Impossible Foods continues its expansion into Asia

Impossible Foods continues its expansion into Asia

Staff Writer 1 min ago
Impossible Foods is launching its plant-based meat on Thursday, 7 March, with a variety of dishes available at eight restaurants throughout Singapore, one of the world’s most vibrant and discerning culinary hotspots.
SEE ALSO : Impossible Foods chooses HK to go global
Home to some of the world’s most fanatical food critics and gourmets, Singapore is considered one of the greatest food destinations worldwide. It’s the first Asian city to host The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards (called the “Oscars of the global restaurant industry).” Influenced by its geography and rich history – a cross-section of Malay, Chinese, Indonesian, Indian, Middle Eastern and European cultures. Singapore is famous for its abundance of Michelin-starred establishments and its bustling “hawker” street-food culture.
On 6 March, one day before launch, from 6 to 10 pm, Impossible Foods will host the first public preview of its plant-based meat for the first 500 people who come to the world-famous Lau Pa Sat Festival Market. Dishes will be served at Lai Heng Fried Kway Teow and Sunny Viet Vietnamese Cuisine. In addition, My Coffee Shop, a restaurant within Lau Pa Sat, will be transformed into an Impossible pop-up for one evening only, featuring the Impossible Burger by Chef Andrei Soen of Park Bench Deli and the Impossible Crispy Pancake with Chinese Chives by Chef Ricky Leung of Empress.
Starting 7 March, Impossible Foods’ flagship product will go on the menu at Singapore’s leading restaurants, including Adrift by David Myers, Bread Street Kitchen by Gordon Ramsay, CUT by Wolfgang Puck, Empress, Park Bench Deli, Potato Head Singapore, Privé Orchard and Three Buns Quayside. The restaurants will serve a wide variety of Impossible selections from Western and Asian gastronomy.
“Singaporeans are blessed with and obsessed with great food. They’re among the world’s most demanding gourmets — and I’m sure the region’s chefs will rise to the occasion and create the world’s most imaginative Impossible dishes yet,” said Pat Brown, CEO and Founder of Impossible Foods.
The Impossible Burger debuted in 2016 at Momofuku Nishi, the New York City restaurant of Chef David Chang. More than 5,000 restaurants in the United States now serve the Impossible Burger — from awardwinning restaurants to family-owned diners, and the nation’s original fast-food chain, White Castle. Last year, Impossible Foods launched in Asia and is now served in nearly 150 restaurants in Hong Kong and Macau.
Impossible Burger can be used in any ground meat dish and is easy to cook on the BBQ, charbroiler, flat top grill, high speed oven, steamer or sauté pan. The product contains no gluten, animal hormones or antibiotics. It’s kosher- and halal-certified.
A quarter-pound Impossible Burger has 0 mg cholesterol, 14 grams of total fat and 240 calories, and as much bioavailable iron and protein as a comparable serving of ground beef from cows. (A quarter-pound, conventional “80/20” patty from cows has 80 mg cholesterol, 23 grams of total fat and 290 calories.)
Earlier this year, Impossible Foods launched its first product upgrade at the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES), where “Impossible Burger 2.0” took home the show’s highest honors, including the “Most Unexpected Product,” “Best Product Launch,” and “Triumph of Food Engineering.
Based in Redwood City, Calif., Impossible Foods uses modern science and technology to create wholesome and nutritious food, help restore natural ecosystems, and feed a growing population sustainably. The company makes meat from plants – with a much smaller environmental footprint than meat from animals.
To satisfy the global demand for meat at a fraction of the environmental impact, Impossible Foods developed a far more sustainable, scalable and affordable way to make meat, without the catastrophic environmental impact of livestock.
SEE ALSO : Food companies enjoy fashion moment
Shortly after its founding in 2011, Impossible Foods’ scientists discovered that one molecule — “heme”— is uniquely responsible for the explosion of flavors that result when meat is cooked. Impossible Foods’ scientists genetically engineer and ferment yeast to produce a heme protein naturally found in plants, called soy leghemoglobin. The heme in Impossible Burger is identical to the essential heme humans have been consuming for hundreds of thousands of years in meat — and while the Impossible Burger delivers all the craveable depth of beef, it uses far fewer resources because it’s made from plants, not animals.
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Words you’ll never see me use in restaurant reviews – SFChronicle.com

