‘I was cast as the exotic girl – then as the terrorist’s mother’: Madhur Jaffrey on acting, food and race | Food | The Guardian

‘I was cast as the exotic girl – then as the terrorist’s mother’: Madhur Jaffrey on acting, food and race | Food | The Guardian

First she was a movie star, then she taught the west to love Indian cookery. At 85, she looks back on two remarkable careers. W inter is emptying the last of its sleet from the sky as Madhur Jaffrey opens the door to her home in upstate New York. The house, built in the 1790s, smells of ancient wood. Jaffrey and her husband, the violinist Sanford Allen, spend a few days a week here, driving up from the Greenwich Village apartment where they have lived for 52 years. At 5ft 2in, with her hair in a shiny bob, Jaffrey cuts an unfussily elegant figure.
We are here to talk about her newest venture, Madhur Jaffrey’s Instantly Indian Cookbook. A compendium of recipes for the Instant Pot, an electric pressure cooker that has won itself an army of devotees known as “potheads”, it is her 30th cookbook. What makes this particularly impressive is that, for Jaffrey, writing about food has always been a second career.
At 85, she is widely considered responsible for bringing Indian cooking to a western audience through her books and her cooking shows on the BBC. But she is first and foremost an actor. In 1965, she won the Berlin film festival’s Silver Bear for best actress for her work in Merchant Ivory’s Shakespeare Wallah . A few years before that, she helped introduce Ismail Merchant to James Ivory. Today, she has 43 credits to her name on IMDb .
Most recently, she starred in her first rap video , playing the grandmother of the rapper Mr Cardamom. “The hardest part was learning the lines,” she says. “Because you’re talking so fast and have to know it all and have the beat right. We had to do it in two days.” Those lines included: “I’m the best damn nani that you ever done see” and: “I’m the number one nani – don’t fuck with me.”
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Madhur Jaffrey in Mr Cardamom.
“It’s like playing Lady Macbeth,” she told the New York Times. “If you’re an actress, you have to play everything.”
Jaffrey grew up in Delhi, surrounded by cousins, in a sprawling family compound with extensive gardens owned by her grandfather, a successful barrister. In her 2005 memoir Climbing the Mango Trees, Jaffrey recounts an active, largely happy childhood marked by lyrical adventures: when she was five, she writes, she learned how to swim “with the help of a watermelon”.
The fifth of six children, Jaffrey began going to the cinema at the age of three, thanks to her father, the manager of a ghee factory and an ardent cinephile. “We were steeped in the history of film,” she says. She remembers loving Tyrone Power, Laurence Olivier and the first Pride and Prejudice, and wanting “to be Marlon Brando”.
Years later, Jaffrey would meet the actor at an event honouring Shakespeare Wallah and her work in it. “It was weird,” she says: she was seated between Brando and the director Satyajit Ray for part of the evening, and the two talked across her the entire time. Then, later, Brando’s head was turned by a woman in a black sari. “After that, he wouldn’t stop,” Jaffrey says. “Wherever she went, he would follow.”
Films were also Jaffrey’s introduction to broader political awareness: when God Save the King was played after each screening, her whole family, led by her father, would walk out of the theatre. “It was our little protest,” she says. In 1947, when she was 14, the partition of India brought an onslaught of violence into Jaffrey’s life: friends of her family were killed, and at school, her Hindu and Muslim classmates refused to talk to each other. For her part, Jaffrey just wanted everyone to get along. “I was always in the middle,” she says, “and actually disliked by both sides because they didn’t understand me.”
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Jaffrey in the 1965 Merchant Ivory film Shakespeare Wallah, with Shashi Kapoor. Photograph: Kobal/Rex/Shutterstock
Having seen firsthand the way religious identity can be weaponised, Jaffrey has a dim view of today’s political climate, especially in her adopted home of the US. “Don’t start me,” she says. “I feel very strongly about it. I think it’s awful. I mean, this is supposed to be a democracy and a country made up of immigrants. Who is not an immigrant?” Intolerant thinking, she says, can “take hold of you like an awful disease”. She has seen it happen plenty of times, to people she knows. “We are all here for such a short time, for heaven’s sake. Let’s give each other respect and acceptance.”
At the age of 19, with the help of three scholarships, Jaffrey left India to study at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London. It was 1955, and the city, she remembers, was cold and covered in smog at three in the afternoon. The food was terrible, save for the fish and chips. Longing for a taste of home, she wrote to her mother, requesting recipes. Her mother dutifully obliged, writing her instructions in Hindi on onionskin paper that Jaffrey still has.
By the time she was at Rada, Jaffrey had already fallen in love with Saeed Jaffrey, also an actor; after graduation, she decided to follow him across the ocean to the town of Winooski in Vermont, where he was doing summer shows. Thanks to the movies, she says: “We knew what to expect. I wanted to see a drugstore where you could have a milkshake and a hot dog, so that’s the first thing I did. But other than that – I mean, there were surprising and wonderful things like the amount of food they ate, but we’d seen the country in every film.”
She and Saeed moved to New York, where they lived in the Village and threw dinners for their friends, a broad circle that included actors, musicians and artists. Among them were a soft-spoken young director named James Ivory and a brash would-be producer named Ismail Merchant. After the pair began collaborating, Jaffrey would go on to appear in six of their films, the last of which, Cotton Mary in 1999, she co-directed with Merchant.
Facebook Twitter Pinterest In 1981, in the BBC show Madhur Jaffrey’s Indian Cookery. Photograph: Allstar/BBC
Those films would prove to be some of the highlights of Jaffrey’s screen career: although roles on Broadway and Shakespeare Wallah got her off to a promising start, it was the subsequent scarcity of work that made her turn to writing to support her family, which had grown to include three daughters. In 1966, she had divorced Saeed and was living with Allen when Merchant persuaded Craig Claiborne to write an article about her. Indian Actress Is a Star in the Kitchen, Too, the headline in the New York Times proclaimed. The exposure “totally changed my life,” Jaffrey recalls: it eventually led to her first cookbook, in 1973, An Invitation to Indian Cooking.
The impact of that book still resonates. Although there were a few cookbooks about Indian cuisine written for western audiences, the food writer Mayukh Sen says: “Jaffrey was the first Indian cookbook author to really cut through the noise and challenge Americans to think beyond their misperceptions when it came to Indian food. “She was the perfect translator for American home cooks in that era when they may have regarded Indian food with a sense of prejudice or stupefied curiosity.” Crucially, Sen adds: “Madhur was also careful to root her writing in the personal rather than to make broad, overreaching statements about the cooking traditions of India.”
Nine years later, the BBC came calling, asking Jaffrey to be the face of a new cooking show about Indian food. But if Madhur Jaffrey’s Indian Cookery gave her – and by extension Indian food – exposure to a broader audience, it also reinforced a narrow idea of what she could do and the roles she could play.
As a young immigrant to England and the US, Jaffrey didn’t experience overt racism – that only happened once, she says, when they were filming the BBC show in Nottingham and a teenage boy ran past “saying ‘paki, paki’, or something like that”.
But throughout her acting career, Jaffrey repeatedly faced another kind of racism, the kind that pigeonholed her into roles she describes as “sort of Middle Eastern parts where I was dancing with a camel; the exotic girl. And then it became terrorists and terrorist mothers, and then it became doctors.”
That brand of discrimination was mirrored in her career as a writer. “It isn’t that I didn’t want to write about Italy and France. I wanted to, but they wouldn’t let me,” she says. “I would find articles by young [white] Americans going to India for the first time and writing about it in the New York Times, but I couldn’t do that in Italy, even though I’d been 50 times and loved Italy.”
When she proposed doing a world vegetarian cookbook to her longtime editor, Judith Jones, the idea was rejected. “She was a marvellous editor who taught me the most about everything, but she was stuck in a period and wouldn’t budge,” Jaffrey says. “Or maybe she thought it wouldn’t be accepted. I have no idea, but it was just very irksome.”
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Jaffrey with Ismail Merchant in 2001. Photograph: Gabe Palacio/Getty Images
There is still a bit of that in the food world today, she says – the idea that certain kinds of food can only be written about by certain kinds of writers. But that is changing, thanks to a new generation. “The young Indians, they don’t take any guff from anybody. I’m so proud of them,” she says, citing the cookbook author and Guardian columnist Meera Sodha and the food writers Tejal Rao and Priya Krishna. “They don’t think of themselves as not being able to do anything. They have a different kind of attitude and I really admire them.”
For her part, Sodha, who was born in 1982, the same year that Jaffrey’s BBC cooking show debuted, remembers Jaffrey as being a “hero” to her own mother, who had come to the UK from Uganda in the early 70s. “She wasn’t used to seeing Indian women on her British TV screen, let alone women looking glamorous, wearing a sari and cooking Indian food, which is what my mum did day in, day out,” Sodha says. She describes Jaffrey as “a trailblazer” who showed the western world that Indian food “wasn’t all kormas and vindaloo” – and her voice, Sodha adds, is still vital now. “I think people are only just starting to recognise that Indian food is as regional as Italian, in that ingredients and specialities can vary from village to village and town to town in a country of a billion,” she says.
Jaffrey’s latest book is a testament to the research and meticulousness that characterise her work: even basic rice recipes are prefaced by very specific instructions for how to remove the rice from the Instant Pot without ruining the delicate grains. It is one reason that her editor, Lexy Bloom, wanted her to write the book. “The Instant Pot market is crowded,” she says. “But there is no one like Madhur. She’s so smart and so careful and so precise, and has such specific taste.”
“I am sort of a perfectionist,” Jaffrey agrees. “I don’t stop until I have it absolutely right, even if it means trying it again and again.” She didn’t even own an Instant Pot before doing the book, and first had to learn how to use one, but managed to squeeze the research and writing into the two months she had before travelling to Los Angeles to film a series for NBC.
Even now, well into her 80s, she is still deftly switching back and forth between writing and acting. Over the coming week, in addition to press for the new book, she’s got a reading for a new project, something she won’t talk about except to say that it involves “wonderful actors.” There is an upcoming Pakistani literary festival, and in June, travel to the UK for various events. In July, she and Allen will take a vacation in Paris, and then she’ll be off to Mexico to visit her grandson. “He’s a foodie,” she says. “All my grandkids are foodies.”
As she poses for photographs outside in the grey April chill, she points out the sorrel, lettuce and onions beginning to sprout in her extensive gardens and exclaims with delight over the blueberry bushes, which are starting to blossom.
She and Allen first began coming up to the area to stay with Ivory and Merchant, who lived nearby; it was 35 years ago, while they were housesitting for the couple, that they found their house. Back then, being part of the Merchant Ivory gang was like being part of a family. “But then Ismail died, and then Ruth [Prawer Jhabvala, Merchant Ivory’s longtime screenwriter] died. It’s just not the same,” she says. “It’s all changed.”
For dinner, she and Allen are planning to go out to eat with friends. But usually, whether they are here or in the city, they prefer to cook. Allen also knows his way around a kitchen, and they cook all kinds of things.
“What did we have yesterday?” she says. “Indian food. I was using chayote” – a pear-shaped fruit with cucumber-like flesh – “and used it like an Indian vegetable. I made that, and we had a dal and rice. And that was it.”
Topics Madhur Jaffrey The G2 interview Food features

