India saved Rs.149 Cr during The Great Indian Restaurant Festival 2019

India saved Rs.149 Cr during The Great Indian Restaurant Festival 2019

India saved Rs.149 Cr during The Great Indian Restaurant Festival 2019 Posted on by admin
India has always been a food loving country, with taste, colour and aroma forming a major part of our cuisine. With culture and dialect changing every 100 KMs, local cuisine in each state also distinctly matches the preferences of our billion-strong population.
However, Indians were never known for being big on dining out until we had a case in point recently. The recently concluded third edition of Dineout’s annual food carnival, the Great Indian Restaurant Festival (GIRF) ended recently and the data we gathered from this year’s GIRF clearly points to the fact that Indian millennials are increasingly discovering the pleasures of dining out with friends & family while exploring cuisines from around the world.
The festival witnessed close to 65% savings on Bills, Buffet, Drinks (including alcohol) at 6000+ Restaurants across 11 cities. In line with this year’s theme of #monthofmore, the festival saw an overwhelming response from food connoisseurs who indulged in binge eating with more food, more discounts and more incredible dining out experiences.
Here are some interesting trends from GIRF 2019:
In case you’re a foodie looking to combine your love for great deals with a passion for unique food & drinks, download the Dineout app on Android / iOS today! Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Comment

Read More…

Marylebone's Ooty on why its new mango wine is proving such a big hit

Reviews, recipes and a feast of flavours ES FOOD newsletter Reviews, recipes and a feast of flavours Enter your email address Continue Please enter an email address Email address is invalid Fill out this field Email address is invalid You already have an account. Please log in .
Register with your social account or click here to log in I would like to receive the latest restaurant reviews, recipes and food trend every week, by email Update newsletter preferences
At Ooty in Marylebone , orange is the new white. And red, for that matter. The south Indian restaurant , from the former head chef of Michelin-starred Vineet Bhatia London, is the first in Europe to serve its new status amber tipple: an exotic wine made from 90 per cent alphonso mangoes.
“It’s been an instant hit with diners,” says chef Manmeet Singh Bali, who first discovered mango wine on a trip to Pune, India, in 2016. There, Rhythm Winery produces flavours from peach to pineapple and kiwi but it was the mango variety infused with chenin blanc grapes that captured his attention.
The key lies in its versatility, says assistant general manager Kenny Jacob. The wine is sweet on the first sip but it has a light, dry aftertaste which cleanses the palate — making it the perfect accompaniment to complex spicy food.
It goes well with both meat and fish so Bali recommends pairing it with the chilli scallops, prawn recheado or chettinad venison dosa, and you can drink it all night, says Jacob. Unlike beer, which can leave you too full, and red wine, which can be heavy, the mango wine is light and fresh. It is also semi-sweet, so it works well as a dessert wine, says Bali. Try it with the meetha paan kulfi or apricot and cardamom tart.
“Guests instantly love the incredible aroma on the nose and are pleasantly surprised as the wine does not come across as 12.5 per cent ABV,” says Jacob. “The wine is beautifully balanced with a dry finish, and its mid-palate is ambrosial and shows a hint of tartness through the ripe fruit. The end-palate is clean, fruity and fresh.” At basement bar The Ooty Club, many cocktails — which are inspired by railway journeys through India — use mango wine as a base instead of sparkling wine or prosecco.
Head bartender Bethani Pather has used it to develop a cocktail called Ooty’s Pom Royal, a mix of Vouvray sparkling wine, homemade grenadine and gold dust. It’s also used in the Date to Remember cocktail, which features Amrut single malt, bitters and date syrup — a fresh new flavour for spring. The best Indian restaurants in London 19 show all The best Indian restaurants in London 1/19 Hoppers There’s a reason this place still has hour-long waits on for tables on a daily basis, and its not slow service. This beautiful little restaurant offers delicious Sri Lankan street food at extremely affordable prices, with favourites including the mutton rolls and bone marrow varuval alongside the marinated tamarind and ginger chicken wings – all of which are available on the set menu for £30 per person. The star of the show at this Soho spot is the dish the restaurant is named for – the egg hopper – a fried bowl-shaped beauty made with fermented rice and coconut milk, with a perfectly contained yolk in the middle. Once again, the Sethi family (the group behind Bubbledogs, Gymkhana and Trishna) prove they’re an unstoppable force leading London’s Indian restaurant revolution. 2/19 Bombay Bustle Step inside Bombay Bustle and you’ll be transported to a colonial-era railway carriage – first class, naturally. Inspired by the Dabbawalas of Mumbai – men who traditionally travelled across the city by train to deliver home-cooked meals – Bombay Bustle captures the essence of a rich and vast culinary tradition. Follow the station-style signage to navigate between the bar and dining areas and take a seat in one of the coach-style booths. There you’ll tuck in to some of Mumbai’s most celebrated dishes: opt for the small plates and share as many as you can. Top picks include the rarah keema pao, a richly spiced lamb mince served with a buttered bun, and the masala akuri – spiced scrambled eggs gleaming atop a truffled naan. Save room for the tandoor dishes: the cardamom-spiced murgh malai chicken is a triumph. 3/19 Indian Accent Despite decidedly unassuming appearances – it really just looks like another faintly dull spot for bored Mayfair types – this is an extraordinary place, turning out gorgeous, intensely flavoured plates of food. The first signs of genius come early on, with the tiny bite of blue cheese-filled naan (we asked for a second plate), which are remarkably memorable and impossible to over recommend. The place is full of food that manages to be both earthy and elegant at the same time, at times dazzlingly inventive, other moments reliably comfortable. Portions are small, service is friendly if fussy, but by God the food is delicious. Even their puddings are exceptional and their brunch is likely the most interesting in London. Neither of these things is usual for an Indian restaurant – but then Indian Accent isn’t usual; it goes beyond than that. A delight. 4/19 Jamavar Mayfair’s Jamavar is another that proves that Indian fine dining in the capital is fiercely good. Much like its contemporaries, the venue has a colonial gentlemen’s club feel to it and offers delicately-spiced plates that pack a punch. Highlights include the juicy scallops Bhel with a tamarind and date chutney and the slow cooked Jamavar dal with black lentils. Familiar favourites can be found on the menu too, like the moreish old Delhi butter chicken. 5/19 Cinnamon Bazaar There’s a reason Vivek Singh is one of the capital’s most celebrated Indian chefs and the proof is in the pudding. Everything here from food to decor is built to resemble the vibrancy and energy of ancient and modern bazaars located along old trading routes. Something that follows through in the food, which fuses both east and west with dishes such as a lamb roganjosh shepherd’s pie and Vindaloo of ox cheek with masala mash. 6/19 Dishoom Dishoom is rightly regarded a staple of London life, even though just eight years have passed since its first Bombay Cafe opened in Covent Garden. The group’s monopoly of the casual, quality dining scene spans five London branches and another two in Edinburgh and Manchester. Be sure to try the mahi tikka (grilled, marinated fish) and okra fries as part of a sharing-plate meal. Meanwhile the chole poori (puffed, fried bread with chickpea curry) makes a cheap and hearty lunch for one. The real standouts are the black daal and the breakfast bacon naan, both of which have achieved legendary status and have the lamb chops too, which deserve to be similarly revered. Dishoom 7/19 Darjeeling Express This place has come a long way since serving Indian food to 12 supper club guests in Wood Green. Six years on, the location may have changed – they now boast a permanent site in Kingly Court – but the food is as good as ever. None of the team are trained chefs, instead all being amateurs-turned-professionals who learned to cook perfecting long-standing family recipes. This eccentricity might just be why it all works as well as it does. Chef patron Asma Khan’s ever-changing menu has a homely feel to it but no means is lacking in finesse: the Calcutta-Hyderabad-Rajput cooking is all boldly spiced, vigorously flavoured and served in generous portions. It is a bold, lively place where it’s fun to drink up and tuck in. There are stories here; fortunately, you can still book up to hear them. Hear them first hand before next year, when Khan becomes the first British chef to appear on Netflix’s Chef’s Table. Daniel Hambury/Stella Pictures 8/19 Quilon Another star of the capital’s Indian food scene. Chef Sriram Aylur shows consistency is forte as the food is vibrant and delicate with a home-style to it. Standout dishes include their signature fish curry with tender halibut and a creamy-with-a-kick coconut and chilli sauce, as well as the perfectly spiced Mangalorean chicken. 9/19 Cinnamon Kitchen Battersea The Cinnamon Club’s younger, laid back sister offers an alternative set up to its fine dining sibling. The restaurant is the baby of the family and much like its sister branches, chef Vivek Singh has worked wonders with its vibrant menus. The dinner offering is on the meatier side, with a hearty selection of grilled meats and dishes such as the clove-smoked lamb ramp and the fiery rump steak with masala chips. There’s also a plethora of breads to mop up any excess sauce, including four different types of naan; plain, garlic, peshwari and a chicken tikka and cheese. 