Hungry Hound: Pa Lian in Wheaton is the only Burmese restaurant in Illinois

Hungry Hound: Pa Lian in Wheaton is the only Burmese restaurant in Illinois

Steve Dolinsky NAPERVILLE, Ill. (WLS) — The country of Myannmar, formerly known as Burma, is barely understood in the U.S. Even less so is its cuisine, since there is only one Burmese restaurant in the state. It’s in the western suburbs, where a small but strong ex-pat population has settled. Our Hungry Hound headed out there to check out the menu for himself recently. He was pleasantly surprised by what he found. EXTRA COURSE: ‘Fried tofu’ at Pa Lian EMBED More News Videos
In Steve’s Extra Course video, he talked about an appetizer that is a classic Burmese offering, called “fried tofu,” but in reality, it’s not tofu at all. He’ll explain. You’d think Burmese food would resemble its neighbors in Thailand, India or China. It’s close, but also unique unto itself. At Pa Lian, which has been open barely a year in a Wheaton mall, the family here is cooking just as if they were back home. “Basically what we eat is salad, rice and curries are most of the dishes we eat every day,” said Tawk Zalian, owner of Pa Lian. “Tea leaf salad is one of the national dishes – essential dish too – we eat every day.” They begin by shredding cabbage and adding in a few sliced tomatoes. Then a crunchy combo of lentils, yellow beans, toasted peanuts and sesame, followed by a spoonful of fermented tea leaves. A bit of oil, some lime and a vigorous mix to combine everything, resulting in a fantastically delicious salad. “It’s crunchy, a little bitternesss; you put the limes, that’s gonna make a little sour too. Depends on your taste,” Zalian said. Curries in Burma are based on ginger, onion and garlic and they’re not spicy. They’ll briefly boil some rice stick noodles until soft, then add them to the base of the bowl. The thin curry is ladled over, and garnished with fresh cilantro. They also use chewy udon noodles, in a drier dish with curried, ground chicken and crispy onions. The influence from neighboring countries is obvious. “Next to Thailand, India and China, you’re in the middle, so kind of surrounded by flavors, you can see a little bit but it comes out a unique flavor,” Zalian said. Another favorite: a thick, mild curry that looks more like gravy, embedded with slow-cooked pork belly. Perfect comfort on a cold day. “Most people tell me, ‘It’s flavors we’ve never had before,'” Zalian said. So don’t try to compare Burmese to Thai or Indian or Chinese, because it draws from all of those countries. But there are some dishes that are truly unique, like this tea leaf salad you’re not going to find anywhere else in the world. PA LIAN 254 E. Geneva Rd., Wheaton 331-716-7905

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Restaurants lose appetite with tax sop not on menu – The Economic Times

About a dozen prominent restaurant brands have either halted expansion in the country or revised targets downwards over a year after the government scrapped input tax credit (ITC) under the revised goods & services tax regime. A few others said they would set up only online outlets or within hotel premises where they can continue to avail of the tax credit.
“We are dealing with a 25-30% loss in EBITDA after the restaurant sector was denied input tax credit. We will stop expanding in India and set up outlets only overseas if a rollback doesn’t happen this year,” said Priyank Sukhija, chief executive of First Fiddle Restaurants, which operates Lord of the Drinks, Warehouse Cafe and Townhouse.
In November 2017, the government cut GST rates on restaurants to 5% from 18%. But it also scrapped ITC, which the industry said escalated capital expenses and rentals by 15-18% as they could no longer claim credits on the GST they paid on raw materials and rent, and use those to offset tax liability. Hiking prices by 3-5% and passing on some cost to customers have not been enough to protect margins, they said.
“We have decided not to invest in new brick and mortar stores this year, unless things for the sector improve. Instead, we are planning to set up an online-only restaurant brand,” said Anurag Katriar, CEO of deGustibus Hospitality, which runs the brands Indigo, Tote on the Turf and Neem. “The denial of input tax credit has led to capital expenditure going up and margins coming under pressure. Besides, a lot of business is moving online,” Katriar said.
Deep discounting by heavily funded online delivery platforms such as Swiggy and Zomato has changed the dynamics of the sector, impacting footfalls and diverting consumer traffic to these platforms. These platforms, though, gave the restaurant industry the option to set up online-only outlets where the costs are less.
Fine dining chain Cafe Delhi Heights, which runs 21 outlets in Delhi-NCR, Mumbai and Pune, has cut its target on opening new restaurants by a third for the year. Sharad Batra, cofounder, said: “We have revised expansion targets from a dozen outlets a year to three-four. Scrapping of the input tax credit has been hurting the sector and we are not at a level playing field with hotels.”
Others such as Massive Restaurants is setting up outlets within hotel premises. Restaurants within hotels which charge room rates of more than Rs 7,500 per night need to pay GST at 18%, but they can claim input tax credit.
Zorawar Kalra, MD and founder of Massive Restaurants, which runs premium fine-dining brands Masala Library and Farzi Café, said: “The removal of ITC has significantly affected the already slim margins. We are setting up multiple outlets in various five-star hotels for our brands. These are coming up in three months’ time. We are going to hotels not just because of the ambience and safe environment, but primarily because we get the benefit of input tax credit.”
Besides rollback of ITC, inflationary pressures, hyper-local delivery stores, steep rentals and intermittent localised regulations have also hit growth, industry official added.
Speciality Restaurants, which runs Mainland China and Oh! Calcutta, is looking at multiple ways to counter input tax credit issue, including stepping up online presence, said managing director Anjan Chatterjee. “The ITC rollback has significantly dented profitability of the organised sector and more particularly for operators who have premises on leases,” Chatterjee said. “We are consolidating and expanding our oriental cuisine formats at locations which fit into our financial matrix. Also focusing on dark kitchens to create a separate vertical as delivery of food is growing at a faster pace. The wet-led formats are also being expanded, looking at millennials,” he added.
A report on Indian food services by the National Restaurant Association of India estimates the market to be Rs 5 lakh crore by 2021, and lists challenges such as real estate costs, taxation and high attrition.

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Chingari At Radisson Blu Hotel, Doha Launched Its First Shikar And Biryani Food Festival

Chingari At Radisson Blu Hotel, Doha Launched Its First Shikar And Biryani Food Festival Posted on Comments
The Indian Ambassador to the State of Qatar led the ribbon cutting ceremony and the opening of the first Shikar & Biryani Food Festival at Chingari, in the Radisson Blu Hotel, Doha.
On Tuesday, 26 March 2019, the first Shikar & Biryani Food Festival was officially opened with a ribbon-cutting ceremony led by the Indian Ambassador His Excellency Mr P. Kumaran and the General Manager of Radisson Blu Hotel, Doha, Mr Gordon Mackenzie . The highly anticipated food festival will run daily from 26 March – 5 April 2019 from 6 pm to 11 pm .

A brief background about the early hunting history in India during the nineteenth and early twentieth century of the British Empire, the rulers of Indian princely states along with the British Army Commanders used to hunt in the wild and bring the game or Shikar to their royal kitchens to be cooked by their Master Chefs.
On the other hand, biryani is a mix of the native spicy rice dishes of India and the Persian pilaf. It is believed that the dish originated in Persia and was brought to India by the Mughals. After the Mughals left, this dish was adopted by the royal kitchens and since then became a staple all over the continent.
In celebration of this rich history, Chingari is launched its first Shikar and Biryani Food Festival. During this event, you will get a chance to experience and taste some of the dishes from the royal kitchens of India. It is, however, worth noting that only farm bred animals are used in our kitchen. DISCOVER THE FINEST FROM THE ROYAL KITCHENS OF INDIA
Venue: Chingari at Radisson Blu Hotel, Doha
Chingari which translates as ‘sparkling charcoal’ delightfully crackles with authenticity and brings genuine Tandoor cuisine to Doha. Dine in the splendour of the Maharaja as you feast on our irresistible meals, marinated to perfection and cooked in traditional clay ovens, whilst musicians sing sweet ghazels, the sound of India.
Ground Floor, West Wing Open Daily from 6 pm – 11 pm
For enquiries and reservations, please call 4428 1555 or email us at Related Link:

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Award-winning Authentic Indian Food at Moksh

