In Bengaluru, beer is the new coffee – NRAI

In Bengaluru, beer is the new coffee – NRAI

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It’s Sunday evening at the Byg Brewski Brewing Company on Hennur Road in north-east Bengaluru. Till recently a long stretch of road meandering through farmlands and acting as an alternate route to the airport, it has seen hectic construction over the past five years. As you head towards Byg Brewski, you see signs of this everywhere: half-finished buildings, new fast food and takeaway joints, and even, surprisingly, a Fabindia showroom.
Entering the microbrewery for the first time, even seasoned travellers and pubbers are likely to be a bit gobsmacked: It is a massive, largely open-air space with a fort-like feel, the effect enhanced by burning torches fixed from sconces along the walls and a large water body at the centre of the courtyard. At 65,000 sq. ft, it is among the largest brewpubs in Asia.
The open kitchen is spread over 5,000 sq. ft, with over 70 kitchen staff. It employs 90 servers in shifts, along with around 40 bar attendants. Four bars located at various corners of the property serve seven varieties of craft beer on tap, brewed in-house and piped to the bars via 3-4km of piping. The microbrewery churns out around 20,000 litres of beer every month. It also has a thriving cocktail scene run by award-winning mixologist Rohan Matmary, whose pride and joy is the ice vault at Byg Brewski—it churns out, on average, 600 kg of ice every day. The property is almost completely zero-plastic, with biodegradable takeaway and home-delivery containers, no plastic garbage bags, and soda fountains and glass bottles instead of plastic bottles.
I am shown around the property by Pravesh Pandey, partner-owner at the Byg Brewski Brewing Company, which runs this mega pub along with a slightly smaller one on Sarjapur Road, as well as a chain of homey, old-fashioned bars called Bob’s Bar. Things fall into place when Pandey says he has a cruise ship background, having worked with P&O Cruises. Byg Brewski is built on a similar scale, and it is built to impress.
“Our whole business model is based on the extra-large concept. If you look around us, everything is getting smaller: homes, restaurants, offices. For most people, big is 10,000 sq. ft. We want people coming in here to feel transported, to feel like they are at a resort, to go away with memories,” says Pandey.
He affirms that brewpubs (pubs with microbreweries on their premises which make craft beer in-house) are mushrooming in Bengaluru and everyone seems to want in on the business. Apart from the fact that there is a ready customer base that has been primed on craft beer, making your own beer is cheaper, in the long term, than buying spirits. While you do spend a fair amount on the setup, equipment and licences, manufacturing your own alcohol at scale is profitable, says Pandey.
Brewers are betting that the demand for craft beer is only going to grow, as it has in hipsterish American states like Oregon and California. “Per capita consumption of beer in India is about 5 litres per year. In Asian countries, this is about 20 litres, and is even higher in markets like the US,” says Pandey. While most of the beer consumption in India is still of the bottled variety, especially “strong beer” in rural and semi-urban areas, once people get a taste of good craft beer, it is difficult to go back to drinking “horse piss”, as one microbrewery owner puts it.
Thejaswi Udupa, quizzer, columnist and director of product at a real-estate listing site (also a bit of a beer nerd), welcomes the “obvious explosion” of microbreweries—from a dozen a couple of years ago to around 55 today (with a confirmed six-eight in various stages of development). In his view, the proliferation in numbers has not impacted quality. “On the contrary, it has improved and the variety is more diverse,” he says. “A personal heuristic I use is how many of them are brave enough to put one or two proper IPAs (India Pale Ales) on the menu. For a long time, only a couple made competent IPAs, but in the last year, some of the newer ones have been ‘hopping’ their beers up,” he says, referring to the amount of hops added to the brew, which gives it a more full-bodied and flavourful, albeit stronger and more bitter, taste.
The availability of beers with higher IBUs—international bittering units, the measure of the concentration of hop compounds in beer—is used worldwide as a sign of a market with maturing tastes. In the past few months, Udupa, who calls the lighter Hefeweizen (wheat beer) “the paneer of the beer world”, has been impressed by the DIPAs (Double IPAs) he tried at two new brewpubs, Biergarten and The Bier Library, both of which have opened within the last six months.
What’s brewing, Bengaluru?
A couple of months ago, a list started doing the rounds of Bengaluru WhatsApp and Facebook groups that obsessively discuss food, drinks and the F&B industry in India. It was a list of 52 microbreweries/brewpubs currently operational in Bengaluru. The figure came as a surprise to many, even those who go out often and are usually well-informed about new pubs and restaurants, the go-to places, what’s shutting down and what’s coming up in a city where the contours of commerce are as dynamic as the weather. Even though most of them had noticed the proliferation of brewpubs, with new clusters coming up practically in every neighbourhood, they didn’t have the exact number, nor did they anticipate it to be quite this high.
That number is around 55 now (independently verified by Lounge ). Another 70 or so are “tap-rooms” that serve beer on tap from craft beer made locally (but not on the premises). Even as I was researching this article, a new brewpub, Aurum Brew Works, opened up in my neighbourhood of Sarjapur Road, a tech hub with special economic zones, corporate campuses (including Wipro’s headquarters) and vast residential complexes. Many of the new brewpubs seek locations in the peripheral areas of the city where large tracts of land are available for establishments that by rule have to be large (it is a government-mandated rule that microbreweries have to be located within premises spanning a minimum of 10,000 sq. ft).
So many pubs and microbreweries have opened in the past couple of years within a 5 km radius of Sarjapur Road that the area’s new name is “Brewpur”, says Gaurav Sikka, partner and managing director at Arbor Brewing Company, with a laugh.
We are sitting in Arbor’s spacious balcony area. It is late afternoon on a Wednesday, and the place is already starting to fill up. Sikka is drinking a glass of Beteljuice Pale Ale, a new beer created in-house as a collaboration between the pub’s brew team headed by master brewer Hollis Coates and home brewer Karthik Singh. “We first brewed this in March 2016 and we’ve brewed this every year since,” Sikka says. The beer begins with an aroma of citrus and lemongrass, and then you get hit by that lingering, unmistakably Indian paan taste that comes from the addition of fresh betel leaves to the beer when it’s almost ready. It is unlike any beer you have had before—but once you taste it, you may suddenly realize that your understanding of what beer is has been pretty limited.
“There has been an explosion (of brewpubs). For a long time, there were just four-five of us (brewpub owners) and it was a close-knit group. While most of us are still connected via formal and informal groups, it’s getting hard to keep track of the new ones. And people are talking about this boom wherever I go. There’s a tinge of envy in other markets, and you get instant street cred if you run a successful craft brewery in Bengaluru,” says Sikka. “It has become a very sophisticated drinking market.”
What makes craft beer in Bengaluru unique and the scene distinctive from other craft beer centres in the country—primarily Pune and Gurugram—is not just the number of brewpubs. In sheer numbers, Gurugram isn’t too far behind, with approximately 45. But quality, innovation and a passion for craft brewing, along with a set of risk-taking, career-jumping individuals who take the craft seriously, set the Bengaluru scene apart.
