Impossible Foods : Continues Asian Expansion in Singapore

Impossible Foods : Continues Asian Expansion in Singapore

Award-winning restaurants Adrift by David Myers, Bread Street Kitchen by Gordon Ramsay, CUT by Wolfgang Puck, Empress, Park Bench Deli, Potato Head Singapore, Privé Orchard, and Three Buns Quayside amongst the first to serve Impossible™ in Singapore Impossible Foods expands its footprint throughout foodservice locations in Asia All restaurants in Singapore can order “Impossible 2.0,” considered one of the most innovative technologies in the world Impossible Foods is launching its plant-based meat Thursday, 7 March, with a variety of dishes available at eight restaurants throughout Singapore — one of the world’s most vibrant and discerning culinary hotspots.
This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20190305006036/en/
Empress highlights Impossible meat in three dishes: Black Pepper Impossible Meatball Skewers, Pan Fried Impossible Gyoza, and Impossible Crispy Pancakes with Chinese Chives. (Photo: Business Wire)
Home to some of the world’s most fanatical food critics and gourmets, Singapore is considered one of the greatest food destinations worldwide . It’s the first Asian city to host The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards (called the “ Oscars of the global restaurant industry ”). Influenced by its geography and rich history – a cross-section of Malay, Chinese, Indonesian, Indian, Middle Eastern and European cultures – Singapore is famous for its abundance of Michelin-starred establishments and its bustling “hawker” street-food culture.
Tonight, 6 March from 6 to 10 pm, Impossible Foods will host the first public preview of its plant-based meat for the first 500 people who come to the world-famous Lau Pa Sat Festival Market. Dishes will be served at Lai Heng Fried Kway Teow and Sunny Viet Vietnamese Cuisine. In addition, one of the stalls will be transformed into an Impossible pop-up for one evening only, featuring the Impossible Burger by Chef Andrei Soen of Park Bench Deli and the Impossible Crispy Pancake with Chinese Chives by Chef Ricky Leung of Empress.
Starting 7 March, Impossible Foods’ flagship product will go on the menu at Singapore’s leading restaurants, including Park Bench Deli, Three Buns Quayside, Potato Head Singapore, Privé Orchard, Empress, and Marina Bay Sands’ Bread Street Kitchen by Gordon Ramsay, CUT by Wolfgang Puck and Adrift by David Myers. The restaurants will serve a wide variety of Impossible selections from Western and Asian gastronomy.
“Singaporeans are blessed with and obsessed with great food. They’re among the world’s most demanding gourmets — and I’m sure the region’s chefs will rise to the occasion and create the world’s most imaginative Impossible dishes yet,” said Pat Brown, CEO and Founder of Impossible Foods.
Impossible: Better in Every Way
The Impossible Burger debuted in 2016 at Momofuku Nishi, the New York City restaurant of Chef David Chang. More than 5,000 restaurants in the United States now serve the Impossible Burger — from award-winning restaurants to family-owned diners, and the nation’s original fast-food chain, White Castle. Last year, Impossible Foods launched in Asia and is now served in nearly 150 restaurants in Hong Kong and Macau.
Impossible Burger can be used in any ground meat dish and is easy to cook on the BBQ, charbroiler, flat top grill, high speed oven, steamer or sauté pan. The product contains no gluten, animal hormones or antibiotics. It’s kosher- and halal-certified.
A quarter-pound Impossible Burger has 0 mg cholesterol, 14 grams of total fat and 240 calories, and as much bioavailable iron and protein as a comparable serving of ground beef from cows. (A quarter-pound, conventional “80/20” patty from cows has 80 mg cholesterol, 23 grams of total fat and 290 calories.)
Impossible Every Which Way in Singapore
The island city-state of Singapore covers about 700 square kilometers and is home to more than 7,600 restaurants — including those helmed by some of the world’s best known chefs. Starting 7 March, the following award-winning establishments will begin serving Impossible’s flagship product:
Park Bench Deli serves sandwiches with a strong focus on high-quality ingredients. Chef Andrei Soen will feature the Impossible Patty Melt , ($22) which will replace their existing Patty Melt made with ground beef from cows.
Potato Head Singapore and Three Buns Quayside by Potato Head serve innovative burgers, sides, and desserts designed by Group Executive Chef Adam Penney. Both locations will offer brand-new burgers, including The Impossible Dream ($27) and Impossible Chedda ($23).
Privé Orchard ’s Group Executive Chef Robin Ho serves Juicy Lucy Impossible Meatball Spaghetti ($19) and Impossible Satay Sliders ($15), as well as the Nothing is Impossible Beef Cheeseburger , part of a kids set meal at $12.
Empress at the Asian Civilisations Museum offers traditional Chinese cuisine, and Executive Head Chef Ricky Leung will feature appetizers: Impossible Crispy Pancakes with Chinese Chives ($6.80), Pan-fried Impossible Gyoza ($6.80), Black Pepper Impossible Meatball Skewers ($8.80) and mains: Sichuan Mapo Tofu with Impossible Meat ($18) and Dragon’s Breath Fried Kuay Teow with Impossible Meatballs ($18).
Bread Street Kitchen by Gordon Ramsay showcases casual British European fare and is helmed by Executive Chef Sabrina Stillhart. The restaurant is offering The Impossible™ Flatbread ($24), The Impossible™ BSK Burger ($25), and The Impossible™ Wellington ($39), a creative spin on Bread Street Kitchen’s iconic Beef Wellington.
CUT by Wolfgang Puck is the first Asian outpost of the award-winning steak restaurant; Executive Chef Joshua Brown has created The Impossible™ Slider , a remake of its signature mini Kobe beef sliders, priced at $18 for three.
Adrift by David Myers boasts a creative California izakaya menu, inspired by David Myers’ sojourns across Asia and Europe. Executive Chef Wayne Brown serves The Impossible™ Sausage Roll , a juicy plant-based sausage ($14).
Impossible will be available to restaurants in Singapore on a limited and exclusive basis through Classic Fine Foods – Asia’s leading importer and distributor of fine foods. The group specialises in sourcing, importation, storage, marketing and distribution, and has been operating throughout Asia and Europe since 2001.
Big Taste, Small Footprint
Earlier this year, Impossible Foods launched its first product upgrade at the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES), where “Impossible Burger 2.0” took home the show’s highest honors, including the “ Most Unexpected Product ,” “ Best Product Launch ,” and “ Triumph of Food Engineering .”
Based in Redwood City, Calif., Impossible Foods uses modern science and technology to create wholesome and nutritious food, help restore natural ecosystems, and feed a growing population sustainably. The company makes meat from plants – with a much smaller environmental footprint than meat from animals.
To satisfy the global demand for meat at a fraction of the environmental impact, Impossible Foods developed a far more sustainable, scalable and affordable way to make meat, without the catastrophic environmental impact of livestock .
Shortly after its founding in 2011, Impossible Foods’ scientists discovered that one molecule — “ heme ” — is uniquely responsible for the explosion of flavors that result when meat is cooked. Impossible Foods’ scientists genetically engineer and ferment yeast to produce a heme protein naturally found in plants, called soy leghemoglobin.
The heme in Impossible Burger is identical to the essential heme humans have been consuming for hundreds of thousands of years in meat — and while the Impossible Burger delivers all the craveable depth of beef, it uses far fewer resources because it’s made from plants, not animals.
About Impossible Foods:
Based in California’s Silicon Valley, Impossible Foods makes delicious, nutritious meat and dairy products from plants — with a much smaller environmental footprint than meat from animals. The privately held company was founded in 2011 by Patrick O. Brown, M.D., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry at Stanford University, and a former Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. Investors include Khosla Ventures, Bill Gates, Google Ventures, Horizons Ventures, UBS, Viking Global Investors, Temasek, Sailing Capital, and Open Philanthropy Project.
More information:
impossiblefoods.com
www.twitter.com/impossiblefoods
www.facebook.com/impossiblefoods
www.instagram.com/impossible_foods
Press Kit:
www.impossiblefoods.com/media
View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20190305006036/en/

