-25 Truck Stop…for an Indian Buffet!

You can ask for a plate if you prefer a tidier presentation. Mark Antonation
Still, the aroma of curry rose above the smell of pine floor cleaner. And past aisles of snack foods and car accessories, we finally found several stainless-steel pans holding various stews, seasoned rice and a few desserts. Through an open doorway, we spotted a cook chopping vegetables in a small kitchen in the back. We made eye contact, and he came out to help us decipher the sauces blanketing unknown meats and vegetables.
Goat curry and tikka masala were available, as promised, along with saag paneer, another chicken dish, lentils in brown sauce, what looked like a carrot salad, and some gulab jamun, little round pastry balls soaked in thin syrup. We pointed to what we wanted and the cook loaded up a couple of styrofoam clamshells, with only moderate success at keeping our choices separate, since the generous scoops of rice overflowed the container’s compartments. Behind him, photos of individual dishes decorated the wall, an indication that entrees could be ordered separately for those not interested in the $10.95 buffet. On that wall, you also finally see the name of the eatery: All in One Restaurant.
We took seats at an odd little half-table with a view of the back of the lottery machine and sampled our haul. Everything was heavy on the salt, but a mélange of spices still came through, especially in the goat curry. The spinach in the saag paneer was dried out from its time on the steam table; hitting the buffet at lunch is probably a better bet. But the tikka masala was surprisingly creamy and fresh; perhaps we’d arrived just as a new batch was finished.
Was it the best Indian cuisine I’d ever had? No, but as truck-stop fare goes, it wasn’t bad. It certainly stood out from the sea of fast-food burgers and convenience-store grub in the area.
Nav Singh, a native of India, has owned the gas station for the past thirteen years, and says he added the buffet seven years ago because “there’s no other Indian food on I-25.” Best view in the house: lottery tickets, sunglasses and burritos. Mark Antonation If you like this story, consider signing up for our email newsletters. SHOW ME HOW

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Prego, The Westin Mumbai Garden City’s Italian Fun-Dining restaurant launches a New Menu ~In association with Asian Art House~
Mumbai, 22 nd April 2019: Prego, The Westin Mumbai Garden City’s Italian Specialty restaurant, unveiled a new menu to enhance the restaurant’s fun-dining experience with authentic yet innovative gourmet flavours of Genoese cuisine. In association with the Asian Art House, the exquisite afternoon witnessed a camaraderie of like-minded guests who appreciate fine art and exquisite food.
The unique showcase titled ‘Shades of Asia’ juxtaposed a curated collection of Indian and Vietnamese art featuring 30 superlative artworks from renowned artists, alongside the newly introduced menu. The creations displayed include works by eminent names like MF Husain, Amit Bhar, Laxman Aaley, Sangeeta Babani, Thota Laxmanan, Bhaskar Rao Botcha, Rangoli Garg, Sujata Sah Sejekan and Gourishankar Soni. Prego offers guests unique artistic flavours from the kitchens of Italy and brings to life a culinary art house where guests can enjoy a lively show kitchen while feasting on the most loved Italian classics including fresh pastas, homemade bread, and delicious hand-tossed pizzas. Inspired by the flavours of Genoa – Italy’s principal seaport, the cuisine is based on traditional Mediterranean cooking and very rich in ingredients and flavors. Executive Chef Rahul Dhavale along with Chef Antonello Cancedda, Chef de cuisine of Prego redefine gastronomic experiences with their proficient skills. Commenting on the launch of the new menu, Antonello Cancedda, Chef De Cuisine at Prego shares, “As an Italian and a local of Italy’s ancient port city – Genoa, Genoese cuisine is ingrained in me since I was a child. The cuisine is authentic, flavorful and extraordinarily enticing. I was always fond of my mother’s cooking style & having one meal of the day together with the family was a tradition where Pizzas were a favorite amongst everyone.” He further adds, “The new menu of Prego – our authentic Italian fun dining restaurant located at the Lobby Level is a tribute to Genovese cuisine. It offers a twist of authentic Italian culinary trends. The food specialties of Liguria has a notable inclusion of Genoa’s invention – Pesto & is enjoyed at all hours of the day. Some must haves from the menu include ‘Burrata A Calazione’, ‘Trofiette Al Pesto Della Rina’ and ‘Pollo Alla Cacciatora’.” A sojourn of two exquisite artistic endeavors amalgamate with ease at Prego, The Westin Mumbai Garden City, commemorating an unforgettable and enriching afternoon of masterful artwork complemented with gourmet delights.