Eat Eat Out
Moksh: award-winning authentic Indian cooking
Real, proper and authentic Indian cooking is hard to find in Cape Town. If you’re a spice aficionado, vegetarian or vegan, Moksh is the mostest!
Owner Sunil Krishnan proudly shared the latest accomplishment of the Moksh Restaurant Group: winning “Best Indian Cuisine” at the CTEX Restaurant Awards 2019! Cape Town’s truly authentic Indian Restaurant, Moksh took first place as the Best Indian Cuisine at the Cape Town Experiences (CTEX) Awards 2019 for Restaurants & Dining.
Moksh owner Sunil Krishnan at the CTeX Awards 2019
Moksh owner Sunil Krishnan at the CTeX Awards 2019
Moksh Indian Restaurants are fine-dining Indian restaurants offering guests a truly traditional Indian experience, with exotic cuisine from the subcontinent, prepared with artful and exquisite combinations of spices.
Moksh food is an authentic Indian fine-dining experience
The name ‘Moksh’ has a double meaning – to attain the highest level of satisfaction, and ‘freedom’. Both of which you will certainly experience when dining at Moksh! Cape Town Experiences Magazine (CTeX) Asst. Editor Kim Lopes said this award acknowledges a celebration of Indian Cuisine which is so loved and popular amongst food lovers in Cape Town. ‘CTeX and our affiliates have had the privilege to be exposed to over 4000 great brands, businesses and individuals in the Cape that we have found were best of the best in Cape Town and greater Cape. These are brands which have made Cape Town the number one tourist destination in the world and deserve to be celebrated.’ ‘When our panel of judges returned names for possible nomination, we cross referenced and found that Moksh Indian Restaurants’ name came up in every list.’ ‘For this reason, it was a clear candidate for nomination in the Best Indian Cuisine category.’
The rest was up to points and votes. Judges separately scored the booking system, food and service delivery, which made up 60% of the final decision.
The remaining 40% of the decision was up to the public who voted on the CTeX website
Moksh was announced the official winner at Nomad Bistro. Accepting the award, Moksh Owner Operator Sunil Krishnan said it was an honour to receive the accolade for the 9 yrs of hard work his team has put into the brand. ‘I would like to thank all of our customers who have supported us through the years at our 7 branches and found it worthy to vote for us. We feel truly blessed by the continued love! At Moksh, we are truly the most authentic Indian cuisine and believe in not competing but excelling, based on our amazing food.’
ABOUT MOKSH Moksh has gained its popularity in Cape Town through great Indian food, professional service and attention to detail. Having established itself as one of the Mother City’s best restaurants for authentic North Indian cuisine, this restaurant group, proudly located in Durbanville, Paarl, Kenilworth, Somerset West, Welgelegen, Worcester and Langebaan, invites guests to an elegant experience in a calm Indian inspired environment. Expect an expansive menu of dishes, made from from scratch, using honest Indian ingredients all skilfully prepared by pukka Indian chefs and served with a smile. Whether you like your curry mild, medium or hot, Moksh will fine tune the spicy notes to meet your palate, without compromising on the well rounded depth of flavour found in every dish.
Consider sharing a platter of snacks while enjoying a drink from the fully licensed bar, or try out one of the many exciting starters, ranging from Masala Papad (deep fried poppadums with tomato and onion) to crispy samoosas that out rank them all. Be sure to save room for mains, as curry portions are hearty and are best enjoyed with a range of sambals and sides! Visit the beautiful website Moksh
Or follow them on Instagram @mokshdining
Cost: Curries range from R99-175 Contact: 021 872 4548 Address:2 Pastorie Ave, Esterville, Paarl Other Moksh Branches: Durbanville, Kenilworth, Somerset West, Welgelegen, Langebaan and Worcester
Moksh Indian restaurant interior

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5 unexpected things that made South Africa my favourite ever holiday destination

Home / World Localities / 5 unexpected things that made South Africa my favourite ever holiday destination 5 unexpected things that made South Africa my favourite ever holiday destination World Localities
Brought to you by South African Tourism .
Having the opportunity to see and experience different parts of the world is one of life ‘s great pleasures.
And for me – going to South Africa is the very highlight of my travels .
Having spoken to people who had also visited the country in advance of my trip, I’ll admit that my expectations were sky-high: stunning landscapes, an array of second-to-none watersports, wildlife, bustling cities there was plenty I wanted to get stuck into.
And thankfully, when I did arrive on South African soil, it entirely lived up to all my hopes – and in unexpected ways too.
Here’s why:
1) Food
The cuisine in South Africa is truly exceptional – probably the best food I’ve eaten abroad, in fact. The country combines a whole load of delicious influences – think French, African , Indian, and Malaysia flavours. Divine!
And, of course, there is the country’s famed barbecue: a traditional al fresco braai is a must for anyone travelling to the region – not just for the actual fare but also for the entire experience.
For those not familiar, a braai involves grilling food over hot coals. Ideally, you’ll sit around the fire to eat, talk, eat, make new friends, and eat. Typical food enjoyed includes boerewors (a type of sausage), steak, lamb, chicken and sometimes even game. Sides and veggie-friendly offerings include baked potatoes and corn on the cob.
My words of advice are to arrive HUNGRY: you will get plenty of food.
2) Accommodation
The variety of hotels, hostels, guest-houses, and self-catering properties on offer in South Africa is fantastic – and I was really impressed with value you can get too.
For something a little more indulgent, however, on a drive towards Durban I stayed at the Zimbali hotel for a night. To this day, I maintain that it was the most wonderful spot I have ever stayed in.
We had our own lodge that had a balcony overlooking a stunning view of a forest and lake (I had a feeling of being submersed in wilderness despite being just a few steps from another building).
For good measure, the hotel also had an infinity pool, another pool right beside the sea, and access to the beach . Heaven!
3) Cities
Some people think of South Africa and immediately think of safaris – but the cities are bustling, a fusion of different cultures, and full of excursions, activities, and sights and sounds.
Case-in-point being Durban, a city of 600,000 people on the eastern coast that I visited and loved.
From this metropolis you can do the likes of swimming with sharks, walking on the Bay Of Plenty beach , and eating and drinking like royalty in some seriously amazing eateries and bars. The Durban Botanic Garden is also world-class while at the Moses Mabhida stadium (built for the 2010 World Cup) you can take tour of the grounds or else ride on a SkyCar to the top of the stadium’s iconic arch for spectacular views of the city.
4) Art
I’ll admit that I’m a bit of a museum and gallery nerd – and South Africa certainly offered me plenty to whet my appetite. The Zeitz Museum Of Contemporary African Art, for example, opened less than two years ago in Cape Town and houses the world’s largest collection of contemporary African art. Some 9,500 sq metres in size, it spans nine floors and has a rooftop sculpture garden.
Staying in Cape Town, the perfume museum is considered among the best in the world of its kind. It contains around 5,000 bottles – including one from ancient Rome that is more than 2,000 years old. Needless-to-say, there is an array of incredible smells on offer, as well as great insight into the history of perfume.
Otherwise, the Heart Of Cape Town museum is dedicated to the world’s first heart transplant, which took place in the city in 1967.
A post d by Zeitz MOCAA (@zeitzmocaa) on Mar 15, 2019 at 1:30am PDT
5) Shopping
If you’re flying in or out of Johannesburg, make sure to make time for a spot of shopping. In fact, the city is often deemed the best for retail therapy across the entire continent (so it would be shame to miss out!).
For something different , 27 Boxes is a collection of shipping-crate boutiques that champion local design and production. And when you get hungry – there are fab restaurants too as well as bursts of live music .
Sandton City is a large complex complete with Coach, Bang Olufsen, Jimmy Choo, Adidas, Hugo Boss, Armani Jeans, Zara, and Nike as well as jewellers, restaurants, hairdressers, and nail bars.
For something less mainstream, the Neighbourgoods Market takes place on Saturdays in Braamfontein. It’s a two-storey, red brick warehouse and has plenty of local ware including hand-crafted furniture, ceramics, jewellery not to mention fruit, vegetables, and snacks.
In such a diverse and vast country, I’ll admit it’s tough to tease out only a handful of South African highlights.
Whatever you decide on doing, however, there is a real sense of hospitality that will strike a chord with Irish people: the South African ubuntu is a philosophy that champions humanity towards others and to this day it’s there in bucket-loads across almost every walk of life .
Enjoy!
Brought to you by South African Tourism .
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Travel , sponsored, animals, holiday , South Africa , safari , Durban, South African Tourism . Google News: Museum Rome site-her.ie

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A Visit To God’s Own Country – Kerala