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Top Things to do in Jaisalmer, Rajasthan. · MAP CAMERA TRAVEL

/ Top Things to do in Jaisalmer, Rajasthan. · MAP CAMERA TRAVEL Top Things to do in Jaisalmer, Rajasthan. · MAP CAMERA TRAVEL Tripoto https://www.tripoto.com/ By Krupa Welcome to the land of imperial forts, luxurious palaces and splendid havelis (mansions). Also knows as Golden city of India, Jaisalmer in Rajasthan is a very vibrant, rich in culture and beautiful city situated in the heart of Thar dessert. From Witnessing the grandeur of majestic Jaisalmer fort and palaces to indulging into some fun and adventurous activities at the sand dunes, Jaisalmer offers a plethora of options to amaze all the tourist across the world. Day 1 Hotels Map Flights We have been to quite a few places in Rajasthan, but Jaisalmer has its own unique charm to explore. Being famous for its beautiful fort, lakes, and gardens. The city gives us a glimpse of the rich cultural heritage and colors of the state of Rajasthan, India. If you’re visiting India’s Golden City, you’ll learn the history behind the prehistoric walls and experience the beautiful culture of the desert state of Rajasthan. Here’s We’ve prepared a list of the Top things to do in this magnificent city. Hotels Map Flights ** Watch Sunrise in Thar Dessert ** Since our flight was delayed and we couldn’t catch sunset in Thar dessert. We made it to sunrise next morning and trust us, the sunrise was as stunning as it could be. Less crowd, whole sand dunes to ourselves, cheap camel ride, all of it was in place. No doubt, sunsets in dunes will give you beautiful opportunities to take pictures but sunrise is equally wonderful. So, if you wish to do a lot of photography, we insist you to visit dunes for sunrise. ** Dessert Safari & Cultural Night ** If you want to step away from the city bustle and experience life on the desert. We highly recommend doing the dessert safari in Sam, Jaisalmer. You can take evening safari and enjoy and sun sinking down by the dunes. you can also enjoy Rajasthani folk music & dance performances, followed by a sumptuous local cuisine buffet dinner. ** Camp stay in Sam Sand Dunes ** Dessert camping in Sam sand dunes has its own different experience where you can enjoy the dessert life and indulge into Rajasthani cultural night. We were staying in Le Royal Dessert Camp, which is one of the best luxury dessert camp in Sam. There are different Cottages/ AC tents/ non-AC tents that you can decide to stay in based on your choice. To name a few, you can also book to stay in one of these dessert camps – the oasis, Dessert safari camp, Prince dessert camp etc. you can choose to book swiss tents or AC deluxe tents to enjoy your stay. All of these dessert camps will have Camel Safari + Cultural night and stay included in the package. Camping rates: INR 3000- 6000 per person for AC Tents/cottages. ** Take a tour of Jain Temples ** Jaisalmer has some of the wonderful Jain temples. Behold and explore the Jain Temples in Jaisalmer, which are marvelous treasures of the desert city and witness the intricate designs of the temples dating back to the 12th and 15th century. Within the vicinity of The Jaisalmer fort lie 7 Jain temples which are a quintessence of beautiful structural designs. Right from ceilings to tombs to gateways, each part of this temple is decorated with mirrors, frescoes, carvings, etc. Shoes, leather items, food items are strictly prohibited. The time restrictions are only for tourists. Jain pilgrims can visit throughout the day. Timings: Till 12 noon (every day for non-jains) Entry Fee: Free (Indian) -INR 10 (Foreigner) Camera Fee: INR 50 (Still) and INR 100 (Video). ** Immerse in the marvelous architecture of Havelis ** In the city of Jaisalmer, Rajasthan a classical architectural marvel stands. 3 Havelis, Patwao ki Haveli, Nathmal ki Haveli and Salim Singh ki haveli are the most popular attractions in Jaisalmer. Patwao ki Haveli: A cluster of 5 small havelies, it was the first haveli that was constructed in Jaisalmer. It is said that he was a very rich trader of those times and so he commissioned 5 separate havelis for his 5 sons. The walls of Patwon ki Haveli were encrusted with stunning mirror work and beautiful paintings, which have slightly lost its sheen due to abuse and encroachment. Hotels Map Flights The colossal arches, 60 wonderful jharokhas (balconies) and gateways are other highlight of the architecture. The walls of Patwon ki Haveli were encrusted with stunning mirror work and beautiful paintings, which have slightly lost its sheen due to abuse and encroachment. The colossal arches, 60 wonderful jharokhas (balconies) and gateways are other highlight of the architecture. Hotels Map Flights Salim Singh ki Haveli: Salim Singh ki Haveli was built in 1815 CE by Salim Singh, the then Prime Minister of the kingdom when Jaisalmer was the capital. The architecture of this haveli is unique as compared to the other Havelis. This mansion was not created with the help of cements and mortar- the stones relate to strong iron rods. The architecture of this mansion is inspired by dancing peacock. The mansion has five storeys and every structure is carefully built and carved. The Haveli consists of as many as 38 balconies and they all have distinct designs. Hotels Map Flights Nathmal ki Haveli: Nathmalji ki Haveli is a renowned architectural marvel in the heart of Jaisalmer near Patwon ki Haveli. It is one of the prominent Jaisalmer places to visit. Nathmalji ki Haveli is a renowned architectural marvel in the heart of Jaisalmer near Patwon ki Haveli. It is one of the prominent Jaisalmer places to visit. The chief architects of this haveli were two brothers, named Hathi and Lulu. There is a very interesting story regarding its construction. It is believed that both the brothers started building the facets of the haveli simultaneously. The two