When I first thought up this idea — to lay out all the words that I tend to stay away from when I write about food and the people who make it — I didn’t think the list would be very long. (Honestly, I just thought “ethnic” would be the one, since that’s a word that’s been a thorn in my side for years.) Of course, there are certain words that can make people’s skin crawl, like “mouthgasm” and “noms.” But after conversations with colleagues at The Chronicle and in the food world at large, and after brainstorming on my own, I realized that, as a writer who aims to improve my political consciousness and empathy toward others, there is a lot of use in simply thinking about how my word choice can help or hinder that goal.
Owing to a mixture of myth, prejudice and marketing, food writing in particular is often victim to strange verbiage that fails to describe accurately or fairly. One of my great hopes with my own writing is for it to better reflect and respect the way real people live in the world.
Some might call this self-censorship or being too politically correct. But, as a writer, I think pretending that word choice doesn’t matter would undermine my whole profession. Moreover, if caring about other people means I have to find a better and more creative word than “addictive” to describe how good a bag of chips is, I’m fine with the small inconvenience of that.
Here’s what I’ve got so far. Full disclosure: Many of these are words and phrases that I’ve used in the past. What would you add to the list?
[ Want to read more from Soleil? Subscribe to her weekly newsletter, Bite Curious, here . ]
PSYCHOLOGY
Crack
In addition to being overly dramatic, it seems really callous to write that a bowl of bean dip is “like crack.” No matter how delicious something might be, its effect on me is nothing close to what crack does to people and their families. It’s supposed to be funny and edgy to compare a gourmet cupcake to crack because of how far the chi-chi bakery I’m standing in is from the kind of community that has historically been devastated by the crack epidemic. The ignorance is the joke.
One interesting example of its persistence is in the way we talk about Momofuku Milk Bar’s “Crack Pie.” Writers have called its creator, chef Christina Tosi, a “crack dealer” and used the language of addiction to describe the dish. Honestly, the company should have done the right thing and changed it by now.
Addictive
I’ve used this before in a few contexts, and I realized after talking to friends and colleagues who struggle with real-world addiction that it’s a word that I need to ease out of my food writing. There are so many other ways to say that a food appeals to us; we don’t need to glorify or make light of what other people go through to make that point.
Guilt
I don’t use this word because of the harm it does to our relationship to food, especially because “guilt” in this context never actually refers to things that do carry ethical weight, like cannibalism or stealing food from the hungry. Why should anyone besides the Hamburglar, who seems to enjoy the act of larceny for the sheer thrill of it, feel guilty about their food choices? The overwhelmingly majority of the time I’ve encountered this word in food writing or a marketing context has been about diet food, mainly directed toward girls and women: “guilt-free snacks,” “ice cream without the guilt,” and so on. Criminalizing the everyday act of eating reinforces the idea that we need to punish ourselves for wanting food when we’re hungry, which encourages us to develop really screwed-up and disordered attitudes toward our own bodies. Relatedly, I hate every time Great British Bake-off judge Prue Leith says that a pastry is good if it’s “worth the calories.”
RACISM
Ethnic
I can’t count how many times I’ve participated in conversations about using the word “ethnic” in food writing. Though it still makes plenty of appearances in both journalism and everyday chitchat, the term makes no sense: Who and what do we mean when we say “ethnic restaurants”? Do we mean Restaurant Jeanne d’Arc, which serves souffles and other traditional French foods? Or Bill’s Hamburgers, the Richmond neighborhood institution that specializes in that all-American delicacy? Odds are, that’s not it at all. We’re talking about pho shops, taquerias, Indian buffets and Jamaican grills, places that we associate with the lowbrow and with communities of color. But don’t all humans have an ethnicity that they identify with, even vaguely? The imprecision of the word — and the assumption that it doesn’t apply equally to people and cuisines associated with Europe or white America — gives me such a headache.
Authentic
Like “ethnic,” authenticity operates like a shackle. I refuse to use it as a qualitative judgment on restaurants because of how meaningless it can be. Often, I find that the impulse to use it comes from a place of assumed expertise: I know that a rendition of a dish is authentic because I can differentiate the real stuff from fakery. But if we’re to assume that food is an art, can’t we allow it to change its shape? If art speaks to a milieu, a personal story or psychological state, should we punish it for not 100 percent reflecting our own memories? Instead of judging food based on authenticity, I find that doing the work to understand the goals of the chef or restaurateur can be more fruitful both for the diner and the food industry as a whole.
Kaffir lime
The Chronicle’s style guide suggests “makrut” or “magrut” in place of “kaffir” when referring to Citrus hystrix, a plant whose leaves are common ingredients in Southeast Asian cuisines. Its etymological origin seems a mystery, though there is some evidence to suggest that it came from association with a Sri Lankan ethnic group. The trouble comes from the fact that the word is a cognate for a slur used by white colonists to refer to Black Africans in South Africa. Though the spirit of the word likely has very little to do with the latter context, my reasoning is the same as the reason why you’re never going to catch me casually saying or writing the word “niggardly.” There are so many other words.
The next big, the new
In my view, calling a food “the new X” is useful shorthand. At the same time, it encourages a trend-focused way of thinking about cuisine that I think shortchanges everyone, from purveyors to diners. There’s an assumption of interchangeability with this phrasing, indicating only that you should be chasing this next shiny thing because it’s like the last shiny thing. Is there an actual human story behind this that deserves fleshing out? Is there really any utility in writing that “pho is the new ramen” that is worth the implicit argument that Asian cultures and cuisines are all the same?
GENDER
Slutty
What makes food “slutty”? Does it lie in the visual parallels between genitalia and an oozy egg yolk dripping over a brioche bun, the forbidden aspect of eating ortolan or the cheapness of a Taco Bell Doritos Loco taco? As a metaphor, it works by bringing together the aspects of whoredom into the food we eat, emphasizing attributes that our culture associates with loose women. It works well, but I don’t use it because it reinforces misogynistic and literally objectifying ideas about women who have sex.
Man food, girly drinks
Forcing food into the gender binary seems really unnecessary, though I’m sure many of us can easily define what the categories of “man food” or a “girl drink” might include. Putting even the tiniest bit of critical pressure on the idea collapses it, especially when you begin to realize the futility of trying to attribute some intrinsic masculine quality to a plate of nachos. It feels strange to have to articulate this in 2019, but any human being of any gender can eat a salad or drink a Tom Collins: doing so does not and should not give them an identity crisis or cause others to shame them. Side note: I lost it when Jiro Ono, the sushi chef featured in “Jiro Dreams of Sushi,” admitted to giving women customers smaller portions of food during his omakase. They pay the same, don’t they?
ECONOMICS
Cheap eats
Earlier this year, Washington Post reporter Tim Carman announced that he would be changing the name of his column, the $20 Diner. He had a few reasons for doing this, which he articulates well in that piece. The “cheap eats” designation works along a similar vein, privileging price point over all of the other potentially good things about a restaurant. Affordability does matter to me, especially as a Millennial who can see moths flying out of her savings account. But I think there is a way to talk about restaurants that are more affordable without encouraging readers to think of them as cheap first and interesting second.
Up-and-coming neighborhood
I find that food writing about restaurants and cafes that open in gentrifying neighborhoods tends to shorthand what’s been happening in those areas with fuzzy phrasing like this. It’s very much the language of real estate marketing: cute and optimistic in the way that “fixer-upper” and “cozy” can be deceptive. In the neighborhood context, “up-and-coming” means that they’re in the process of kicking all of the working-class people out. Instead of using terminology like this to soften what’s actually happening in the real world, I’ll be honest and name gentrification when I see it.