A Visit To God’s Own Country – Kerala Posted on March 29, 2019
Kerala is regarded as one of the most aesthetic places in India. It has great locations and one can find serenity in almost every location of the state. It immediately soothes the inner soul of an individual. It is known as God’s own country because of its exquisite landscapes, which is like a melting pot of wide attractions. The beauty of nature lies in this place with addition of magical hill stations.
Kerala has breathtaking beaches, rare tranquil backwaters and is also historically enriched. One can witness majestic forts and the cultural heritage is supreme here. It is a popular destination for lovers, as well as a group of friends can also find their eternal peace. Hence, it can be said that Kerala is a great combination of the best of nature and luxury.
How to Reach Kerala
Kerala is blessed to have a coastline of 580 km; it has the Arabian Sea towards its west and the Eastern Ghats are there on the east. There are different ways through which one can reach Kerala; one might take a flight and come or else there are trains which can take you to the bliss of a ride. Three airports located in Kerala are: Thiruvanthapuram International Airport Cochin International airport. Karipur or Calicut International Airport.
If you are travelling by air, then it is very much accessible to reach from any part of the country. Most people opt for the flying option only as it saves time and is also convenient. One can also go for the trains; there are a lot of trains that give you a great ride through the lush green parts of the southern valleys. There are 200 railways stations that connect Kerala with rest of India. Only the hill stations i.e, Munnar, Wayanad and Thekkady are not connected. On the other hand, if you are up for a road trip then there are three main national highways that connect Kerala with the rest of India. These highways are 17, 49 and 47; they are connected to Karnataka and Tamil Nadu directly.
Best time to visit Kerala
The place is known as God’s own country for several reasons. One of the main reasons is that one can visit Kerala at any time of the year. It has a pleasing and enjoyable climate throughout the year; though the time from September to March is regarded as the best season to visit Kerala. The weather at this time of the year is pleasant. It is located near the tropics, so during the summer season, the weather is a bit hot but could be manageable. Peak season would be from September to March, it might rain occasionally that will be like a blessing to the visitors.
Places to Visit in Kerala
There are some extremely beautiful locations in Kerala that are nothing but a paradise to the tourists. One must have a proper knowledge about the places of attraction in the state of Kerala. The attention of global tourists also stays because of the scenic beauties. The rich cultural heritage of Kerala holds all sorts of nature lovers from all parts of the world. Kerala has a diversity of beautiful locations; there are hills, hamlets, commercial cities, beaches, and a lot to explore. It is apt for family vacations and honeymoon couples. Some of the must visit places in Kerala are as follows: Kochi- Gateway to Kerala
Kochi is located in the south west region of Kerala, it is popularly known as the Gateway to Kerala. It has a great impact of the British rule on its monuments and structures. There are many historical and architectural sites such as Mattancherry Dutch Palace, St. Francis Church and more. If you are interested to know more about the heritage of this place, then one might take a tour in the Kerala Folklore Theatre and museum. Alleppey – The backwater hot spot
One of the best tourist places in Kerala is Alleppey, it tops the list of the tourists who have been here. It provides tourists with backwater trips and houseboat stays. A fair number of people area attracted for to its serene beauty. Long time ago, Lord Curzon has infamously said that Kerala is the Venice of East and it actually turned out to be one. Kerala’s backwaters are highly appreciated. People mostly look forward to stay in houseboats when they are on a visit to Alleppey. As the place is culturally rich it has got Krishnapuram Palace, Sri Krishna Temple and more. There is a Snake Boat race that happens in Alleppey and is definitely a crowd puller. Munnar – Perfect For Honeymoons
Munnar is one of the most popular hill stations in Kerala; it has exquisite landscapes and great scenic beauty. It has misty valleys, flying clouds and around 80,000 miles of tea plantation garden. This place looks exactly like a heaven on earth. Home stays are best in this region. The cute bungalows and cozy hotels in Munnar make this place perfect for honeymoon of a couple. Kumarakom – Tranquil Places of All
Kumarakom is situated near the Vembanad lake and it is like a quite little hamlet with great sceneries all around. One can relish their taste buds here because of the true flavours of coastal Kerala foods. One can find deliciously fresh coconuts in Kumarakom and most people also go for fishing in the dense mangrove forests. Kumarakom backwaters, Bird Sanctuary, Aruvikkuzhi waterfalls are some of the important tourist spots. Exceptional monuments such as Juma Masjid, Mahadev Temple are also there. Kovalam – Beach Fun to its Fullest
Kovalam beach is one of the best beaches in Kerala; people mostly go for new year celebrations, sunbathing, cultural fests etc. One can easily feel stress free with the deep strong massages that they get there; even the Ayurvedic treatments are also alluring. People from various countries with different cultures come to visit Kovalam beach. The beauty of the place lies in the popular tourist spots such as Hawah beach, the lighthouse Samudra beach, rock cut caves, Karamana river etc. Varkala – Most Scenic Place
One of the best seaside places in Kerala is Varkala; it has enticing coastline with cliffs on one side and on the other hand there is lush green slopes which is a major attraction for tourists. One can actually feel paradise on earth in Varkala. The beach looms beautiful during the time of sunsets and well as sunrises. The hues of the rays make the beach look aesthetic and surreal. Exotic beach resorts are there for the feel of a luxurious stay. It is also well known as a religious place In Hindu Culture. Vishnu Temple, Janardan Temple, Sarkara Devi Temple are some of the prime locations in Varkala. Trivandrum – Beauty with a touch of Peace
It is one of the most peaceful places in Kerala. It is the capital of Southern Indian state of Kerala. It can be distinguished by the British Colonial Architecture and many art galleries. The cultural heritage is so rich that it is the home to Kuthira Malika Palace. This palace is adorned with carved horses and collection of materials from the royal palace.
Things to Do In Kerala
It is one of the most popular destinations for tourists in India and also from all over the world. For the longest time, this place has been popular among couples, families and also backpackers. It is a complete travel package because of the geographically rich atmosphere. One can also do a lot of sporting activities such as river rafting, deep sea diving, rock climbing and many more.
On the other hand, it also offers the food lovers to have a taste of delicious cuisines and enjoy the evenings with a touch of traditional inheritance. It is popular for Ayurvedic treatments and deep massages. This helps in keeping the balance of health and mind for an individual. Tourists can also but handicrafts, so that they will remind them of the great travelling experience that they had in Kerala.
Pamper your Taste buds with Traditional Kerala Dishes
If you are visiting to any state of India, then it is must to taste the traditional dishes of that particular place; Kerala has a lot of traditional dishes and all of them should be tasted for once. The use of coconut oil gives a great texture to the traditional Kerala cuisine. Puttu and Kadala curry is a famous vegetarian combination; served mostly as a healthy breakfast.
Another beloved breakfast dish from Kerala is Idiyapam and egg curry; it just soothes your taste buds invariably. In certain places it is called Nool puttu. Another dish which can be served as breakfast, lunch and even dinner is Appam; it can be combined with stew and also can be a classic sidekick for chicken curry, even Kerala’s favourite beef. But above all this, the mass favourite of Keralians is the Malabar chicken Biriyani; there is nothing more delicious and aromatic than Biriyani. It gives the special traditional feel with the smell of spices in it. Thus one can definitely have a great experience with their luxurious stay in Kerala.
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Vasundhara Sarovar Premiere Vayalar – A Luxury Resort in God’s Own Country