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The 5 Hottest New Eateries in the Caribbean

The Caribbean culinary scene has never been hotter, and that’s in large part to a growing wave of new eateries across the region.
But some are particularly special, drawing diners for breathtaking food that’s taking the region’s cuisine to new heights.
Here are the five hottest places to eat in the Caribbean right now, all of which have debuted in the last year.
Brass Boer, Bonaire It isn’t just one of the newest. Plainly, this is the greatest eatery in the Caribbean right now, the brainchild of the husband-and-wife team behind The Netherlands’ three-Michelin-star De Librije . It’s set at the Delfins Beach Resort in Bonaire, and it’s really a new level of restaurant in the Caribbean, with truly stratospheric sophistication, sourcing, artistry and service.
Barranco, St Martin The family behind the celebrated Riva Plage in Saint Tropez has taken their talents to Grand Case, bringing the venerable culinary destination a new energy as it undergoes its own renaissance in the wake of Hurricane Irma. It’s the Cote d’Azur meets the French Caribbean, with inspired seafood, a heavy influence from Latin America (named as it is after Lima’s Barranco district) and a buzzy oceanfront vibe.
Eating House 1503, Grand Cayman Celebrity Chef Roy Yamaguchi catapulted to fame as an innovator of Hawaii Regional Cuisine, and his first-ever Caribbean restaurant is a marvelous fusion of Caribbean and Hawaiian flavors and styles, set in a crisp space adajcent to the Margaritaville Beach Resort on Seven Mile Beach. Yamaguci takes fresh local catches and reinvents what’s possible with Caribbean seafood, along with an impressive cocktail program.
Vianda, Puerto Rico While it took a major hit from Maria (including the loss of the world-class Yantar), Puerto Rico’s once-magnificent culinary scene is making a comeback with new eateries like Vianda, set up by the husband-and-wife duo of Amelia Dill and Francis Guzman, whose portfolio includes stints at San Francisco’s Range and New York’s Blue Hill, among others. The farm-to-table-focused restaurant has a simple, seasonally-rotating menu, with a mix of small and large plates emphasizing the island’s signature tastes.
Braata, Saint Croix Local chef Digby Stridiron has been one of the leading lights of St Croix’s culinary renaissance, and he’s at it again with Braata, a “West Indian kitchen”-slash-rum bar set in the heart of the city of Frederiksted. Here, it’s all about Caribbean flavors and comfort food, from adobo fried chicken to dishes like conch-and-shrimp mofongo, with Stridiron’s signature plating and a heavy emphasis on the Caribbean’s Noble Spirit.
The post The 5 Hottest New Eateries in the Caribbean appeared first on Caribbean Journal .

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22 hottest peppers in the world – CEIO

0 Comments 23rd April 2019
There’s a good chance you’ve come across a way too spicy pepper in your life. Maybe you sought it out; maybe it snuck up on you in a salsa. Either way, that fiery burn is seared in your memory. But unless you’re an extreme heat seeker, that pepper you tried is far milder than the peppers that reach the top of the Scoville Scale.
The Scoville Scale is an objective scale used for measuring the spicy heat of peppers and other hot foods. Items on the scale are ranked by their Scoville Heat Units (SHU), which measure the concentration of capsaicin (the active compound responsible for spice). The SHU range from zero up to the millions, each one representing how many cups of sugar water it would take to dilute a cup of the food to a neutral spiciness level. For example, a cup of jalapeño takes between 2,500 and 8,000 cups of sugar water to neutralize the spice, so it’s 2,500 to 8,000 SHU.
While the test used to be more subjective and based on testers’ tastes, high-performance liquid chromatography has made it possible to measure the exact amount of capsaicin in the pepper possible. Which, for the sake of tester’s mouths, is a huge plus in today’s world of super peppers. When the Scoville Scale was created by Wilbur Scoville in 1912, he never could have imagined the human-engineered peppers that can be hundreds of times hotter than anything that occurs in nature.