10/19 Jikoni Granted, this spot isn’t just an Indian restaurant. It specialises in flavours from other parts of Asia too, offering twists on traditional poppadoms and bhajis, but largely boasts a variety of Indian-inspired triumphs. Small plates include the clove-smoked venison samosas with beetroot chutney and larger plates deliver too, like the mutton keema, which is sandwiched between two toasted brioches to form a wildly indulgent Sloppy Joe. Much like the food, the decor is comforting, with mismatched tablecloths and cushions, giving it a relaxed, homely feel. 11/19 Gunpowder Husband and wife team Harneet and Devina Baweja opened this spot back in November 2015 with the help of Mumbai-born head chef Nirmal Save, formerly of Tamarind and Zaika. Nearly three years on and there’s no stopping them: not only did the team launch a cookbook earlier this year but Gunpowder was recognised by Michelin with a Bib Gourmand in 2018, which it retained at the 2019 awards. The the menu offers rich, well-executed, belt-loosening plates that will leave you feeling wholly satisfied and wanting to do it over again. Standout dishes include the charred lamb chops and the chettinad pulled duck. 12/19 Benares “No Indian restaurant in London enjoys a more commanding location or expansive interior,” said the Michelin Guide’s 2019 inspectors, as the place held onto its star for the twelfth year in a row. Expansive, perhaps, but Bernares doesn’t look especially ravishing either inside or out. Still, its polished interior can house up to 300 guests and encompasses four private dining rooms, bar, a main dining room and a lounge, where guests are greeted by a pool of floating flowers. Food here is an inventive blend of quality British ingredients, traditional Indian recipes and contemporary techniques. 13/19 Trishna Unlike some of its competitors, which tend to have a more meaty focus, Trishna celebrates the coastal cuisine of southwest India. The food on the menu pays close attention to coconut and tamarind, and accordingly dishes are fragrant without being overpowering, though they’re brazen with the spice – expect to have your socks very soundly blown off. The tandoor offers a selection of seafood from charred scallops to salmon tikka. 14/19 Gymkhana Gone are the days when Indian restaurants were stereotyped as budget-friendly, BYOB haunts. The capital’s Indian fine dining scene is booming and Mayfair’s Gymkhana is a testament to that. It’s hardly a surprise too, considering the Trishna and Hoppers team are behind it. The venue pays homage to colonial India’s gymkhana clubs – spaces where members of high society would socialise, dine, drink and play sport. Menus here capture the intensity and depth of flavour that north Indian cuisine has to offer, with dishes such as the guinea fowl Tikka and wild muntjac biryani. Bold flavours are the name of the game here, but classics like the chicken butter masala are still on the menu and do not disappoint. No wonder this place has kept its Michelin star four years in a row. 15/19 Kricket It’s always nice to see a pop-up given a permanent site. It’s even nicer to see a former pop-up given a permanent site and then get the recognition it deserves. From humble beginnings of a shipping container in Brixton to retaining its Bib Gourmand twice in a row, Kricket has come a long way and picked up plenty of fans in the process. Its menu is often updated but it remains all about small, seasonal sharing plates and India-inspired cocktails. That said, there are some regulars – the bhel puri and samphire pakora are going nowhere, neither is the keralan fried chicken, all with good reason. The bar serves a rotation of six cocktails, all of which feature delicate, oriental spices; anything with spiced jaggery syrup or darjeeling Bourbon is going to be a hit. 16/19 Brigadiers Inspired by the army mess bars of India, this up-market Indian barbecue joint draws a crowd with its range of entertainment, beers on tap, sports screenings and, most importantly, its small plates. Once you’ve finished playing pool in its art-deco “social hub”, or downed your last pint in the Tap Room tavern, sit down in Brigadiers’ dining room to pour over its extensive menu – their are 16 sides alone. Grill-lovers should try the sikandari kid goat shoulder and the BBQ chicken wings, while those looking for something lighter will enjoy the delicately spiced Indo Chinese chicken lettuce cups. There are plenty of well-crafted vegetarian options, too, such as the gently charred wood fired mushroom methi malai naan and the smoked aubergine missi rotis. If a restaurant can attract crowds to Bank on a weekend, it must be doing something right. Matt Writtle 17/19 Masala Zone Sisters Camellia and Namita Panjabi have decades of research behind them, which rubs off on their authentic food. The menus boast a selection of Indian all-stars from grills, tandoors and curries to vibrant street food. The paneer tikka made with fresh fenugreek leaves and yellow chilli proves that veggie curries can be just as flavoursome and rich as their meaty counterparts. Likewise, the familiar korma gets an upgrade, with saffron infused into it. The thalis, however, are the stars of the show here — various small dishes are served on a circular tray, creating a colourful platter of vegetables, dal, chapati, rice, salad and pickles. With seven different branches across the capital, each site has its own identity and brings something different to the table. The Covent Garden restaurant has puppets hanging from the ceiling while the Bayswater branch has eye-catching graphics plastered over the central dining room pillars. 18/19 Indian Zing This longstanding favourite in Hammersmith offers modern, dynamic Indian food. It’s another fine-dining spot that’s popular with locals and celebs alike (even the late Michael Winner was a fan). A real knowledge of India’s regional cooking shines through at this place, thanks to Mumbai-born chef-patron Manoj Vasaikar. The chicken shatkora lives up to the restaurant’s name with herbs and spices balanced by a punch of zesty citrus, and the lamb dhansak, a speciality of the Mumbai Parsi community, combines traditional flavours with seasonal produce. This restaurant packs out on a regular basis, but the service always remains calm and attentive — the sign of a true gem. 19/19 Chakra This little known Kensington spot is all too often overlooked in lists like these. It’s a fabulous neighbourhood place and appropriately upmarket for Kensington, tucked away opposite the excellent Elephant & Castle. They’ve recently refurbished but the real draw is the terrace space; sit out and tuck into their delicious little bites. It’s the sort of place to order a few glasses of wine while tucking into the likes of truffle Kulcha (addictive bites of wild mushroom & black truffle naan) or monk fish marinated beautifully with kasundi mustard paste. The Lucknowi lamb kebab is a must too. Service is the quiet, friendly type. David Clack 1/19 Hoppers There’s a reason this place still has hour-long waits on for tables on a daily basis, and its not slow service. This beautiful little restaurant offers delicious Sri Lankan street food at extremely affordable prices, with favourites including the mutton rolls and bone marrow varuval alongside the marinated tamarind and ginger chicken wings – all of which are available on the set menu for £30 per person. The star of the show at this Soho spot is the dish the restaurant is named for – the egg hopper – a fried bowl-shaped beauty made with fermented rice and coconut milk, with a perfectly contained yolk in the middle. Once again, the Sethi family (the group behind Bubbledogs, Gymkhana and Trishna) prove they’re an unstoppable force leading London’s Indian restaurant revolution. 2/19 Bombay Bustle Step inside Bombay Bustle and you’ll be transported to a colonial-era railway carriage – first class, naturally. Inspired by the Dabbawalas of Mumbai – men who traditionally travelled across the city by train to deliver home-cooked meals – Bombay Bustle captures the essence of a rich and vast culinary tradition. Follow the station-style signage to navigate between the bar and dining areas and take a seat in one of the coach-style booths. There you’ll tuck in to some of Mumbai’s most celebrated dishes: opt for the small plates and share as many as you can. Top picks include the rarah keema pao, a richly spiced lamb mince served with a buttered bun, and the masala akuri – spiced scrambled eggs gleaming atop a truffled naan. Save room for the tandoor dishes: the cardamom-spiced murgh malai chicken is a triumph. 3/19 Indian Accent Despite decidedly unassuming appearances – it really just looks like another faintly dull spot for bored Mayfair types – this is an extraordinary place, turning out gorgeous, intensely flavoured plates of food. The first signs of genius come early on, with the tiny bite of blue cheese-filled naan (we asked for a second plate), which are remarkably memorable and impossible to over recommend. The place is full of food that manages to be both earthy and elegant at the same time, at times dazzlingly inventive, other moments reliably comfortable. Portions are small, service is friendly if fussy, but by God the food is delicious. Even their puddings are exceptional and their brunch is likely the most interesting in London. Neither of these things is usual for an Indian restaurant – but then Indian Accent isn’t usual; it goes beyond than that. A delight. 4/19 Jamavar Mayfair’s Jamavar is another that proves that Indian fine dining in the capital is fiercely good. Much like its contemporaries, the venue has a colonial gentlemen’s club feel to it and offers delicately-spiced plates that pack a punch. Highlights include the juicy scallops Bhel with a tamarind and date chutney and the slow cooked Jamavar dal with black lentils. Familiar favourites can be found on the menu too, like the moreish old Delhi butter chicken. 