Thursday, March 28, 2019 Vasundhara Sarovar Premiere Vayalar – A Luxury Resort in God’s Own Country Kerala is undoubtedly God’s own country. Think sprawling beaches, swaying palm trees, coffee plantations, silent backwaters, peaceful hill stations, therapeutic therapies and soulful food, and you are transported to paradise instantly. But the highlight of this serene place is the hospitality. We got a taste of luxury and hospitality at a fabulous retreat called Vasundhara Sarovar Premiere Vayalar. A small village tucked amidst lush greenery, Vayalar echoes tranquility and connects you with nature. Introduction Nestled amidst verdant and peaceful backwaters in Vayalar, this place is an absolute sanctuary for someone looking for a rejuvenating vacation. Vasundhara Sarovar Premiere is indeed a premier retreat with an extensive offering of fitness, spa and wellness programs coupled with culinary delights that enrich the soul. The resort creates a feeling of comfort and a home away from home. How to reach there There is no direct fight to Vayalar, but it can be accessed from Delhi to Cochin in almost 4 hours. Vayalar is barely 2 hours by road from Cochin International airport. The moment you board the cab sent by the hotel, they help you in smothering with love and warmth. A basket of goodies is the first thing you will get to see once you slide in the cab. The drive is pretty comfortable as the driver is well trained and ensures you enjoy the beautiful sight of swaying trees that Valayar is abundant with. The moment the cab stops at the resort, the first impression you will instantly get is a homecoming. A smiling lady applies tikka on the forehead and welcomes you with a garland made with fresh flowers. Reception The first impressions of Vasundhara Sarovar Premiere are as endearing as the city which oozes heritage, warmth, grandeur and solace. The wooden flooring throughout the lobby reflects craftsmanship while the water bodies and stones add to the charm. Several artifacts simply bring you more closely to the tradition and heritage of Kerala. The 6 acre expansive luxury resort offers 5 star comforts and amenities with an authentic Ayurveda experience. The large resort complex is surrounded by immaculate landscaping, tropical plants, and an artificial lake that is interconnected with Vayalar’s backwaters. With 60 luxury rooms and 6 floating cottages to choose from, Vasundhara Sarovar Premiere is full of options and offers flexibility for all kinds of guests from honeymooners, large families to corporate. Floating cottage – Luxury Uniterrupted! We stayed in the floating cottage which came with a sprawling area of comfortably furnished space. The cottages stand out because they offer guests the ability to get into their own private Jacuzzi. That’s right; you can get in and out of the Jacuzzi right from the comfort of your room! Besides this, the room has all the luxury amenities that included a wide dressing table, kettle with coffee tea sachets, sofa set. The bathroom has toiletries from Biotique, soft towels, slippers and gowns and a rain shower. Dining – Mystic Spice The resort’s award winning restaurant Mystic Spice is perhaps the best I have come across. Not only do they have soulful traditional curries, their ambiance celebrates the grandeur of the southern state which is evident in their décor. The Mystic Spice Restaurant is a testimony that healthy food can be deliciously satisfying. An innovative menu is lovingly created, influenced by cuisines from South India. Comfortable chairs and sofas spread out evenly only add to the dining experience for guests. The aroma spread out in the air is very soothing for the soul and accentuates the appetite. The executive chef is skilled in crafting sumptuous delicacies and ensures guest leave the table fully satisfied. The buffet lunch we had was not only delicious but offered a wide variety of dishes for any taste. Spa – Upasana Kerala is known for the traditional therapies that have amazing healing benefits for the mind, body and soul. Not only are they therapeutic but they help in the healing process. We were invited to experience the odyssey of wellness at their spa. The monumental entrance to the Upasana Spa is testimony of the local craftsmanship as well as the materials and techniques used; like the traditional cedar wood, chiseled and manicured pots and plants that provide a completely immersive, 360-degree well-being experience. The traditional Kerala architecture, design and opulent craftsmanship are proudly and lovingly displayed at the spa. From the wide open areas, spacious rooms, scintillating view of the lake and trees that dress the courtyard area, to enchanting candle lit aroma oil walkways – wherever you glance there’s a vision of beauty. The spa is a palace in its own right – elegant and serene with scattered calming water features. Facilities include state of the art Ayurveda and Thai massage rooms, steam rooms, attached rain showers where you can bathe amidst the sound of birds and natural air ushering in. The spa menu is extensive and treatments are expertly executed – ranging from basic massages to detox massages that follow a minimum 7 day schedule. They also have a room for manicure pedicure and facials. The highlight of the spa is the serene view of the resort that is covered in swaying trees and the pool adjoining the lake. I met my daughter after her experience at the reception. She loved the shirodhara experience and also mentioned how the therapist tailored her needs and adjusted the pressure to her liking. Post the treatment, we were offered some calming herbal tea with honey. The tea accentuated my relaxation. I thanked my therapist and the team for the amazing experience and left the spa satisfied and beaming with joy. The evening was a celebration of the South Indian cuisines through their celebrated chef who created masterpieces for us to relish. Chef Abhilash comes with an extensive background in crafting extraordinary dishes that satiate the soul. The resort created a fabulous dining experience for us to devour the unique flavors of Kerala in their six course menu. The Kerala Dining Experience A beautiful candle lit dinner was organized by the resort and we were enthralled to experience the culinary odyssey. The starters include masala grilled prawns and kuchumber salad (leaf wrapped grilled fish, prawns cooked on a hot griddle & Indian spices). Followed by mutton roast and paratha – a delectable showcase of presentation and flavor. There is always a fine line between careful arrangement of small bites and an overwhelming smorgasbord. Keeping this in mind, Chef Abhilash planned some of the best dishes for us. Before the main course, we enjoyed lemon mint sorbet, a palette cleanser that has the perfect fresh mint sensation that gives a nice balance with sweet sensations and a long pleasant finish. The mildly sweet drink cleansed the palate, and primed our taste buds for the main course to follow. In the main course, we were served Kerala rice with meen (fish), banana flower thoran, ulli theyal . We loved the main course but the star of the show was the desserts which comprised of banana toffee and ada pradhaman (rice flakes with jaggery and coconut milk). The next day was a big surprise for us. The resort had organized a houseboat experience for us and was enthralled. The Houseboat – A Beautiful Odyssey The Houseboat experience organized by the resort is an experience worth cherishing. We were welcomed by the warm staff at the houseboat who escorted us to an altogether world of luxury and warmth. The houseboat is literally a small house that is equipped with all the luxury amenities and reflects grandeur. The wooden floors display the artistic finesse of Kerala, while the ceilings take you away to a midsummer night’s dream and the spacious chairs ooze comfort and relaxation. There is an ample space for dining in the living area and a large seating area for big families. There are two luxury bedrooms that have all the amenities to make the stay comfortable. The textured floors, large glass windows, spacious tables, comfortable chairs and soothing vibe create an elegant moment with a hint of decadence. The stairs take you to the deck which has a Jacuzzi. The soft breeze on the deck, while enjoying a breathtaking view of the coconut trees brings one closer to peace and happiness. What we loved was the sunshine playing on our face while we enjoyed fresh coconut water served by the warm staff at the houseboat. We also got to experience the refreshing toddy drink when the houseboat stopped at one of the small villages to give us a feel of the local experience. Surprisingly we loved the drink. When we returned a fabulous sadya meal was laid. Sadya is a traditional experience in Kerala during onam when the gods are served this meal as Prasadam. There are 21 dishes, including pickles, chutneys, poppadams, curd, rice and parantha . The prasadam is served on a banana leaf and tastes delicious. We were filled to the brim eating but ensured there wasn’t any wastage. After folding the banana leaf and closing the lovely meal, we retired to the bedrooms to rest for some time. The temperature is always perfect inside and the beds are super plush and comfortable to help you snooze. I enjoyed the beautiful scenery as the houseboat moved along. The sound of birds and the water created a symphony with the movement of the houseboat that seemed heavenly. The houseboat experience is something one must enjoy as it brings you closer to God’s own country. We reached the resort and headed towards the tea corner which is operated by a local villager and managed by the resort. Guests can enjoy tea, coffee and snacks thus relishing the local flavors of the Southern state. The day closes with a nice warm dinner at the Mystic spice. We enjoyed a continental fare of Chinese delicacies along with soups and salads. Local Sight-seeing The next day was a day filled with excitement and fun as the resort had planned sight-seeing for us. We left the hotel after a light lunch of traditional meal and boarded the cab. The sight-seeing at Vayalar is extremely enjoyable as it has an amazing conjugation of culture and adventure. We visited the Alleppey boathouse junction, near Allappuzha, Kerala. Operated by Kerala Canoe Tourism houseboat, this place is ranked Number 1 among all houseboats according to Trip Advisor. The place is clean and offers a stunning view of the backwaters. Next stop was the International Coir Museum – The museum showcases the traditional processes and development of coir industry, including retting and fibre extraction. This is a place where one can enjoy watching the products made with coir so artistically. There is a souvenir shop attached to the Museum where visitors can have the joy of shopping a wide range of coir handicrafts, coir doormats, coir ornaments etc. Next the cab took us to the Revi Karunakaran Memorial Museum. Revi Karunakaran was the architect of the modernized coir industry of Kerala. The museum is located at Alappuzha, Kerala, India that displays decorative art and artifacts, including a large private collection of Swarovski crystals and ivory. The visit to the museum is worth it as each artifact displays the intricacy and fondness that Revi’s wife had in showcasing her husband’s collection. The last stop was the beach where we enjoyed the serenity and the beauty all around. The waves gashing at the shore is a sight that is worth watching. The beaches at allepey are surprisingly clean and have shacks to enjoy drinks. We reached the hotel and went towards the pool to cool off. It’s always a delight to enjoy a dip in the evening watching the starlit sky. The last day ended with a coastal menu prepared by the executive chef and his team. The next day, the hotel arranged a speed boat ride that was absolutely thrilling and adventurous. The ride was extremely astounding and adventurous. You can get a taste of fun in this boat ride. Entertainment at the resort – The Resort provides several facilities for guests to keep them occupied. From Infinity pool that overlooks the rainwater lake to fishing expeditions, each activity is planned to accentuate the guest’s experiences. The Houseboat cruises, speedboats, pedal boats, rowboats and sunset cruises can be conducted based on guest’s requirements. Besides, walking/jogging trails can also be organized. You can also do yoga under the guidance of their expert teachers. Cycles are also provided to explore the property. There is a 6000 sq ft indoor activity center for kids with pool table, table tennis and board games. Indoor games like snooker, table tennis, carom and chess. Outdoor activities like badminton, fishing and fish feeding. Arts and Music Vasundhara Sarovar Premiere has an open air amphitheatre where you can enjoy the dramatic and colorful traditional performing arts and music of Kerala. We witnessed a fabulous kathakali performance that was exhibited by the local artists who displayed a visual treat through their expressions. Herb Garden Herbs used in Kerala’s multilayered cuisine have legendary healing and medicinal values. The space recreates a local herb garden where these plants are carefully tended and used in everyday life. For those interested, the garden has a map which gives valuable information about the herbs. There is also a dais for talks on holistic healing and healthy living. Bidding adieu to Vasundhara Sarovar Premiere – Goodbyes are the worst as for us the resort was more than a home for us now. The extremely hospitable staff, the chef and his team, the spa therapists had worked their charm on us and it would be difficult to get back to the usual routine. But Delhi was calling and we had to leave God’s own country. While leaving the resort, the warm staff presented us with a token of love by gifting us a beautiful set of wooden coasters. We loved their warm gesture and with a heavy heart bid goodbye to the resort. If you enjoyed reading my experience and are willing to get a taste of luxury amidst verdant greenery, then this place is perfect. You can also visit their website for details on booking.