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The 13 Best Bucket List Destinations, According to Our Expert Travel Advisors – Travel+Leisure

Image zoom Matteo Colombo/Getty Images
If you’re like us, your bucket list is never truly complete. Tallying the destinations you’d like to travel to someday is a task that’s both fun and never-ending — and one that’s made infinitely more enjoyable by receiving recommendations from others.
That’s why we took to asking Travel + Leisure ’s A-List — our collection of the world’s top travel advisors — to see where they think we should go. Collectively, they cover every inch of the globe, helping to craft one-of-a-kind itineraries for passionate travelers.
From kicking back in an overwater bungalow in Bora Bora to glimpsing the out-of-this-world sands of Chile’s Atacama desert, here are 13 destinations T+L A-List advisors think you should add to your bucket list. Image zoom Elena Liseykina/Getty Images
“Moscow, Russia in the winter. Nothing takes your breath away like fresh snow at night on Red Square, the ruby red stars of the Kremlin lighting the horizon and the lights of GUM department store lighting the entire square.” — Greg Tepper, Exeter International
“The paradox of travel is wanting an isolated experience, but being partly responsible for why they are increasingly rare. Providencia remains one of the few pure locations, unspoiled by mass tourism. Reaching this uncharted island by small propeller plane is not a journey many are willing to make, almost ensuring the place to yourself. Colombia isn’t known for white sand or pristine beaches but Providencia is the exception. A sanctuary of vibrant marine life sets this “Sea of Seven Colors” ablaze. Colombian hospitality with an undercurrent of Caribbean ease gives this charming island a well-deserved place on our Amakuma-approved bucket list.” — Marc Beale, Amakuna
“Yunnan should be on every travelers’ bucket list — and foodies in particular will love this part of China. Yunnan is a landlocked province in the country’s southwest that sits on the border near Laos, Myanmar, and Vietnam. Yunnan cuisine is a fusion of the famously spicy Sichuan food of the north, the light and seafood-oriented cooking of the east, and the fresh Thai flavors of the south. In Yunnan, farm-to-table is not an Alice Waters creation, it’s what millions of people do every day. Truffles, chanterelles, and porcini are just common summer mushrooms that farmers forage in the mountains and bring to market. A Yunnan truffle chicken soup demands a pound of truffle alone! Yes. You heard me right, a pound.” — Mei Zhang, WildChina Image zoom Oscar Wong/Getty Images
“Definitely Marrakech. Go for the Yves-Saint Laurent Museum, which recently opened. Check out the design and artisanship in the unchangeable old souks and hip Sidi Ghanem. Be surprised by the nascent contemporary art scene. Marrakech is just about to host the second edition I:54 Contemporary African Art Fair. Don’t forget to visit MACAAL, the Museum of African Contemporary Art Al Maaden, and check out the newest exhibits. — Michael Diamond, Cobblestone Private Travel
“In the world, there are destinations that everyone should see once — Egypt’s pyramids and Machu Picchu, for example. But then there are the places that make you want to return over and over. The kind of place where you feel like buying a house and moving there. Provence is one of those places. The quality of light captured by artists such as Van Gogh and Cezanne is truly special. Visiting the places that inspired them, Arles and St Remy offer insight into the landscape and architecture that inspired them. The scents of lavender and thyme waft past when you are hiking and biking to stunning hilltop towns like Gordes and Les Baux. It is an experience that will keep you coming back. — Kathy Stewart, Butterfield & Robinson
“Amankora, Bhutan. Going there is a spiritual and cultural safari where you can walk through ancient rhododendron forests, glimpse endangered black necked cranes in the wild, soak in a hot stone bath, interact with saffron-robed monks, and dine in a rustic stone potato shed. Where else can you do all of that on the same trip?” — Chad Clark, Chad Clark Travel Ventures
“Primate treks are an unforgettable activity worthy of any travel bucket list. Embark on a gorilla trek in Rwanda or Uganda to witness endangered mountain gorillas in the wild, or be entertained by social chimps at a camp like Greystoke Mahale in Tanzania. For a unique safari activity in Africa, I love recommending fly camping with Kichaka Expeditions in Ruaha National Park, Tanzania. Here, travelers walk miles through the African bush with two armed guides to find a private mobile camp awaiting their arrival, offering one of the most remote places in ‘safari Africa.’” — Craig Beal, Travel Beyond Image zoom Igor Alecsander/Getty Images
“I think the Atacama desert in northern Chile has to be part of any sensible bucket list. Sandwiched between the Andes and the Pacific Ocean is this strip of desert which, according to NASA, is the driest in the world. They test their equipment here before they send it to Mars, and when you come here you’ll see why. It’s positively extra-terrestrial! One valley is red and looks just like Mars, while another is cratered like the moon. That’s all before you get to the bubbling hot geysers, the volcanoes, or the vast white salt flats scattered with bright pink flamingos. All this from the comfort of a world class lodge? Put it on the list!” — Paul Irvine, Dehouche
“Boarding the Magellan Explorer in Antarctica is like James Bond on ice. This is my kind of expedition — a mind-blowing ship that’s part ice breaker, part epic contemporary design haven. There is nothing about this ship that doesn’t scream ‘Let’s head south into the most uncharted landscapes on earth.’ It makes me hold my breath. Going to Antarctica is one of those once-in-a-lifetime trips, and the Magellan Explorer is how to do it in style.” — Sandy Cunningham, Outside Go
“Staying in an overwater bungalow in the turquoise blue waters of French Polynesia is a must. I have been fortunate enough to spend time in this magical destination for the past 20 years and it never gets old. Combine the island of Bora Bora with one of the Tuamotu islands and you will experience the best of French Polynesia. The majestic Mount Otemanu in Bora Bora and the lagoon of a “sunken volcano” in Rangiroa, paired with some of the best marine life in the world, can’t be matched. — Susanne Hamer, TravelStore Image zoom iStockphoto/Getty Images
“Of the world’s greatest island destinations, I recommend Maldives. Located just four degrees above the equator — way out there in the middle of the Indian Ocean — the atolls that make up this tiny nation are an exquisite natural wonder. The finely ground coral that makes the sand so eye-poppingly mesmerizing is soft underfoot, and makes a great seat for witnessing the place’s glowing red sunsets. The crystal clear waters are so clean that all kinds of life can be seen from outside the water. It’s also one of the most pristine places on earth to go snorkeling — colorful life in all forms: fish, reptiles, and mammals abound. Being in the water with 70 to 100 manta rays or a whale shark will leave an indelible mark on a traveler’s soul. It’s magical. The atolls are small and most often have only one resort or property on them, which translates to an peaceful, uncrowded environment. Who wouldn’t want to stay in an overwater bungalow?” — Malaka Hilton, Admiral Travel
“Santiago de Cuba is, for me, an absolute must. It’s especially great for those who’ve already seen Havana and the more heavily visited parts of eastern Cuba. The town is rich in history and a heart of Afro-Cuban culture and music — you can easily spend three days here or extend to hit Baracoa and explore eastern Cuba’s beautiful nature. This all gets a lot more accessible when American Airlines begins nonstop service from Miami this May — just in time for the steamy Carnaval at the end of July.” — Joe Sandillo, Almaz Journeys
“Consider Naxos, where old world Cycladic architecture meets white-sand beaches infused with local cuisine. The shorts-and-flip flop feel of the Greek Islands comes alive, walking through picturesque villages like Halki where the local artisans showcase their work. Put simply, visiting Naxos takes your breath away.” — Petros Zissimos, Hellenic Holidays Advertisement