In ascending order, here’s how the hottest peppers in the world rank from the naturally occurring to the unnatural Frankensteins humans have created. 22. Madame Jeanette (225,000 SHU)
The Madame Jeanette hails from Suriname, a small country on the northeast coast of South America. Its smooth, yellow pod packs a surprising punch. Believed to be named for a prostitute from Paramaribo, it has neither fruity nor floral undertones — it’s just hot. The Madame Jeanette can commonly be found in traditional Suriname and Antillean cuisine, often tossed into dishes whole to add spice to every bite. 21. Scotch Bonnet (100,000-350,000 SHU) Photo: Altin Osmanaj /Shutterstock
The Scotch Bonnet is a Caribbean pepper, and it gets its name from a perceived resemblance to the Scottish Tam o’ Shanter (those floppy plaid hats with the pom-poms on top). It has a little bit of sweet to go along with all that spicy and is most commonly found in hot Caribbean dishes like jerk chicken or jerk pork, though it crops up in recipes as far away as West Africa. They’re one of the main ingredients in the famous West Indian hot pepper sauces, which differ from country to country but can be found in almost every household in the Caribbean. 20. White Habanero (100,000-350,000 SHU)
The first of many varieties of the famed habanero to make the cut, the white is particularly rare and difficult to cultivate. These peppers grow on tiny bushes, but each one produces an exceptionally high yield. There’s some debate about whether they originated in Peru or Mexico (some people go so far as to differentiate between Peruvian White Habaneros and Yucatan White Habaneros), but regardless of their origins, these peppers can be found lending heat to traditional Mexican stews and salsas. Their influence has even extended out into the Caribbean, where they’re employed in sauces and marinades. 19. Habanero (100,000-350,000 SHU) Photo: Joshua Resnick /Shutterstock
This habanero is the orange kind you can buy in the grocery store, but just because they’re readily available doesn’t mean they’re less vicious than any of their cousins on this list. Originating in the Amazon, this pepper was brought northward through Mexico (where most of them are grown now). The habanero is actually a different variety of the same species as the Scotch Bonnet, though it’s used more in Mexico than in the Caribbean, lending a fruity and floral kick to Yucatanian food. 18. Fatalii (125,000-325,000 SHU)
The first pepper on the list from the Eastern Hemisphere, the Fatalii is a chili from central and southern Africa. Brave souls claim that its flavor is notably citrusy (though how anybody can taste anything through that much burning is beyond me), and so it’s used largely in fruity hot sauces from its native Africa through the Caribbean. Just beware when confronted with this pepper as the heat starts early, covers your whole mouth, and takes quite a while to dissipate. 17. Devil’s Tongue (125,000-325,000 SHU)
Similar in appearance to the Fatalii, and a member of the habanero family, the Devil’s Tongue was first discovered growing in Pennsylvania among its habanero relatives. Nobody’s quite sure where it originated or how it came to be growing in the field of an Amish farmer, but it’s become renowned for its bright, fruity, and sometimes slightly nutty taste. Because its past is a mystery, however, there are no real ‘traditional’ uses for the Devil’s Tongue — experts recommend eating them fresh in salsas or salads if you can take the heat. 16. Tigerpaw NR (265,000 — 328,000 SHU)
This new type of habanero pepper was scientifically engineered, rather than naturally cultivated. The “NR” in the name signifies nematode resistance, as the US Department of Agriculture’s research division (ARS) developed this particular pepper plant to be resistant to root-knot nematodes, a parasite common to many pepper and tomato plants. Its name comes from a scientist who saw photos of the pepper and thought it looked somewhat like a tiger paw, although it’s an apt name because it hits like a tiger paw, too. Because of its distinctly unnatural upbringing, the Tigerpaw, like the Devil’s Tongue, lacks traditional use in cuisine. However, its similarity to the traditional orange habanero means it’s easily substituted in any of the multitudes of habanero recipes used throughout Mexico. (Be cautious: It tends to pack a bigger burn than its more traditional relative.) 15. Chocolate Habanero (aka Congo Black) (300,000-425,000 SHU) Photo: Iva Vagnerova /Shutterstock
Chocolate Habaneros originated in Trinidad and in fact have absolutely nothing to do with the Congo. This one’s a favorite of many ‘chiliheads,’ who somehow remain conscious long enough to detect a rich, smoky flavor buried somewhere under all that heat. What you won’t taste is any hint of chocolate. The name comes from the color of the pepper, not the flavor. Chocolate habaneros have been dubbed the “ultimate salsa pepper,” though you’re more likely to find them in world-famous Jamaican jerk sauce. 14. Caribbean Red Habanero (300,000-475,000 SHU)