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Grow Your Own Herbs

Grow Your Own Herbs March 3, 2019 | By SG In Becoming Vegetarian |
One of the side effects of becoming a vegetarian is often a renewed interest in growing your own…anything. Maybe you have a large, sun-drenched yard in which you could install a vegetable garden. Consider yourself lucky, and go for it!
However, if you’re one of the many folks who live in a small apartment or condo with a small patio or “yardlet” or a lone sunny window, you’d just like to grow something , anything!
Fresh herbs are much more flavorful than their dried counterparts – and have you seen the prices on those little bottles of dried herbs in the supermarket these days? Particularly the two more well-known brands. It’s ridiculous. You’d think they were fertilized with gold dust.
If you’re new to any kind of gardening or houseplant care, the little starter kit below on the right contains chives, cilantro, oregano, and parsley seeds to ease you into growing your own.
There are a number of herbs you might want to grow. The question to ask yourself is, “What do I like?” If you have a good vegetarian cookbook (or you like the recipes you’ve found in this blog), go through the ingredients list of each recipe you think you’ll be making, particularly those you’ll be making repeatedly. Which herbs are used the most?
Master Gardening has a wide selection of herb seeds, conventional and heirloom, to choose from. Visit them by clicking the link below on the left. You will find the herbs by entering “herbs” in the search box at the top left of their home page.
If you love onions, chives are a good choice – they’re a great topper for baked potatoes and bisque-style soups, and make a nice addition to pasta primavera. If you eat a lot of Italian food, you would do well to have basil , oregano , parsley , and rosemary on hand. Obsessed with Julia Child and all things French? Parsley , tarragon , and thyme are a nice trio to have in the windowsill. Maybe a little ornamental Bay tree if you’ve got the room, as well. If you are a fan of cilantro (the powdered seeds are sold as coriander), experiment with Asian, Indian, and Mexican recipes. Cilantro is what makes salsa, salsa, in my not-remotely-humble opinion. Dill is something useful to have on hand if you like to pickle your vegetables. Mint is common in Indian and Mediterranean cuisine, and if you’re a tea drinker you’d be crazy not to have your own stash of fresh mint on hand. Sage is common in Indian, Mediterranean and Southwestern U.S. cuisine. Logging In…

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New cookbook aims to help cancer patients during treatment and recovery

The side-effects of cancer treatment can be excruciating. While health professionals might recommend eating well to keep strength up, cooking and eating are often the last things cancer patients feel like doing. A new cookbook aims to help cancer patients get the nutrients they need.
Nutritionist Tamara Green is the co-author of The Living Kitchen: Healing Recipes to Support You Body During Cancer Treatment and Recovery. The cookbook features recipes and tips for cancer patients and those caring for them.
Dealing with side-effects
When she was younger, Green witnessed friends in their twenties being diagnosed with cancer.
“This was a real wake-up call that cancer doesn’t necessarily discriminate,” Green said.
Green and Living Kitchen co-writer Sarah Grossman delved deep into research to find the best ingredients to eat while going through cancer treatment. They tested recipes on clients undergoing cancer treatment and received feedback on what worked and what didn’t.
Jenn Stark More Green says food is important for those going through chemotherapy. It helps mitigate many common side effects like nausea, weight loss or an altered sense of taste.
“It also helps to strengthen the body as it goes through cancer treatment, which is really intense,” said Green.
The book offers plans on when and how to prep for meals for those who often lack the energy to cook.
Submitted More For those who feel nauseated, Green recommends dry and easy foods like rosemary crackers and light, healthy muffins, which gently help balance blood sugar. She also recommends recipes with ginger, a well-known nausea reliever.
Many chemotherapy patients find food tastes metallic or like cardboard. To combat this, she suggests using herbs and spices in meals. Many Living Kitchen recipes feature spices and other influences from Indian, Thai and Moroccan cuisines.
Getting the right nutrients
For patients who want to keep weight on, Green suggests having veggie, bone or chicken broths. This is an easy way to get calories, hydration and nutrients. She also recommends smoothies, which can be packed with good fats like almonds or coconut oil, protein powder, micronutrients, minerals and vitamins. They’re also easy to sip on.
“We really encourage foods that are going to work for you, not against you,” said Green.
Once in remission, it’s time to strengthen the body and support the organs that underwent extreme stress during treatment. Green says patients can switch to heartier main dishes as their appetites return.
Listen to the full interview here:

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A night of Indian cuisine, entertainment set for March 23

News / A night of Indian cuisine, entertainment set for March 23 A night of Indian cuisine, entertainment set for March 23 A festival that celebrates good over evil and welcomes in spring is coming to the area. The Community Arts Center of Cambria County will be host its inaugural Holi Festival of Colors, an authentic night of Indian cuisine and entertainment, beginning at 6 p.m. March 25 in the Goldhaber-Fend Fine Arts Center gallery, 1217 Menoher Blvd., Westmont. “We are so excited to feature such an unique gathering of dynamic ethnic food and premium cultural entertainment,” said Angela R. Godin, executive director of the arts center. “It’s very special to the Community Arts Center to constantly grow with programming and feature local diverse entertainment, especially a celebratory festival that promotes positivity.” The Holi Festival will begin with the Parade of Colors, followed by the Indian and American national anthems. The event will include an Indian menu – Flavors of India – catered by India Garden. It will feature appetizers of samosas and lemon chicken with chutney; a main course of chicken tikka masala, palak paneer, bhindi and eggplant, chole, raita, rice and naan bread; and dessert of gulab jamun and jalebis. The menu is not gluten free and contains items such as nuts, dairy, cinnamon, turmeric, red chilis and cumin seeds. There also will be a history of Holi presentation by Neelam Malhotra. The evening will culminate with a dance performance by Bollywood Believe, an Indian American dance group from Richland. In 2005, members Aditi Sridhar, Nadia Khan and Tulsi Shrivastava began dancing together as children and have since performed at over 25 events in the Johnstown area. “The support and co-organizational efforts of Neelam Malhotra and the arts center’s education coordinator, Jennifer Fultz, have really helped to develop an authentic evening that everyone in the community would enjoy attending,” Godin said. Proceeds will benefit programming at the arts center. Tickets are $20 for members, $25