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UK restaurant boss asks fellow businessmen to sell Pakistani cuisine with pride

Listen UK restaurant boss asks fellow businessmen to sell Pakistani cuisine with pride
LONDON: A leading Pakistani restaurant boss has called on Pakistani restaurant owners to proudly own Pakistani cuisine and stop marketing their business places as Indian.
Raja Suleman Raza, who made his name after setting up a successful chain of Spice Village restaurants across Britain, said that Pakistani cuisine has a distinct taste and flavour when compared with Indian cuisine but it was surprising that several Pakistanis market their restaurants and eateries as “Indian” while actually serving Pakistani cuisine and being of Pakistani origin.
“I proudly go around and tell the world that I am a Pakistani, my restaurants serve Pakistani cuisine and I am proud of it. I have been doing a great business by marketing my business associated with Pakistani name and Pakistani food. It’s unfortunate that hundreds of Pakistani restaurant and takeaway owners in Britain don’t want to be associated with the Pakistani name and instead use ‘Indian’ name to do business,” said Suleman Raza, who has won several food industry awards.
“I call on all such restaurant owners to reconsider their approach, be true to yourself, your origin and be proud of Pakistan. This will give you more respect and credibility than anything else,” he stressed in an interview with The News and Geo.
Suleman Raza came to Britain from Pakistan several years ago and started working as a chef in a Brixton restaurant with an aspiration to start his own restaurant. He always felt things could be done differently for more delectable outcomes. The young Suleman found himself captivated with London’s eclectic restaurant scene and longed to bring some of that foodie culture back to South of London.
“I was even more sure of my success as I thought I had found the magic potion to hit it off – the spices,” he said. Suleman decided to set up his restaurant business in Tooting for “people who might drive long distances to find an authentic restaurant with great food, where they could take their time with friends and families without feeling rushed. Slow, enjoyable food. Nothing to be rushed”.
While sweating himself in kitchen, Suleman immersed himself in almost daily restaurant planning. He began collecting travel-magazine photos of restaurants, along with reviews and other articles about their food presentations. “I started spending most of my time away from cooking thinking about the components of food, blends of spices, service and ambiance,” he recollected.
He opened Spice Village restaurant in 2004. His workdays usually started at 9 a.m., going over the itinerary of the day with dozens of items to source, and ended at 3 a.m. after clean-up. Suleman regularly mopped and swept the restaurant, hauled delivery boxes to the recycling centre, did the restaurant’s laundry and served as general handyman.
Suleman’s hard work has been rewarded. Customers have poured in, some of them from 30-40 miles away. Spice Village spread to the East of London and West of London too and its clients include mainly Pakistanis, Indians, Bangladeshis and many others. From Tooting it reached Ilford and then Southall.
“I always thought it would be more challenging to bring people in without alcohol. However, I believed if we would be good enough, we could do that. I don’t believe in alcohol and do believe in getting customers intoxicated with the power of spices – a much healthier option.”
Spice village customers range from the British House of Commons and House of Lords to Lambeth Palace, the Riyal Military Academy at Sandhurst, several embassies and London’s best starred hotels and iconic venues. London’s mayor Sadiq Khan ranks Spice Village among his favourites.
“I have made sure that I promote Pakistan every day through my business and that’s my responsibility and my commitment to the country of my origin. We are all set to go global in second half of 2019 with branches in South Asia and Middle East,” said Suleman.
LONDON: A leading Pakistani restaurant boss has called on Pakistani restaurant owners to proudly own Pakistani cuisine and stop marketing their business places as Indian.
Raja Suleman Raza, who made his name after setting up a successful chain of Spice Village restaurants across Britain, said that Pakistani cuisine has a distinct taste and flavour when compared with Indian cuisine but it was surprising that several Pakistanis market their restaurants and eateries as “Indian” while actually serving Pakistani cuisine and being of Pakistani origin.
“I proudly go around and tell the world that I am a Pakistani, my restaurants serve Pakistani cuisine and I am proud of it. I have been doing a great business by marketing my business associated with Pakistani name and Pakistani food. It’s unfortunate that hundreds of Pakistani restaurant and takeaway owners in Britain don’t want to be associated with the Pakistani name and instead use ‘Indian’ name to do business,” said Suleman Raza, who has won several food industry awards.
“I call on all such restaurant owners to reconsider their approach, be true to yourself, your origin and be proud of Pakistan. This will give you more respect and credibility than anything else,” he stressed in an interview with The News and Geo.
Suleman Raza came to Britain from Pakistan several years ago and started working as a chef in a Brixton restaurant with an aspiration to start his own restaurant. He always felt things could be done differently for more delectable outcomes. The young Suleman found himself captivated with London’s eclectic restaurant scene and longed to bring some of that foodie culture back to South of London.
“I was even more sure of my success as I thought I had found the magic potion to hit it off – the spices,” he said. Suleman decided to set up his restaurant business in Tooting for “people who might drive long distances to find an authentic restaurant with great food, where they could take their time with friends and families without feeling rushed. Slow, enjoyable food. Nothing to be rushed”.
While sweating himself in kitchen, Suleman immersed himself in almost daily restaurant planning. He began collecting travel-magazine photos of restaurants, along with reviews and other articles about their food presentations. “I started spending most of my time away from cooking thinking about the components of food, blends of spices, service and ambiance,” he recollected.
He opened Spice Village restaurant in 2004. His workdays usually started at 9 a.m., going over the itinerary of the day with dozens of items to source, and ended at 3 a.m. after clean-up. Suleman regularly mopped and swept the restaurant, hauled delivery boxes to the recycling centre, did the restaurant’s laundry and served as general handyman.
Suleman’s hard work has been rewarded. Customers have poured in, some of them from 30-40 miles away. Spice Village spread to the East of London and West of London too and its clients include mainly Pakistanis, Indians, Bangladeshis and many others. From Tooting it reached Ilford and then Southall.
“I always thought it would be more challenging to bring people in without alcohol. However, I believed if we would be good enough, we could do that. I don’t believe in alcohol and do believe in getting customers intoxicated with the power of spices – a much healthier option.”
Spice village customers range from the British House of Commons and House of Lords to Lambeth Palace, the Riyal Military Academy at Sandhurst, several embassies and London’s best starred hotels and iconic venues. London’s mayor Sadiq Khan ranks Spice Village among his favourites.
“I have made sure that I promote Pakistan every day through my business and that’s my responsibility and my commitment to the country of my origin. We are all set to go global in second half of 2019 with branches in South Asia and Middle East,” said Suleman. Latest News