An upgraded version of the habanero, clocking in at almost twice the spice, this adorably small pepper approaches sinister levels of heat. Like many of the other contenders on this list, the Caribbean Red likely hails from the Amazon basin (though some argue for Yucatan origins) and is a staple in Mexican cooking, where it can be commonly found in salsas and hot sauces. More creative uses of the pepper include a guest appearance in “Caribbean Red Pepper Surprise” ice cream, though, according to one consumer, “The surprise is, your brain is on fire, and your taste-buds are in love, but your fillings have melted.” 13. Red Savina (200,000-577,000 SHU)
Yet another habanero cultivar, this bad boy’s been selectively bred for generations to produce larger, heavier, and spicier fruit — to give you some idea of where this list is headed, the Red Savina was the hottest pepper in the world from 1994 to 2006, and we’re not even halfway through. As a close relative of all the habanero peppers, the Red Savina shares the well-established Central American origin story but was developed further in California. It was discovered by accident when a farmer trying to grow domestic habaneros found a bright red pepper different from the orange habaneros in his field. He kept it, bred it, and started selling it as its own product. The strain is protected by the US government’s Plant Variety Protection Act, ensuring its spice for many generations to come. 12. Naga Morich (aka Dorset Naga) (1,000,000-1,500,000 SHU)
Naga Morich means “serpent chili” in Bengali. Sister of the famed Ghost Pepper (yet to come), this beauty is native to northern India and Bangladesh, where it’s often eaten green (read: unripe) and raw, as a side dish. The Dorset Naga is a particular strain of the Naga Morich pepper that was selectively bred for maximum heat — the first pepper on earth to break one million SHU (double the rating of the Red Savina). Aside from mind-numbing heat, they also boast a fruity flavor; some claim to taste notes of orange and pineapple, but personally, I find the idea of being able to taste anything amidst the mouth-fire highly suspect. 11. Trinidad Scorpion CARDI (800,000-1,000,000 SHU) Photo: MongPro /Shutterstock
The Trinidad Scorpion gets its name from its homeland and its appearance. The latter half of the name makes sense once you get a look at one. The peppers have a little stinger opposite the stem, which looks like the poisonous barb on the tail of a scorpion. Although, if you want to relate the power of the pepper’s spice to a scorpion, that works as well. The “CARDI” addendum stands for Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute, the research group responsible for the breeding of this particular pepper. We’re now well within the ‘dangerously hot’ range, a fact further evidenced by the two main uses of the Trinidad Scorpion CARDI: firstly, in military-grade mace, and secondly, mixed in with marine paint to prevent barnacles from growing on the bottoms of boats. But I guess you could put it in your food if you really wanted to. 10. Bhut Jolokia Chocolate (800,000-1,001,304 SHU) Photo: Pete Burana /Shutterstock
The Bhut Jolokia (aka Naga Jolokia) is more commonly known by its Americanized name, the Ghost Pepper. The chocolate variant of this pepper is a very rare naturally occurring permutation of the standard red and is named not only for its rich coloring but also for its notoriously sweet flavor. Don’t be fooled by the sweetness, though — it’s just as spicy as its red cousin, at over a million SHU. Native to India, the Ghost Pepper is responsible for some of the most brain-searing, tongue-sizzling curries and chutneys in the entire world. However, it’s also used in military weapons and smeared on fences to ward off stampeding elephants. 9. Bhut Jolokia (aka Ghost Pepper) (800,000-1,001,304 SHU)
The Bhut Jolokia, or Ghost Pepper, is the fiery, less sweet original that spawned the Chocolate Ghost Pepper ( bhut means ghost or supernatural creature). Native to India, the Ghost Pepper is responsible for some of the most brain-searing, tongue-sizzling curries and chutneys in the entire world. However, it’s also used in military weapons and smeared on fences to ward off stampeding elephants. The standard red variant of this pepper is much easier to find than the chocolate variety, and is the fuel for restaurant challenges and idiotic YouTube videos worldwide. Fun fact: The Ghost Pepper is an inter-species hybrid between the species containing all of the habanero cultivars and the species containing the Tabasco pepper. 8. 7 Pot Chili (over 1,000,000 SHU)
The 7 Pot Chili gets its name from its alleged ability to provide enough spice for seven pots of stew, and at over a million SHU, I’m inclined to believe it. Unsurprisingly, this little demon is also from Trinidad, where evil peppers grow like weeds, and you’ll find it in many of the same dishes as the other Caribbean peppers in the habanero family — stews, marinades, and hot sauces. The 7 Pot (sometimes called the 7 Pod) displays all-over “pimpling,” a texture only found in the spiciest of peppers (appearing as though they’re boiling themselves from the inside out). 7. Gibraltar (aka Spanish Naga) (1,086,844 SHU)