That a pub scene is flourishing in Bengaluru at all is remarkable. The city’s F&B industry’s tussles with the excise department are legendary, and include the difficulty in procuring licences (especially the CL-9 bar and restaurant licence that the government stopped issuing in 1992; it needs to be bought off a previous holder), jumping through hoops to comply with ever-changing and arbitrarily enforced rules, and corruption and bribery at a Narcos level.
But Bengaluru’s enthusiasm for pubbing as a well-established cultural and social activity pushes things along. Everyone meets over a beer—it is the new coffee. Work meetings are held over beer. Older millennials organize and participate in beer tastings and beer-and-food pairings. Co-working spaces like WeWork offer beer on tap. And most craft-beer lovers drink it not to get drunk, but for the taste and a mild high, as well as the social aspect of hanging out over a beer.
The “going out for a drink” scene in the city is now active not just on weekends, but stretches from Wednesday-Sunday, with only 40% fewer customers in the early days of the week. Drinking patterns are also different from other metros—here, people take a longer time over their drinks. On a weekday, average peak business hours tend to be 7-8 hours, says Sibi Venkataraju, partner and founder at Toit, whereas in other cities it’s 3-4 hours. “In the other cities, beer is not the preferred beverage. People want to get drunk faster and head home. The scene in Bengaluru is more casual and laid-back, with people spending more time over their drinks, which is ideal for beer consumption,” says Venkataraju.
In 2010, the Karnataka excise department started to issue microbrewery licences after intense lobbying by players such as Arvind and Meenakshi Raju, founders of Bengaluru’s first brewpub, Biere Club, Venkataraju and Sikka. Along with Windmills Craftworks in Whitefield, which opened in 2012, they were the first batch of craft-beer makers in the city—and they started something special.
Their brews were world class and created an instant love for craft beer, says John John Eapen, aka “JJ the Keg”, a beer evangelist who has been helping newer brewpubs in the city set up their equipment and develop their beers. Eapen, an aeronautical engineering dropout who has done a little bit of everything in his professional life—from training as a pilot in Canada and being a BPO trainer to sales and marketing—runs a popular blog called Tales of Froth, where he assiduously tracks the beer, especially craft beer, business in India, and a Facebook group, Friends of Froth.
Business is good, says Eapen, and he is getting more offers to consult with upcoming breweries than he can handle. His calculations suggest that a brewery selling 15,000-20,000 litres of craft beer in a month can earn revenue of 1.25 crore- ₹2.5 crore per month. Most brewpub owners assume average consumption to be 1 litre per person per sitting in Karnataka, and 0.85 litres per person elsewhere.
The evening we meet, Eapen has just finished taking a team from an Australian craft-beer company on a scouting trip to Bengaluru to a few brewpubs around the city. “What is unique to Bangalore is that you don’t have to step out of your neighbourhood in search of craft beer,” he says. “Every neighbourhood, at least those that have a fair number of young people, has a cluster of microbreweries.”
Interestingly, well-established brewpubs like Toit and Arbor have chosen not to open new outlets in the city, instead moving to bottling and canning, along with expansion to other cities. While Toit already has Mumbai and Pune outposts, Windmills is coming up with one soon in Mumbai. All three companies are exploring the packaged craft-beer market, with Arbor being the first off the blocks with its Goa plant (started in August), which is already churning out three varieties sold exclusively in the state. The Karnataka factory will be up within the next couple of months, says Sikka, while Toit’s Venkataraju says the brand’s plant in Bengaluru will be up and running in the “next 12-18 months”. Windmills Craftworks is also setting up a plant in Goa.
But first, a visit to Karnataka’s first production craft brewery, which is setting the trend of supplying locally brewed craft beer to pubs and restaurants.
The craft of beer-making
Vidya Kubher runs up the steep metal steps nimbly to check on the current batch brewing in the Geist beer factory in its initial stages of preparation—the “hot” stage. The petite Kubher looks dwarfed by the massive metal vats that surround her, but she is in her element as she opens the vats, takes a sniff here, adjusts a dial there, and oversees the staff working at this factory redolent of the unique, warm, sweet, moist smell of malting barley.
“I like working in a factory kind of environment,” says Kubher, who is among a handful of female brewmasters in the country. She studied brewing techniques in Chicago and Munich after a career in mutual fund asset management. She was drinking Geist beer before she joined the company as its chief brewer, she says—at a time when Geist was still manufacturing its beer in Belgium and selling it in India. Around 2010, mounting loses forced it to temporarily halt operations.
Co-founder and CEO Narayan Manepally, whose obsession with craft beer started when he was working with Intel in Portland, Oregon (the undisputed mecca of craft beer in the world), started sketching out a plan for a beer factory that would keg freshly brewed varieties of craft beer. “When Brewsky in JP Nagar and the first Byg Brewski came up on Sarjapur Road, the first three months—till we got the microbrewery licence—were below break-even. Then, the licence came in and we started brewing, and, in a couple of months, we had tripled revenue. That’s when we knew that we were on to something,” says Narayan, who has been an investor in Brewsky in JP Nagar and the Byg Brewski Brewing company.
Narayan and chief operating officer Mohan Alapatt found the perfect place for Geist’s factory on the outskirts of the city at Nimbekaipura (“village of lemons” in Kannada)—like many other areas of fast-mutating Bengaluru, a strange jumble of multi-storeyed office buildings and residential complexes, lakes and farmlands. It was an abandoned plywood factory with a grand old banyan tree in the middle of the property that immediately took hold of their imagination.
Today, Geist supplies beer to around 70 Bengaluru pubs and restaurants that want to serve fresh craft beer to customers without the hassles of setting up their own microbreweries. With the 10,000 sq. ft law, it’s not even possible for many of them to do so. Meanwhile, Geist is also setting up a beer garden on its premises, and once a month, Kubher conducts a “brew tour” of the factory, familiarizing people with the brewing process.
There is growing interest in learning more about this process, in keeping with the artisanal food and beverage movement across the world. While the essential beer-making process is the same for both industrial and craft beers, the latter is produced in much smaller batches, ensuring quality control and the ability to tweak the process to create exciting variants, like adding seasonal ingredients (most of the breweries do seasonal beers, such as Toit’s famous jackfruit beer or Arbor’s Beteljuice). The other essential difference is temperature and sunlight control. Bottled beer is often transported and stored at suboptimal temperatures—at times, retail outlets charge a “cooling fee” from manufacturers to store their beers correctly. Keeping the beer cold and dark (the reason most bottles are dark in colour) prevents oxidation and a process called “skunking”, where light interacts with the hops in beer to produce a distinctly “off” smell.
Some of the Bengaluru breweries also stand out for their sustainable practices. At Geist, the RO plant produces a significant amount of run-off water, which is used for cleaning and watering plants. Rainwater is harvested and raw materials are recycled and reutilized as much as possible. When yeast produced in the brewery can no longer be reused for beer production, it is denatured and neutralized and given to nearby poultry farmers to mix with their poultry feed as a supplement—this helps in the hardening of egg shells. All the spent grain (barley and wheat malt) is sent to a local pig and dairy farm to be used as animal feed, while even the wooden containers in which they get their imported hops from Germany are broken down to make furniture for the factory.