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Find Out Your Dream Club Mahindra Resort With This Food Quiz

c. I love to try new cuisines, don’t stick to one
d. South Indian
7. What would you use excessively when you cook?
a. Garlic
c. Spices
d. Grated coconut
Now count the number of times you chose one option and based on your maximum selection, pick the Club Mahindra resort.
A. Club Mahindra JAISALMER
You are someone who really loves a nice paneer or butter chicken gravy with a delicious butter garlic naan to savour it with. You are all for curries and a heavy north Indian meal can help your mood drastically. Opportunities to try the local cuisine, at the Jaisalmer resort in Rajasthan, as well as in the city will be many. The traditional Dal Bati Churma and Gatte ki Subzi are all time favourites, but you should also try the Ker Sangri, which are desert beans with capers. It’s a local favourite. Other popular vegetarian dishes in Jaisalmer also include Bhanon Aloo -potatoes stuffed with mint paste, and served with gravy, and Kadi Pakoras, flour dumplings cooked in yogurt sauce. Non vegetarians can feast on the Murgh-e-Subz, boneless strips of chicken, stir fried with shredded vegetables. The Tandoor Thali is for those with a hearty appetite. With two chicken items, one being the famous tikka, kebabs, and naan, it is a fulfilling meal you will not find elsewhere other than this resort in Jaisalmer , Rajasthan!
B. Club Mahindra NALDEHRA
Truly a lover of the food served in the mountains, you are a true blue hippie. Himachal contains a lot of yoghurt in its cuisine. This includes meats cooked in yoghurt gravy and other traditional methods like Khatta Ghosht and Murgh Anardana. You must start your meals with the Khoru soup, which is rich in Naldehra flavours. The Club Mahindra Naldehra resort’s vegetarian menu includes Madra, an extremely popular dish. You can end your meal with delicious desserts made of rice and yoghurt.
C. Club Mahindra DUBAI
You have always been someone who experiements with their food and trying out new cuisines or restaurants is always on your agenda. Not only do you love to try various ingredients and sample the culture at different locations, you take active interest in travelling. Dubai is a place that is easier to plan and yet not incredibly heavy on the pocket and with the Club Mahindra resort sorting out your accommodation, you are all set. Dubai’s street food is a revelation. Bite into the delicious Shawarma, stuffed with marinated meat and garlic sauce, pickles and hummus. Or try the Falafel, pita pocket stuffed with lettuce, veggies, tahini and fries. A must try is Ghuzi, a succulent dish with roasted lamb served on top of rice with vegetables and nuts. There’s also Tabbouleh, Kebabs, fragrant Biryanis and seafood dishes. Al Harees, a traditional Arab baked dish made in a wheat pot with marinated meat is what almost every tourist tries.
D. Club Mahindra KERALA
Despite the various cuisines and cultures that surround us, you are someone who is comfortable sticking to what feels like home. A true lover of South Indian food and everything that the cuisine has to offer, you are at home with a pot of filter coffee and a dosa. The region of Kerala has loads to offer and the mainstay of the cuisine of Kerala are coconuts and aromatic spices. It lends it that distinct taste. Vegetarians also have a plenty to choose from. They can go for rice with aviyal (assorted vegetables in a yogurt-coconut base), thoran (dry vegetable or greens) or appam with stew or parotta with curry. Of course, universal favourites like sambhar, rasam and other curries make sure everybody has a happy, full belly. Typical vegetables used in Kerala cuisine are the locally grown jackfruit, yam, tapioca, plantains and other tubers.
Read these Club Mahindra reviews to know more about what members have to say about the food served at these above mentioned Club Mahindra resorts! Offer

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UK restaurant boss asks fellow businessmen to sell Pakistani cuisine with pride

UK restaurant boss asks fellow businessmen to sell Pakistani cuisine with pride UK restaurant boss asks fellow businessmen to sell Pakistani cuisine with pride National LONDON: A leading Pakistani restaurant boss has called on Pakistani restaurant owners to proudly own Pakistani cuisine and stop marketing their business places as Indian.Raja Suleman Raza, who made his name after setting up a successful chain of Spice Village restaurants across Britain, said that Pakistani cuisine has a distinct taste and flavour when compared with Indian cuisine but it was surprising that several Pakistanis market their restaurants and eateries as “Indian” while actually serving Pakistani cuisine and being of Pakistani origin. “I proudly go around and tell the world that I am a Pakistani, my restaurants serve Pakistani cuisine and I am proud of it. I have been doing a great business by marketing my business associated with Pakistani name and Pakistani food. It’s unfortunate that hundreds of Pakistani restaurant and takeaway owners in Britain don’t want to be associated with the Pakistani name and instead use ‘Indian’ name to do business,” said Suleman Raza, who has won several food industry awards. “I call on all such restaurant owners to reconsider their approach, be true to yourself, your origin and be proud of Pakistan. This will give you more respect and credibility than anything else,” he stressed in an interview with The News and Geo. Suleman Raza came to Britain from Pakistan several years ago and started working as a chef in a Brixton restaurant with an aspiration to start his own restaurant. He always felt things could be done differently for more delectable outcomes. The young Suleman found himself captivated with London’s eclectic restaurant scene and longed to bring some of that foodie culture back to South of London. “I was even more sure of my success as I thought I had found the magic potion to hit it off – the spices,” he said. Suleman decided to set up his restaurant business in Tooting for “people who might drive long distances to find an authentic restaurant with great food, where they could take their time with friends and families without feeling rushed. Slow, enjoyable food. Nothing to be rushed”.While sweating himself in kitchen, Suleman immersed himself in almost daily restaurant planning. He began collecting travel-magazine photos of restaurants, along with reviews and other articles about their food presentations. “I started spending most of my time away from cooking thinking about the components of food, blends of spices, service and ambiance,” he recollected.He opened Spice Village restaurant in 2004. His workdays usually started at 9 a.m., going over the itinerary of the day with dozens of items to source, and ended at 3 a.m. after clean-up. Suleman regularly mopped and swept the restaurant, hauled delivery boxes to the recycling centre, did the restaurant’s laundry and served as general handyman. Suleman’s hard work has been rewarded. Customers have poured in, some of them from 30-40 miles away. Spice Village spread to the East of London and West of London too and its clients include mainly Pakistanis, Indians, Bangladeshis and many others. From Tooting it reached Ilford and then Southall. “I always thought it would be more challenging to bring people in without alcohol. However, I believed if we would be good enough, we could do that. I don’t believe in alcohol and do believe in getting customers intoxicated with the power of spices – a much healthier option.” Spice village customers range from the British House of Commons and House of Lords to Lambeth Palace, the Riyal Military Academy at Sandhurst, several embassies and London’s best starred hotels and iconic venues. London’s mayor Sadiq Khan ranks Spice Village among his favourites. “I have made sure that I promote Pakistan every day through my business and that’s my responsibility and my commitment to the country of my origin. We are all set to go global in second half of 2019 with branches in South Asia and Middle East,” said Suleman. National http://bit.ly/2WvsXWG Share This:

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Comment on What Does Curcumin Do For Your Body? by Mukta Agrawal