The Spanish Naga is grown, of course, in Spain but was actually developed in the UK. Like the 7 Pot, this one’s so fiendishly spicy that its skin is bubbling and wrinkled, an effect probably exaggerated by the unique conditions under which it’s grown: The plants have to be kept indoors in enclosed plastic tunnels and subjected to blisteringly hot temperatures in order to churn out peppers that spicy. Since they’re largely man-made, there aren’t any traditional dishes that use the Gibraltar chili, but they’re available in Western Europe if you’re interested in concocting a curry and then never tasting anything again for the rest of your life. 6. Infinity Chili (1,176,182 SHU)
Most of the rest of the peppers on this list have been engineered by humans. I guess once we identified the hottest pepper in the world, all we could do from there was make them hotter ourselves. The Infinity Chili was engineered in the UK by breeder Nick Woods, but it only held the world record for two weeks before it was ousted by the next contender, the Naga Viper. Like the previous two, this pepper is red and wrinkly and shriveled and horrible looking — as would you be after eating it. 5. Naga Viper (1,382,118 SHU) Photo: BDKKEC072 /Shutterstock
Nature never intended this pepper to exist. It’s so strange, so very unholy in its spiciness, that the plants can’t actually produce offspring exactly like the parent. Okay, fine, it’s not because it’s an evil abomination — it’s an unstable three-way genetic hybrid between the Naga Morich, the Bhut Jolokia, and the Trinidad Scorpion, which can’t naturally incorporate the genes from all three breeds into its seeds. If you want to grow it, you have to get the seeds from its human creator, Gerald Fowler (and the waiting list is several thousand people long). 4. 7 Pod Douglah (aka Chocolate 7 Pot) (923,000-1,853,396 SHU)
The mean sister of the 7 Pot Chili, the Douglah (also known as the Chocolate 7 Pot) is characterized by heavily textured dark brown or even purple skin. This pepper comes agonizingly close to two million SHU, so one would imagine flavor is the last thing anyone’s thinking about as they’re lying on the floor, weeping. This pepper is far into the heat range that you need to seriously consider wearing gloves and goggles if you plan on handling them in any capacity. And yet, many say the Douglah is one of the most deliciously flavored peppers, with a full-bodied fruitiness unmatched by others of its spice level. Hailing from Trinidad, land of the brutal pepper, this variety can be found in many of the same dishes as the other Caribbean contenders. 3. Trinidad Scorpion Butch T (1,463,700 SHU)
This cultivar of the Trinidad Scorpion is the pride and joy of Butch Taylor, owner of Zydeco Hot Sauce in Mississippi. Tiny, red, and sinister, this pepper has a little stinger on the end, characteristic of the scorpion peppers. The Scorpion Butch T is so spicy you have to wear safety gear to cook with it (that means masks, gloves, full-body suits — the works), and cooks have claimed numbness in their hands for up to two days afterwards. 2. Trinidad Moruga Scorpion (2,009,231 SHU)
The Moruga Scorpion, the first pepper ever to break 2 million SHU, held the world record for spiciness for several years and hails from, you guessed it, Trinidad. Each fruit is about the size of a golf ball and contains as much capsaicin as 25 milliliters of police-grade pepper spray. This is the spiciest naturally occurring pepper known to man, but, like the Douglah, it’s also famously fruity and flavorful. Fans recommend adding a small amount to any dish for an explosion of flavor, as well as the endorphin rush that accompanies the consumption of something that spicy. 1. Carolina Reaper (1,569,383-2,200,000 SHU) Photo: Adrian_am13 /Shutterstock
This is it. The big one. The grand emperor of spicy peppers. The Carolina Reaper claimed its crown in November of 2013 as the spiciest pepper of all time, blowing the Moruga Scorpion’s measly 2 million SHU away by over 200,000 units. And it’s one nasty-looking pepper, fully equipped with the texture and scorpion tail (or, in this case, the reaper blade) of the Trinidadian heavyweights, though it lacks the natural heritage of the Moruga Scorpion. The Reaper was engineered in South Carolina by Ed Currie, owner of PuckerButt Pepper Co., by mixing an exceptionally hot Caribbean pepper from the island of St. Vincent and a pepper from Pakistan. They have a whole line of Reaper-based merch available on their website if you’re brave. Personally, I like the taste of food, so I have to pass. What can I say? I fear the Reaper.
Editor’s Note: This article was originally published in 2014 and was updated in 2019.