5/19 Cinnamon Bazaar There’s a reason Vivek Singh is one of the capital’s most celebrated Indian chefs and the proof is in the pudding. Everything here from food to decor is built to resemble the vibrancy and energy of ancient and modern bazaars located along old trading routes. Something that follows through in the food, which fuses both east and west with dishes such as a lamb roganjosh shepherd’s pie and Vindaloo of ox cheek with masala mash. 6/19 Dishoom Dishoom is rightly regarded a staple of London life, even though just eight years have passed since its first Bombay Cafe opened in Covent Garden. The group’s monopoly of the casual, quality dining scene spans five London branches and another two in Edinburgh and Manchester. Be sure to try the mahi tikka (grilled, marinated fish) and okra fries as part of a sharing-plate meal. Meanwhile the chole poori (puffed, fried bread with chickpea curry) makes a cheap and hearty lunch for one. The real standouts are the black daal and the breakfast bacon naan, both of which have achieved legendary status and have the lamb chops too, which deserve to be similarly revered. Dishoom 7/19 Darjeeling Express This place has come a long way since serving Indian food to 12 supper club guests in Wood Green. Six years on, the location may have changed – they now boast a permanent site in Kingly Court – but the food is as good as ever. None of the team are trained chefs, instead all being amateurs-turned-professionals who learned to cook perfecting long-standing family recipes. This eccentricity might just be why it all works as well as it does. Chef patron Asma Khan’s ever-changing menu has a homely feel to it but no means is lacking in finesse: the Calcutta-Hyderabad-Rajput cooking is all boldly spiced, vigorously flavoured and served in generous portions. It is a bold, lively place where it’s fun to drink up and tuck in. There are stories here; fortunately, you can still book up to hear them. Hear them first hand before next year, when Khan becomes the first British chef to appear on Netflix’s Chef’s Table. Daniel Hambury/Stella Pictures 8/19 Quilon Another star of the capital’s Indian food scene. Chef Sriram Aylur shows consistency is forte as the food is vibrant and delicate with a home-style to it. Standout dishes include their signature fish curry with tender halibut and a creamy-with-a-kick coconut and chilli sauce, as well as the perfectly spiced Mangalorean chicken. 9/19 Cinnamon Kitchen Battersea The Cinnamon Club’s younger, laid back sister offers an alternative set up to its fine dining sibling. The restaurant is the baby of the family and much like its sister branches, chef Vivek Singh has worked wonders with its vibrant menus. The dinner offering is on the meatier side, with a hearty selection of grilled meats and dishes such as the clove-smoked lamb ramp and the fiery rump steak with masala chips. There’s also a plethora of breads to mop up any excess sauce, including four different types of naan; plain, garlic, peshwari and a chicken tikka and cheese. 10/19 Jikoni Granted, this spot isn’t just an Indian restaurant. It specialises in flavours from other parts of Asia too, offering twists on traditional poppadoms and bhajis, but largely boasts a variety of Indian-inspired triumphs. Small plates include the clove-smoked venison samosas with beetroot chutney and larger plates deliver too, like the mutton keema, which is sandwiched between two toasted brioches to form a wildly indulgent Sloppy Joe. Much like the food, the decor is comforting, with mismatched tablecloths and cushions, giving it a relaxed, homely feel. 11/19 Gunpowder Husband and wife team Harneet and Devina Baweja opened this spot back in November 2015 with the help of Mumbai-born head chef Nirmal Save, formerly of Tamarind and Zaika. Nearly three years on and there’s no stopping them: not only did the team launch a cookbook earlier this year but Gunpowder was recognised by Michelin with a Bib Gourmand in 2018, which it retained at the 2019 awards. The the menu offers rich, well-executed, belt-loosening plates that will leave you feeling wholly satisfied and wanting to do it over again. Standout dishes include the charred lamb chops and the chettinad pulled duck. 12/19 Benares “No Indian restaurant in London enjoys a more commanding location or expansive interior,” said the Michelin Guide’s 2019 inspectors, as the place held onto its star for the twelfth year in a row. Expansive, perhaps, but Bernares doesn’t look especially ravishing either inside or out. Still, its polished interior can house up to 300 guests and encompasses four private dining rooms, bar, a main dining room and a lounge, where guests are greeted by a pool of floating flowers. Food here is an inventive blend of quality British ingredients, traditional Indian recipes and contemporary techniques. 13/19 Trishna Unlike some of its competitors, which tend to have a more meaty focus, Trishna celebrates the coastal cuisine of southwest India. The food on the menu pays close attention to coconut and tamarind, and accordingly dishes are fragrant without being overpowering, though they’re brazen with the spice – expect to have your socks very soundly blown off. The tandoor offers a selection of seafood from charred scallops to salmon tikka. 14/19 Gymkhana Gone are the days when Indian restaurants were stereotyped as budget-friendly, BYOB haunts. The capital’s Indian fine dining scene is booming and Mayfair’s Gymkhana is a testament to that. It’s hardly a surprise too, considering the Trishna and Hoppers team are behind it. The venue pays homage to colonial India’s gymkhana clubs – spaces where members of high society would socialise, dine, drink and play sport. Menus here capture the intensity and depth of flavour that north Indian cuisine has to offer, with dishes such as the guinea fowl Tikka and wild muntjac biryani. Bold flavours are the name of the game here, but classics like the chicken butter masala are still on the menu and do not disappoint. No wonder this place has kept its Michelin star four years in a row. 15/19 Kricket It’s always nice to see a pop-up given a permanent site. It’s even nicer to see a former pop-up given a permanent site and then get the recognition it deserves. From humble beginnings of a shipping container in Brixton to retaining its Bib Gourmand twice in a row, Kricket has come a long way and picked up plenty of fans in the process. Its menu is often updated but it remains all about small, seasonal sharing plates and India-inspired cocktails. That said, there are some regulars – the bhel puri and samphire pakora are going nowhere, neither is the keralan fried chicken, all with good reason. The bar serves a rotation of six cocktails, all of which feature delicate, oriental spices; anything with spiced jaggery syrup or darjeeling Bourbon is going to be a hit. 16/19 Brigadiers Inspired by the army mess bars of India, this up-market Indian barbecue joint draws a crowd with its range of entertainment, beers on tap, sports screenings and, most importantly, its small plates. Once you’ve finished playing pool in its art-deco “social hub”, or downed your last pint in the Tap Room tavern, sit down in Brigadiers’ dining room to pour over its extensive menu – their are 16 sides alone. Grill-lovers should try the sikandari kid goat shoulder and the BBQ chicken wings, while those looking for something lighter will enjoy the delicately spiced Indo Chinese chicken lettuce cups. There are plenty of well-crafted vegetarian options, too, such as the gently charred wood fired mushroom methi malai naan and the smoked aubergine missi rotis. If a restaurant can attract crowds to Bank on a weekend, it must be doing something right. Matt Writtle 17/19 Masala Zone Sisters Camellia and Namita Panjabi have decades of research behind them, which rubs off on their authentic food. The menus boast a selection of Indian all-stars from grills, tandoors and curries to vibrant street food. The paneer tikka made with fresh fenugreek leaves and yellow chilli proves that veggie curries can be just as flavoursome and rich as their meaty counterparts. Likewise, the familiar korma gets an upgrade, with saffron infused into it. The thalis, however, are the stars of the show here — various small dishes are served on a circular tray, creating a colourful platter of vegetables, dal, chapati, rice, salad and pickles. With seven different branches across the capital, each site has its own identity and brings something different to the table. The Covent Garden restaurant has puppets hanging from the ceiling while the Bayswater branch has eye-catching graphics plastered over the central dining room pillars. 18/19 Indian Zing This longstanding favourite in Hammersmith offers modern, dynamic Indian food. It’s another fine-dining spot that’s popular with locals and celebs alike (even the late Michael Winner was a fan). A real knowledge of India’s regional cooking shines through at this place, thanks to Mumbai-born chef-patron Manoj Vasaikar. The chicken shatkora lives up to the restaurant’s name with herbs and spices balanced by a punch of zesty citrus, and the lamb dhansak, a speciality of the Mumbai Parsi community, combines traditional flavours with seasonal produce. This restaurant packs out on a regular basis, but the service always remains calm and attentive — the sign of a true gem. 19/19 Chakra This little known Kensington spot is all too often overlooked in lists like these. It’s a fabulous neighbourhood place and appropriately upmarket for Kensington, tucked away opposite the excellent Elephant & Castle. They’ve recently refurbished but the real draw is the terrace space; sit out and tuck into their delicious little bites. It’s the sort of place to order a few glasses of wine while tucking into the likes of truffle Kulcha (addictive bites of wild mushroom & black truffle naan) or monk fish marinated beautifully with kasundi mustard paste. The Lucknowi lamb kebab is a must too. Service is the quiet, friendly type. David Clack