What Does Curcumin Do For Your Body? Posted on 19 Feb
Turmeric or Curcumin is a wonder herb, and it has many health benefits. It is generally bright orange, bitter and also powerful.
It is the vibrant ingredient that gives curry its memorable hue. If you have tried Indian cuisine, you’ve likely tasted it and loved it. What is curcumin?
Curcumin is one of the most powerful natural home medicines you could take. Curcumin is the main active compound in turmeric, which is one of the most widely used plants in Chinese and Indian country medicine. Curcumin is extracted from turmeric to make few supplements and there’s growing interest in the capability of this all-powerful plant medicine to help prevent and reverse so many of our common health challenges.
What can curcumin do you for you? A lot, apparently. The superfood – or super spice, rather – may help with diabetes, heart health, eczema and psoriasis, pain relief and so much more.
This vibrant yellowish-orange root is a natural wonder. This is generally used in Asia for thousands of years both as a dye and for medicinal purposes, it has also been and still is a cooking staple (its hue makes curry and mustard, yellow). Originating from the same family as ginger, the most active element in turmeric is curcumin, and is where most of this golden spice gets its long list of healing properties. Composition Of Turmeric or curcumin
The important chemical component of turmeric or curcumin, diferuloylmethane, and bisdemethoxycurcumin.
Along with these elements, it contains volatile oils like atlantone, turmerone, and zingiberene. Other components are proteins, sugars, and resins. Curcumin contains an essential oil. Dry rhizomes yield8 % of essential oil. Fresh one’s yield24 % oil which contains zingiberene. Alcohol and Ketone are also obtained by volatile distillation.
Sound too good to be true? There’s more. Curcumin has been shown to lift levels of norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin. With a stronger cocktail properties of these neurochemicals you can get lot of benefits.
It has ten neuroprotective actions that generally give support for better memory, focus, and cognition. This multifunctional spice is also used to regulate fat metabolism, alleviate IBS, regulate bile flow, reduce joint pain and bring luster to the skin.
Curcumin as they call it in Hindi is revered for its spiritual significance. Often referred to as The Golden Spice or The Spice of Life, curcumin is a common accessory in wedding rituals and prayer ceremonies. Originally the spice was used in rites and rituals intended to promote fertility, prosperity, and spiritual purification.
It is available in turmeric, it is incredibly purifying. As a sure source of anti-fungal, anti-microbial and anti-bacterial extracts, this spice can help you fight infections and boost immunity. Dense in vitamins and minerals this magical curcumin spice promotes overall well-being.
Curcumin available in turmeric, The Healthiest Food
This spice is used for centuries in the kitchen and also medicinal treatments.
It is a golden spice of the life. It has various health benefits. Widely used in different medicines for curing health problems.
Other names of turmeric are CURCUMA LONGA, CURCUMIN, TUMERIC, CURCUMINE.
The botanical special name of turmeric is CURCUMA LONGA L. Nutritional Value Of Curcumin
Almost everyone uses turmeric while cooking food. But, have you ever thought of its nutritional value?
Nutritional value of 2 teaspoons of curcumin or turmeric is: Iron: 88 milligrams Here are the few benefits of using curcumin Fights Inflammation
Generally curcumin has few super anti-inflammatory properties. Chronic inflammation has been shown to cause diseases including cancer, arthritis, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and more. As you all know that curcumin found it had significant anti-inflammatory properties, powerful enough to match the effectiveness of some anti-inflammatory drugs. Packed with Antioxidants
Another big bonus of curcumin is its antioxidants. Antioxidants generally help us fight free radicals, and excessive amounts can be damaging to our DNA and cells. Curcumin is the key component in turmeric offering its antioxidant powers. As you know that most extremely effective in both fighting free radicals and boosting the body’s antioxidant enzymes. Regulates Mood
There’s definitely hope that curcumin can also help to regulate mood, including the treatment of depressive disorders. As you know that curcumin with a common antidepressant, fluoxetine. Individuals were either given 1,000 milligrams of curcumin and 20 milligrams of fluoxetine individually or combined, and found 1,000 milligrams of curcumin can be used to treat patients exclusively suffering with major depressive disorder. Improves Your Complexion
The health benefits of curcumin extend beyond internal health. The anti-inflammatory properties of curcumin can also boost the complexion when applied topically, boosting radiance and controlling oily skin. You can also consume curcumin in the form of capsules or tablets. Balances Blood Sugar
“The blood sugar balancing effects of curcumin make it a great option for those with type-1 or type-2 diabetes. “It helps to lower blood-sugar levels and fight insulin resistance.” One tasty way to incorporate it into your day is on food and drinks. Look for fresh and ideally certified organic curcumin. You can also take curcumin in the form of capsules. Reduces Joint Pain
We’ve already told you that turmeric or curcumin is known for its anti-inflammatory properties, so it’s no surprise it may help to reduce joint pain. It is important spice for reducing pain. As you all know that curcumin is comparable to the drug for dealing with pain relief and improved function. You can take curcumin in the form of supplements and capsules. Detoxifies the Body
The body naturally gets rid of waste, mostly with the help of the liver. But some experts feel you can help the process. Curcumin or Turmeric helps support our organ’s natural detoxification systems. It does this by thinning the bile. This allows the bile to flow more freely through the intestines and eliminate it from the body. Boosts the Immune System
A strong immunity can help your body better fight off germs and viruses. Curcumin has been shown to increase the immunity-boosting proteins in the body. Consider whipping up a batch of curry soup and be sure to top with some black pepper, which has been shown to help the body’s absorption of curcumin. You can consume curcumin in the form of supplements or capsules. Lowers Cortisol Levels
Cortisol is known as the “stress hormone.” And chronically elevated cortisol levels have been linked to a wide range of mental and physical conditions — from depression to obesity. As you all know that curcumin may lower cortisol and elevate positive neurotransmitters. You can take curcumin in the form of capsules. Protects Against Cancer
As you all know that you all have few promising results for curcumin and cancer. Generally with precancerous cells in various organs were treated with curcumin, and found that . The researchers suggest that it may stop the precancerous cells from growing into cancer. And that curcumin, when taken at high levels, may help fight against pancreatic cancer cells. Helps Lower Cholesterol
As all know that turmeric or curcumin can also lowers LDL cholesterol levels (a.k.a. “bad” cholesterol). These curcumin supplements or capsules may help increase the amount of LDL cholesterol the liver rids from the body, and may prevent the intestines from absorbing LDL. Reduces Body Fat
For now, eating healthy and exercise are the two best ways to maintain healthy body fat levels. But as you know that curcumin might be another option. The curcumin may also alter the composition of fat cells in our bodies. They also noted curcumin’s anti-obesity effects could be related to its inflammation-reducing properties. Improves Cardiovascular Health
Another impressive curcumin bit is the suggestion that it may improve cardiovascular health. And curcumin may be as effective in improving vascular function in post-menopausal women as a moderate exercise routine. As by combining exercise and curcumin into a program significantly shows the result of slowed age-related degeneration of the heart. Calms the Digestive System
Curcumin is widely used in Ayurvedic it also helps with various bodily issues, including digestion and gas. And, it appears there is some science to back it up. As you know that cucumin also reduces bloating and gas symptoms in subjects suffering from indigestion. Sharpens Memory
It’s still early for research to say for sure, but there some evidence suggests curcumin may help reduce the inflammation of nerves in the brain linked to Alzheimer’s Disease. That same study also found that curcumin may help to protect the brain against oxidative stress. Lowers Blood Pressure
A natural blood thinner, the curcumin in turmeric has the ability to dilate the arteries. Because it relaxes blood vessels, it may reduce the risk of hypertension. Its anti-inflammatory properties also may help with overall cardiovascular functioning, which in turn helps maintain a healthy blood flow. Helps You Get a Better Sleep
Logging seven to eight hours of shut-eye is crucial for your good health, as sleep deprivation can wreak havoc on everything from your hormones to your appetite. As you all know that curcumin capsules helps protect 72-hour sleep deprived human from the symptoms of sleep deprivation. Works as an Antiseptic
The health benefits of turmeric have found that it has antibacterial and anti-fungal properties, making it useful to disinfect cuts and burns. The curcumin may also speed up the healing of wounds. For very minor scrapes and cuts, creating a paste with the powder with water can be a quick at-home remedy. You can also take curcumin in the form of capsules. Works As A Natural Headache Remedy
Migraines tend to be caused by inflammation of blood vessels in the brain, and curcumin might just help to relieve the pressure. That’s thanks to its anti-inflammatory properties, you can consume curcumin in the form of supplements or capsules. Calms Eczema
Eczema is linked to chronic inflammation, and those with eczema know the frustration of suffering with dry and itchy skin. To date, there have been a handful of clinical trials looking at the effectiveness of curcumin on both eczema and psoriasis, with positive results with ingested curcumin. When curcumin is used topically in the form of capsules, it may benefit your skin health.
Above all are the benefits of curcumin. You can use curcumin in the form of supplements or capsules.
This entry was posted in Health and tagged Benefits of Curcumin , Benefits of curcumin capsules , Curcumin , Curcumin or turmeric , Curcumin uses , turmeric benefits . Mukta Agrawal Mukta Agrawal is a qualified nutritionist, and has been in the health and fitness arena since 7 years. She has a post graduate degree in clinical nutrition and dietetics, and is passionate about educating people regarding the truths and myths of health through the InLife Blog. Her belief in the fact that good health is for everyone is one of the highlights of her writing.