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From Brew Hall to defensive miscues, Loons seek improvements at Allianz Field

From Brew Hall to defensive miscues, Loons seek improvements at Allianz Field Written By Andy Greder / St. Paul Pioneer Press Apr 23rd 2019 – 6pm. Share Minnesota United midfielder Jan Gregus (8) prepares for a corner kick against New York City in front of Loons fans during the first half of their April 13 game at Allianz Field in St. Paul. David Berding / USA TODAY Sports
ST. PAUL — Minnesota United wants Allianz Field to be both a cathedral and a fortress.
A cathedral — in soccer parlance — for fans to revere the beautiful game, and a fortress in terms of difficulty for opposing MLS teams to visit and come away with a win.
United has been working to refine both that consumer experience and its sporting operations after the St. Paul stadium debuted April 13 with 19,796 fans watching the Loons settle for a 3-3 draw with New York City.
The Loons (3-3-1) will now face the Los Angeles Galaxy (6-1-0) in the first night game at Allianz Field at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 24. It will kickoff three straight home games, including matches against D.C. United at 12:30 p.m. Sunday and the Seattle Sounders visiting at 7 p.m. May 4. In the stands
United had about 15 run-up events before the stadium opener, but only one training session for the Loons ahead of their first game there. A snowfall of 8 1/2 inches fell on the grass field about 48 hours before kickoff and precluded the Loons from training at the stadium a few days before to the game. A few snowbanks on the West side of the field were the only traces of winter left by game time.
“When a stadium gets opened, there can be a a negative tone to what happened,” United CEO Chris Wright said. “There can be a negative tone to what went awry operationally, or something happened that maybe was a deflection from the pride that everybody has in the stadium. To be very honest, we didn’t get that.”
But Wright said United has a list of 200 items to be improved, all organized on a big spreadsheet. Some of the main objectives come in food and beverage service.
The Brew Hall on the north side of the stadium was a massive success during the Saturday opener, Wright said. The demand, however, was too much for United — which is self-managing the stadium — to keep up with the sales of suds.
Delaware North, United’s food and beverage partner, has since spent $25,000 to convert its paper point-of-sale system to a digital operation to speed up sales. The club hopes to have that enhancement up and running by Wednesday’s game.
Allianz Field also had shortages of pizza and cuisine from Hot Indian and Brasa. “(They) got completely shellacked,” Wright said of the latter two stands. “They were out of food about halfway through halftime. So that is over 400 units per stand. We’ve got to address that, which they are. That’s a good problem to have.”
The Allianz Field opener, which also dealt with the stress of nearly 1,000 credentialed staff, media and other officials, also served as the rollout of Minnesota United using 100 percent digital tickets. Wright reports few substantial issues in how that software on MNUFC’s app was first adopted. On the field
On the soccer side, Minnesota reverted back to the defensive struggles from its first two years of MLS play, which originated at TCF Bank Stadium. After giving up three goals to New York City, they gave up four to Toronto FC in a 4-3 loss Friday in Ontario.
With that spike, the Loons are on pace to give up more goals than they did in either of their first two MLS seasons. That in itself is remarkable considering they set an MLS record for most goals allowed in consecutive campaigns.
“One of the things that we are searching for is a defensive identity,” said Wright, who oversees sporting director Manny Lagos, coach Adrian Heath and the rest of the sporting staff. “We’ve long been criticized, and rightfully so, for the number of goals that we give up, the way we give up goals, etc.
“I know our coaching staff and players are working very, very hard on changing that,” Wright said. “I want Allianz Field to become a place that is very, very difficult for opponents to play in. We’ve got to seek that, and a big part of that is the mentality of our players and our coaching staff. The mentality of our soccer operations and the mentality of our supporters.”
Heath and players such as Ozzie Alonso, Michael Boxall and Brent Kallman have chalked up the defensive lapses to individual errors or a lull that has come in the moments after one goal is scored. Against New York City and Toronto, the Loons gave up two goals over a few short minutes.
“We are trying to eradicate individual mistakes,” Heath said Monday. “It’s what we’ve spoke about. I don’t think there has been anything wrong with the collective positioning of the group, but individuals are making errors that’s costing us dearly every single game.”
Loons players said the first game at Allianz Field was difficult because the stadium was new to them, too.
“We’ve got to go on and make it our home now,” Heath said. “It’s early days, I know, but we’ve got to make it a fortress.” Latest Articles SD Public Utilities Commission sets 2020 gross receipts tax levy for utility companies Apr 23rd 2019 – 6pm

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From Brew Hall to defensive miscues, Loons seek improvements at Allianz Field

By Andy Greder / St. Paul Pioneer Press Today at 6:35 p.m. Minnesota United midfielder Jan Gregus (8) prepares for a corner kick against New York City in front of Loons fans during the first half of their April 13 game at Allianz Field in St. Paul. David Berding / USA TODAY Sports
ST. PAUL — Minnesota United wants Allianz Field to be both a cathedral and a fortress.