sides are similar, but not identical. Timings: 8 AM to 6 PM Day 2 Hotels Map Flights ** Eat the local cuisine (Rajasthani thali) ** We are big fan of Rajasthani food. Rajasthan’s cuisine is as rich, colorful and diverse as its people and traditions. The delicacies of this desert state will delight your taste buds with a tasty spread of gastronomic delights. You must try Dal baati churma, Pyaz ki kahori (onion kachori), Mirchi bada and Sweet dish – Gevar. We loved the food of The Trio restaurant as they served delicious Rajasthani thali. Make sure to head to some great roof top restaurants in Jaisalmer which serves you some amazing food along with the view of Jaisalmer fort. We suggest, Suryagarh Restaurant, Pleasant Haveli restaurant and The Lal Garh. Hotels Map Flights ** Boating in Gadisar Lake ** Gadisar Lake or Gadsisar Lake is an artificial reservoir in Jaisalmer. It was the only source of water for the Jaisalmer city in the olden days and also one of the best Jaisalmer sightseeing places. The Gadisar Lake can be visited any time of the day, though it is best to go early in the morning and watch the sun rise. Boating facility is also available in this lake where charges vary from type of boat and based on duration of boating. Shikaras are also available to go around the lake. The serene Gadisar Lake springs to life during the annual Gangaur celebrations. This is the most popular point to take photographs of Jaisalmer Fort early in the morning when the fort looks golden with the first rays of the Sun and a bird viewing site and a major attraction of Jaisalmer city. 6 AM to 6 PM Rs. 10 for Row Boat, Rs. 50 for Paddle Boat and Rs. 100 for Shikara for 30 minutes ** Witness the sunset at Bada Bagh ** Bada Bagh, also known as Bara Bagh literally means a spacious, palatial garden. Situated just 6 kilometers away from Jaisalmer, enroute Ramgarh, the garden boasts of royal cenotaphs with beautifully, carved images of the late Maharajas and their families. Hotels Map Flights Each Chhatri preserves an inscribed tablet recording the death of Maharajas. We went to watch the sunset here and we were mesmerized by the history of this place and the beautiful view this place offers by the windmills. The single brown desert provides a picturesque landscape for this attraction. In the desolate desert, the peace is like having taken a fistful of tranquilizers- a crypt-quiet atmosphere allowing you to soak in the faintest whirr of the wind as it rumbles the sand. Witnessing the sunset from Bada Bagh is a memory one holds forever. Entry fee: INR 20 for domestic, INR 50 for others Hotels Map Flights ** Get lost in the history of abandoned village – Kuldhara** Kuldhara was not part of our itinerary, but our cab driver made us stopover here to look at this place and we are glad we did. There’s so much history about this place being abandoned. History says, Kuldhara is an abandoned and cursed village in the Jaisalmer district of Rajasthan, India. This is one of the haunted places in Rajasthan and also one of the famous tourist places in Jaisalmer. Per legend, Salim Singh was the Diwan of Jaisalmer who was known for dissipation. He set eyes on the beautiful daughter of the chief of the village. He also told the villagers of Kuldhara that if his wish wasn’t fulfilled, he would levy heavy taxes on them. Brahmins were very staunch towards their principles. Fearing the Salim Singh, instead of giving their daughter, the villagers left their homes and their belongings and ran away to a place which no one knows till date. But before leaving, they cursed the place that no one would be able to live there again. Till this day, the village remains abandoned and no one really spends a night here. The ruins of Kuldhara are a fine example of the architectural excellence of that era and draw photographers and movie-makers to their narrow lanes. Hotels Map Flights ** Feel Patriotic in Jaisalmer war museum ** Jaisalmer War Museum is situated at Military Station on the Jaisalmer – Jodhpur Highway. This unique war museum is surely a must visit place for all Indian and foreigner tourists coming to Jaisalmer. The museum covers an area of over 10 acres of land. It has two large Information Display Halls, an Audio Visual Room and a souvenir shop. Apart from the evolution of the Indian Army, the museum showcases tales of bravery and sacrifice of heroes of the wars. War trophies and vintage equipment are on display along with tanks, guns and military vehicles. The museum has murals of soldiers who lost their lives in the war and weapons used at that time. The Indian Air Force has also contributed in the museum by presenting a hunter aircraft, which was used during the Battle for Longewala during the 1971 Indo Pak War. The Museum is organized by the Indian Army. The entry to the Jaisalmer War Museum is open to and free for all visitors. Timings: 10 AM to 6 PM ** Parasailing in kanoi** Around 20 kms away from Jaisalmer, in Kanoi, you can do parasailing and add some adventure in your trip. We had parasailing and had so much fun. For those of you who are looking for some thrilling Parasailing in Jaisalmer, then this tour is just perfect for you. Get over the fear of height; try Parasailing and that too high up in the desert of Jaisalmer which is also said to be a blend of skydiving and has been attracting a lot of tourist across the globe. Parasailing and Paragliding are quite like each other with the only difference that Parasailing is conducted on an open ground with a parachute tied to a Jeep. This activity is conducted on the ground under the instruction of qualified instructors. Price: INR 700 per person Time: 10am – 5.30pm A visit to this effervescent city is bound to leave you mesmerized, and the stunning beauty and cultural richness of Jaisalmer is sure to compel you to come back. This blog was originally posted on MAP CAMERA TRAVEL Like this? Pin here for later