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The Ultimate Guide To 4 Days Of Fun In Singapore

/ The Ultimate Guide To 4 Days Of Fun In Singapore The Ultimate Guide To 4 Days Of Fun In Singapore May 7, 2019 by Lotte 28 Comments
Singapore is a city-state in Southeast Asia, small in size but so much fun to visit! It was totally different than the other countries we visited in Southeast Asia ( Philippines , Vietnam , Cambodia , Thailand , Laos and Malaysia ). I absolutely loved spending 4 days in Singapore, maybe because it was so different.
Different how? Well, just a couple of things on the top of my head… This post contains affiliate links.Please read my disclosure policy for more information. Singapore is very organized!
From the moment I arrived at the airport it became very clear that Singapore is extremely organized: Information is listed in 4 languages (English, Mandarin, Tamil and Malay). Getting through customs and getting a stamp in my passport is effortless because of the ingenious system of automatically opening gates with red and green lights. There is a free shuttle train taking us to the terminal where the MRT (Mass Rapid Transport) departs to the city center. What a difference with Manila, where the absence of a free shuttle and a total lack of cash had me in tears . Even the public toilets in Singapore are organized;-) Singapore is very clean!
Southeast Asia is great, really, I loved it! But it’s not clean… There is so much (plastic) trash lying next to the roads, floating in the water and piled up in the city streets.
Not in Singapore though, the city is spotless! Bins everywhere, grass that looks so straight like it has been cut with a nail clipper (I wouldn’t be surprised if it actually is;-), clean and maintained buildings, the newest cars and the shiniest malls… Imagine the floor would get wet, that would be horrible! LOL:-) (Public) transport in Singapore is very reliable!
Everyone who has been to Southeast Asia knows that even though the driver of the minivan/bus/tuktuk/etc. says he’ll take you from point A to point B, you never know exactly where you are going to end up.
Like the time I bought a bus ticket from Luang Prabang to Vang Vieng and was dropped off at Vang Vieng’s new bus station. Which is ‘conveniently’ located 2km out of town. And obviously jam-packed with friendly tuktuk drivers willing to take you to the city center. For a friendly price that is…
Or the time I thought I booked transportation from Hue to Hoi An and it turned out to be a full-blown tour taking the entire day.
Or that time in the Philippines , when I booked a ticket with Roro bus that was supposed to be so many things and turned out the be the complete opposite of those things.
None of this ‘nonsense’ in Singapore. In Singapore there is the easy to understand-communicated-in-4-languages-always-on-time-super-reliable-MRT.
I could probably go on for a while but let’s just say it was a nice change of pace. And funnily enough I found myself missing the chaos of Southeast Asia after a couple of days in structured Singapore:-) How to visit Singapore on a budget
Let me tell you about the budget needed for Singapore first before showing you around the city:-).
Expensive? Yes!
Worth it? Totally! Singapore itinerary and travel budget: facts and figures I traveled in Singapore with my husband, all expenses are for the two of us together . We spent 4 days in Singapore. We arrived by plane from Bangkok and left by bus to Johor Bahru in Malaysia. I quote prices in Singapore Dollar (SGD) as well as € and $. The SGD is a pretty stable currency, but of course there are some variations in the exchange rate. When we visited (in May 2015) €1 was approximately 1,50SGD and $1 around 1,40SGD . In total we spent 560SGD (€372/$400) in the 4 days we were in the country, which is an average of 140SGD (€93/$100) a day and includes all expenses in Singapore plus transportation costs to Johor Bahru bus terminal. Costs for the flight from Bangkok to Singapore are not included. Our Singapore expenses are made up of costs for accommodation, transport, food and activities Accommodation: 43% of daily costs Transportation: 9% of daily costs Food and drinks: 34% of daily costs Paid activities: 14% of daily costs Where (not) to stay in Singapore on a budget? The Vintage Inn: recommended
The first 2 nights we stayed at the Vintage Inn which is the only dorm room we stayed at during our 5-month trip. It’s not that I don’t like staying in dorms, but I found that, traveling as a couple, prices for a private room are similar or even cheaper than the price for two beds in a dorm.
About: The Vintage Inn is a nice hostel and located very close to the MRT station Little India. It is nice to have some privacy by means of a curtain you can slide for your ‘capsule’, other than that it’s the same as a regular dorm. Very clean, comfy bed, some room next to the mattress to put your stuff, a locker for valuables and really helpful friendly staff.
Price per night: we paid €34,20, including a basic breakfast. Fragrance Hotel Rose: not recommended
The second 2 nights we stayed at Fragrance Hotel Rose. Not a great stay…
About: the room was small (normal in Singapore) with an en-suite bathroom (a luxury in Singapore for a hotel under €100 per night). The bed was comfy, air conditioning nice and quiet, small free mineral water bottles supplied every day and complementary WiFi.
I cannot understand how a hotel that has just been renovated can already smell this bad.
Fragrant? Definitely!
Roses? Absolutely not!
The hotel opened just a couple of weeks before we stayed there, but it smelled like somebody had been smoking non-stop in the room for years. So. Gross!
We spend very little time in the room because every time we entered we felt like entering an ashtray. Staff was very apologetic about it and brought an air purifying device which helped for about an hour after which the smell was back. So I won’t be going back & I definitely wouldn’t be willing to pay more than the promotional rate.
Price per night: because of an introduction offer we only paid €47,93 per night, but because of the smoke I still felt this was way too much! Click here to find a nice hotel in Singapore! How to get around in Singapore?
The MRT in Singapore is extremely efficient and very cheap, check MRT info and map here . And if there is no MRT station close to your hotel, there is an extensive bus network as well.
The plus side of the bus is that you see more of the city but it usually takes longer than the MRT. More info about buses in Singapore can be found on this site. What to eat in Singapore?
Singapore is all about food! There is a mixture of cultures and cuisines, ranging from typical Singaporean dishes like chilli crab, to Peranakan dishes like laksa and Chinese influenced food such as Wanton Mee.
Though, I have to admit I ate a lot of Indian when I was there (which is yet another culture present in multifaceted Singapore). I am ‘slightly’ addicted to Indian food and there aren’t many places in the Netherlands where you can get proper Indian so I ate as much prata, dosa and curry as I could find.
I also tried and really liked the previously mentioned laksa (a spicy noodle soup), but stupidly enough forgot to try out the famous Singapore chilli crab…
Next time, definitely next time! Also read this awesome post by a true Singaporean which dishes you cannot miss during your Singapore visit. When to visit Singapore?
Singapore is a great year-round destination as it never gets cold. We visited in May when average temperatures are around 27 degrees Celsius. However, the average daily temperature in Singapore’s is very stable throughout the year and generally only fluctuates between 25-30 degrees Celsius.
If you are looking to avoid the rainy season, stay clear of November, December and January (when most precipitation falls). The best things to do in Singapore: our 4 day itinerary
There are so many things to do in Singapore, you could easily spend weeks and not run out of places to see (or things to eat). However, I ‘only’ spent 4 days in Singapore, involving a lot of sightseeing, walking and… sweating.
With temperatures over 30 degrees Celsius and a humidity of 90% it is impossible not to sweat. Unless you stay indoors all day (I guess this is actually quite possible because of the MRT and the countless air conditioned malls;-). But that would mean you’ll miss all the fun, so I say: walk, walk, walk! A brief summary of our Singapore itinerary Singapore day 1: Singapore skyline, Gardens of the Bay, Marina Bay Sands (click here to find out how much a night will cost you) , Chinatown, Singapore City Gallery, Merlion and the Singapore skyline by night. Singapore day 2: Little India, Raffles Hotel, Boat Quay, Clarke Quay and Robertson Quay. Singapore day 3: Sentosa Island, The Pinnacle @ Duxton, Marina Bay Sands observation deck. Singapore day 4: Mount Faber Loop, Henderson Waves, Alexander Arch, Canopy Walkway.
Below you can find all the nitty gritty details, a map and pictures of all the highlights we visited in Singapore. Singapore itinerary day 1 Itinerary : Vintage Inn – Singapore Skyline – Gardens of the Bay – Marina Bay Sands – Chinatown – Singapore City Gallery – Merlion and night skyline – Vintage Inn Admiring Singapore’s world famous skyline. Checking out the Singapore Flyer: 165 meters tall and currently the world’s second tallest Ferris Wheel. Walking through Gardens of the Bay , a green oasis in a busy city. Marveling at the amazing Marina Bay Sands Building. I mean: how do you come up with an idea like this?! And what’s more: how do you actually build something like this?! Admiring the cool buildings and structures in Singapore, like the Flower Domes and the artificial trees in Gardens of the Bay. Walking around Marina Sands Mall and laughing out loud when seeing the indoor canals, complete with little boats cruising through them. Sure, why not… Exploring the quaint streets of Chinatown, what a cute and colorful houses! Trying to count how many people and animals are displayed at the Sri Mariamman Temple Visiting Singapore City Gallery where a 11 meter scale model of the city is on display. I am truly impressed by the amount of planning involved to maximize the use of the limited amount of square meters available in this tiny country. Making fun of the Merlion: who came up with that?! It’s so weird and kitchy and ugly… Very recognizable though, that’s for sure;-) Admiring the skyline in the dark, maybe even more beautiful than by day… Singapore itinerary day 2 See map on Google Itinerary : Vintage Inn – Little India – Raffles Hotel – Boat Quay – Clarke Quay – Robertson Quay – Fragrance Hotel Rose Exploring Little India: this has got to be the most colorful house I have ever seen, so pretty! Another colorful building: the Sri Veeramakaliamman Temple. The famous Raffles hotel that opened its doors in 1887 (100 years before I was born!). Strolling around Boat Quay, Clarke Quay and Robertson Quay: the center of trade since the founding of Singapore. Singapore itinerary day 3 Itinerary: Fragrance Hotel Rose – Sentosa Island – The Pinnacle @ Duxton – Marina Bay Sands – Fragrance Hotel Rose Strolling around Sentosa Island: the playground of Singapore. Read about visiting Universal Studios on Sentosa Island here ! Sentosa Island: artificial beach? Check! View from Pinnacle @ Duxton: a residential building with the world’s longest sky garden (500 meters) on the 50th floor. Not a bad view from your roof top terrace:-) Look, the Buddha Tooth Relic Temple!
From one high building to the other. We ascend the Marina Bay Sands building and slowly see the night fall… Maybe next time we can stay at this iconic hotel … Singapore itinerary day 4 See map on Google Itinerary: Fragrance Hotel Rose – Mount Faber Loop – Henderson Waves – Alexander Arch – Canopy Walkway – Fragrance Hotel Rose As if we didn’t walk enough in the prior 3 days, we decided to do the Southern Ridges Walk. Very green and very nice! So green indeed, you would almost forget you are still in a big city! The Henderson Waves, what a beautiful bridge! The Canopy Walk: walking high above the ground through the treetops:-).
Yes I did a lot of walking:-). From the hotel I took the MRT or the bus into the city and walked from there because the actual city center isn’t that big.
Now that I think about it, despite the long list of things I visited, I did not actually spent much money on activities. There are only 3 paid activities in this Singapore itinerary: The Pinnacle @ Duxton sky garden (5SGD per person) The observation deck of the Marina Bay Sands building (23SGD per person) Movie ticket (10,50SGD per person). We love movies and it was nice to cool off after all the walking around in the hot sun.
You can download the budget breakdown infographic and the map of the 4 day itinerary below.
Looking for more travel planning resources? Check out the Phenomenal Globe Travel Planning Library and my Travel Resource page ! Have fun in Singapore and let me know if you have any questions!
This post was updated in May 2019 Like it? Share it!