Read More…

Punjab Grill’s Menu Is as Extravagant as Its Mirror-Plated Private Room

Lamb raan arrives on a silver platter with roasted vegetables and an edible gold leaf garnish. Jennifer Hughes/Punjab Grill Punjab Grill, D.C.’s new ultra-luxe Indian restaurant, opened in Penn Quarter on Monday with a menu boasting chutney flights, paneer cheesecake, and lamb garnished in real 24-carat gold leaf. “We aren’t trying to force you into dining like a king, but if you want to it’s readily available,” says Karan Singh, CEO of the Punjab Grill group that owns restaurants across India, Singapore, the United Arab Emirates, and Thailand. The inaugural stateside location of the luxury Indian brand is now serving lunch and dinner at 427 11th Street NW. Petrossian caviar appears on the menu as an optional garnish for adraki tuna tartare with sago crips or tawa-seared scallops served with saffron tandoori cauliflower puree, broccolini, and shikanji (salted limeade) foam. Full caviar service, available at any seat, comes alongside circular discs of warm tandoori naan , sour cream, and white butter made on-site. “We made it sufficiently Indian without losing the integrity of caviar service,” Singh says. Every inch of his 4,700-square-foot restaurant is designed to look like the home of rich regional rulers in India known as maharajas . There’s a 40-foot slab of chiseled pink sandstone lining the bar and a private dining room covered floor to ceiling in 150,000 tiny mosaic mirrors (with Hermès plateware picked to match the pattern). There’s also plenty of thought behind the food. Chef Jaspratap “Jassi” Bindra grew up in Kanpur, India, and has helmed kitchens across some of the finest resorts and restaurants across his country. Singh says he picked Bindra over a handful of Michelin-starred chefs in New York and London. Opening Dinner Menu (1) by on Scribd Bindra adds playful, global twists to Punjabi cuisine from North India. Take the burrata starter, served with spiced eggplant and tomato. While it’s not a traditional Indian dish, there is a Punjabi tie-in: Singh says Punjabis have a significant presence in Italy’s dairy industry. “This burrata was most likely made by Punjabi dairy farmer,” Singh says. Burrata badal jaam , with spiced eggplant, heirloom tomatoes ($12), can be topped with shaved truffles for an extra price. Jennifer Hughes/Punjab Grill Another highlight off the small plates section ($10-$16) is the chana masala , a popular Indian chickpea dish that’s transformed into a spreadable “hummus” alongside amritsari kulcha — a tandoori bread — and pickled radish achar . Bindra is offering four types of naan (butter, garlic, sundried tomato, olive and basil, and lemon). The latter comes alongside the chicken “red curry” tulsi tikka , marinated in Thai makhni sauce. That citrusy naan also pairs well with seafood dishes like a a Chilean sea bass ($38) with a jaggery cumin glaze, Brussels sprouts thoran , and tangy kokum coconut sauce poured around the fish in front of diners. Chutney flight Jennifer Hughes/Punjab Grill The middle “lion’s share” section ($12-$42) of the menu includes lots of dishes from grill or the tandoor. One inventive vegetarian order is a bowl of malai broccoli with amul cheese — a ubiquitous cheese in India (similar to Kraft) — that takes on a fondue form, topped with crunchy spiced churma . While each Punjab Grill celebrates Punjabi cuisine, menus are unique to each location. It was Singh’s idea to execute an Indian take on Peking duck, inspired by one he had in D.C. The preparation follows a similar process as the Chinese staple, taking a minimum of five days to prepare. It’s carved table side, adorned with Indian spices, and served with super thin roti bread. Diners are also encouraged to load up on sides. Black or yellow lentil dal — a staple at Indian restaurants — takes 24 hours to make. Other accompaniments includes eggplant, Brussels sprouts with fresh coconut and curry leaf, and a gamut of chutneys and house-made pickles. Burani palak paneer with spinach, tandoori cottage cheese, olive tapenade, and garlic ($28). Jennifer Hughes/Punjab Grill The opening list of 10 cocktails ($14 each), made behind the dramatic mother-of-pearl and brass bar, also have an Indian bent. Consultant Luca Giovannini and his team developed the cocktail menu in collaboration with India-based mixologist Nitin Tewai. Bartender Chris Porter, most recently at the Inn at Little Washington , is now stirring drinks at D.C.’s Punjab Grill. His spin on the Old Fashioned features a theatrical table side presentation: The Kasauli 1820 cocktail, named after the first distillery in India, is revealed under a billowing cloud of smoke. The Kasauli 1820 cocktail comes with Rittenhouse Rye, saffron & spiced sugar, orange, and smoke. Jennifer Hughes/Punjab Grill Inside the stunning S heesh Mahal room, which diners access directly through a private door, a concierge helps curate the experience. That means any off-menu item is fair game. Other potential requests include a private performance by a sitar player or an all-vegan menu. There’s only a handful of needs that can’t be met. Singh seriously investigated the possibility of allowing guests to make royal entrances atop elephants (that’s a no go). Chicken tikka in malai alfredo Jennifer Hughes/Punjab Grill Tandoori tiger prawns ($20) with moilee curry sauce, curry leaf, and tomato jam. Jennifer Hughes/Punjab Grill Dark chocolate pistachio giandiya. Jennifer Hughes/Punjab Grill The Land of Five Waters punch cocktail (daron calvados, rhubarb, hibiscus, chamomile tincture, lemon, garam masala, and prosecco). Jennifer Hughes/Punjab Grill