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Impossible Foods Continues Asian Expansion in Singapore

Award-winning restaurants Adrift by David Myers, Bread Street Kitchen by Gordon Ramsay, CUT by Wolfgang Puck, Empress, Park Bench Deli, Potato Head Singapore, Privé Orchard, and Three Buns Quayside amongst the first to serve Impossible™ in Singapore Impossible Foods expands its footprint throughout foodservice locations in Asia All restaurants in Singapore can order “Impossible 2.0,” considered one of the most innovative technologies in the world
SINGAPORE –(BUSINESS WIRE) Impossible Foods is launching its plant-based meat Thursday, 7 March, with a variety of dishes available at eight restaurants throughout Singapore — one of the world’s most vibrant and discerning culinary hotspots.
This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20190305006036/en/
Empress highlights Impossible meat in three dishes: Black Pepper Impossible Meatball Skewers, Pan Fried Impossible Gyoza, and Impossible Crispy Pancakes with Chinese Chives. (Photo: Business Wire)
Home to some of the world’s most fanatical food critics and gourmets, Singapore is considered one of the greatest food destinations worldwide . It’s the first Asian city to host The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards (called the “ Oscars of the global restaurant industry ”). Influenced by its geography and rich history – a cross-section of Malay, Chinese, Indonesian, Indian, Middle Eastern and European cultures – Singapore is famous for its abundance of Michelin-starred establishments and its bustling “hawker” street-food culture.
Tonight, 6 March from 6 to 10 pm, Impossible Foods will host the first public preview of its plant-based meat for the first 500 people who come to the world-famous Lau Pa Sat Festival Market. Dishes will be served at Lai Heng Fried Kway Teow and Sunny Viet Vietnamese Cuisine. In addition, one of the stalls will be transformed into an Impossible pop-up for one evening only, featuring the Impossible Burger by Chef Andrei Soen of Park Bench Deli and the Impossible Crispy Pancake with Chinese Chives by Chef Ricky Leung of Empress.
Starting 7 March, Impossible Foods’ flagship product will go on the menu at Singapore’s leading restaurants, including Park Bench Deli, Three Buns Quayside, Potato Head Singapore, Privé Orchard, Empress, and Marina Bay Sands’ Bread Street Kitchen by Gordon Ramsay, CUT by Wolfgang Puck and Adrift by David Myers. The restaurants will serve a wide variety of Impossible selections from Western and Asian gastronomy.
“Singaporeans are blessed with and obsessed with great food. They’re among the world’s most demanding gourmets — and I’m sure the region’s chefs will rise to the occasion and create the world’s most imaginative Impossible dishes yet,” said Pat Brown, CEO and Founder of Impossible Foods.
Impossible: Better in Every Way
The Impossible Burger debuted in 2016 at Momofuku Nishi, the New York City restaurant of Chef David Chang. More than 5,000 restaurants in the United States now serve the Impossible Burger — from award-winning restaurants to family-owned diners, and the nation’s original fast-food chain, White Castle. Last year, Impossible Foods launched in Asia and is now served in nearly 150 restaurants in Hong Kong and Macau.
Impossible Burger can be used in any ground meat dish and is easy to cook on the BBQ, charbroiler, flat top grill, high speed oven, steamer or sauté pan. The product contains no gluten, animal hormones or antibiotics. It’s kosher- and halal-certified.
A quarter-pound Impossible Burger has 0 mg cholesterol, 14 grams of total fat and 240 calories, and as much bioavailable iron and protein as a comparable serving of ground beef from cows. (A quarter-pound, conventional “80/20” patty from cows has 80 mg cholesterol, 23 grams of total fat and 290 calories.)
Impossible Every Which Way in Singapore
The island city-state of Singapore covers about 700 square kilometers and is home to more than 7,600 restaurants — including those helmed by some of the world’s best known chefs. Starting 7 March, the following award-winning establishments will begin serving Impossible’s flagship product:
Park Bench Deli serves sandwiches with a strong focus on high-quality ingredients. Chef Andrei Soen will feature the Impossible Patty Melt , ($22) which will replace their existing Patty Melt made with ground beef from cows.
Potato Head Singapore and Three Buns Quayside by Potato Head serve innovative burgers, sides, and desserts designed by Group Executive Chef Adam Penney. Both locations will offer brand-new burgers, including The Impossible Dream ($27) and Impossible Chedda ($23).
Privé Orchard ’s Group Executive Chef Robin Ho serves Juicy Lucy Impossible Meatball Spaghetti ($19) and Impossible Satay Sliders ($15), as well as the Nothing is Impossible Beef Cheeseburger , part of a kids set meal at $12.
Empress at the Asian Civilisations Museum offers traditional Chinese cuisine, and Executive Head Chef Ricky Leung will feature appetizers: Impossible Crispy Pancakes with Chinese Chives ($6.80), Pan-fried Impossible Gyoza ($6.80), Black Pepper Impossible Meatball Skewers ($8.80) and mains: Sichuan Mapo Tofu with Impossible Meat ($18) and Dragon’s Breath Fried Kuay Teow with Impossible Meatballs ($18).
Bread Street Kitchen by Gordon Ramsay showcases casual British European fare and is helmed by Executive Chef Sabrina Stillhart. The restaurant is offering The Impossible™ Flatbread ($24), The Impossible™ BSK Burger ($25), and The Impossible™ Wellington ($39), a creative spin on Bread Street Kitchen’s iconic Beef Wellington.
CUT by Wolfgang Puck is the first Asian outpost of the award-winning steak restaurant; Executive Chef Joshua Brown has created The Impossible™ Slider , a remake of its signature mini Kobe beef sliders, priced at $18 for three.
Adrift by David Myers boasts a creative California izakaya menu, inspired by David Myers’ sojourns across Asia and Europe. Executive Chef Wayne Brown serves The Impossible™ Sausage Roll , a juicy plant-based sausage ($14).
Impossible will be available to restaurants in Singapore on a limited and exclusive basis through Classic Fine Foods – Asia’s leading importer and distributor of fine foods. The group specialises in sourcing, importation, storage, marketing and distribution, and has been operating throughout Asia and Europe since 2001.
Big Taste, Small Footprint
Earlier this year, Impossible Foods launched its first product upgrade at the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES), where “Impossible Burger 2.0” took home the show’s highest honors, including the “ Most Unexpected Product ,” “ Best Product Launch ,” and “ Triumph of Food Engineering .”
Based in Redwood City, Calif., Impossible Foods uses modern science and technology to create wholesome and nutritious food, help restore natural ecosystems, and feed a growing population sustainably. The company makes meat from plants – with a much smaller environmental footprint than meat from animals.
To satisfy the global demand for meat at a fraction of the environmental impact, Impossible Foods developed a far more sustainable, scalable and affordable way to make meat, without the catastrophic environmental impact of livestock .
Shortly after its founding in 2011, Impossible Foods’ scientists discovered that one molecule — “ heme ” — is uniquely responsible for the explosion of flavors that result when meat is cooked. Impossible Foods’ scientists genetically engineer and ferment yeast to produce a heme protein naturally found in plants, called soy leghemoglobin.
The heme in Impossible Burger is identical to the essential heme humans have been consuming for hundreds of thousands of years in meat — and while the Impossible Burger delivers all the craveable depth of beef, it uses far fewer resources because it’s made from plants, not animals.
About Impossible Foods:
Based in California’s Silicon Valley, Impossible Foods makes delicious, nutritious meat and dairy products from plants — with a much smaller environmental footprint than meat from animals. The privately held company was founded in 2011 by Patrick O. Brown, M.D., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry at Stanford University, and a former Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. Investors include Khosla Ventures, Bill Gates, Google Ventures, Horizons Ventures, UBS, Viking Global Investors, Temasek, Sailing Capital, and Open Philanthropy Project.
More information:
impossiblefoods.com
www.twitter.com/impossiblefoods
www.facebook.com/impossiblefoods
www.instagram.com/impossible_foods
Press Kit:
www.impossiblefoods.com/media
//www.businesswire.com/news/home/20190305006036/en/
Rachel Soeharto: rachel.soeharto@impossiblefoods.com +1 310 490 1938
Andrea Seifert: andrea@aka-asia.com +65 8612 9224
Jia En Chan: jiaen@aka-asia.com +65 9389 4813
General Inquiries: ifsg@aka-asia.com +65 6222 6136