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Food You Wouldn’t Expect to Find in Sonoma County

Mar 28, 2019 | All | 2 | Slide 1 of 66
Stockhome, Petaluma: Swedish meatballs, tunnbrödrulle (grilled frankfurters wrapped in lavash bread with veggies), gravlax (cured salmon with mustard dill sauce), celery root gratin and, around Fat Tuesday, semla (cinnamon buns with almond paste and whipped cream). 220 Western Ave., Petaluma, 707-981-8511. (Photo courtesy of newrevmedia.com) Slide 2 of 66
Gravlax (cured salmon with mustard dill sauce) at Stockhome in Petaluma. (Photo by Chris Hardy) Slide 3 of 66
Celery root gratin with Wrangeback cheese at Stockhome in Petaluma. (Photo by Heather Irwin) Slide 4 of 66
Semla at Stockhome in Petaluma. (Photo by Heather Irwin) Slide 5 of 66
Swedish “Saturday Candy” at Stockhome in Petaluma. (Photo courtesy of newrevmedia.com) Slide 6 of 66
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Pearl, Petaluma: T he Israeli Breakfast (za’ atar pita, lemon & chili labneh, green hummus, meyer lemon marmalade), levantine spiced brisket, shakshuka (chickpea, peppers & tomato stew, griddled halloumi, baked eggs), cassoulet (tarbais beans & sauerkraut, toulouse sausage, duck confit, poached egg – pictured). 500 1st Street, Petaluma, 707-559-5187. (Photo by Heather Irwin) Slide 8 of 66
Shakshuka with chickpea, fava and tomato stew at Pearl restaurant in Petaluma. (Photo by Heather Irwin) Slide 9 of 66
Persian fish stew at Pearl restaurant in Petaluma. (Photo by Heather Irwin) Slide 10 of 66
Quinua, Petaluma: Aguadito de Pollo (Peruvian soup), Jalea de Mariscos (crispy fish and mixed seafood with Rocoto sauce), Seco de Cordero Norteno (slow-cooked lamb shank with Cuzqueña beer and Peruvian peppers), Helado de Lucuma (ice cream with tropical Peruvian lucuma fruit flavor), Alfajores (Peruvian artisan cookies). 500 Petaluma Blvd. S, Petaluma, 707-981-7359. (Photo by Heather Irwin) Slide 11 of 66
Lomo saltado (steak and fries) Peruvian style at Quinua Cocina Peruana in Petaluma. (Photo by Heather Irwin) Slide 12 of 66
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Gator’s Rustic Burger & His Creole Friends, Petaluma: Creole Jambalaya (with smoked chicken and cajun sausage), Mumbo Gumbo (with Dungeness crab, smoked chicken, sausage, shrimp), Crawfish Étouffée. 5 Petaluma Blvd. S., Petaluma, 707-658-1845. (Photo by John Burgess) Slide 14 of 66
Cajun Wildflower Honey and Jalapeño Wings on a bed of English cucumbers, pickled red onion and a spicy creole bleu cheese dressing from Gator’s Rustic Burger & His Creole Friends in the Petaluma theater district. (Photo by John Burgess) Slide 15 of 66
Soban Korean Cuisine , Petaluma: V arious Korean pancakes, spicy squid, pork kimchi jjigae (stew), dolsot bibimap (rice, veggies, fried egg in hot stone pot – pictured), bibim guksoo (noodles in sweet spicy chili paste with veggies), Korean wines/spirits. 255 N. McDowell Blvd., Petaluma, 707-769-3112. ( Photo by Heather Irwin) Slide 16 of 66
Real Donër, Petaluma: Lamb and beef doner and kebabs, Cigarette Borek (flaky dough stuffed with feta cheese & deep fried), Baba Ganoush (eggplant puree), Kisir (bulgar based salad), Kadayif (shredded dough filled with pistachios, soaked in simple syrup), Revani (semolina cake soaked in simple syrup, topped with coconut flakes). 307 F Street, Petaluma, 707-765-9555. (Photo by Jeff Kan Lee) Slide 17 of 66
YiaYia’s The Grateful Greek, Penngrove: L amb and beef Greek gyro (pictured) with homemade tzatziki, flaming cheese (saganaki on grilled pita or Italian bread), Yanni’s sausages. 10007 Main Street, Penngrove, 707-664-5442. (Photo by Heather Irwin) Slide 18 of 66
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Popi’s Flaming Cheese at Yia Yia – The Grateful Greek in Penngrove. (Photo by Heather Irwin) Slide 20 of 66
Hana, Rohnert Park: N atto (fermented soybeans), ankimo (steamed monkfish “foie gras” with ponzu sauce), okonomiyaki (Tokyo-style pancake with shrimp, squid, vegetables, topped with fried egg), chawanmushi (savory egg custard), tontoro (pork jowl). 101 Golf Course Dr., Rohnert Park, 707-586-0270. (Photo by Jeff Kan Lee) Slide 21 of 66
Toro sashimi at Hana Japanese Restaurant in Rohnert Park. (Photo by Jeff Kan Lee) Slide 22 of 66
Don Julio’s Rincon Latin Grill and Pupusas, Rohnert Park: P upusas revueltas (pork and cheese pupusas), pupusa de queso con loroco (cheese pupusa with loroco – a tropical plant from El Salvador), mojarra frita (fried tilapia fish), yucca frita con chicharon. 217 Southwest Blvd., Rohnert Park, 707-242-3160. (Photo by Carlos Alas-Grande) Slide 23 of 66
The pupusa burger at Don Julio’s includes your choice of steak, grilled chicken, orange marinated chicken, carnitas, shredded beef or chorizo. (Photo by Carlos Alas-Grande) Slide 24 of 66
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Sautéed prawns in bell peppers, mushrooms and onions, served with homemade Spanish rice, whole white beans, sour cream and fresh tropical mango salsa all wrapped in a tomato tortilla at Don Julio’s in Rohnert Park. (Photo by Carlos Alas-Grande) Slide 26 of 66
Gerard’s Paella, Santa Rosa: Valdeon paella (prawn, squid, mussels, chicken paella), choripan bocadillos (Spanish baguette sandwich with chorizo sarta, tetilla cheese and charred kale), churittos con chocolate. 701 4th Street, Santa Rosa, 707-708-8686. (Photo by John Burgess) Slide 27 of 66
El Valdeon Paella with prawns, squid, mussels, marinated chicken sweet peppers, garbanzo and green beans from Gerard’s Paella Y Tapas in downtown Santa Rosa. (Photo by John Burgess) Slide 28 of 66
Huevos al Plato with slow-roasted tomatoes, garlic, onions, farm egg and serrano ham with warm baguette from Gerard’s Paella Y Tapas in downtown Santa Rosa. (Photo by John Burgess) Slide 29 of 66
Huevos al Plato with slow-roasted tomatoes, garlic, onions, farm egg and serrano ham with warm baguette from Gerard’s Paella Y Tapas in downtown Santa Rosa. (Photo by John Burgess) Slide 30 of 66
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Sazón , Santa Rosa: V arious ceviches, Anticucho de Corazón (beef heart skewers), Picante de Verduras (Peruvian veggies and quinoa in an aji amarillo cream sauce), mazamorra morada (warm purple corn pudding with fruit). 1129 Sebastopol Rd., Santa Rosa, 707-523-4346. (Photo by John Burgess) Slide 32 of 66
Salmon Tiradito with sashimi-style salmon in a blood orange, passion fruit and aji limo aioli sauce with a side of mango salsa criolla from chef/owner Jose Navarro of Sazon Peruvian Cuisine in Santa Rosa. (Photo by John Burgess) Slide 33 of 66
Ceviche de Tiradito, a halibut ceviche sashimi-style with a house made Leche de Tigre aji Amarillo sauce served with sweet potato and Cuzco corn from chef/owner Jose Navarro of Sazon Peruvian Cuisine in Santa Rosa. (Photo by John Burgess) Slide 34 of 66
La Gare, Santa Rosa: Escargots de Bourgogne, Cuisse de Grenouilles (frog legs), Demi Canard a l’orange (duck in orange sauce), Ris de Veau Financière (sauteed veal and sweet breads), seasonal flambées. 208 Wilson Street, Santa Rosa, 707-528-4355. (Photo by Chris Hardy) Slide 35 of 66