Read More…

Attend Cooking Classes in Los Angeles and Phoenix

By ‘Login’, you agree to the Terms of use , Privacy Policy and Guidelines for PR Content Attend Cooking Classes in Los Angeles and Phoenix June 23, 2014 9:00 am – Los Angeles and Phoenix are popular destinations both for couples and kids. There are many awesome activities that families can engage in, either to waft off the holiday, or just to pass time on an idle weekend.
2940 Johnson Ferry Road Suite B�218 Marietta, GA Atlanta carolrobinson1459@gmail.com Los Angeles and Phoenix are popular destinations both for couples and kids. There are many awesome activities that families can engage in, either to waft off the holiday, or just to pass time on an idle weekend. Cooking is one of the most engaging activities people can do at home and indeed there are very few things in life as rewarding as a home-cooked meal. This comes at a price since not many masters exist, especially among kids and working adults. However, this short-coming will bring an opportunity for any cooking enthusiast to attend cooking classes in Los Angeles or Phoenix. Below are some awesome places couples may want to visit for classes in both cities.Taste of paceFor cooking classes in Los Angeles simply go toDowntown LA on Mateo Street to this awesome place. They have bi-weekly cooking classes at less than $100 per person. It is designed especially for economic cooks who go with seasonal food prices from farmers� flea markets. Students are trained for practical cooking with available ingredients. The beauty is that you will be allowed to sip a glass of wine on your meal after a hard day�s cooking!HipcooksHipcooks is the place for themed cooking in LA. If you are thinking exotic, and adventurous, this is the place for you. Class venues are on the peripheries of town, Westside and Eastside which attracts rather large classes. This is good though since the tuition comes down to $65. There are skilled cooking instructors giving students the best demos and recipes.Le Cordon Bleu Master ChefFor those who need personalized cooking classes, check out here. However, this becomes expensive at $100, which is always worth it. The advantage is that students have personal stations, and they get to do everything apart from giving instructions itself! This is definitely good for skill and hands-on training. Remember to bring containers to carry dinner home on your day of study.Sweet basilFor the cooking classes in Phoenix and its outskirts, there are several choices too. Sweet basil gives culinary classes for virtually every dish, from roasted beans to chocolate cake. Their grilling recipes and lessons hold great repute among cooking enthusiast so it will be worth a try. This school is unique though, offering non-conventional packages. There is a 12 week class for cooking basics for novices dubbed �The essence of cooking�. There is also a couples� training every Friday teaching them how to cook together without killing each other. This is definitely a must-go for every fun-seeking couple.The DhabaThis is your place for Indian dishes and cooking classes in Phoenix. The school also specializes in exotic, Asian, and generally international cuisine. Lessons divided in culinary packages and single lessons as a flexible of attracting one-week and one-day classes.Sur La TableFinally, Sur la table is literary French for �on the table�. They have more classes than students could possibly keep up with a wide array of options to choose from. The training includes many specializations and combinations and your time will be the only limit to learning how to cook virtually any dish.Whatever your intentions of enrolling for cooking classes in both cities, make sure it turns out to be fun. The point is joy at the end of the day! For more information, visit: http://classesncamps.com/attend-cooking-classes-los-angeles-phoenix/ Related Tags: Cooking Classes Los Angeles, Cooking Classes Phoenix
Disclaimer If you have any questions regarding information in this press release, please contact the person listed in the Contact / Company information box of this page. Please do not attempt to contact Market Press Release. We will be unable to assist you with any information regarding this release. Market Press Release disclaims any content contained in this press release.

Read More…

Drop That Snack! – Reason.com

Peter Bagge In 1985, legendary food critic Ruth Reichl wrote an essay for the Los Angeles Times that sounded ludicrous then and just pathetic today. She was reviewing Border Grill, a nouveau Mexican restaurant in Los Angeles’ ever-hip Melrose district run by Mary Sue Milliken and Susan Feniger—nowadays food royalty, but back then two hotshot Midwestern chefs. The review rightfully raved about the food, and Border Grill continues to feed suburban moms and their rich husbands to this day.
RELATED ARTICLES Class Action Food Lawsuits Are Booming Baylen Linnekin | 3.09.19
Thanks to Decades of Government Meddling, U.S. Dairy Is Going Through a Crisis Baylen Linnekin | 3.02.19
The FDA’s Fixation on Nut Milk Labeling Is Not About Food Safety or Consumer Health Mike Riggs | 2.28.19
MORE ARTICLES BY Gustavo Arellano These California Kids Got In Trouble for Playing La Migra, a Game Where ‘Border Agents’ Chase ‘Illegal Immigrants’ 4.18.18 2:20 pm
Mexican Radio in Los Angeles Crashes—And Down With It Comes An Anti-Immigrant Fable 12.08.17 11:22 am
Chicano Yaktivists Be Damned; Regular Mexicans Are Wild for Coco , Disney 11.29.17 11:00 am
Food Policy Food Police Food Freedom Los Angeles Hispanic Regulation Nanny State But then Reichl inadvertently gave readers a taste of the tortured food psychology that eternally infests America’s second-largest city. “It looks like all the people who keep asking when Los Angeles is going to get a great Mexican restaurant,” she enthused, “may finally have an answer.”
This, in a city that was almost one-third Latino. That had once been a part of Mexico. That was swarming with Mexican eateries of every provenance, from taco trucks to diners to white-tablecloth and beyond. But because those spots were popular with the working class—whites and Latinos—they didn’t count.
In Reichl’s defense, she was just verbalizing what most of the city’s learned class thought, then and now. For decades an innovator in food trends—from fast food chains to the California cuisine of Wolfgang Puck and Nancy Silverton to Mexican everything, Korean grub, food trucks, Taco Bell, prepared foods (canned menudo! frozen burritos!), Wienerschnitzel, so much more—Los Angeles is America’s ultimate food laboratory. Whether you’re a gourmand or a grubber, what’s being eaten here by kids and workers today will show up in Topeka in a couple of years. Hey, Jayhawkers: Get ready for bacon-wrapped hot dogs!
But Los Angeles, particularly though not only in the 21st century, has also become a place for do-gooders to try to govern the habits of the public gut. Those bacon-wrapped hot dogs, sold off of carts, are nowadays as much a part of the Angeleno nightlife as Dodgers broadcaster Vin Scully and nosy po-po. But said po-po usually impound said carts under orders from health officials who are afraid eaters will die from the unholy union of pork on pork. It’s the way of L.A.: From banning new fast food restaurants to arresting people who sell raw milk to cracking down on backyard chicken coops, Los Angeles has set the standard for the rest of the country on how to legislate against our right to nosh on what we want. And the hammer inevitably falls on the common man.
“California produces and innovates and eats in ways the rest of the U.S. and increasingly the world notices,” says Ernesto Hernández-López, a law professor at Chapman University in Orange who has written about Southern California’s taco-truck wars. “At the same time, local and state interests inspire crackdowns on the innovation. Because many trends happen here first, so do the efforts to regulate them.”
To paraphrase H.L. Mencken: L.A.’s official food policy seems to operate on the haunting fear that someone, somewhere , may be happily eating.
More and more, those two worlds of L.A. culinary innovation—the elite and the street—are colliding. Roy Choi, the fusion taco artist who revolutionized American cooking nearly a decade ago with his Kogi Korean BBQ truck, made his name popularizing among hipsters what had long been a staple of the California working class, especially Mexican immigrants. He has now become an active proselytizer for bringing top chefs into the ‘hood—in order to save the very people who invented the taco truck and know all about organic food from their home countries and their own eating habits.
“There are no chef-driven restaurants in the ‘hood,” where people are “starving” for quality food, Choi complained to a rapt audience at the 2013 MAD Symposium, an annual event held in Copenhagen that’s like a TED Talk for the foodie set. “Not one….The restaurants that do exist are fast food chains.” His suggestion? “What if every high caliber chef, all of us in here, told our investors as we’re building restaurants…for every fancy restaurant we build, it would be a requirement to build a restaurant in the ‘hood as well?”
I guess Choi doesn’t think all the loncheras and street vendors in barrios across the U.S. count as “chef-driven.” But where chef-shaming might fail, bans can succeed. Celebrity foodie Jamie Oliver relocated the second season of his ABC reality show Food Revolution to L.A. so he could play the Great White Father fighting for brown and black kids against the evil Los Angeles Unified School District and its vile school lunches. Oliver’s crowning achievement? Getting the district’s trustees in 2012 to bar the insanely flavorful Flamin’ Hot Cheetos from all campuses.
The contemporary progressive food philosophy, best epitomized on the national level by Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move! program, is based on the notion that the country’s fat, diabetic, unhealthy working classes are simply too derelict to make informed food choices. That decades of corporate greed have led to so-called “food deserts” and “food apartheid,” in which chain restaurants and liquor stores are blighting neighborhoods and serving up what Choi described as “corrosive chemical waste.” That salvation lies only in going back to the land—putting farmers markets in low-income neighborhoods and promoting organic, sustainable foodways from elementary school through adulthood.
This mind-set produced a first-of-its-kind food policy in Los Angeles in 2011. That’s when the City Council enacted a ban on new fast food restaurants being built in South Central.
“There are people who are accused of being the food police, of trying to control what goes into people’s mouths,” council member and bill sponsor Bernard Parks, the former Los Angeles police chief, told the Los Angeles Times back then. “But we just don’t think that we need to give fast food more rights around here. We don’t think our community needs to have 10 or 15 or 18 ways to eat a hamburger.”
Increasing poor people’s food choices by limiting them. Only a modern politician could come up with that, you might think. But in fact L.A.’s culinary nanny state has roots in academia and salon culture, and has served as a cudgel for the downtown and Westside power elite to use against unloved brown folk since the 19th century.
‘They Were Born of the Pueblo—They Perish in the Metropolis’
The Golden State’s propensity to shame and police what people eat is in its DNA. The Spanish missionaries who colonized California in the late 1700s fed their Indian wards a European diet of bread, wheat, and livestock, keeping them from the plants and animals that had nourished them for generations. Fray Mariano Payeras, who had worked with the indigenous in Southern California, confessed to his superiors in 1820 that this decreed diet was downright murderous. “They live well free,” he said of the Indians, “but as soon as we reduce them to a Christian and community life they decline in health, they fatten, sicken and die.”
Things didn’t get any better once California became part of the United States. As Los Angeles transformed from dusty Mexican cow town to emerging American commercial capital, politicians decided civic health was imperiled by Mexican food—specifically tamales, that most quintessential of Mexican meals. Around the 1880s, entrepreneurs began selling the toothsome treats from horse-drawn wagons, either going from town to town or hitching up to a single location. These tamaleros proved extremely popular in downtown L.A., filling the needs of thousands of migrants, gringo and Mexican alike, who craved cheap, delicious grub.
Watching the hoi polloi enjoy their food proved unbearable for city fathers. In 1897, the City Council tried to keep tamale wagons from opening until 9 p.m.; four years later, the police chief recommended they close at 1 a.m. since they offered “a refuge for drunks who seek the streets when the saloons are closed for the night.”
Photo Credit: Peter Bagge