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‘Driven by its cuisine, Japanese food exports to India jumped 40 per cent in 2018’

Twitter Facebook Pinterest Google+ Search Forever NEWS Economic ‘Driven by its cuisine, Japanese food exports to India jumped 40 per cent in 2018’ ‘Driven by its cuisine, Japanese food exports to India jumped 40 per cent in 2018’ Japanese Ambassador Kenji Hiramatsu.
Indicative of the growing popularity of Japanese cuisine in India, food exports from the East Asian nation jumped 40 per cent in 2018.
Even as it is working with various entities to further bump this up and has bestowed a government-authenticated tag on 36 fine diners.
“Last year, Japan reached an agreement with India on the sanitary certificate of fishery products exported from Japan to India. Following this, in 2018, the export of Japanese food from Japan to India increased to about 1.3 billion Japanese yen (about Rs 833 million), which translates to a more than 40 per cent increase compared to 900 million Japanese yen (about Rs 580 million) in 2016,” the country’s Ambassador, Kenji Hiramatsu, told IANS in an interview.
The Japanese government is currently working on increasing exports of agricultural products and foods to India and is engaged in discussions with Indian government agencies including the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), Ministry of Agriculture & Farmers Welfare (MoAFW) and Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MoFPI), he said.
“With FSSAI, we signed an MoU on food safety last October at the annual summit meeting, and are currently in discussions on improving the management system of food imports to India. With MoAFW, we are having discussions on exporting Japanese apples and pears to India,” the ambassador said.
For Japanese restaurants, he pointed out, “the availability of Japanese ingredients and drinks from Japan are essential. Therefore, in order to promote Japanese food in India, at the same time, we also need to work on the establishment of an ecosystem where Indian outlets can have easy access to Japanese ingredients and drinks. I will keep working on this important task furthermore”.
He also pointed out that until last year, the number of certified Japanese Food Supporters, a tag granted by the Japan External Trade Organisation to fine diners, was only one in India, but now, the number has dramatically increased and 36 are certified in India, including 16 which were certified in February.
“I hope more Indian people will start visiting these restaurants and enjoy the taste of Japan,” he said.
How would he describe the role of food diplomacy in India-Japan ties?
“I think we can understand each other’s culture more in depth at the ground level by appreciating both Indian and Japanese food. You can also learn something about Japanese sensitivity and sense of beauty through Japanese cuisine.
“Japan is a country with a highly refined food culture, and the Japanese people have traditionally enjoyed a rich variety of food gathered from the mountains as well as the sea. Japan has four distinct seasons, and in each of these four seasons, we can enjoy different kinds of agricultural produce and fresh seafood at their best,” he said, adding that Japanese chefs are fully in tune with the seasons and use the freshest available seasonal ingredients to create Japanese cuisine.
“Enjoying Japanese food also means learning about the Japanese people and their culture. Through cultural exchanges including food between Japan and India, I think we can enrich our lives and gain a better understanding of each other’s country,” the ambassador explained.
How does he see the roadmap for the spread of Japanese cuisine in India?
“Currently, we have some Japanese restaurants operating in major cities of India, such as Delhi, Mumbai, Bengaluru and Chennai, because of the increasing number of Japanese expats and also the growing awareness of Japanese food, especially among young Indians. We would like to reach out more to Indian people in these big cities first,” Hiramatsu said.
(Vishnu Makhijani can be contacted at vishnu.makhijani@ians.in)