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UK restaurant boss asks fellow businessmen to sell Pakistani cuisine with pride

Listen UK restaurant boss asks fellow businessmen to sell Pakistani cuisine with pride
LONDON: A leading Pakistani restaurant boss has called on Pakistani restaurant owners to proudly own Pakistani cuisine and stop marketing their business places as Indian.
Raja Suleman Raza, who made his name after setting up a successful chain of Spice Village restaurants across Britain, said that Pakistani cuisine has a distinct taste and flavour compared with Indian cuisine but it was surprising that several Pakistanis market their restaurants and eateries as ‘Indian’ while actually serving Pakistani cuisine and being of Pakistani origin.
“I proudly go around and tell the world that I am a Pakistani, my restaurants serve Pakistani cuisine and I am proud of it. I have been doing a great business by marketing my business associated with Pakistani name and Pakistani food. It’s unfortunate that hundreds of Pakistani restaurant and takeaway owners in Britain don’t want to be associated with the Pakistani name and instead use ‘Indian’ name to do business,” said Suleman Raza, who has won several food industry awards.
“I call on all such restaurant owners to reconsider their approach, be true to yourself, your origin and be proud of Pakistan. This will give you more respect and credibility than anything else,” he stressed in an interview with The News and Geo.
Suleman Raza came to Britain from Pakistan several years ago and started working as a chef in a Brixton restaurant with an aspiration to start his own restaurant. He always felt things could be done differently for more delectable outcomes. The young Suleman found himself captivated with London’s eclectic restaurant scene and longed to bring some of that foodie culture back to South of London.
“I was even more sure of my success as I thought I had found the magic potion to hit it off – the spices,” he said. Suleman decided to set up his restaurant business in Tooting for “people who might drive long distances to find an authentic restaurant with great food, where they could take their time with friends and families without feeling rushed. Slow, enjoyable food. Nothing to be rushed”.
While sweating himself in kitchen, Suleman immersed himself in almost daily restaurant planning. He began collecting travel-magazine photos of restaurants, along with reviews and other articles about their food presentations. “I started spending most of my time away from cooking thinking about the components of food, blends of spices, service and ambiance,” he recollected.
He opened Spice Village restaurant in 2004. His workdays usually started at 9 a.m., going over the itinerary of the day with dozens of items to source, and ended at 3 a.m. after clean-up. Suleman regularly mopped and swept the restaurant, hauled delivery boxes to the recycling centre, did the restaurant’s laundry and served as general handyman.
Suleman’s hard work has been rewarded. Customers have poured in, some of them from 30-40 miles away. Spice Village spread to the East of London and West of London too and its clients include mainly Pakistanis, Indians, Bangladeshis and many others. From Tooting it reached Ilford and then Southall.
“I always thought it would be more challenging to bring people in without alcohol. However, I believed if we would be good enough, we could do that. I don’t believe in alcohol and do believe in getting customers intoxicated with the power of spices – a much healthier option.”
Spice village customers range from the British House of Commons and House of Lords to Lambeth Palace, the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst, several embassies and London’s best starred hotels and iconic venues. London’s mayor Sadiq Khan ranks Spice Village among his favourites.
“I have made sure that I promote Pakistan every day through my business and that’s my responsibility and my commitment to the country of my origin. We are all set to go global in second half of 2019 with branches in South Asia and Middle East,” said Suleman.
LONDON: A leading Pakistani restaurant boss has called on Pakistani restaurant owners to proudly own Pakistani cuisine and stop marketing their business places as Indian.
Raja Suleman Raza, who made his name after setting up a successful chain of Spice Village restaurants across Britain, said that Pakistani cuisine has a distinct taste and flavour compared with Indian cuisine but it was surprising that several Pakistanis market their restaurants and eateries as ‘Indian’ while actually serving Pakistani cuisine and being of Pakistani origin.
“I proudly go around and tell the world that I am a Pakistani, my restaurants serve Pakistani cuisine and I am proud of it. I have been doing a great business by marketing my business associated with Pakistani name and Pakistani food. It’s unfortunate that hundreds of Pakistani restaurant and takeaway owners in Britain don’t want to be associated with the Pakistani name and instead use ‘Indian’ name to do business,” said Suleman Raza, who has won several food industry awards.
“I call on all such restaurant owners to reconsider their approach, be true to yourself, your origin and be proud of Pakistan. This will give you more respect and credibility than anything else,” he stressed in an interview with The News and Geo.
Suleman Raza came to Britain from Pakistan several years ago and started working as a chef in a Brixton restaurant with an aspiration to start his own restaurant. He always felt things could be done differently for more delectable outcomes. The young Suleman found himself captivated with London’s eclectic restaurant scene and longed to bring some of that foodie culture back to South of London.
“I was even more sure of my success as I thought I had found the magic potion to hit it off – the spices,” he said. Suleman decided to set up his restaurant business in Tooting for “people who might drive long distances to find an authentic restaurant with great food, where they could take their time with friends and families without feeling rushed. Slow, enjoyable food. Nothing to be rushed”.
While sweating himself in kitchen, Suleman immersed himself in almost daily restaurant planning. He began collecting travel-magazine photos of restaurants, along with reviews and other articles about their food presentations. “I started spending most of my time away from cooking thinking about the components of food, blends of spices, service and ambiance,” he recollected.
He opened Spice Village restaurant in 2004. His workdays usually started at 9 a.m., going over the itinerary of the day with dozens of items to source, and ended at 3 a.m. after clean-up. Suleman regularly mopped and swept the restaurant, hauled delivery boxes to the recycling centre, did the restaurant’s laundry and served as general handyman.
Suleman’s hard work has been rewarded. Customers have poured in, some of them from 30-40 miles away. Spice Village spread to the East of London and West of London too and its clients include mainly Pakistanis, Indians, Bangladeshis and many others. From Tooting it reached Ilford and then Southall.
“I always thought it would be more challenging to bring people in without alcohol. However, I believed if we would be good enough, we could do that. I don’t believe in alcohol and do believe in getting customers intoxicated with the power of spices – a much healthier option.”
Spice village customers range from the British House of Commons and House of Lords to Lambeth Palace, the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst, several embassies and London’s best starred hotels and iconic venues. London’s mayor Sadiq Khan ranks Spice Village among his favourites.
“I have made sure that I promote Pakistan every day through my business and that’s my responsibility and my commitment to the country of my origin. We are all set to go global in second half of 2019 with branches in South Asia and Middle East,” said Suleman. Latest News

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Eleven restaurants for sale in Essex that you can buy right now – Essex Live