From hobbyists to pro brewers
In any city that has discovered a passion for craft beer, there’s a simultaneous rise in interest in home-brewing. Since beer does not require distillation like spirits, the process is seen as relatively simple, and the rise of brewpubs assures an ecosystem where equipment and raw materials are easier to come by. Bangalore Brew Crew, a group of beer enthusiasts and hobbyists who found each other through their passion for home-brewing, runs a Facebook page for home-brewers that has over 500 members. While not all of them are brewing actively at home, all accounts indicate there are 150-200 active home-brewers in Bengaluru.
Karthik Singh and Manish M.K. are two well-known members of the group who have made the jump from brewing for pleasure to taking it up professionally. While Singh has worked with Brewsky, JP Nagar, and is currently a brewmaster at Yellow Submarine, Manish is part of the brewing team at Windmills.
Most home-brewers however, prefer to remain anonymous owing to legal grey areas. India’s notoriously complicated and often contradictory alcohol laws have created an atmosphere of ambiguity where, frankly, no one is sure whether making beer for personal consumption is legal or not, and backyard brewers would rather err on the side of caution.
Ankur Agarwal, an India Institute of Technology, Kanpur graduate who made his first batch of beer at home in 1999 and is passionate about fermentation, runs Arishtam, a Bengaluru-based start-up that sells home-brewing equipment, malts, hops and yeast and conducts brewing workshops once a month. According to him and his partner, a lawyer, home-brewing for personal consumption is not illegal, and he says he has filed RTIs with the state excise department to figure out the intricacies of the law. “I am yet to encounter any law that explicitly prohibits individuals from home-brewing for personal consumption in limited batch size,” says Agarwal.
There are three things that amateur brewers should keep in mind, he says: You cannot distil spirits/alcohol without holding a licence; you cannot engage in any kind of sale of your home brew liquor, including hosting paid events where home-brew is served or bartering alcohol for goods and services; and you cannot cross state boundaries with alcohol.
Karnataka excise department officials, however, say brewing any alcohol without a licence is illegal, and individuals doing so can be booked under laws pertaining to the illicit manufacture, sale and possession of alcohol.
“We are operating under a ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ policy. Most of us know that the excise department can make trouble for us, even though the legalities are complicated and might be overturned in a court of law as there are no laws explicitly banning brewing of beer for personal use—only distillation is explicitly banned. But who wants to get into a legal mess? The excise guys will find something or the other to book a case against you,” says home-brewer NS, who doesn’t want to be identified. “Someday a case will go to court, and finally there might be some clarity, but till then we would prefer to fly under the radar and get our brew on,” he adds. Some of the home-brewers I spoke to for this story even said “please don’t mention the legal aspect at all or it will alert ‘them’”.
In fact, these kinds of “don’t ask, don’t tell” policies are endemic to the F&B business in Bengaluru/Karnataka. Take, for instance, the official and unofficial costs of starting a microbrewery. While the “on-paper” cost of licences for setting up a microbrewery/brewpub is around ₹ 8.5 lakh ( ₹ 6 lakh for a CL-9 bar and restaurant licence, ₹ 2.5 lakh for a microbrewery licence), the actual cost can go up to ₹ 3.5 crore. Earlier this year, The Economic Times published a comprehensive report on how corruption is affecting the F&B industry here, describing Bengaluru as “the most challenging city in India for the restaurant industry”.
You need almost 40 approvals, no-objection certificates and licences to open a restaurant in the city—each one of which comes at a price steeper than what it costs on paper, say industry insiders. Plus, “peaceful running” costs have to be paid regularly. “Every few months, excise department cops find a reason to dig up something in the rulebook about the volume of music or smoking on the premises or whether you can serve alcohol on the rooftop or something like that. There’s panic among all pub and bar owners, hefty sums of money exchange hands, and then they are told to lie low for a while. After a month or so, the cycle repeats itself,” a pub owner who has been in Bengaluru for over 10 years told me on condition of anonymity. Another said a group of restaurant and bar owners from Indiranagar, a hot spot, were planning to pool in resources and create a “monthly kitty” to ensure “peaceful operations”.
As for the sudden microbrewery boom, Venkataraju believes that at least some of the growth can be put down to what he calls “irrational spending”. “It is a strange feature of the hospitality business that unlike, say, manufacturing or IT, perception of success plays a huge role in the amount of money people are willing to spend on setting up new businesses. It’s quite arbitrary and not really backed by hard numbers—perhaps they think it’s cool, or they are excited by the ‘buzz’ factor,” says Venkataraju. At the same time, Bengaluru, like in any thriving urban micro-economy, has seen the inflow of real-estate money, with folks who have made significant piles looking to invest in something trendier or willing to bank-roll a younger generation.
Did the brewpub kill fine-dine?
While some of the brewpubs do make an attempt to create a diverse and exciting food menu, featuring local and regional favourites like pandi curry, chicken ghee roast, and Kerala beef fry, along with dim sums, baos and even sushi, most restrict themselves to bar snacks and go with the ever-popular trio of fries-nachos-pizza.
With the microbrewery boom, the number of new risk-taking, food and specific cuisine-led places has definitely fallen in Bengaluru. This is also a factor of the younger demographic of the city’s diners, who are less likely to spend serious time and money on gourmet meals.
Though he doesn’t agree that “the microbrewery craze” has specifically hit the fine-dining scene in the city, Manu Chandra, chef-partner at the Olive Group, believes it has “marked a tectonic change in the going-out culture overall in Bangalore”. “The requirement of a minimum of 10,000 sq. ft means that these places are always large, and such large places cannot be microfocused on singular cuisine offerings alone. Some might try to make them cuisine-focused, but we will have to see how that pans out,” says Chandra cautiously, though he agrees brewpubs have “changed both the taste and the perception of going out for a generation of customers”.
Riyaaz Amlani, CEO of Mumbai-based Impresario Entertainment & Hospitality Pvt. Ltd, believes the microbrewery boom “is a craze at the moment, but, like all crazes, it will reach its peak”. “Yes, risk-taking is not very prominent right now, but people will reach a certain amount of fatigue and once their tastes have matured, will seek out exciting food experiences,” he says.
“We are at a crossroads now. The government has increased the duties on craft beer, there are so many compliance issues, and getting the right talent is becoming more difficult. But given a little bit of push from the government, we will see an even bigger boom in Bengaluru,” says Arbor’s Sikka, who believes that in a couple of years, the number of brewpubs here will touch 100.
San Diego, a city with a population of around 1.4 million, has over 200 craft breweries, tasting rooms and brewpubs—Bengaluru’s population is over 12 million, leaving a lot of room for growth.
For now, it’s summer, and the taps are churning out a lot of liquid gold. Keep calm and get your brew on.