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Celebrating Essence of Superfood for Super Women at The Imperial

Travel Celebrating Essence of Superfood for Super Women at The Imperial The Imperial Culinary Club celebrated women’s day with chef Parul Pratap’s healthy recipes & tea sommelier Anamika Singh’s tea infusions
CELEBRATING THE power of women, The Imperial Culinary Club organised a session dedicated to superfoods with Chef Parul Pratap and Tea Sommelier Anamika Singh- Founder of Anandini Himalaya Tea. The duo led their expertise to the club with a live culinary session on superfood recipes and tea infusions. The session focused on every common house kitchens where women can bring the best use of superfoods.
Turmeric, Spinach, cumin, pomegranate, beetroot, walnuts and more. The smorgasbord of these superfoods and spices is actually hidden in a woman’s kitchens. The concept of superfoods has been trending for a while and has gained recognition, both nationally and internationally.
‘Superfoods’ worldwide are mostly international foods such as kale, chia seeds, and quinoa and have come into India at the cost of the rich variety of Indian foods that have existed for centuries. The term has started gaining popularity among Indians because of their rich omega 3 fatty acids, antioxidants and dietary fibre.
In India, the label superfood is being associated with the forgotten foods like millets, amaranth, basil seeds and the likes. Expressing her views, Chef Parul stated, “Food heals. Food is the medicine for not just the soul but several ailments as well, by including certain ingredients in our everyday meals and snacks, we can aid healing and enhance the nutritive value of what we eat. By using superfoods in our daily meals, we can make every dish delicious and healthy without compromising on indulgence or taste.”
Chef Parul, in her interactive master class, demonstrated the recipe of Pumpkin Risotto with Basil Butter and Oats Apple Crumble in details which can simply be made by easily accessible ingredients. Apple Crumble originated during World War II food rationing. The topping is made of butter, flour, and brown sugar rolled together so that it resembles breadcrumbs. The major objective was to discover the relevance and the secret health benefits of our very own spice box, herbs and vegetables.
Complementing Chef Parul’s culinary tribute to women was Anamika’s all new tea blends. Born into a family of tea makers and drinkers, Anamika carries an ocean full of knowledge on tea. While introducing two new lovely flavours, ‘Humming Homeward’ and ‘Bronze’, Anamika shared the grasp of ‘How to Make a Perfect Cup of Tea’. “One should be very careful while choosing the type of tea to use. It is important to know the source of the tea leaves. Create an experience with a cup of tea. Eventually what you sip is what affects your body. Hence be mindful about what you sip,” she says.
The session was a 38th remarkable addition to the tradition of The Imperial culinary club. “The Imperial culinary club has a huge following in creating unforgettable learning experiences for our discerning guests. We have taught global recipes, tried to impart culinary skills in the simplest manner with interactive sessions on a live station and solved all home cooking queries for them,” Vijay Wanchoo, Senior Executive Vice President & General Manager, the Imperial, New Delhi added.
Speaking about his future plans with the club, Wanchoo expressed his desire to launch a special coffee table book showcasing The Imperial’s cuisine. Share this article: Tags

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5 Best Options for Planning a 10 Day Trip to India

image source – www.indiainmymind.com
Suggested Tour itinerary: Delhi-Manali-Jispa-Sarchu-Leh-Uley Topko-Basgo-Leh-Delhi
One of the best ways to explore the country in 10 days is Ladakh Tour which was far away from the hustle-bustle of the city. Holidays in Ladakh offers beyond your imagination. Your adventure begins as soon as you enter between Manali and Leh and your Journey gets most then expect. Visit the major attraction of Delhi, Manali, Leh, Sarchu, and other destinations included in this tour.
The unmatched natural beauty: Jammu & Kashmir Tour – image source – www.aujourdhuivoyage.com
Suggested Tour Itinerary: Srinagar-Sonamarg-Gulmarg-Pahalgam-Katra-Jammu
This is the best thing about traveling is that it makes you realize what you were missing. Jammu & Kashmir tour package can be a difficult state to travel in India with all that abandoned beauty. The region has everything that you might be interested in doing in India like snow-capped mountains, scenic landscape, adventure activities, and delicious food.
Get a chance to admire the awe-inspiring architectural grandeur: Golden Triangle Tour image source – www.indiainmymind.com
Suggested Tour itinerary: Delhi-Agra-Jaipur- Delhi
The most searchable and traversed tour of Golden Triangle India Tour , thus it is deliberately listed in the bucket list of travelers. Discovering the most popular destinations of North India, the Golden Triangle Tour Package is one of a kind as it allows the one to get drenched into the history and cultures of India. You can enjoy a guided tour of the historical architectures of these cities and enjoy shopping in Jaipur.
A sight of marvelous majesty and glory: Forts and Palaces tour image source – www.rajasthaninmymind.com
Suggested Tour itinerary: Delhi-Mandawa-Bikaner-Jaisalmer-Jodhpur-Ranakpur-Udaipur-Pushkar-Jaipur-Fatehpur Sikri-Agra-Delhi
Unwind the magical beauty of majestic forts and palaces of Rajasthan. Rajasthan is the most popular for its beautiful forts and palaces which are probably the finest example of the brilliance of artisans. The royal state boasts up the rich cultures and traditions. The forts and palaces of Rajasthan reflect the glorifying past of bygone era. This tour covers the popular forts and palaces of included cities along with enjoying a camel ride in Jaisalmer.
Loosen up in the serenity and romance of South India: Kerala Tour image source – www.indiainmymind.com
Suggested Tour itinerary: Cochin-Munnar-Periyar-Kumarakom-Alleppey-Kovalam
Certainly one of the most scenic places to India, Kerala is also known as the “God own Country”. Kerala is enclosed with magnificent backwaters, emerald tea plantations, pristine beaches, and tranquil cities which are the most popular attractions of Kerala. Experience the rich cultures, vivid temples, mouth-watering cuisines add uniqueness to the state.
These are some of the best trips of India which give you a chance to get immersed into the vibrancy of Indian beauty. There are many other ways to plan your 10 days trip in India like treks to Uttarakhand, Textiles, and Handicrafts of Gujarat, Chennai Andaman Tour, India wildlife tour, etc which can also be a part or your tour. 10 days India tour is a far better option than planning short trips in India as the country is enclosed with endless beauty and magical charm.