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Kenya Travel Guide

Share Travel & Tourism
Kenya has a reputation for being a remarkable breeding ground. Anthropologists recognize it as one of the birthplaces of humankind; in the West, it’s also known as the country where Barack Obama’s father and numerous marathon winners were born. But Kenya is also growing as a center of commerce in East Africa. For both business trips and leisure travel, Kenya has much to offer its visitors.
In addition to the famed Masai Mara Game Reserve, in southwestern Kenya, where safari aficionados can view lions, giraffes, and zebras from the comfort of a jeep, the country allows its guests the chance to explore amazing beaches and city life. We recommend taking a few weeks to explore Kenya: from the bustling streets of Nairobi to the coastal peacefulness of Mombasa and the intriguing and eye-opening landscapes of safari reserves, Kenya is one of Africa’s jewels. What to Do in Kenya
1. Masai Mara Game Reserve : Photographs and film cannot begin to be equivalent to seeing the amazing Big Five game—lions, African elephants, Cape buffalo, leopards, and black rhinoceros—right in front of you during a safari. “Big Five” is a traditional hunting term that refers to the five animals most difficult to hunt, given their aggressive nature (game hunting is largely illegal in Kenya). Check with your hotel about booking a multiday safari. Take it from us: it is worth the time and the money to invest in an experience that will supply you with memories (and pictures!) for a lifetime.
2. Wildebeest Migration at Masai Mara : From July to September, one of the most magnificent of events takes place throughout the Masai Mara Game Reserve. The wildebeest migration comprises hundreds of thousands of wildebeests, zebras, gazelles, and other animals in a stampede for grazing land. While one can observe the move from a safari vehicle, we highly recommend the renting of a hot air balloon for viewing the wildebeest migration or even just to see the beauty of the Mara.
3. Nairobi : As Kenya’s capital and its most populated city, Nairobi is teeming with activities, foods, and naturally beautiful phenomena. Whether you are looking to go shopping in a mall or an outdoor market, eat traditional Kenyan cuisine or game meat, hike in a game reserve, or roam the busy streets of East Africa’s largest city, Nairobi is worth a few days of your time. For more information, check out our dedicated page on Nairobi.
4. David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and the Giraffe Center : These two animal centers stand out as offering some of the best daytime activities in Nairobi. The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust specializes in raising orphaned elephants and black rhinos and reintroducing them to the wild. Every morning, visitors can watch the elephants be fed and bathed. Few sights are more charming than that of these young creatures interacting with the center’s staff, and the daily program provides you with insight into the techniques and rationale for the center’s goals. ( +254 (0) 202 301 396 ; rc-h@africaonline.co.ke)
Ever kissed a giraffe? It might serve you well. Giraffes have foot-long tongues that get plenty of sunlight during feeding times, and the animals have eaten acacia tree thorns for generations. Thus, giraffe saliva has antiseptic, sunproofing properties, so don’t be afraid of a smooch here or there! The center is home to the endangered Rothschild giraffe, and in addition to getting close to the animals, visitors can spend some time learning about the center’s history and mission. We guarantee that the Giraffe Center will provide you with one of the best photo opportunities of your trip.
5. Nairobi National Park : With giraffes in one direction and skyscrapers in the other, this park is the only protected area in the world in close proximity to a capital city (it’s seven kilometers from Nairobi). More than 400 species of birds having been observed—as well as leopards, lions, cheetahs, zebras, giraffes, black rhinos, and more—the Nairobi National Park is worth a day’s visit. We recommend that you ask your hotel for the names of reputable touring companies that can take you through the park. You will need to take a valid passport to the park’s entrance in order to be granted entry. ( +254-20-600800 ; reservations@kws.go.ke)
6. Fort Jesus and Old Town in Mombasa : Mombasa’s (LINK TK) Fort Jesus stands at the crossroads of the city’s tangled history with Europe and the Middle East. The Portuguese built this stronghold in 1593 and spent the next hundred years fighting with the Arabs to maintain control. When the British ruled Mombasa, the fort was turned into a prison, and in 1958 the area was made a national park. The architecture is worth gazing at, the museum has centuries-old artifacts, and the fort is a great jumping-off point for a trip into Old Town.
The beauty of the ancient buildings of Old Town makes this neighborhood a must-see during your visit to Mombasa. Ornate carved doors and balconies, built in the 1600s, reflect a Portuguese influence, while the street design and architecture display touches of the Middle East.
7. Lamu : This one-vehicle island is a world away from mainland Kenya, with its 1700s-era architecture and predominantly Muslim population. If you’re on the water, take a ride in a dhow, a traditional Arab sailing vessel; if you’re on land, walking is the best method to explore places like Lamu Town, where you can eat fresh seafood and explore winding streets and colorful markets. The best way to get to the island is by plane, a short trip from Nairobi; check with your hotel or a local travel agent about your trip to Lamu.
8. Amboseli National Park : For a safari that’s off the beaten path, we recommend Amboseli National Park, with its view of Mount Kilimanjaro as a gorgeous backdrop. Because it is one of the smaller parks in Kenya, visitors are more likely to spot the endangered black rhinoceros, as well as the other four members of the Big Five.
9. Mount Kenya : The second-highest mountain on the entire continent of Africa, Mount Kenya is located in the central region of the country. While reaching its summit requires some prior mountaineering experience, many lesser peaks and beautiful glaciers are accessible by hiking paths. We recommend that you plan your visit to Mount Kenya during peak weather periods (January and February, and late August until September). The mountain trails are perfect for viewing wildlife and flora. Any trip into Mount Kenya National Park should be organized with a registered guide; that is the only way to ensure your safety, for the paths throughout the park can be confusing.