Eleven restaurants for sale in Essex that you can buy right now Every one is someone’s dream job Share Pavarotti restaurant (Image: Dedman Gray) Get the biggest Daily stories by email Subscribe Thank you for subscribing See our privacy notice Could not subscribe, try again later Invalid Email
Have you ever fancied running your own restaurant?
Maybe 2019 is the year you, or someone you know, realise your dreams and luckily there are plenty of opportunities out there.
There’s everything from large Italians and Mediterranean restaurants to smaller cafes and tearooms all over the county, and you can choose from a busy city location to a quiet spot by the sea.
Essex Live has rounded up some of the best ones: The Mews (Image: Dedman Gray) The Mews
2 Nelson Mews, Southend-on-Sea SS1 1AL
What’s it like? This is billed as ‘one of Southend’s best known bar/restaurants’. There are three floors including a basement used for storage.
The ground floor has a bar and restaurant and space for 20 seats and the first floor has around 40 seats. There are separate kitchen and washing up areas.
The turnover is between £10,000-£14,000 per week and trade is split food 60% and drink 40%.
It’s spread over 4,000 sq ft.
The Mews is currently described as ‘a world of fine dining and exquisite luxury at one of Southend’s best kept secrets’.
Guide price: £795,000
Estate agent: Dedman Gray Property Consultants Limited ERI restaurant (Image: Christie & Co) ERI Restaurant
236-238 High Rd, Dagenham, Romford RM6 6AP
What’s it like?
This restaurant has been fully refurbished to a high standard. It’s on a busy road with plenty of passing trade and is large inside. It is currently closed.
On the ground floor there is space for up to 80 seats and also a full, open grill kitchen. There’s also a separate function room with pool tables which can take around 40 seats.
The kitchen is spacious and there is customer parking.
ERI was a Mediterranean restaurant which is now closed.
The whole space is 2,935 sq ft.
Guide price: Offers invited Timbers restaurant (Image: Hilton Smythe) Timbers Restaurant
Blake House Craft Centre, Rayne, Braintree , Essex CM77 6RA
What’s it like?
The popular Timbers restaurant at the craft centre was established back in the 1980s and the owner is now looking to retire.
It has space for up to 100 guests and includes a fully licensed bar and dance floor. It is also hired for private events including weddings. It also currently runs popular tribute and music acts every month.
There is plenty of scope to add value here as the opening hours could be extended and the themed nights could be expanded (these currently bring in 50% of the income).
Timbers currently offers a large array of menu options including breakfast, afternoon tea, daytime, fish and chips, evenings, snack and coach parties.
Guide price: £149,995 Mad Hatters tearoom (Image: Dedman Gray)
2 Queens Rd, Southend-on-Sea SS1 1LU
What’s it like?
This is one for those with a sense of fun. This is a themed cafe and tearooms just off Southend High Street and it’s currently very popular. There are lots of different afternoon teas to choose from, as well as breakfast, brunch, lunch and quality hand-made sandwiches.
They cater for functions too which brings in 30% of the business.
The gross profit over the last three years was £216,003.
The customer area is on the ground floor while the first floor has a cake/preparation room, washing up room, storage and staff toilets.
Guide price: £95,000
Estate agent: Dedman Gray Property Consultants Limited Ronnie’s cafe and wine bar (Image: Dedman Gray) Ronnie’s cafe and wine bar
18 Spa Road, Hockley SS5 4PH
What’s it like?
This decent-sized coffee shop and licensed cafe has seats for around 20 inside, plus some stool seating. There is also space for four chairs on the pavement outside.
As it’s around 460 sq ft, the estate agents suggest it’s ideal for first time caterers or partners looking for a small concern. There’s a bar/servery, a well-maintained kitchen and toilets.
The annual turnover is between £98,000-£102,000. The licence allows films, live and recorded music and dancing seven days a week til midnight.
A new, five-year lease will need to be purchased for £15,500 pa.
Guide price: £59,500
Estate agent: Dedman Gray Property Consultants Limited Read More Pavarotti restaurant (Image: Dedman Gray) Pavarotti restaurant
Hamlet Court Road, Westcliff-On-Sea, Essex, SS0
What’s it like?
This kind of restaurant doesn’t come up very often. It is set in a beautiful building in Westcliff which was once a bank. Set on a corner plot, you can’t miss this elegant building.
Features include a 4m high ceiling and a basement vault and safe.
The ground floor has around 80 seats and a kitchen and toilets. The basement is around 220 sq ft.
Pavarotti is currently an Italian restaurant offering ‘genuine Italian cuisine in beautiful surroundings’.
Overall the restaurant is 1,700 sq ft.
Guide price: £55,000
Estate agent: Dedman Gray Property Consultants Limited The Indian restaurant (Image: Bradleys Countrywide) Indian restaurant
Springfield Road, Chelmsford
What’s it like?
This award-winning Indian restaurant was established in Chelmsford in 1987. It’s in a busy area with plenty of passing trade, and it already has an excellent reputation.
Average weekly takings are around £6,500 per week and the lease is also available at £42,000 per year.
This includes four-bedroom accommodation on the first floor.
The restaurant currently offers an extensive Indian menu and has traditional decor.
This restaurant has chosen to leave its name out of the estate agents’ information sheet so we have done the same.
Guide price: £49,995 Lanthong restaurant (Image: Blacks Business Brokers) Lanthong
6 Baddow Rd, Chelmsford CM2 0DG
What’s it like?
The Lanthong Thai restaurant has been in the city for around ten years and has built up a superb reputation and client base.
It’s on Baddow Road which is seconds from the High Street and is always busy.
There are 60 seats for customers and the annual turnover is around £133,536.
The current owner wishes to retire.
All the furniture and fixtures are included.
Guide price: £59,950
Estate agent: Blacks Business Brokers Read More BBQ Express (Image: Hilton Smythe) BBQ Express
212 High Rd, Ilford IG1 1QB
What’s it like?
This might be a small chicken restaurant and takeaway but it has to be seen to be believed inside.
It boasts distinctive black, red, yellow and green decor and modern, booth-style seating.
It’s a family business, started in 2016, serving up freshly prepared grilled chicken, burgers, subs, wraps, skewers and desserts.
There’s a key area for development as it currently opens at noon, so the breakfast trade could be added, and an alcohol licence could be added too. It’s in a populated area and there is a good customer base.
Guide price: £129,999 Taco Ria restaurant (Image: Dedman Gray) Taco Ria
27 Chichester Rd, Southend-on-Sea SS1 2JP
What’s it like?
This is a ground floor restaurant that is being offered with all fixtures and fittings. It’s currently a taco and tequila bar spread over 1,060 sq ft.
Downstairs is the customer area, as well as outside space for six people. There’s also a bar and commercial kitchen. On the first floor there are toilets, staffroom, storage and cold room.
Takings are around £4,000 per week. There is a licence to play music til late.
Guide price: £49,950
Estate agent: Dedman Gray Property Consultants Limited Stay in the know, follow Essex Live
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7-9 Rosemary Road, Clacton CO15 1NZ
What’s it like?
This restaurant is billed as an investment opportunity. Romolo’s has been an Italian restaurant and pizzeria in the area for 35 years and has a good reputation.
The ground floor has been extended to the properties next door and now measures 1,400 sq ft. There’s a restaurant and bar, toilet and commercial kitchen.
Upstairs there’s a two-bedroom flat, also comprising lounge, kitchen and bathroom, in need of renovation
Guide price: £229,995
Estate agent: Omega Property Services Read More

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Quote: : wurcer great regional differences. India can roughly be divided in 6 cuisine regions.
Of these, Goa cooking in the West Indian region serves the spiciest meals.
Portuguese influence, a distinctive difference between Spanish cuisine and the neighbour is that the Portuguese love hot peppers in their dishes, Piri Piri is just the most well known example. Eating in Portugal can be flaming hot.
It were the Portuguese who brought chillies to Western India. (Portuguese city names in Goa : Vasco da Gama aka Vasco, Mormu gao , Mar gao , Varca, Goa Velha , Talei gao , Assa gao , Chor ao Island, etc
Food in the North of India leans more towards Persian/Mughal cuisine (dairy products, koriander, use of nuts).
Eastern Indian cuisine is highly influenced by Chinese and Tibetan cooking.
South India is known for everything fried, papadams, donuts, pancakes.
A more detailed list of various cuisines within India would be :
– Assam
– Awadhi
– Bengali
– Brahmin
– Coorg
– Chettinad
– Goa
– Gujarat
– Hyderabadi
– Kashmiri
– Kerala
– Konkani
– Meghalaya
– Malvani
– Manipur
– Mizoram
– Moplah
– Mughlai
– Nagaland
– Sikkim
– Syrian
– Parsi
– Punjabi
– Rajasthani
– Orija

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