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India Witnesses 40 percent hike in Japanese food exports

India Witnesses 40 percent hike in Japanese food exports March 6, 2019 at 5:30 pm With the growing Popularity of Japanese cuisine in food exports from the East Asian nation jumped 40 percent in 2018. Even as it is working with various entities to further bump this up and has bestowed a government-authenticated tag on 36 fine diners. The Japanese government is currently working on increasing exports of agricultural products and foods to India and is engaged in discussions with Indian government agencies including the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI). Ministry of Agriculture & Farmers Welfare (MoAFW) and Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MoFPI). the availability of Japanese ingredients and drinks from Japan are essential. Therefore, in order to promote Japanese food in India, at the same time, we also need to work on the establishment of an ecosystem where Indian outlets can have easy access to Japanese ingredients and drinks. I will keep working on this important task furthermore. The Japanese Ambassador pointed out that With FSSAI, they had signed an MoU on food safety last October at the annual summit meeting, and are currently in discussions on improving the management system of food imports to India. With MoAFW, they are having discussions on exporting Japanese apples and pears to India, This is also seen a way to improve ties between India and Japan and the food is an aspect how ties can improve and bring the nations closer. Related Posts

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Garima Arora: On Being Asia’s Best Female Chef

gaa , gaggan , garima arora , bangkok , michelin , rene redzepi , noma Comment Garima Arora talks to Aysha Tanya about leading a multi-cultural kitchen, using indian techniques on local produce, and the cerebral process of recipe creation. At about 7 pm one November evening, as Garima Arora, chef and owner of Gaa, Bangkok, huddled over a table with her sous chef and PR manager, her cellphone buzzed. She answered on loudspeaker (“my phone never works, and I have to answer all my calls on loudspeaker”) when the person on the other end of the line said, “Hello, we’re calling from The Michelin.” The whole room went completely quiet. When she finally hung up, the silence was broken with joyful cheers. Gaa helmed by Chef Garima Arora had been awarded its first Michelin star. She has worked in some of the most influential kitchens in the world — a three-year stint at Noma (ranked as the Best Restaurant in the World for four years) — where she was the only woman in the kitchen at one point; at Gorden Ramsey’s Verve in Dubai and at Gaggan in Bangkok, (named number 1 in Asia’s Best Restaurants for four years in a row) under the tutelage of Gaggan Anand. However, growing up, Garima wanted to be a journalist, and even worked as one for a year — but opening a restaurant was always at the back of her mind. “I thought I’d win my Pulitzer and then go open a restaurant,” she jokes in a podcast interview with Pooja Dhingra , the founder-owner of Le 15 Patisserie. She quickly realised however, that being a chef is a “young person’s game” and couldn’t be put off for too long, and enrolled at Le Cordon Bleu, Paris. And it wouldn’t be an exaggeration to say that today, Garima is definitely at the top of her game. Over a phone conversation, she patiently explains to me that no, the way it played out in The Hundred Foot Journey, is not how the call from The Michelin happened in real life. You don’t know how many stars you’ve won until the award ceremony takes place, and there isn’t a particular time that you can expect them to call, making the surprise even sweeter. Gaa opened its doors to the public in April 2017, when Chef Garima was 31 years old. Eighteen months into the journey, the restaurant already has a Michelin star under its belt, making her the first Indian woman to earn one. “Gaa is a culmination of all the reasons I fell in love with Thailand,” Garima shares with Pooja. “Thailand and India have a lot of similarities as far as food is concerned, and Gaa is an expression of that connection.” The style of the restaurant is cheekily described as ‘Modern Eclectic Cuisine’ and uses a lot of Indian techniques to bring out the best in local produce. As Garima explains , “One of the main techniques that we draw from India is extracting umami from vegetables. I think it’s amazing how Indian techniques let you do that, leaving nobody ever missing meat.” The restaurant also has its own fermentation room, and a lot of the in-house staples like soy sauce, fish sauce, butter and cheese are made here. There is a lot of pride in turning humble, ordinary ingredients into culinary marvels. Offering a 10-course and a 14-course tasting menu, the dishes served here have one foot firmly in the nostalgic past and the other in the future. Take, for example, a caramelised milk skin with beef and yeast aquafaba, or a burnt coconut sugar ice cream with pork floss, persimmon, macadamia cheese and malai. Both malai and milk skin are homely ingredients that we know and love, spun into wildly creative new avatars. Coming up with these recipes is a cerebral process, and learning to think about food intellectually is something that Garima picked up from her time in the Noma kitchen, where Chef Redzepi is known for his wonderfully scientific, yet poetic interpretations of Nordic ingredients that create iconoclastic dining experiences.
Unripe Jackfruit with Roti and Pickles I ask Garima who her mentors are, outside those in the industry, and without hesitation, says it is her father. “He’s my best friend, and outside the kitchen I look up to him for advice in every part of my life.” “We went out for dinner one night to a restaurant at the Taj. I may have been 12 or 13. I really enjoyed the meal, and my father said, ‘Do you want to know what the bill was?’ And he showed it to me. And he said, ‘If this is how you want to eat every night of your life, when you grow up, this is how much money you should earn for yourself.’ He doesn’t remember this, but I do. And it always stuck with me. Perhaps one reason I’m so diligent and independent and chase what I want so strongly is because I understand that being successful is important. And I think this is what we need to teach our women. Women’s emancipation or liberation does not happen by talking about it, it happens with education and economic independence. This is the most important and crucial point of making sure that women are equal in society. I’m glad he instilled that in me.” Rather fittingly, it was announced last week that Garima has also been voted Asia’s Best Female Chef, the only Indian woman to have won, so far. We talk about the what it means to have a separate category for women, when there isn’t one for men. “I for one am against positive discrimination of any sort,” she explains. “But that’s an ideal world, isn’t it? On the other hand, it is a great way to recognise individual and team efforts. [My team] is really excited and happy, and for that reason, I’m excited and happy.” Her team comprises of chefs and interns from 7 nationalities — the only fights they have is about what music to listen to in the kitchen — and Garima, having worked in some of the toughest and most demanding kitchens in the world herself, she has a clear idea of her job as leader of the pack. “One thing I have learned is to give every individual space to be their own personality. Recognising people for what they bring to your team and playing to their strengths is very important. Not everybody is the same, not everybody has the same skill sets or the same level of competence, but everyone has their own role to play.”
The interiors of Gaa However, there is no getting around that the fact that a commercial kitchen is an incredibly high-stress work environment, and that burnout rates are high. Garima believes that part of the solution is to pay the staff high wages, and give them more time off — a cost that will eventually have to be borne by the paying customer. But equally important is treating those in the service industry with more dignity. “It is so easy to de-humanise a server, and I do find that a lot in our diners today. There needs to be more empathy from diners and the management but also the third party, which is the critics. [The wait staff and chef are] expected to be superheroes, work crazy hours, look a certain way, be engaging with the guests, take criticism, but also be humble. It’s too much to ask from a human being, I think.” So what does India’s first woman to win a Michelin star want her legacy to be? “To have done something meaningful for my country, its cuisine and its people.” ALSO ON THE GOYA JOURNAL Featured