Beef Wellington with carrots and green beans at La Gare restaurant in Santa Rosa. (Photo by Chris Hardy) Slide 36 of 66
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Aroon Thai Market, Santa Rosa: P roduce includes choy sum, rau muong, jackfruit, bitter melons, Thai eggplant (pictured), rambutan, Thai chili and longan. Also has pork buns and Chinese donuts. 2770 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa, 707-576-0256. (Stock photo) Slide 38 of 66
European Food Store, Santa Rosa: Russian-inspired dumplings, headcheese, landjäeger sausage, kefir, poppy seed roulade, German rye bread, handmade Russian piroshki (pictured), Nordic licorice, Russian kvass (fermented rye beverage). 2790 Santa Rosa Ave., Suite M, Santa Rosa, 707-527-0319. (Stock photo) Slide 39 of 66
Abyssinia Restaurant, Santa Rosa: Sambusa (pastry shell filled with veggies and lentils or beef), kitfo (Ethiopian steak tartar), bozena shiro (seasoned milled chickpeas in berbere sauce), doro we’t (Ethiopian delicacy, spicy chicken stew), shiro we’t (Ethiopian hummus). 913 4th Street, Santa Rosa, 707-568-6455. Slide 40 of 66
El Coqui, Santa Rosa: Mofongo (fried green plantains with garlic), Bacalaíto (batter-fried fritter filled with minced cod fish), Canoas con Carne Molida (sweet plantain stuffed with seasoned ground angus beef smothered in cheese), Jibarito (seasoned ground beef, tomatoes and Monterey jack cheese between two layers of fried green plantains). 400 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa, 707-542-8868. Slide 41 of 66
Cubano sandwich at El Coqui in Santa Rosa. (Photo by Jeff Kan Lee) Slide 42 of 66
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LaSalette, Sonoma: Bacalhau no Forno (baked cod casserole), twice braised beef tongue, wild mushroom açorda (country bread crouton in mushroom broth with slow-cooked egg), caldeirada (Portuguese Fisherman’s Stew – pictured), feijoada completa (national Brazilian dish of beef, pork, sausage and black beans), porco à alentejana (pork and clams). 452 First Street East, Suite H, Sonoma, 707-938-1927. (Photo by John Burgess) Slide 44 of 66
Feijoada Completa with stewed beef, pork, smoked sausage and black beans from chef Chef Manuel Azevedo at La Salette in Sonoma. (Photo by John Burgess) Slide 45 of 66
Atypical Couvert, olive oil cake, queijo fresco ice cream, candied chourio with a drizzle of olive oil from chef Chef Manuel Azevedo at La Salette in Sonoma. (Photo by John Burgess) Slide 46 of 66
Tasca Tasca, Sonoma: Tremoço (lupini beans), caldo verde (Portugal’s national soup), boquerones (white anchovies), lomo embuchado (air-dried pork loin), fried spicy pig’s ears, goat stew, bacalhau (salt cod cakes), Portuguese olive oil ice cream. 122 West Napa Street, Sonoma, 707-996-8272. (Photo by Erik Castro) Slide 47 of 66
Portuguese Mac & Cheese at Tasca Tasca Portuguese Tapas Restaurant & Wine Bar in Sonoma. (Photo by Erik Castro) Slide 48 of 66
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Santé, Sonoma: Sl ow-cooked duck egg, grilled California squab, Miyazaki A5 Wagyu beef, bluefin tuna crudo, Valrhona chocolate soufflé. 100 Boyes Blvd., Sonoma, 707-939-2415. (Photo by Kent Porter) Slide 50 of 66
Shige Sushi & Izakaya, Sonoma (moved from Cotati): I ka maru (grilled whole squid), maguro yukke (tuna tartare with quail egg), hamachi carpaccio. Maxwell Shopping Center, 19161 Sonoma Hwy, Sonoma, 707-933-9331. (Photo by Alvin Jornada) Slide 51 of 66
Gyoza at Shige Sushi Japanese Kitchen. (Photo by Alvin Jornada) Slide 52 of 66
La Michoacana, Sonoma: P aletas or Mexican popsicle flavors like sweet corn, tequila, rose petal, horchata, spicy cucumber. 18495 Hwy 12, Sonoma, 707-938-1773. (Photo by Beth Schlanker) Slide 53 of 66
BurtoNZ Bakery, Windsor: M inced beef and cheese pie, Scotch egg, lamington cakes (Australian sponge cake rolled in chocolate and coconut), New Zealand sausage. 9076 Brooks Road, South, Windsor, 707-687-5455. (Photo by John burgess) Slide 54 of 66
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Tisza Bistro + Bar, Windsor: Wiener Schnitzel with German Butterball Potatoes and Lingonberry jam, Spätzle Mac ’n Cheese with smoked Lardon, bratwurst, marzipan torte. 8757 Old Redwood Hwy, Windsor, 707-838-5100. (Photo by Heather Irwin) Slide 56 of 66
Hungarian pancake with walnut cream at Tisza Bistro in Windsor. (Photo by Heather Irwin) Slide 57 of 66
Castañeda’s Marketplace, Windsor: Cupcake-concha (manteconchas -pictured), banderillas (Mexican corn dogs), polvorones (Spanish shortbread), orejas (fried pork ears), bolillo (small, baguette-like bread), telera (soft roll), cotija (hard cheese), panela (loaf of unrefined whole cane sugar). 8465 Old Redwood Hwy, Suite 601, Windsor, 707-838-8820. (Photo by Ricardo Ibarra ) Slide 58 of 66
The Taste of Tea, Healdsburg: G yoza ramen, yaki shirataki (stir-fried veggies with clear noodles), hijiki donburi (house-braised seaweed and fried fishcake), bura don (pork loin, eggplant in a black garlic miso chili sauce), shiso ochazuke (rice ball seasoned with shiso [from the mint family] topped with pickled radish). 109 North Street, Healdsburg, 707-431-1995. (Photo by Heather Irwin) Slide 59 of 66
Mochi at Taste of Tea in Healdsburg. (Courtesy photo) Slide 60 of 66
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Bravas Bar De Tapas, Healdsburg: Boquerones (fresh anchovies marinated in vinegar), long-cooked pork cheeks, salmorejo soup (version of tomato gazpacho), crispy pig ears. 420 Center Street, Healdsburg, 707-433-7700. (Photo by Heather Irwin) Slide 62 of 66
Mai Vietnamese Cuisine, Cotati: Banh Xeo (crispy Vietnamese crepe), Pho Dac Biet (special combo soup), Bun Thit Nuong (vermicelli BBQ pork in a house special fish sauce), Com Tom Nuong (BBQ prawn in fish sauce), Com Cari Mai Bien (scallop curry) and other Vietnamese specialty dishes. 8492 Gravenstein Hwy, Cotati, 707-665-9628. (Photo by Jeff Kan Lee) Slide 63 of 66
Apna Bazaar, Cotati: Various Indian fare, including falafel, ginger paste, soan papdi pistachio dessert (pictured), chana dal (Indian split lentils). 7500 Commerce Blvd., Cotati, 707-665-0333. (Stock photo) Slide 64 of 66
Asiana Market, Cotati: Dried cuttlefish, lotus roots (prepared, pictured), Japanese mustard, homemade kimchi, tobiko (flying fish roe). 7665 Old Redwood Hwy., Cotati, 707-664-0526. (Stock photo) Slide 65 of 66
Worth a trip to Marin – Vladimir’s Czechoslovakian Restaurant , Inverness: Hungarian Goulash, baked garlic rabbit, Moravian cabbage roll, beef tongue, chicken paprikash, klobasa sausage. 12785 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Inverness, 415-669-1021. (Photo from Yelp) Slide 66 of 66
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by Maci Martell
It’s no secret Sonoma County offers a wide variety of exquisite cuisine, from upscale tapas to $2 street tacos. Mexican, Japanese and Thai food are commonplace in the county, but the international and exotic fare goes much deeper. For all the Sonoma County foodies out there, we’ve rounded up a fascinating lineup of exotic fare you might be surprised to find right here in Wine Country. Click through the gallery for details. Share:

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Four glam restaurants creating restaurant row in the Houston Galleria – HoustonChronicle.com

1 of 15 Detail main dining room at Nobu Houston at the Galleria. Photo: Peter Mollick 2 of 15 Detail of main bar at Nobu Houston at the Galleria. Photo: Peter Molick 3 of 15 Baby spinach with grilled shrimp at Nobu Houston at the Galleria. Photo: Henry Hargreaves 4 of 15 Fluke with dry miso at Nobu Houston at the Galleria. Photo: Henry Hargreaves 5 of 15 Crispy rice with spicy tuna at Nobu Houston at the Galleria. Photo: Henry Hargreaves 6 of 15 The Matsuhisa Martini at Nobu. Photo: Dave Rossman 7 of 15 A section of the bar seating area at Fig & Olive, a new restaurant in the Galleria. Photo: Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle 8 of 15 Six of the signature crostini at Fig & Olive, a new restaurant in the Galleria. Photo: Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle 9 of 15 Six of the signature crostini at Fig & Olive, a new restaurant in the Galleria. Photo: Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle 10 of 15 Burrata and heirloom tomatoes with watermelon, apple cider dressing and basil at Fig & Olive at the Galleria. Photo: Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle 11 of 15 Assorted crostini at Fig & Olive in the Galleria. Photo: Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle 12 of 15 Olive oil cake with Morrocan-style syrup, hints of jasmine tea, blood orange mascarpone and blood orange dust at Fig & Olive. Photo: Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle 13 of 15 A Soul Flower cocktail made with gin, basil, rosemary honey, lemon juice, lavender bitters and aquafaba at Fig & Olive. Photo: Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle 14 of 15 An artist rendering of Musaafer, opening winter 2018 at the Galleria. Photo: The Spice Route Company 15 of 15 Artist renderings of Musaafer, a new restaurant from The Spice Route Company, will open fall 2018 at the Galleria. Photo: The Spice Route Company
The Houston Galleria always had retail bragging rights but not necessarily restaurant ones. That began to change when Yauatcha, the Chinese dim sum teahouse with a Michelin-star résumé, brought some London polish to the shopping mecca last year.
Now the Galleria is in the midst of a full-fledged foodie makeover ­- all taking place in the former Saks Fifth Avenue space with its dramatic, theatrical façade courtesy of Philip Johnson. That’s where Fig & Olive set up shop in March as the first of four stylish concepts in this new culinary luxury collection.
The second, Nobu, ushered in international-realm dining and Hollywood panache – Robert De Niro is a partner with chef Nobu Matsuhisa, and together they have 40 locations around the world. With its signature dishes of black cod in miso and yellowtail with jalapeño, Nobu has been crushing it since opening last month.
Which is exactly what the Galleria hoped for when it assembled the collection that also will include regional Indian restaurant Musaafer by the United Arab Emirates-based Spice Route Company and Blanco Tacos & Tequila, both slated for winter 2018 openings.
The four-restaurant cluster reflects the diversity of Houston, according to Greg Vlahos, senior vice president of leasing for Simon Property Group. “We were interested in attracting unique, first-to-the-market operators” whose appeal would be readily apparent to Houston’s upmarket shoppers and international visitors, he said.
Indeed, there’s a welcome global spin to the new tenants of what’s now called Galleria VI.
Fig & Olive is a honeyed dip into the foods and flavors of the Cote d’Azur; Nobu flashes with its Nikkei fusion of Japanese and Peruvian cuisines; Musaafer will mine the Indian spice route; Blanco, from the restaurant group behind nearby North Italia, will cut right to the Texas soul with tacos and tequila.
When the final two restaurants open, the Galleria’s dining cred could give its fashion retailers a run for their money.

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Analysis of Indian Food in the UK Food Industry