A cathedral — in soccer parlance — for fans to revere the beautiful game, and a fortress in terms of difficulty for opposing MLS teams to visit and come away with a win.
United has been working to refine both that consumer experience and its sporting operations after the St. Paul stadium debuted April 13 with 19,796 fans watching the Loons settle for a 3-3 draw with New York City.
The Loons (3-3-1) will now face the Los Angeles Galaxy (6-1-0) in the first night game at Allianz Field at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 24. It will kickoff three straight home games, including matches against D.C. United at 12:30 p.m. Sunday and the Seattle Sounders visiting at 7 p.m. May 4. In the stands
United had about 15 run-up events before the stadium opener, but only one training session for the Loons ahead of their first game there. A snowfall of 8 1/2 inches fell on the grass field about 48 hours before kickoff and precluded the Loons from training at the stadium a few days before to the game. A few snowbanks on the West side of the field were the only traces of winter left by game time.
“When a stadium gets opened, there can be a a negative tone to what happened,” United CEO Chris Wright said. “There can be a negative tone to what went awry operationally, or something happened that maybe was a deflection from the pride that everybody has in the stadium. To be very honest, we didn’t get that.”
But Wright said United has a list of 200 items to be improved, all organized on a big spreadsheet. Some of the main objectives come in food and beverage service.
The Brew Hall on the north side of the stadium was a massive success during the Saturday opener, Wright said. The demand, however, was too much for United — which is self-managing the stadium — to keep up with the sales of suds.
Delaware North, United’s food and beverage partner, has since spent $25,000 to convert its paper point-of-sale system to a digital operation to speed up sales. The club hopes to have that enhancement up and running by Wednesday’s game.
Allianz Field also had shortages of pizza and cuisine from Hot Indian and Brasa. “(They) got completely shellacked,” Wright said of the latter two stands. “They were out of food about halfway through halftime. So that is over 400 units per stand. We’ve got to address that, which they are. That’s a good problem to have.”
The Allianz Field opener, which also dealt with the stress of nearly 1,000 credentialed staff, media and other officials, also served as the rollout of Minnesota United using 100 percent digital tickets. Wright reports few substantial issues in how that software on MNUFC’s app was first adopted. On the field
On the soccer side, Minnesota reverted back to the defensive struggles from its first two years of MLS play, which originated at TCF Bank Stadium. After giving up three goals to New York City, they gave up four to Toronto FC in a 4-3 loss Friday in Ontario.
With that spike, the Loons are on pace to give up more goals than they did in either of their first two MLS seasons. That in itself is remarkable considering they set an MLS record for most goals allowed in consecutive campaigns.
“One of the things that we are searching for is a defensive identity,” said Wright, who oversees sporting director Manny Lagos, coach Adrian Heath and the rest of the sporting staff. “We’ve long been criticized, and rightfully so, for the number of goals that we give up, the way we give up goals, etc.
“I know our coaching staff and players are working very, very hard on changing that,” Wright said. “I want Allianz Field to become a place that is very, very difficult for opponents to play in. We’ve got to seek that, and a big part of that is the mentality of our players and our coaching staff. The mentality of our soccer operations and the mentality of our supporters.”
Heath and players such as Ozzie Alonso, Michael Boxall and Brent Kallman have chalked up the defensive lapses to individual errors or a lull that has come in the moments after one goal is scored. Against New York City and Toronto, the Loons gave up two goals over a few short minutes.
“We are trying to eradicate individual mistakes,” Heath said Monday. “It’s what we’ve spoke about. I don’t think there has been anything wrong with the collective positioning of the group, but individuals are making errors that’s costing us dearly every single game.”
Loons players said the first game at Allianz Field was difficult because the stadium was new to them, too.
“We’ve got to go on and make it our home now,” Heath said. “It’s early days, I know, but we’ve got to make it a fortress.”

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Easy Butter Chicken Recipe

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Easy keto butter chicken recipe – a creamy, rich, and delicious chicken dish with creamy curry flavor that everyone loves that is naturally gluten free and low carb!
If you love butter chicken… you’re going to love this recipe and my twist on my favorite Indian food dish – with chicken thighs!
This rustic, hearty butter chicken dish is bursting with creamy curry flavors and lots of fresh garlic and fresh ginger. Just Take Me To The Easy Butter Chicken Recipe Already!