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A Complete Package in Chandigarh

We were finding ways to escape the sub-zero temperatures in Shimla, and that’s when Chandigarh happened. A 4-hour drive from Shimla, we reached the city by 11 am and headed straight to Park Plaza Zirakpur – A 5 Star property, located right on the highway, but close to Chandigarh’s domestic and international airports and its bustling city center.nnWe were greeted with a bespoke personalized welcome where the whole team was there to welcome us. We had a beautiful traditional welcome with flowers and sindoor. After the long drive, the welcome drink was a much needed refreshment. We also met Mr. Umeish Yadav, General Manager at Park Plaza Zirakpur, who told us that we would have a memorable time for sure.nnWe wanted to explore the property and get to know about the property so the very gracious Nisha, patiently walked us around the sprawling property and finally into our rooms. The attention to details by the Park Plaza Zirakpur team is what gives it a luxury feel.nnIndian hospitality being truly special, our room came with a personal touch – sweet smelling flowers, a box of chocolates, a platter laden with fresh fruits and variety of decadent nibbles. On the bed, there was a handwritten letter by the housekeeping team, to assure us that anything we need will be taken care of. Cozy and comfortable, our space felt like a warm hug on a cold winter day.nnPark Plaza Zirakpur offers a range of rooms and suites for every traveler’s need, making it a perfect fit for business and leisure guests alike. Rooms are well-equipped with Wi-Fi, large bathrooms & advanced ayurvedic toiletries and very comfortable beds.nnThe staff at Park Plaza Zirakpur leaves no stone unturned to make their guests feel special. Their inhouse restaurants cater to any food indulgence that the guest would want. There’s Essence – the all-day dining option which offers a multi-cuisine menu. Zaranj – for authentic North Indian food. Free Spirit – a lounge to unwind with some drinks and quick bites.

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Best Table Service Restaurants at Walt Disney World