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Originally Posted By: grapedrink Quote: : That’s why the popularity of Vegemite in the UK never made sense to me.
Probably because salt is the only thing the Brits season their food with, so it’s an easy extension for them
Say what you want but while traditional British food is rubbish (except for cream tea and Fish & Chips), Brits figured out how to appropriate other world cuisines and put their own twist on it.
It’s no secret that UK has best Indian restaurants, very different from those in India.
Crack, right here.

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Where to Eat and Drink March 6–12

Dining Events Where to Eat and Drink March 6–12 The week in which: We raise a glass (and shell) to the Northwest’s only native oyster, break (pide) bread with our Turkish neighbors, and (unironically) sip tiki drinks. By Haley Gray 3/6/2019 at 9:00am
Cafe Turko will dish up a family-style Turkish dinner on the eve of International Women’s Day.
Celebrate the Native Olympia Oyster Washington boasts options aplenty for locally cultivated oysters—but just one of these shelled marine mollusks is native, and it needs our help. The Ostrea lurida , known to most as the Olympia oyster, is one of two dozen Pacific Northwest foods included in the Ark of Taste, a catalogue of at-risk foodstuff. This Wednesday night at Seattle Central College, Slow Food Seattle aims to use these tasty intertidal treasures (with dry riesling and cider to match) to enlist you in its conservation efforts. The educational evening of hors d’oeuvres is dually for enjoying and learning about this at-risk mollusk. Eat, drink, and listen to short presentations from local history and science writer David George Gordon and Puget Sound Restoration Fund deputy director Jodie Toft. Tickets are $40.
Wed, Mar 6 ESP Gin Tiki Cocktail Clash This Wednesday at Rumba , raise a paper umbrella-adorned glass to refined takes on the tawdry tiki drinks of yore. Competitors will shake or stir inventive gin-based tropical-themed drinks while attendees sip on cocktails. You’ll find no cheap rum or thick, saccharine syrups here; expect spirits meant to be tasted and modifiers selected to enhance, not conceal, their flavors. Eight local competitors will compete for the ultimate prize from 2 to 5; $10 admission includes two drink tickets. And there’s more: The clash is just one small part of Seattle Cocktail Week , an industry and general public event series that spans bars across the city.
Mar 6–27 Badass Women of Wine Month Bar Ferdinand in Capitol Hill’s Chophouse Row pours many a lovely glass of wine for the depth of flavor, surely, but also the depth of knowledge behind it. That’s why the restaurant is celebrating badass wine and the equally badass women who craft them every Wednesday from 6 to 8. The schedule goes as follows: Megan Barone from Petit Monde (March 6), Ioana and Raphael of the Prince and the Bear (March 13), Laurie Brauss of Vin2U Wine (March 20), and Liz and Owen of Owen Kotler Selections pouring Ancarani with Rita Babini (March 27). Come as you are, wine connoisseurs and non, for a midweek tasting.
Thu, Mar 7 International Women’s Day Eve Dinner It’s one thing to appreciate Turkish food’s deliciousness, says Intentionalist founder Laura Clise, but it’s one better to appreciate the person who made it. In honor of International Women’s Day, the local organization is hosting a family-style meal prepared by Seattle’s unofficial Turkish cuisine ambassador Sureyya Gokeri of Cafe Turko . The meal is intended to showcase the woman-powered, immigrant-owned business and to foster connections with Seattle’s Muslim community. Come for the bright Mediterranean flavors, but stay for the people and stories behind them. The evening begins at 6:30 and costs $25 per head.
Fri, Mar 8 Sambusa Popup Shop Sambusa, a Washington-based caterer and popup outfit, has twice won diners over with its Somali turnovers by the same name (sambusas are a savory, traditional Middle Eastern snack food, similar to the Southeast Asian samosa). This Friday at 4 in Elm Coffee Roasters , the local business returns for its third popup. Look for an only-in-the-PNW rendition of the classic dish, salmon sambusas, as well as the usual flavors.
Ticket Alert March 25: Karachi Cowboys Popup at Delancey Long-time Delancey regulars Nasir Zubair and Kyle Johnson are stepping away from the dining table and into the kitchen. The duo will pop up inside the Ballard pizzeria to create a multicourse mashup of Indian-Pakistani food imbued with a little bit of Texan soul. Zubair grew up in the melting pot of Houston, Texas—”where you can find cowboys of all types enjoying Sunday supper in an Indian or Pakistani restaurant,” says the event page. So, expect a likewise melting pot menu: papadam with a mint-jalapeno chutney, sweet potato samosa with tamarind barbecue chutney, smoked daal (lentils), mango coleslaw, garam masala–pickled beets, Bengali-style pickled cauliflower, and smoked beef rib. Dessert comes in the form of Frankie and Jo’s vegan gingered golden milk ice cream and a cardamom macaron. Dinner starts at 6:30; tickets are $60 and likely going fast. Please send event details for consideration to noshplanner[at]seattlemet[dot]c om. Filed under

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