I get lots of questions and comments on my posts – so I try to provide as much information in them as possible for my readers.
I have readers of all level cooking ability on my site – and frequently get lots of questions on my recipes – so I put a lot of information in my posts for my readers.
If you’d prefer to skip over these tips, tricks, and serving suggestions – please scroll to the bottom of the page where you will find the easy printable recipe. Is There Butter in Butter Chicken
Butter isn’t a traditional part of Indian curries – so many people wonder if there is even butter in butter chicken. Unlike garam masala, or other popular Indian curries, there is actually butter in butter chicken.
While the dish can be made with coconut cream and other non dairy options, butter chicken does often contain butter and heavy whipping cream mixed into the spicy, savory tomato sauce.
Butter chicken isn’t an old dish in Indian cuisine – it was created in the now world renowned Moti Mahal restaurant in Delhi , India when they mixed leftover chicken in a tomato based gravy with butter and cream.
Butter Chicken is now one of the most popular curry dishes in India, and across the world! Chicken Thighs Butter Chicken Recipe
Traditionally, chicken thighs aren’t used in butter chicken recipes – as they use chunks of chicken breasts, or leftover Chicken Tikka.
I love the rich, savory flavors of butter chicken – but often buy chicken thighs since my husband is on a keto diet and chicken thighs work better into his macros.
Chicken thighs offer a higher fat content for those on a keto diet – and are a much more economical cut of chicken for those on a budget.
This method is in no way traditional – but does bring the flavor of my favorite Indian chicken dish to chicken thighs, for a rich and hearty meal that will blow you away with flavor.
This recipe is built off my Best Baked Chicken Thighs Ever recipe – you will pan sear and then bake the chicken thighs, while making the butter sauce in the pan you browned the chicken on as the chicken thighs bake. Keto Buter Chicken Recipe
Butter Chicken is an excellent keto friendly dish for those on a keto diet, since the ingredients (like many Indian food favorites) are gluten free and lower in carbohydrates.
This keto Indian chicken recipe is one you will love making over and over again!
I recommend serving this keto butter chicken recipe with my recipe for the Best Cauliflower Rice ever – or with Keto Naan Bread (recipe coming soon!)
Be sure to double check ingredients – make sure you use olive oil and not a vegetable oil, and opt for fresh herbs for the most flavor, where possible. Other Delicious Chicken Thigh Recipes You’ll Love:
If you love this delicious easy keto butter chicken recipe, please visit some of my other favorite chicken thigh recipes!
They are simple, quick, and all bursting with juicy chicken flavor! Keto Chicken Thigh Recipes The Best keto chicken thigh recipes ever – easy delicious chicken thigh recipes the whole family will love. Easy Caprese Chicken Thighs Recipe Get the Recipe The Best Easy Baked Chicken Thighs Recipe The best easy baked chicken thighs recipe – easy, perfect crunchy baked chicken thighs that are juicy and moist, with a crunchy outside using simple ingredients you already have on hand! Get the Recipe Baked Ranch Chicken Thighs Easy, crunchy, delicious Baked Ranch Chicken Thighs are a super simple one pot baked chicken thigh recipe everyone loves – bursting with ranch flavor in only five ingredients! Low carb, mess free, a deliciously crunchy crust, in a huge family favorite that is sure to make anyone a fan of chicken thighs in under 40 minutes! Get the Recipe Keto Adobo Air Fried Chicken Thighs Recipe Keto Adobo Air Fried Chicken Thighs Recipe – delicious air fried chicken thighs with a crispy, crunchy adobo seasoning crust that is naturally low carb and bursting with flavor! Get the Recipe Easy One Pan BBQ Chicken Thighs Delicious and simple year round favorite, these Easy One Pan BBQ Chicken Thighs are a huge family favorite, great for picky eaters and those on low carb or keto diets, and are super simple, bursting with bbq flavor and crispy chicken thighs, in just one pan! Get the Recipe One Pot Garlic Butter Chicken Thighs and Mushrooms One Pot Garlic Butter Chicken Thighs and Mushrooms – decadently delicious chicken thighs and a mushroom side dish all in one pan with the most amazingly delicious garlic butter sauce! Get the Recipe Easy Butter Chicken Recipe
If you love this easy butter chicken recipe as much as I do, please give it five stars (click the stars in the recipe below), and help me share on facebook and pinterest! CONNECT WITH SWEET C’S! Be sure to follow me on my social media, so you never miss a post!

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