Read More…

DINNER IN CUSCO CITY – Add a top gastronomic experience to your tour!

DINNER IN CUSCO CITY – Add a top gastronomic experience to your tour! Mar 11, 2019 We have partnerships with the best restaurants in town, eating out is a great idea embraced by many tourists! A dinner in Cusco City comprises the best international and Peruvian foods, drinks, desserts. Also a top typical show with music and dances! How is a Typical Dinner in Cusco City? We are sure you will totally enjoy it! First, there is a huge and varied buffet, with both Peruvian cuisine, world dishes and desserts. You’ll find our best picks, like the ceviche, other seafood, new Andean cuisine like alpaca steak, quinoa and more. Also, really yummy international treats like lasagna, spaghetti, Japanese, Chinese, Indian recipes and more. Know more about our excellent gastronomy . All kinds of drinks are available, we certainly recommend the pisco sour , Perú’s main cocktail. (Also, check our wonderful article about drinks in Peru). And for dessert, delicious treats, many of them made of exotic, healthy fruits from the Andes and the Amazon. This unforgettable dinner in Cusco City also includes a wonderful set of typical Andean dances: they appear dressed with beautiful, colorful costumes, sometimes masks and the choreographies are enchanting. Many visitors join the dance floor and enjoy a quite happy, elating moment. The music is in charge of a folkloric band, which in turn also performs a show. You can buy their original CDs of Andean tunes and international pop classics. There are tours which include a really great deal of millenary folklore and traditions, like the Lake Titicaca-2 Days!
Everybody gets back to the hotel totally satisfied by a wonderful night! Where is a Typical Dinner in Cusco City? For example, one of our associates is the Tunupa Restaurant Grill & Bar , an amazing place at Cusco’s Plaza de Armas (Main Square), with a section where couples can enjoy the romantic view. There is also a large salon for groups and families. Tunupa Restaurant is quite elegant , and the decoration combines contemporary and pre-Hispanic features. One highlight is the collection of ancient textiles and pottery displayed on the walls, really a pleasure to admire and ask the guide about. You can also read our article regarding colonial pottery in Cusco . Enjoyable instrumental music when the band is not playing. You’ll meet people from all around the world and spend a really happy, yummy night! If you want to enjoy more of this cosmopolitan town, check a great option, the Cusco City Tour . It is surely possible adding a typical dinner in Cusco City to any of our tours! Talk to our travel professionals and they will arrange everything!

Read More…

Sahara Star Celebrates The Win Of Mabruk At The Times Food And Nightlife Awards 2019

194 Sahara Star celebrates the win of Mabruk at the Times Food and Nightlife Awards 2019 March, 2019, Mumbai: Adding another cap to its feather, Mabruk – The Mediterranean restaurant won the best Lebanese fine dine cuisine award for the ninth time at the Times Food & Nightlife awards 2019 that was held on 01st March 2019. The Times Food and Nightlife Awards 2019 is one of the most prestigious award ceremonies for Mumbai restaurants. It is also considered the Oscars of Food and Nightlife. The restaurants are judged by a jury of industry connoisseurs. The Mabruk, is a Mediterranean restaurant, sets the mood with its casual low seating on a wooden deck and a spectacular view of the lagoon area, the pillar less clear-to-the sky dome as well as the other restaurants. At Mabruk you can enjoy the sophistication and subtleties of Mediterranean cuisines with the exotic ingredients of the Middle and Far East. Chef Jihaad is the man behind all the delicacies prepared at Mabruk and he gets his knowledge from Lebanon. On this great achievement, Chef Salil Fadnis, Hotel Manager at Sahara Star said, “We are ecstatic on winning this prestigious award for the ninth time. Perfection is something that we strive to accomplish, along with that giving unique yet traditional food to our customers is the goal.” Mabruk gets the famous dishes of the Mid East to your plate like samboussek, tabouleh and the evergreen falafel. This along with the ambience is what led to this restaurant. About Sahara Star Hotel Sahara Star, the flagship hotel of Sahara India Pariwar, is one of India’s most desirable destinations. The 5-star hotel strategically located near Mumbai’s domestic airport magnificently blends Indian mysticism and culture, while personifying the country’s progressive spirit blending peerless hospitality with ultra-modern technology. Creating a paradigm shift, Sahara Star showcases world largest-pillar-less- clear- to- sky dome, an architectural landmark blending hospitality and entertainment to cater one of the most individualized hospitality experiences. Hotel Sahara Star features 348 well-appointed luxurious guestrooms with 25 elegant suites.9 specialty restaurants, 9 unique concepts and 1 inimitable journey. Hotel Sahara Star brings together a sumptuous array of delicacies from across the Globe. The hotel features an unbelievable external façade made of glass and steel post completion. Here, the culture, mystique & hospitality of India blend with modern facility & services to create the finest business-cum-leisure hotel of the country.