Erin Foster 2 Comments best restaurants , table service restaurants , where to eat at disney world Share This!
We’ve been busy tabulating the results of reader surveys (thanks for the all the input!) and are now ready to reveal Touring Plans readers’ picks for the best restaurants at Walt Disney World, 2019. Not surprisingly, some of your favorites are much-heralded signature venues, the posh gourmet spots. But there are also several affordable spots as well, particularly if you enjoy them at breakfast or lunch.
And now, drum roll please, here are your top 20 picks for best table service restaurants at Walt Disney World… Chocolate pyramid at Epcot’s Spice Road Table 20. Tiffins , Animal Kingdom. Tiffins benefits from the convenient location outside Pandora. When you’ve spent the day riding on the back of a banshee, you’re bound to work up an appetite. The menu features African spices and lots of seafood. 19. 1900 Park Fare , Grand Floridian resort. Buffet service at breakfast and dinner, both featuring Disney characters. The cold strawberry soup is a favorite at either meal. The dinner service includes tableside visits from Cinderella and Prince Charming, as well as Cindy’s step sisters Anastasia and Drizella. The sisters bring the sass and provide plenty of comedic interaction with guests. 18. Tusker House , Animal Kingdom. Donald Duck and friends character dining at breakfast, lunch, and dinner. A balanced mix of American dishes and African specialties. If you have a nervous eater in your party it’s a good first step into exploring the world of African cuisine; they can start with as much or as little as they like and there are plenty of “safe” options if they’re not in an experimental mode. 17. Wine Bar George , Disney Springs. This is a bar with a strong food game. Come for the wine, stay to share the tapas-style small plates with your companions. Perfect for a shopping break or light supper. 16. Liberty Tree Tavern , Magic Kingdom. Thanksgiving dinner, every day of the year. If you’re not in the mood for turkey and the fixins, there are other comfort food options like meatloaf and pot roast. Convenient location right in the middle of Liberty Square. P.S. They now serve beer, wine, and hard cider. 15. Crystal Palace , Magic Kingdom. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner buffets with Winnie the Pooh and his pals. Try to get a breakfast reservation before the park opens and you’ll be fed for the day and in a perfect place to hop on the rides as soon as they open. 14. The Boathouse , Disney Springs. There’s a solid menu of seafood classics like clam chowder, fried shrimp, whole lobster, and a full raw bar, as well as steaks and chicken, but the real star is the vertiginous S’mores Baked Alaska, a mountain of rocky road ice cream and toasted marshmallow fluff. Don’t try to conquer it alone. 13. Spice Road Table , Epcot. The outdoor seating offers some of the best views for people watching at Epcot. You can get small plates or full entrees of Moroccan and Mediterranean dishes. Share a pitcher of their signature sangria and some hummus fries (really!) and you’re in for a pleasant afternoon. 12. Rose & Crown , Epcot. Pretend you’re in Merry Olde England when you’re munching on fish ‘n’ chips, shepherd’s pie, or bangers and mash. They’ve got a nice whiskey sampler and a large selection of “pub blend” mash-ups of British beers and ciders. 11. Grand Floridian Cafe , Grand Floridian resort. The food is basic American fare, but it’s a relaxing setting away from the mayhem in the parks. If you’re looking for a classic eggs Benedict breakfast, this is a lovely place to find it. 10. Teppan Edo , Epcot. Japanese hibachi. They do a good classic onion volcano and often prepare it with a hidden Mickey twist. Great fun for kids who haven’t seen a pro hibachi chef at work. 9. Beaches & Cream , Beach Club resort. Diner-style food like burgers, grilled cheese, and turkey clubs. But you can skip that and move right into dessert. This place is famous for its Kitchen Sink Sundae, an eight scoop monstrosity mounded with fruit, sauces, brownies, whole candy bars, and more, topped with an entire can of whipped cream. 8. Chef Art Smith’s Homecomin’ , Disney Springs. THE BEST FRIED CHICKEN YOU WILL EVER EAT. Also moonshine samplers, outstanding service, and a Southern treat – pineapple-banana hummingbird cake. 7. Yak & Yeti , Animal Kingdom. Asian-inspired dishes like pork belly ramen and wok-fried beef. Take a walk around the restaurant to see all the Asian art and decor. 6. Boma – Flavors of Africa , Animal Kingdom Lodge resort. Buffet-style service at breakfast and lunch with a good mix of African and American dishes. Their dessert specialty is Zebra Domes, a cake base topped with mousse and enrobed in white chocolate and then drizzled with chocolate stripes. 5. Garden Grill , Epcot. Garden Grill is the highest ranked character meal in our survey, with good reason. The atmosphere is unique; you’re dining on a revolving platform that circles past scenes in the Living with the Land attraction located just below the restaurant. The food is fresh and flavorful, with some ingredients grown right there in the Land pavilion. Because of the circular configuration of the dining area, the tables are spread across a narrow band rather than in a cavernous space like some of the other character dining venues. This makes it one of the calmer, quieter places to dine with characters, a sanity-saving feature for many a tired parent. And for the kiddos, Mickey, Pluto, and Chip & Dale greet here. Chip & Dale are among the most lighthearted of the guest-interfacing characters. They’re big on whimsy and often quite playful with young kids. 4. Sanaa , Animal Kingdom Lodge resort. Sanaa is the most affordable of the sit-down restaurants at the Animal Kingdom Lodge. Tucked away at Kidani Village, you can take your time noshing on favorites like an Indian-inspired bread service or lamb kefta. The menu is tilted toward dishes flavored with African and Indian spices, but you can also get a New York Strip steak if you’re in the mood for an American classic. Try to get a seat by the window for a few of the zebras while you dine. And bear in mind that the view is best while it’s light out, so during the winter months you may want to target Sanaa for lunch rather than dinner. 3. California Grill , Contemporary resort. The restaurant specializes in fish dishes (sushi, king salmon, yellowfin tuna) and boasts an extensive selection of California wines, but the real draw here is the fireworks. Dinner guests have a bird’s eye view of the evening entertainment at the Magic Kingdom; they even dim the restaurant lights and pipe in the soundtrack during the fireworks presentation. In addition to dinner, California grill offers a popular Sunday brunch. 2. Jiko – the Cooking Place , Animal Kingdom Lodge resort. Yet another standout at Animal Kingdom Lodge. (Seriously, if you’re a foodie and you don’t want to leave your hotel, Animal Kingdom Lodge should be at the top of your list of places to stay.) This is the gourmet version of African-influenced flavors: cocoa-crusted bison, Botswana Seswaa-style beef short ribs, and lamb tagine are all featured on the menu. Also look for their list of South African wines. 1. Victoria & Albert’s , Grand Floridian resort. There’s not much to say about Victoria & Albert’s that hasn’t been said before. It has been a AAA Five Diamond Award recipient for decades. The service is both elegant and discreet. You’re serenaded with live harp music while you dine. This is the premiere place to celebrate a milestone birthday or anniversary. I typically hesitate to tell people whether a particular experience is worth it , but not this time. V & A’s will set you back $250-300 per person (including tax, tip, and wine), and it is indeed worth every penny.
Just in case your bucket list needs filling and you want to try all of these top picks, to help you keep track of your dining adventures, here’s a Printable Checklist of our 2019 Best WDW Restaurants .
Is your favorite on this year’s list? Do you have a must-eat dish at one of these restaurants? Are any of these on your list of places to try during your next Disney visit? Let us know in the comments below. Our Top 5 Best Tips for Touring Walt Disney World + Video → Erin Foster Erin Foster is an original member of the Walt Disney World Moms Panel at DisneyWorldMoms.com, a regular contributor to TouringPlans.com, and co-author of The Unofficial Guide to Disney Cruise Line. She’s been to WDW, DL, DL Paris, Hong Kong Disneyland, Aulani, DVC Vero Beach, and DVC Hilton Head. She’s a Platinum DCL cruiser and veteran of 10 Adventures by Disney trips. Erin lives near New York City, where she can often be found indulging in her other obession – Broadway theater. Erin can be reached on Twitter @MsErinFoster. You May Also Like

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Experience the Tawa Cuisine Of India only at Sen5es, Marriott Suites Pune!

16/04/2019 Sen5es to serve delectable Tawa delicacies from 19th to 28th April 2019.
Pune, 16th April 2019: Indians have grown up eating a wide variety of street food and fast food. Whether you are in Punjab or Delhi or Maharashtra, each state has their own version of street food, but one common feature between them is the “tawa”. It can help create a buttery plate of pav bhaji or the equally sinful plate of chhole kulchhe.
Giving a tribute to this versatile style of cooking, Marriott Suites Pune brings to its patrons a unique food festival – Tawa of India. This one of a kind food festival will offer innumerable variety of veg and non-veg tawa dishes to the platter of ever demanding food lovers of Pune.
The culinary team of Marriott Suites Pune will showcase Tawa delights from regions of Punjab, Delhi, Kolkata, Jaipur, Lucknow, South India, Uttarkhand. From Kebabs to Paranthas, Khurchans, Tikkis, Pav Bhaji, Chhole Kulche to Dosas, tawa pulao the list goes on! This festival will be packed with exciting flavours from across the country.
Explore this delectable tawa cuisine only at Sen5es, Marriott Suites Pune!
Where: Sen5es, Marriott Suites Pune
When: 19th – 28th April 2019, Time 7 PM to 11 PM
Price: INR 2100 for two (approximately)
Contact: +91 9561605150 | 020 26747474 Related Posts Planning upcoming long weekend at the last moment? Worry not! These Apps are at your rescue!!