10. Great Rift Valley : Commonly referred to as “the cradle of humanity,” the Great Rift Valley has been a central location for excavations of early human skeletons and artifacts. Worth checking out is Lake Nakuru, which attracts thousands of vibrant pink flamingos. We also recommend seeing Lake Naivasha, a freshwater body that is frequented by groups of hippos, water buffalo, and an amazing variety of birds. You can take a single-day or a multiday safari through the Great Rift Valley; just check with your hotel staff for their recommendations for trustworthy touring companies.
11. The Karen Blixen Museum :
Karen Blixen Museum was once the centre piece of a farm at the foot of the Ngong Hills owned by Danish Author Karen and her Swedish Husband, Baron Bror von Blixen Fincke. Located 10km from the city centre, the Museum belongs to a different time period in the history of Kenya. The farm house gained international fame with the release of the movie ‘Out of Africa’ an Oscar winning film based on Karen’s an autobiography by the same title.
Set in expansive gardens, the museum is an interesting place to wander around. The Museum is open to the Public every day (9.30 am to 6pm) including weekends and public holidays. Visitors are encouraged to be at the Museum by 5.30. Guided tours are offered continuously.
12. Wasini Island :Wasini Island is a very sparsely populated area and it’s only 10 kilometers from Kisite Mpunguti Marine national Park. Wasini is a coral island that is traditionally inhabited by the Vumba people, an indigenous group of coastal bantu speaking community with a very rich culture and history. Known by many people as “paradise on earth”. At first, this might sound like another inane slogan but Lamu’s little sister truly is a unique haven of peace and tranquility.
13. The Ruins of Gedi :
The ruins of Gedi are a historical and archaeological site near the Indian Ocean coast of eastern Kenya. The site is adjacent to the town of Gedi (also known as Gede) in the Kilifi District and within the Arabuko-Sokoke Forest.
Set in an idyllic location on the Indian Ocean, and buried deep in a lush forest, the town was thought to have been founded in the early 13th-century. It is one of many medieval Swahili-Arab coastal settlements that stretch from Mogadishu, Somalia to the Zambezi River in Mozambique.
14. Thomson Falls : Thomson’s Falls is a 74 metres scenic waterfall on the Ewaso Ng’iro river, a few Kilometres from Lake Ol Bolossat, which drains from the Aberdare Mountain Range. It was discovered in 1883 by Joseph Thomson, a Scottish geologist and naturalist. Located in Nyahururu, it is a relatively easy stop on an itinerary dominated by wildlife viewing.
15. Diani Beach : Diani Beach is a resort area on the Indian Ocean, 30 km south of Mombasa. It’s the most tourist-oriented beach of South Coast. It is separated from the Tiwi Beach to the north by the Kongo River. Diani beach has been voted Africa’s leading beach destination for the third time running since 2015. When to Go
Geography plays a large part in helping tourists choose the best times for visiting Kenya. Most of the country has two wet and two dry seasons. April is the wettest month, and August is the driest; on average, February is the hottest month, and July is the coolest. Because of Nairobi’s elevation, the city typically has low temperatures year-round, making it a popular destination regardless of the time of year. As for the rest of the country, the climate varies significantly from the tropical coast to the arid interior, where drought is common. The hottest and driest weather generally occurs from January through March—ideal for bird-watching and safaris. Because of the agreeable weather, that is prime tourist season, so plan accordingly.
The annual (and astonishing) wildebeest migration takes place from July until September, when thousands of wildebeest and zebras travel across the Masai Mara National Reserve. The sight of the migration is one you will never forget, and we highly recommend that you plan your trip around this outstanding event. Getting In and Around
Visas: Ensure that your passport is valid for at least six months beyond the end of your visit to Kenya. You should have available at least two blank pages in your passport for your visa and entry/exit stamps. Visas can be obtained in advance from a Kenyan embassy or consulate and can also be purchased at the airport in Kenya. As of May 2009, a single-entry visa costs $25, and a multiple-entry visa costs $50.
A yellow fever immunization card may be requested when you enter Kenya, so visit your local physician or health clinic before your departure and be sure that you have the required vaccinations.
Transportation: Most international flights will arrive in and depart from Nairobi. The city has two main airports, Jomo Kenyatta International and Wilson Airport. If you are flying in or out of Kenya, you will most likely use Jomo Kenyatta. Wilson Airport is primarily for domestic travel; a limited numbe
r of flights around the African continent fly from Wilson, though.
Public transportation is available in larger cities. The government-owned Kenya Bus Service manages many bus routes, but the most popular public transportation method is privately owned minibuses called matatus. While matatus definitely offer the cheapest way to get around, they are also the most congested, as drivers will squeeze in as many passengers as they can. Be prepared for a squished ride.
In most of the cities, especially in areas that are popular with tourists, taxis are available for hire. They can provide a more convenient and safer alternative to public transportation, but taxis are also going to be more expensive. Be sure to negotiate a price before you get into the car, to prevent being overcharged. If you are looking to take a private vehicle service between cities, you’d do well to confer with your hotel staff for advice on reputable companies
Kenya Railways and the Kenya Bus Service, as well as numerous privately owned bus lines, all operate out of Nairobi and travel throughout the country.
Mobile Phones: If your mobile phone uses the GSM 900 system (standard with European mobiles, but most American and Canadian phones run on the 850/1900 system), you will be able to use it in Kenya. Be prepared to spend large amounts of money on phone calls, however. Your best and cheapest alternative is to buy a SIM card from one of the two main companies that sell them in Kenya, Safaricom and Zain. SIM cards and reload credits are sold all over the country. A word to the wise: text messages are significantly cheaper than phone calls, and the reception of text messages is free. Safety and Security
Concerned about your safety as you plan travel to Kenya? We at Africa.com, together with our friends, family and colleagues, travel extensively throughout the continent. Here are the resources we consult when thinking of our safety in Kenya:

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What’s On This Week in Liverpool 4th – 10th March 2019

0 What’s On This Week in Liverpool 4th – 10th March 2019 It’s a week packed with pancakes, superheroes and celebrations of all things female for what’s on this week in Liverpool.
Talk about offering something for everyone. This week in Liverpool we’ve got puppy socials, more footy, pancakes, Independent Women’s Day parties, markets, comedy, George Ezra and er…..Superman and Lois Lane…for real! Grab your faithful side-kick and prepare for a mighty week in the best city in the world. Here’s what’s on this week in Liverpool… Monday 4th March Lobby Lunch, Camp & Furnace
Dinner times just got a whole lot better thanks to Lobby Lunch at Camp & Furnace. Soups, paninis and bevs from 12-4pm in a cosy, Baltic Triangle setting. More here. LFC U23’s v EFC U23’s, Anfield
Didn’t quite get your fill from the Premier League Merseyside derby yesterday? Why not head to Anfield and support the U23’s reds and blues clash. Hopefully there’ll be a goal or two! . Tickets here. The Bodyguard, Liverpool Empire
Alexandra Burke continues her run playing Rachel Marron in the West End stage production of The Bodyguard at the Liverpool Empire. Runs until Saturday. Tickets here . Tuesday 5th March Pancake Day in Liverpool
If you fancy tucking into a fresh batch of fluffy pancakes (like before the kids get home from school) head this way to check out our top Liverpool eateries serving up flipping fun. More: Here’s our top pancake eateries in Liverpool. Liverpool Guild Vintage Clothing Sale, Mount Pleasant
After all those pancakes you might need to invest in some new threads. Why not head to Liverpool Guild and check out the vintage clothing sale from 10am til 5pm. Open to all. Info here. Blurred Tuesday’s, Modo, Concert Square
Don’t wait until the weekend to get into the party mood. Modo’s Blurred Tuesdays brings all the best BritPop and indie classics to Concert Square from 10pm. Info here. Wednesday 6th March Friends Quiz, Baltic Market
There’s some seriously epic prizes on offer at the Friends Quiz night down at the Baltic Market. Alongside food vendors, beers and gin, you can play to be crowned the king of Friends with a £100 bar tab and more. Info here. Bundobust, Indian Street Food Take-Over, The Merchant
Kicking off its three day take over at Slater Street’s The Merchant, Bundobust offers up very best Indian street food including okra fries, Bundo chaat, Vada prav and lots more. Menus here. Gucci Gang, Trap Night, CIRCO
Circo is dedicating Wednesday night to all things Trap! Expect to hear the likes of Lil Pump, Migos, Cardi B, Kodak Black, Drake, Young Thug, Kendrick Lamar, Post Malone and many more! Tickets here. Thursday 7th March Macbeth, Epstein Theatre
Something wicked this way comes! Shakespeare’s most brilliant and bloody tale, Macbeth comes to the Epstein from 9th-16th March 2019. Tickets here. Lunch at Rosa’s Thai Café, Royal Albert Dock
If you treat yourself to lunch or dinner out this week, book a table at Rosa’s Thai Café, Royal Albert Dock. Order the home-made spring rolls and prepare to fall in love with Thai cuisine all over again. Menus here. Psychic Sally, St Helen’s Theatre Royal
World renowned psychic, Sally Morgan, or Psychic Sally as we know her, comes to St Helen’s Theatre Royal for one night only on Thursday. All seats 25. Info and tickets here. Friday 8th March Liverpool Comic Con 2019, Exhibition Centre
It’s finally here! Liverpool Comic Con takes over Exhibition Centre from 8th-10th March and if you’re into comic book heroes, cult tv and film, cosplay, star meet and greats and official merch, this is the event for you. Tickets here. Spice Girls V Destiny’s Child, Camp & Furnace
Who about this for the ultimate International Women’s Day mash up! Two of the biggest all-girl groups of all time go head to head to provide the best soundtrack ever! Say you’ll be there at Camp & Furnace for Spice Girls V Destiny’s Child from 8pm. Tickets here. SisBis International Women’s Day Social, 24 Kitchen Street
Continuing the IWD celebrations, why not head down to 24 Kitchen Street from 6pm and check out the music, food and ‘things to do’ as SisBis waves the flag for female empowerment! Free entry, more info here . Saturday 9th March George Ezra, M&S Bank Arena
King of the clever lyrics, George Ezra plays the M&S Bank Arena on Saturday night as part of his first ever headline UK tour, with support from Sigrid! Some tickets remaining here . Puppy Party, Grand Central Food Bazaar
There’s a free-entry puppy party at Grand Central Food Bazaar on Saturday from 12pm. Whether you’ve got a pooch or you just love the four legged furry friends, get down there and pet them all. Info here. Dirty Dancing Bottomless Brunch, Mullholland Bar
Ready for the time of your life? Mashing up a tasty bottomless brunch and one of the greatest films and soundtracks of all time was always going to be a winner. Head to Mulholland Bar from 1pm – 5:30pm for bottomless prosecco and house cocktails (90 mins) and more. Info here. Liverpool Comic Con After Party, Camp & Furnace
We’ve seen some pretty epic scenes at Camp & Furnace over the years and this Saturday the venue plays host to the Liverpool Comic Con afterparty. So that’s clearly going to take things up a notch! Expect a dancefloor choker with all your fave pop culture icons. Themed cocktails, special guests and more. Tickets here. Sunday 10th March Bombed Out Church, Sunday Social
Head to Berry Street to check out the all new “Bombed Out Church Market” set in one of the city’s most iconic locations, will bring an assortment of Artisan creatives, Arts and Crafts & Street food from 11am. Details here. Liverpool Half Marathon, Pier Head
The BTR Liverpool Half Marathon and 10 Miler kicks off from 9am at the Pier Head this Sunday. Thousands till take to the tarmac to support local causes, so check out the route and cheer them on. Road closures and info here. Paul Sinah, The Two Ages of Man, Hot Water Comedy Club
Former ‘ITV Chaser’, Paul returns to Liverpool with his life, seemingly, still bordering on disarray. Having spent two decades juggling disparate careers, loneliness, heartbreak, a multitude of vices and an overwhelming urge to show off his general knowledge. You’re invited to laugh at his expense this Sunday at Hot Water Comedy Club. Tickets here. Are you hosting an event on Merseyside and want to join our weekly round up? Drop us a line on Twitter , Facebook or Instagram and we’ll do the rest.