Read More…

Chettinad Mixed Vegetable Curry/ Vegan Mixed Veg Curry

Chettinad Mixed Vegetable Curry/ Vegan Mixed Veg Curry
What is life without some spice? Agree? Well for me, certainly holds true. When we talk about spices, I am immediately drawn towards the Chettinad cuisine from Southern part of India. Chettinad cuisine is known for its spicy food. By spicy, I mean the cuisine uses whole spices, especially black pepper and chillies to flavour the food. While you wont see overtly red looking gravies or curries, but you can definitely sense the heat. The cuisine is known for its blend of spices, coconut in various forms – grated and used in wet masala, added in poriyals and as coconut milk to mellow the heat.
So, the recipe in discussion today is the Chettinad Mixed Vegetable Curry. This Vegan curry is a sinfully delicious vegetable curry that makes your otherwise mundane Mondays absolutely delightful.
The Chettinad Mixed Vegetable curry is a mixture of assorted spices, an aromatic curry base of cashews and coconut milk. It is an ideal accompaniment for South Indian Dosa, Adai or Mixed Lentil Dosas, Appams and even Rotis, Plain Parathas or Steamed Rice, as we love it at home. The Mixed Vegetable curry is gluten free, vegetarian, vegan, plant based food that uses no flours for thickening etc. While it sounds similar to the Kerala Mixed Vegetable Stew , it is quite unique in terms of the spices, especially the Chettinad ground coconut masala.
In Chettinad cuisine, unlike popular belief, not all recipes are non-vegetarian. It has an equally delectable amount of vegetarian fare too. One should not miss the curries or gravies, breakfast recipes that the cuisine offers as they have all the key elements of the cuisine – heat, freshly ground coconut based masala and spice.
My tryst with the cuisine happened around 8 years ago on one of our yearly trips to Tirunelveli. The Chef at the hotel we stayed, specialized in Chettinad Cuisine and dished out some lovely vegetarian curries during our stay there. When I returned home, I tried to recreate the dish (with tips from the Chef), couple of times until I found a close match. I personally like to taste and recreate dishes at home. It is like my personal Masterchef Austalia Mystery Box Challenge, which i quite enjoy.
I hadn’t made this curry in quite a long time now and over the weekend I happened to meet up my best friend after a long time and we had lunch together in a South Indian Restaurant. The menu had some Chettinad dishes and I chose a mixed vegetable curry while she chose the chicken variation. I was slightly unhappy with the extra dose of coconut milk which made it sweet. So I knew I had to come back home and cook my version of the recipe and share on the blog soon.
Taking this recipe to the #186Foodie Monday Blog Hop where the theme this week is “Plant based Milk” suggested by dear friend and blogger, Archana G Potdar who blogs at The Mad Scientist’s Kitchen . Archana is an avid baker, has some lovely recipes on the blog pertaining to Maharahstrian, Goan cuisine etc. For the plant based milk theme, I have used Coconut Milk in the recipe to prepare this delectable Chettinad Mixed Vegetable Curry.
Let us now look at the recipe, step by step pictures of the process and make a piping hot bowl of this curry during the week. One tip here – Make extra portions of this curry and refrigerate it. Heat it the next day, the flavours are unbeatable. I do the same everytime I make this curry at home. So are you ready? Head over to the recipe below. If you are looking for few more South Indian Recipes , do check out the Masala Paniyarams (a Chettinad recipe again), Avial (Kerala Style Mixed Veg Curry) which is gluten free, vegan or the Pineapple Pachadi which is a sweet and Sour yogurt based curry recipe from Kerala. Recipe for Chettinad Mixed Vegetable Curry/Vegan Mixed Veg Curry
Prep Time 20 minutes
Serves 2 to 3 nos.
Ingredients 2 cups (200 ml) Mixed Vegetables (cauliflower, peas, beans, carrots) Water to steam the vegetables Salt to taste
Ingredients For the Curry base 1 large onion or 2 medium size onions finely chopped 2 small tomatoes (roughly chopped and pureed) 3 cloves of garlic sliced 1 tblsp of ginger grated 1/2 tsp Haldi powder or turmeric powder 1/2 tsp Red chilli powder 25 nos. Cashews soaked in 1/2 cup hot water 1 tblsp coconut oil Few sprigs of curry leaves Water as required for the curry consistency Salt to taste
Ingredients For the Chettinad Masala Paste 5 nos. Green Cardamom or Elaichi 1 nos. Black cardamom or Badi Elaichi 1 inch Cinnamon stick or Dalchini 10 nos. of methi dana or fenugreek seeds 2 1/2 tsps of coriander seeds or dhania 3 cloves or Lavang / laung 1 tsp Jeera or cumin seeds 1 tsp fennel seeds or saunf 1 tsp black peppercorns 4 nos. Whole red chillies (pondy chillies used here) 1/2 cup freshly grated coconut 1 tsp coconut oil for roasting Water as required to grind masalas into a thick paste
Method
(1) Rinse, Chop the vegetables mentioned above and keep aside.
(2) Prepare a steamer, steam the vegetables with salt as shown below in the picture for 15 minutes. Steaming helps retain the colour, maintain crunch in the vegetable as opposed to direct cooking. Not to mention, the nutrients are intact too.
(3) Now we prepare the Chettinad Masala paste.
(4) For the Masala paste, heat a pan or kadhai, add oil followed by all the ingredients except freshly grated coconut. Saute the whole spices until you get a lovely aroma and then add the grated coconut. Saute for few seconds until the coconut browns up a bit. Remove from pan and keep aside for cooling. Grind this into a thick paste with some water. Roasting of whole spices Masala with freshly ground coconut
(5) Heat a pan or kadhai again and add 1 tblsp of coconut oil followed by finely chopped onions, garlic and ginger. Saute until the onions are translucent.
(6) Add the tomato puree, mix well. Now add haldi powder, red chilli powder and salt to taste.
(7) Cook the onion tomato gravy base until the raw smell goes off. Add the steamed vegetables and mix well.
(8) Make a paste of cashews with 1/2 cup water and keep aside.
(9) Once the vegetables have mixed with the onion and tomato gravy, add the Chettinad masala paste. Mix well. Add some water and adjust the consistency. Check for salt and add if required.
(10) Now add the cashew paste and some torn curry leaves to the curry. Mix well and you will notice the curry will thicken immediately. Adjust the consistency by adding some water. Also, check for salt again.
(11) Finally, add the coconut milk. Mix well and switch off the flame immediately.
(12) Serve piping hot with rice, rotis, dosai, adai etc.
Recipe Notes I have used Pondy chillies not for the colour, but the heat. You can opt for kashmiri red chillies and you will get a deeper red colour of the gravy. I have cooked the entire recipe in coconut oil since it is a South Indian curry recipe. You can use any neutral oil if you like. The turmeric powder used here is home made and a tiny quantity helps. If using store bought, kindly add as required. Adjust the quantity of red chilli powder to your taste and preferences. Since it is a vegan recipe, I have not soaked cashews in warm milk nor used any milk for grinding into a paste / milk. I have soaked in hot water for 15 minutes and used warm water for grinding into a smooth paste. The curry stays good in the refrigerator for couple of days. The very next day of cooking, the curry tastes even more delicious with all the spices seeped well. Consistency of the curry depends on your preference. We like it on a thicker side to scoop with rotis or simply mix it with steamed rice and enjoy.
If you try this recipe at home, please give me a shout out / Tag Me on any of my social media handles.