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Impiana, just as good on the second visit.

This my second stay at the Impiana Hotel, Kuala Lumpur (the fourth stay for my wife). This is a first class hotel with excellent amenities. The staff are unfailingly friendly, attentive and courteous. We are staying on the 20th floor with a striking view of the Petronas Towers framed in our window. Our room is well appointed and extremely comfortable; king-sized bed, luxurious bathroom, spacious. The room is quiet, with only the hum of A/C in the background. The windows are double glazed, so there is little street noise.nnThe Impiana is in an ideal location, adjacent to the KL Convention Centre, close to shopping malls and the Petronas Towers. The hotel is connected to the pedestrian Skybridge that take you to Bukit Bintang, while other destinations, such as the KLCC Park, Aquarium and the hundreds of cafes and restaurants are just a walk away. nnThe Impiana has several eating places; the Tonka Bean Café serves an excellent buffet breakfast of Malaysian, Indian and Chinese food. The Cedar is an al-carte restaurant on the 15th floor, serving international cuisine. A great place is the Bohemia bar with a live band, perfect for a drink after dinner. nnIf you would like to go farther afield, I recommend Grab Cars as the local taxis can be a challenge. Like Uber, Grab Cars are reliable, clean and inexpensive. You know the name of the driver, the number of the vehicle and the cost of the trip via the app. Our drivers have been excellent.nnMalaysia is a fascinating country and KL is a city of diversity, tolerance and cordiality. Our stay at the Impiana has been excellent. I recommend this hotel to anyone wishing to travel to Malaysia and wanting to stay at a top hotel for business or pleasure.

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Explore: Walking Berlin

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Celebrating his fifth visit to Germany’s capital, NIQ MHLONGO walks its streets and finds a cure
The morning of 15 November 2018 is cold. Outside the Alexanderplatz train station, the streets are buzzing; glowing with Christmas decorations. I have five hours to cover about eight of the important landmarks of Berlin by foot, all in an eight-kilometre radius along or near Unter den Linden Boulevard, Friedrichstrasse and Wilhelmstrasse.
The Fernsehturm TV tower is first. It is the tallest building in Berlin, boasting a revolving restaurant at the top with a panoramic view of the city. In what used to be East Berlin, this was a symbol of communist power. In front of it is a big Christmas market, with hundreds of people browsing the stalls packed with food and craft items. Some take pictures with the Ferris wheel in the background, some are ice-skating, some are drinking or eating. I stop at one of the stalls to buy a cup of hot glühwein before joining Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse, heading southwest.
Crossing Spandauer Street, I stop at the Marx-Engels-Forum before the Spree River channel and join the few people taking pictures of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels statues. Across the street is the DDR Museum, which I’ve been to on previous visits. Berlin’s museums are highly recommended, providing an insight into the history of East Berlin and the daily life of its citizens during the Cold War era.
Following Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse across the Spree River brings me to the neoclassical magnificence that is the Altes Museum. The oldest of Berlin’s museums, it hosts a wonderful collection of Greek and Roman artefacts and has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The German Historical Museum next to the Altes follows with its logical sequence of exhibits from the 1500s to present day. Highlights include Napoleon’s hat and sword, which he left behind at the Battle of Waterloo along with his pride.
There is construction on both sides of the road, which has now turned into Unter den Linden Boulevard next to Humboldt University. It feels like a knot of time in the history of Berlin is located along this street – it’s a place where the past, present and future of the German population is bonded together. Humboldt University has produced some of the world’s most influential people – Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, and the philosopher Hegel – and opposite is Bebelplatz, the spot where, on 10 May 1933, the Nazi regime burnt 20 000 books, including the works of Karl Marx
Approaching Friedrichstrasse and the Opera House, the Brandenburg Gate appears 150m ahead. I could turn left towards Checkpoint Charlie – the old iconic border post between East and West – but decide to continue towards the gate and the Reichstag to admire the Prussian architecture.
It is now 3:30pm and getting dark. I walk back past the Holocaust memorial to join Wilhelmstrasse, and the big, modern and rather pretty Mall of Berlin looms ahead. It has just about everything you could want, from food to clothing and homeware – and it’s the former I’m interested in. The big upper court is lined with restaurants peddling different cuisines; I settle for Indian. My waiter suggests the rogan josh (braised lamb chunks with gravy and basmati rice), which I eat while sipping on a Berliner Pilsner.
I have ideas for a return visit. The Potsdamer Platz and the Topography of Terror centre are very close by – but I feel I’ve discovered enough of the broadminded and inclusive spirit of Berlin today. This spirit embodies hope and knows the dangers of divisions. Sometimes I think Berlin is the only city in the world that has completed the full circle of metamorphosis, symbolising the continuity of time and the immortality of the soul. It has fought against and adapted to hostile and evil conditions. From those ashes, it has learnt to find love, humanity, openness, freedom, unity and happiness.
Walking through Berlin cures what no medicine can cure: the ills of the mind caused by constant worry. It heals the soul. The city is no longer the symbol of all the wrongs in the world – those are locked away, deep in the vaults of the past.
Niq Mhlongo is a journalist and traveller, and the author of the novels and . Explore: Walking Berlin
Celebrating his fifth visit to Germany’s capital, NIQ MHLONGO walks its streets and finds a cure
The morning of 15 November 2018 is cold. Outside the Alexanderplatz train station, the streets are buzzing; glowing with Christmas decorations. I have five hours to cover about eight of the important landmarks of Berlin by foot, all in an eight-kilometre radius along or near Unter den Linden Boulevard, Friedrichstrasse and Wilhelmstrasse.
The Fernsehturm TV tower is first. It is the tallest building in Berlin, boasting a revolving restaurant at the top with a panoramic view of the city. In what used to be East Berlin, this was a symbol of communist power. In front of it is a big Christmas market, with hundreds of people browsing the stalls packed with food and craft items. Some take pictures with the Ferris wheel in the background, some are ice-skating, some are drinking or eating. I stop at one of the stalls to buy a cup of hot glühwein before joining Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse, heading southwest.
Crossing Spandauer Street, I stop at the Marx-Engels-Forum before the Spree River channel and join the few people taking pictures of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels statues. Across the street is the DDR Museum, which I’ve been to on previous visits. Berlin’s museums are highly recommended, providing an insight into the history of East Berlin and the daily life of its citizens during the Cold War era.
Following Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse across the Spree River brings me to the neoclassical magnificence that is the Altes Museum. The oldest of Berlin’s museums, it hosts a wonderful collection of Greek and Roman artefacts and has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The German Historical Museum next to the Altes follows with its logical sequence of exhibits from the 1500s to present day. Highlights include Napoleon’s hat and sword, which he left behind at the Battle of Waterloo along with his pride.
There is construction on both sides of the road, which has now turned into Unter den Linden Boulevard next to Humboldt University. It feels like a knot of time in the history of Berlin is located along this street – it’s a place where the past, present and future of the German population is bonded together. Humboldt University has produced some of the world’s most influential people – Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, and the philosopher Hegel – and opposite is Bebelplatz, the spot where, on 10 May 1933, the Nazi regime burnt 20 000 books, including the works of Karl Marx
Approaching Friedrichstrasse and the Opera House, the Brandenburg Gate appears 150m ahead. I could turn left towards Checkpoint Charlie – the old iconic border post between East and West – but decide to continue towards the gate and the Reichstag to admire the Prussian architecture.
It is now 3:30pm and getting dark. I walk back past the Holocaust memorial to join Wilhelmstrasse, and the big, modern and rather pretty Mall of Berlin looms ahead. It has just about everything you could want, from food to clothing and homeware – and it’s the former I’m interested in. The big upper court is lined with restaurants peddling different cuisines; I settle for Indian. My waiter suggests the rogan josh (braised lamb chunks with gravy and basmati rice), which I eat while sipping on a Berliner Pilsner.
I have ideas for a return visit. The Potsdamer Platz and the Topography of Terror centre are very close by – but I feel I’ve discovered enough of the broadminded and inclusive spirit of Berlin today. This spirit embodies hope and knows the dangers of divisions. Sometimes I think Berlin is the only city in the world that has completed the full circle of metamorphosis, symbolising the continuity of time and the immortality of the soul. It has fought against and adapted to hostile and evil conditions. From those ashes, it has learnt to find love, humanity, openness, freedom, unity and happiness.
Walking through Berlin cures what no medicine can cure: the ills of the mind caused by constant worry. It heals the soul. The city is no longer the symbol of all the wrongs in the world – those are locked away, deep in the vaults of the past.
Niq Mhlongo is a journalist and traveller, and the author of the novels and . TAGS:

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1. What’s your favorite Color? Warm yellow (a yellow that swings towards orange)
2. What’s your favorite food? Pretty much anything from the Indian cuisine, either in restaurants or self-cooked
3. What’s your favorite Junk Food? Do peanuts count? I occasionally binge on them, otherwise I avoid junk food
4. What’s your favorite fast food? Not visited any chains in ages, if that what you ask for, but if I need to put anything here, I guess…burgers…but even those I rather eat from a dedicated burger house, than a chain.
5. Who your favorite music artist/song? Christian Kjellvander – Two souls
6. What’s your favorite band/song? Queen – Bohemian Rhapsody (but really, too many great artists, too many great songs)
7. What’s your favorite TV show of all time? Breaking Bad
8. What’s your favorite TV show on right now? Better call Saul (though it pauses atm. If t needs to be on RIGHT NOW, then nothing.)
9. What’s your favorite Game right now? WoW

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Advantages and Disadvantages of Nova Scotia PNP

by Global Tree
The Nova Scotia PNP allows individuals to gain 600 additional bonus points for their Express Entry profile when applying for CANADA PR . However, if you do opt for Nova Scotia provincial nominee program , then you will have to commit to staying in the province for a minimum stipulated time. It is important therefore to know all the pros and cons of living in Nova Scotia before you make your decision Advantages and Disadvantages of Nova Scotia PNP Advantages of Opting For Nova Scotia PNP The infrastructure is on par with the best in the world. Roadways and other forms of transport make daily commuting a pleasurable experience There are many places for spending quality time with your family such as parks, trails, outdoor picnic areas etc Halifax in Nova Scotia is a great place to experience different cultures through festivals and music concerts The province has people from different countries coming together, which makes it diverse and friendly. You can find food from almost all cuisines here Skilled workers with a niche career, who arrive after NOVA SCOTIA PNP can expect to get paid very well as these jobs are high in demand The cost of housing is cheaper than in other provinces, making it easier to own a house in the province You can enjoy quality healthcare as well as free public education when living with your family The province has an old world charm and slow pace of life that can be very relaxing and without the stress of modern life. If you are looking for a quiet place to settle then this is the best option for you Disadvantages of Nova Scotia PNP The taxes paid by Nova Scotia residents are the highest in Canada Public transport, though good, is not as extensive. A car is a must if you want to travel around the province There aren’t as many shops in the capital city of Halifax as compared to other cities Halifax is not well connected by air, and you will need to fly through Toronto every time you travel to India
Nova Scotia PNP is growing in popularity among Indian immigrants to Canada who are looking for a good quality of life.
Read more about below links:

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Booths looks to stock more Artisan suppliers in International range review