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Centara makes debut in Qatar with a brilliant sea-view property

Rahul Preeth
Doha
Leading Thai hospitality group Centara has made its debut in Qatar with the official launch of the Centara West Bay Residences & Suites.
The first thing that you will notice as you enter this spectacular new sea-view property is the jasmine-scented breeze that wafts playfully across the lobby.
The fragrance is one of the factors that complements the hotel’s unique Thai character that the operators hope will position it as an imaginative alternative to the long- and short-stay options in Qatar.
“We are a Thai company and proud of it,” said the group’s Deputy CEO Markland Blaiklock during an event to mark the official launch of the property in Doha on Thursday.
The promise of a Thai experience seems to have struck a chord with people looking for fancy residencies in Doha as more than 65 percent of the Centara property’s individual units have been booked within two months of its soft launch.
For reference, the global average occupancy rate is around 63 percent according to Blaiklock and that in Qatar is around 60 percent over the past 12 months, according to real estate evaluation firm DTZ.
Overlooking the Doha Corniche, the 42-storied property is ideally located at the heart of the city and is barely half-an-hour from the Hamad International Airport.
Guests at the hotel can choose from a range of 265 stylish and spacious rooms including studios, suites, one- to three-bedroom apartments and penthouses.
Residences range in size from 45 square metres to 365 square metres and feature comfortable bedrooms, living and dining areas, well-equipped kitchens, washing machines and tumble dryers. All rooms also offer complimentary high-speed Wi-Fi and Smart TVs, while the floor-to-ceiling windows showcase stunning panoramic views of West Bay.
“With this first Doha hotel, we wanted to highlight two distinct cultures, bringing together elements from Centara’s Thai heritage while celebrating Qatar’s cultural traditions and history,” said Thirayuth Chirathivat, Chief Executive Officer of Centara Hotels & Resorts.
“The official opening of Centara’s first hotel in Qatar is the culmination of our successful collaboration with Al Thuraya Real Estate Development and Marketing Co WLL, the hotel’s owners, whose wisdom, goodwill and spirit of partnership guided the project to completion and successful opening.”
The owners of Al Thuraya Real Estate Development and Marketing said they have been dedicated to this project throughout its construction and would continue to give every effort to ensure its ongoing and future success.
“We are committed to showcasing the country’s cultural heritage, driving tourism to Qatar and contributing to the prosperity of the economy,” they said.
In a statement, Centara highlighted the forces that made Doha a compelling destination for its newest property.
“Doha has been at the centre of the region’s business and economic development and a major catalyst for continued growth in travel and tourism,” its said.
“Qatar has now established itself as a very powerful competitor among host cities, winning major events and sporting competitions, which makes this an ideal entry point to introduce Centara’s Thai-style hospitality to Qatar.”
Centara’s arrival in Doha brings to 68 the total number of Centara hotels in operation or development. Its track record of success has been built across all travel segments, spanning business, leisure and long-stay guests. Its four state-of-the-art convention centres have established Centara as a MICE industry leader for conventions, meetings and events and its properties are home to some of the most popular dining venues for hotel guests, tourists, and citizens of Doha.
Food is an important hallmark of each of the two cultures that come together here, and that is reflected in the dining concepts being introduced at Centara West Bay Residences & Suites.
Dalchini is the hotel’s much-anticipated Indian restaurant that may be the next place to take Doha by storm. Located on the hotel’s ground floor, Dalchini is led by Chef Alfred Prasad, who previously oversaw the four Tamarind Collection restaurants, including the Michelin-starred Tamarind Restaurant in Mayfair, London. Progressive regional Indian cuisine is served at lunch and dinner in a soothing environment.
Caprice, on the first floor, is a café-inspired restaurant and contemporary social hub offering all-day dining and featuring Thai, European and international fare in a vibrant atmosphere.
The Lobby Lounge and the Pool Bar offer light refreshments, a full range of beverages and lively atmosphere ideal for Doha locals and hotel guests alike.
Centara West Bay Residences & Suites was designed with a number of family-focused features and amenities sure to attract local residents and families from overseas. Spacious residences feature up to three bedrooms, plus in-room kitchen and dining amenities and kids also get their own dedicated swimming pool.

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Has a resort feel and that’s good!!

Stayed here for a day, few business partners and clients (from US, Germany, Canada and UK) stayed here as well. It’s a colonial age bungalow turned to a hotel, perched on a hilltop. Entire hill (63 acres) is owned by the hotel and not all of it is built up. This leaves majority of the 63 acres covered under vegetation, which allows a big population of peacocks here. We started calling this ‘peacock hotel’. 😊nVery courteous staff, restaurant is focused on traditional South Indian food though some items from western cuisines are on the offer too.

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