Read More…

Chef pays tribute to Abhinandan with carved watermelon

Chef pays tribute to Abhinandan with carved watermelon 3 New Delhi, March 12 (IANS) Amidst an array of Indian cuisines and food enthusiasts, chef Jitender Singh had his concentration set on a watermelon as he carved out the face of Indian Air Force Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman as a tribute to his heroism. In the thoughtful gesture, Singh, who has served Prime Minister Narendra Modi and former Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, carved out Abhinandan’s distinct and “iconic” moustache, on the watermelon, along with “Jai Hind” in Devanagari script and a couple of army men. “I lost one of my cousins in a Jammu and Kashmir attack… I know what one goes through when your dear ones are in danger. What Abhinandan did for our country is beyond courage and bravery. Through this fruit carving, I wanted to pay a tribute to our brave pilot, our Army men and other defence forces,” Singh told IANS while competing against four other chefs in the category of Fruit and Vegetable Carving at the 14th edition of Culinary Art India (CAI) here. ALSO READ: Proud of you, Sitharaman says after IAF pilot’s safe return Wing Commander Abhinandan had shot down a Pakistan Air Force F-16 fighter aircraft on February 27 during an aerial engagement with Pakistan Air Force, but his plane was hit and he landed in Pakistani territory. He was later released by Pakistan as a “peace gesture”. For Singh, paying tribute to Abhinandan was more important to him than winning the competition. But he scored a silver for it. “I just wanted to beautifully depict Abhinandan’s bravery through my fruit carving skills,” he said, as several visitors at the gala stopped by to see how he shaped up Abhinandan’s face on a watermelon. The culinary festival also saw 15 chefs demonstrating their culinary expertise and competing in Authentic Indian Regional Cuisine. Be it Punjabi cuisine or Rajasthani or Odisha cuisine or South Indian cuisine — different flavours and food preparations from across the country were on display on the first day of the Culinary Art India at the Pragati Maidan here. ALSO READ: Evidence of Pakistan deploying F-16s, one shot down by Abhinandan: India Lukesh Bajaj of Radisson Blu, Paschim Vihar, was acknowledged as a Gold winner, Prem Singh Rathore (The Oberoi) and Sekh Sahajan (Naad Wellness) won Silver, and MD Jibrail (The Ashok) and Vivek Goswami (The Claridges) won Bronze in Authentic Indian Regional Cuisine category. “It feels great when your work gets appreciated. Such competitions help in improving our skills and motivate us to do better everytime,” Bajaj said. According to him, it was his dessert “Bhutte ke gulab jamun” and “Matar ki phirni” which made him win the prize. Not only professional experienced chefs, students who are currently pursuing culinary courses participated at the event too. Chef Vivek Saggar, General Secretary of Indian Culinary Forum, found the CAI competition as a great “platform for young aspiring chefs”. ALSO READ: No greater tribute to Gandhi than a minute of silence in his memory (Comment) (January 30 is Martyrs Day, the death anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi) “CAI is a great platform for these youngsters. I want people to treat these chefs with respect. There was a time when our profession was taken for granted but now the time is changing and I hope people consider these chefs more than just ‘bawarchis’,” he said. (Simran Sethi can be contacted at [email protected] ) –IANS

Read More…

LF 91 A Heritage Food Festival by Zee LIVE and Living Foodz

~ Bringing regional heritage food to urban heartlands, the fest promises to be an amalgamation of culture, cuisine and tradition ~ ~ First edition of the fest to be held on March 9 and 10 at the Turf Club, Mumbai, subsequently in Delhi & Bengaluru ~
Mumbai, March 2019 : India’s culinary culture is one of the oldest and richest in the world the eating habits of Indians differ from one another based on region, religion, state, language and caste making India the most cuisine diverse country in the world.
When it comes to food nostalgia, geography can’t be ignored. A region and its culture spawn food traditions and leave indelible marks on our sub-conscious.
Millions of Indians travel and migrate for work to urban cities in their dream of making it large. What they carry with them though is the nostalgia and emotion of food cooked in their homeland. To preserve and celebrate the glorious history and to reminisce the splendid heritage of diverse food and culture, Zee LIVE and Living Foodz today announced LF 91, a heritage food festival which is an endeavour to bring regional heritage food to the urban heartlands.
In its first edition, LF 91 brings the South of India to Mumbai . Hundreds of authentic dishes from the deep corners of Andhra Pradesh, Kerala, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu will make their way to the maximum city of Mumbai, a careful list curated by our very own celebrity chefs Rakesh Raghunathan and Shipra Khanna from Living Foodz, food prepared by outlets, street food specialists and generations of authentic South Indian destinations will be plated in 4 state zones at the Turf Club in Mumbai.
While you get to choose from a multitude of lip smacking choices in these 4 zones, LF 91 for the first time in a food festival will attempt a limited heritage brunch and a community long table for the Kerala Sadhya. One also gets to pick their favourite spices, pickles, papadams at the Desi Bazaar or dip into soulful music all the way from the South of India.
Speaking about the festival, Mr. Swaroop Banerjee, COO, Zee LIVE said , “ India is a beautiful country with so many colours, cuisine, culture and traditions. LF 91 is an attempt to get all of this on one plate and present it to our people. The festival will not only see food from various parts of the country but also help in retaining and passing the age old secret recipes from various cultures. It will be a truly cultural experience that Zee Live and Living Foodz is proud to present to the audience .”
Shaurya Mehta, head of ZEEL’s premium cluster & COO, Living Entertainment shared, “LF is India’s leading lifestyle channel that celebrates the roots of India in its entirety. We’ve had great shows like Curries of India, Northern Flavors, The Great Indian Rasoi that showcase the diversity of India and that is what Living Foodz as a brand stands for. LF 91 is a great concept that will bring the channel’s ethos to life and celebrate the rich food heritage of India with our consumers. LF 91 reinforces our endeavour towards a 360 degree connect with our consumers – be it on TV, digital and on ground. We are very delighted to present LF 91 with Zee LIVE team and look forward to take this unique curated food festival to each and every corner of this country.”
After Mumbai, the festival will travel to Delhi and culminate in Bengaluru. The two-day festival in each city will present heritage food which will be prepared by the best Khansamas, Maharaj’s and authentic regional cuisine outlets in the country.
More details on LF 91 in Mumbai at Turf Club, Mahalakshmi Race Course :-
On March 9 and 10, 2019 at insider.in
The Great South Indian Brunch* (Limited Seats) Handpicked dishes from the 4 southern states to take your palate through an exciting journey of genuine South Indian cuisines. Indulge in the heritage of South India with authentic decor and ambiance, soothing music, cold beverages and let the paradigm shift south on your senses. What’s more, a celebrity chef from our very own Living Foodz will be hosting this brunch for you.
The Royal Kerala Sadhya* (Limited Seats) From God’s Own Country we bring you god’s crafted masterpiece! A feast straight out of Kerala, prepared by third generation chefs. Their culinary art has stood the test of time and lit a million palates. Indulge in the most celebrated meal in the South of India. After all, a family that eats together stays together!
Masterclass Learn to cook lip smacking South Indian cuisines at a specially curated cooking masterclass with expert chefs.
Performances To add to the evening, well-known home-grown bands from South of India will be performing while you enjoy your South Indian food.
Desi Bazaar Spices from the south of India, pickles, handicrafts, papadams, filter coffee and more. Take the taste of South India back to your homes.
LF 91 – Heritage food stalls from the South of India – The Great South Indian Brunch – crafted beverages – The Royal Kerala Sadhya – The South Indian Desi Bazaar.

Read More…