0 Booths Revamps International Foods Range to Deliver on Flavour and Uncompromising Quality
Family owned Northern retailer Booths have introduced over 175 new products into their International foods range, favouring unique and authentic dishes from brands big on flavour and uncompromising on quality. Booths’ new range has grown by 10% and sees the introduction of Lebanese, Korean and Malaysian cuisines alongside the expansion of existing ranges such as Japanese, Italian, Indian and Mexican.
Buyer Haris Deane says, “Booths is renowned for supporting emerging brands and we’re committed to sourcing the very best products on the market. We look for exceptional products made by people who truly care about quality, taste and flavour. We stock some great tasting, award-winning products many of which have a story to tell.
“Our new range incorporates everyday favourites from well-known brands to authentic handmade artisan foods, as well as ingredients used by top chefs from around the world. We’re proud to work with our suppliers and are delighted to offer our customers the very best of what’s available.’’ Food entrepreneurs Julian and Karen Abel, from Nowt Poncy
New additions to the range include Nowt Poncy, the Lancashire business led by food entrepreneurs Julian and Karen Abel. Both in their 50s, united by a love of simple good food, the ex-head teacher and engineer started making healthy high quality sauces packed with flavour but with reduced salt, sugar and preservatives that typify bottled sauces.
“We want to show the customers that they don’t need to spend loads of time cooking healthy meals – we like to capture the flavours of far-off places at home, but without nasty preservatives and with nutritious healthy ingredients. Booths is a great fit for our brand and it’s an honour to be given the opportunity to show that low sugar, low fat products can taste absolutely amazing’’ explains Julian. Will Chew of Mak Tok, a business he started at Sheffield University missing a taste of home
Malaysian food is predicted to be one of the hottest food trends of 2019. Mak Tok, Malay for Grandmother, is the brain child of Sheffield University student William Chew.
With the rest of his family back in Malaysia, Will missed his mother’s food so he started making his own chilli pastes. “I was missing my mum’s cooking when I was a student. It’s difficult to find authentic Malaysian flavours here in England so I thought why not try and make my own?” Taking inspiration from his mother’s home cooking, Will created a range of chilli pastes that can be used as a base to creating flavoursome Malaysian curries at home.
He soon found his friends were beating a path to his door to sample his fiery pastes. It was his brother, Shang, who first suggested he should think about setting up a business. “I’ve always been really passionate about food and cooking and he was telling me how much people loved my chilli paste so why not turn it into a business. I thought about it and realised there was a gap in the market, and Mak Tok was born.” Booths is the first major listing for this university inspired start-up set for big things.
Holy Cow is a multiple Great Taste Award winning sauce business that sponsors a free school meal in India for every unit sold in the UK. The inspiration behind Holy Cow is Mum Kiran Bhandari. Kiran has taught Indian cooking for years and her simple home-cooked recipes had students begging her for to bottle her unique flavours. Holy Cow was born and the products are developed in home kitchens with layers of flavour and a kick of heat. Faithful to their Indian roots, Holy Cow has proudly sponsored over 187,000 school meals in India, helping to keep students in school and fed nutritious food. Garofalo Pasta
The School of Wok is an award winning cookery school who have launched “cooking lessons in a box” which are kits aimed to bring flair and demystify oriental cooking into home kitchens. Developed by Saturday Kitchen “celebrity chef” Jeremy Pang, the kits include Bao Buns, Black Bean stir fry, Sichuan and Sweet and Sour stir fry kits.
Garofalo has been making pasta in Gragnano, the birth place of pasta in Italy, for over 200 years and is the only dry pasta variety to be recognised by the European Commission as IGP. A pasta awarded IGP status must use the highest quality of ingredients specifically from within Gragnano, including the water which must come from local aquifers, to guarantee an authentic and traditional taste and texture.

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Get the protective power of phytonutrients

Get the protective power of phytonutrients By Jean Larson Today at 7:00 a.m. 1 / 2 2 / 2
Most of us have heard of protein, fat, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals as core components of our diet. A lesser known category includes phytonutrients or phytochemicals. While not considered “essential nutrients,” I consider them extremely powerful compounds for improving health.
Phytonutrients are components of plants that have a wide variety of health benefits. They’re found in all plants, such as fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, herbs, spices, nuts, seeds and teas. Phytonutrients offer protection to the plants themselves, including protection from pests and environmental changes. They’re also a major component of what gives each plant its distinct color, taste and smell.
Similar to how phytonutrients protect plants, they also have a protective effect on the human body. They help the body detoxify and boost immunity. They offer benefits to our heart and vascular system and help with hormone metabolism. Phytonutrients even help stimulate the death of cancer cells.
Garlic contains the phytonutrient allicin, which has been found to be highly anti-inflammatory and protect the cardiovascular system. It also improves cholesterol levels and lowers blood pressure.
Flax seeds contain the highest amount of lignans, a phytonutrient that helps with healthy estrogen metabolism and may reduce hot flashes and night sweats in menopause.
Curcuminoids are phytonutrients found in turmeric root, which is a spice traditionally used in Indian cuisine. Curcumin offers anti-inflammatory benefits and may help prevent or treat colorectal cancer.
These are just three examples. Other phytonutrients include: carotenoids, chlorophyll, various flavonoids, indole-3-carbinol, isothiocyanates, phytosterols, resveratrol and soy isoflavones. You’ll find reliable information on all of them by going online to the Linus Pauling Institute’s Micronutrient Information Center https://bit.ly/2XeMBX5 Here are five steps to get more phytonutrients into your diet:
• Eat nine to 13 servings of whole plant foods every day. A typical serving is about ½ cup cooked vegetables or 1 cup raw greens, a medium piece of fruit, or cup of berries or melon. To reach this daily goal, aim for three to four servings at every meal.
• Know your phytonutrient sources: fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, seeds, herbs, spices and teas. At the grocery store, explore different plant foods you have never tried and start to play with new foods and recipes.
• Eat the rainbow: Green, yellow, orange, red, blue, purple and white. Try to get at least a couple different colors every day, with the goal of getting all seven colors each week.
• Vary your choices. There are literally thousands of phytonutrients, so try to incorporate a new food every week to get the most diversity of phytonutrients throughout the year.
• Get creative. Now more than ever you can find healthy substitutes for common foods that are less nutrient dense. Try cauliflower rice in place of white rice, squash noodles in place of pasta noodles, chickpea- or lentil-based pastas instead of wheat-based pastas. You can also find foods in a variety of colors, including multi-colored carrots or potatoes; red or golden beets; and purple, brown or black rice.
Smoothies are a great way to incorporate a variety of bright, colorful foods into your diet. Inflammation Control Smoothie
½ cup citrus or tropical fruit (such as tangerine, orange, mandarin, papaya, mango, guava)
1 large collard leaf
1/2-inch knob fresh ginger root
1-inch knob fresh turmeric root or ½ teaspoon ground turmeric
½ cup pomegranate seeds or 2 ounces pure pomegranate juice
Water, to taste
Place all ingredients in a high-speed blender. Pulse a few times and then blend to desired consistency, adding water as needed to thin. Yield: 12 ounces.
Jean Larson is a licensed and registered dietitian at Essentia Health. Additional Articles Recommended by Pineandlakes Echo Journal

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