Saturday, March 30, 2019 Analysis of Indian Food in the UK Food Industry Analysis of Indian Food in the UK Food Industry decision maker SUMMARYEating out in U.K has become a haute gastronomical adventure with lip smacking results. Curry houses be a British institution, as much a part of the national fabric as the local pub. Surprisingly there ar more(prenominal)(prenominal) Indian restaurants in capital of the United Kingdom than in Delhi ( cracking of India) (Hemisphere Magazine, 2005). The examine was obtained at discovering the various problems that besiege the sedulousness in UK. The dissertation weaves d unrivalled various problem scenarios and the search to start out it solutions.The three master(prenominal) problems which were discovered through face to face interviews wereoccupation of retaining client through serve up QualityProblem of retaining guest collect to limited workforceProblem of promotion policy advertising and sales promotionFor these problems deuce theories of Hospitality marketplaceing were chosen. These two theor ies i.e. Theory of gain forest and furtherance policy in restaurant industry were imageed in conjunction with the fieldwork analysis of the restaurants in capital of the United Kingdom. Problems were and so talk ofed in gibe to the theories. The discussion gave rise to come uply hypothetical situations which were again tribulationed in raise search.The methodology utilize in the s female genital organ was selected after prudent consideration of the investigate interrogation and the limitations. Using the usurp inquiry tools, an in-depth theater was done and it was known that exclusively three problems were not isolated in themselves rather they were headspring connected. The c erstwhilept of Ser fault Quality was seen missing extensively in the philosophies of the Restau measureurs.In a nutshell, it can be mentioned that nearly from each one problems seem to stem from deficiencies in supporter tone. However at this point, it should be noted that no single p roblem can be the of import culprit nor a special solution, a panacea for all ills. It is with this in mind that this study should be viewed.CHAPTER 1INTRODUCTIONFor the purposes of this search, the term Indian food covers food from the Indian, Bengali and Pakistani traditions. The market take ons sales through restaurants, pubs and takea flairs. ready meals (both frozen and chilled) sauces yesterye ars, accompaniments and get dressed powder. The introductory part of this look for contains set ScenarioThe largest ethnic minority group in Britain are Indians (approx 10,000,000 race) (Crown,2004) with over 40% of them (approx 800,000) living in the Capital i.e. capital of the United Kingdom which contri thoe to 6% of the do population of London (LFC,2004). These facts justify the existence of over 1000 Indian restaurants in UK and 4000 only in London and the South east (Grove International,2004). The excerption of these Curry Houses is a blessing for the true Indian food co nnoisseur. only if recently the Indian Food Industry in UK ready undergone some study structural changes. With the popping up of Giant restaurants in the Capital akin the Cinnamon Club (Westminster), Tamarind (Queen Street) and Zaika (Kensington High Street) in the past couple of years, this has invited the interest of lot of the professional bodies like Time egress Guide, Evening Standards, Daily Telegraph, Financial Times and so forth The various reviews (Iqbal Wahab,2004) disposed by them to the acclaimed Indian restaurants in London speak of their varied interests.Indian food is a 3.2 billion industry in Britain, accounting for two-thirds of all eating out (Geraldine Bedell, May2004). This modern evolved Indian Cuisine in London has sparkled since the time when Tamarind and Zaika, Indian restaurants in London, were awarded the Michelin star. The famous dish complainer Tikka Masala is now an au sotic English national dish (Robin Cook,2004) All these facts well-nigh this I ndustry makes it big and at the same time it evolves more an separate(prenominal) prospects and problems in itself. Importance of Indian RestaurantsIn the expire half-century, curry has become more traditionalisticly English than English breakfast. Some fitting facts in this surroundings areAccording to Mintel reports, Indian restaurants is 1733 million industry in Britain which is more than two third of the aggregate food industry in Britain.(App poleix 1)In an exclusive consumer survey commissioned by Mintel, 42% of the respondents stated that Indian/Bengali/Pakistani food was among the types of food that they nigh enjoyed, up from 38% in 1999. Indian food is most popular with 25-54-year-olds and, in rail line to Chinese food, shows a strong up market bias (Mintel, 05/2004)It is one of the biggest industries in Britain employing over 60,000 people (menu2menu, 2005)There are over 8500 Indian restaurants in UK and 3500 only in London (Grove International, 2004). Indian res taurants are the study players in Brits ethnic cuisines overshadowing Chinese outlets which are around 7400. (Mintel,2005)Indian restaurants serves 2.5 millions Brits all week besides David Beckham celebrated after scoring the goal that able England for the World Cup, at Manchesters Shimla Pinks, with his favorite chicken korma. Madonna, more and more the Anglophile, has obviously interpreted to ordering the taxi curry takeout from the Noor Jahan restaurant near her London home in Westbourne Grove (Guardian,2004, Issue 2). Every lofty street has its Star of India or Taj Mahal. Surprisingly twice as much Indian food is sold in Britain as fish and chips (Economist, 1999) and McDonalds bewilder had to adapt their British menus to include curry and spice.These ubiquitous curry houses are coming up in the world. They are no monthlong consigned to the ranks of post-pub grub besides there is a gradual growth rate in the Indian restaurant market since 1999. (Appendix 1) Also the fact that Indian restaurants commit a strong influence on the retail sphere of influence is undeniable. They puddle provided most of the recipes and are the sole benchmark for au then(prenominal)ticity for products like Indian ready meals, sauces, pastes and accompaniments.UK Food IndustryThe food industry in the UK has undergone dramatic change over the last few decades, a phenomenon which has been named the manipulation revolution Ritson, C. and R. Hutchins (1991). Fragmentation of demand has been coupled with concentration in supply, so that the majority of food expenditure is now channeled through five major supermarket groups Waterson, M. J. (1995). This has posed threats to the small agrifood producer, who is typically unable to meet the volume and agreement of supply assumements of the large retailers. However, opportunities live with as well as arisen many small producers have successfully targeted nook markets, often through direct marketing or distribution through in pendant outlets. Their offerings ordinarily carry the typical characteristics of niche products, in that they possess added mensurate, are differentiated from competitive offerings and charge a premium price. With such(prenominal) characteristics it is possible for small producers to succeed within a highly competitive environment Phillips, M. (1994).However, recent opportunities have also arisen in the food five-fold sectors, as supermarket groups show an increase interest in stocking specialty and revalue-added food products. This interest stems in part from a bank to improve product range and enhance consumer choice. However, it could also be viewed as a response to public criticisms of the negative sociable and environmental personal effects of concentration in food distribution in particular, the development of centralized distribution systems which mitigate against the use of smaller, local suppliers by food multiple arrange. Some supermarket groups in the UK are now a ttempting to improve links with such suppliers, by, for example, devolving decision-making power to store directors, improving purchasing technology and creating opportunities for buyers and producers to meet and discuss one anothers need Carter, . Shaw (1993).There was a Greek community in Greek Street, London as long ago as 1677 so Greek cuisine is not exactly new to Britain. The influx of Cypriots started in the 1920s and 1930s and they began opening restaurants after the Second World War.Greek Cypriots tended to settle in Hackney, Palmers Green, Islington and Haringey and Turkish Cypriots in Stoke Newington. Greek Cypriots appeared in Soho in 1930s then Camden Town after the war and then Fulham by the mid sixties. The main influx of Turkish Cypriots was in the 1960s and by 1971 the Greek Cypriot community had turned its attention to timberland Green, Palmers Green and Turnpike Lane.Only around one third of the 550 or so Greek restaurants in Britain are in London, most of th ese macrocosm in North and West London. Some 40% of the 150 or so Turkish restaurants are in the capital with a expectant concentration in North London. Turkish cuisine is also well represented in Scotland. One of the earliest Greek restaurants was not in London at all but Georges in St Michael Street, Southampton in 1940, moderately pre-dated by The White Tower in Londons West End in 1939. Kalamaras in London W2 opened in 1966 and remains popular today. The most successful of the Turkish restaurants at present is the Efes Group which started in London but is now in several locations throughout the country.Aims and objectives of the researchThe mechanisms of globalisation has made the world a smaller place and, while this has helped to discover various cuisines to new fields, it has subsequently resulted in the development of fusion foods, which has implications for the Indian restaurant market. The image of men behaving badly, gulping downing super-hot curries with several pi nts of lager, are long gone. Today, a trip out for a curry is a posh affair, with some of the countrys top chefs cooking up sophisticated dishes of complexity and variety. (LFC,2004)With these growing fashion of globalization, there is a huge threat to Indian restaurants which are traditionally managed by the family members. According to the Economist-But once trends become clichs they have a expression of nose-diving. Open the pages of the dandy Curry Guide, and you result discover that all is not well. According to the guide, last year there were at least 300 closures of Indian restaurants in Britain, compared with just over a hundred openings. Indian restaurants, while muted the biggest players in the industry, are losing market share eastern cuisine, such as Thai and Japanese food. (Economist, 2005)The main aim of the research is To assess the major issues that determines the performance and competency of the Indian foods/restaurants in UK.The Objectives are to To Assess t he dish up quality and the fork out train Management. To Assess the consumer Perception towards Indian Foods and the applicable Marketing pleat to exploit the opportunitiesRationaleIndian Cuisine which the westerners commonly call Curry is highly popularized by the Indian restaurants in UK. These restaurants which are primarily owned by Indians reflect the specialty of every region of India. The spread of curry beyond its home in the sub-continent is inextricably cerebrate to the presence of the British Raj in India. Army personnel and civil servants acquired a taste for spicy food whilst in India and brought their newly found dishes home. Since then spicy Indian dishes are highly liked by the people in UK.London is a hub of Indian foods and restaurants. With the growing area of distinctiveness and people trying new and creative things in their restaurants in London the problems have started increasing. Problems of not only external environment like increasing competition , strict food and health policies or inflation, etc but also the internal problems which relate to the marketing strategies, sourcing of raw materials or inefficient management, etc.This study leave behind explore SCM issues with reference to market fragility and market access purchasing power purchasing decisions and relationships rendering of client needs barriers and frustrations and strengths and successes. This report is premised on the belief that supply chains are grand for maximizing efficiency. But supply chains are farthermost more important than that the management of supply chains increasingly influences the nature, outdo and confederacy in enterprise development and sustainability. In other words, supply chains are re-structuring the lines of business development in knowledge-based economies. This study allow further high light the consumer perception and the Marketing mix.CHAPTER 2 Literature revue2.0 Chapter OverviewAs Indian Restaurants are a part of the hospit ality industry, this chapter contains the books taken from the subject of marketing in hospitality industry. Two main theories are used to analyze the three main problems stated in the previous chapters. They are* service Quality and Supply concatenation* Promotion Policy Advertising and Sales promotionThe two theories are then analyzed in light of the problems. A relationship is developed among the industry and theories by researching the trends. These theories are then used for drawing conclusions and recommendations in further chapters. For the reader, this chapter will be the base of agreement the ongoing trends in the Indian Restaurant industry.2.1 Introduction to Hospitality Marketing in Restaurants today marketing isnt simply another function of business rather its a philosophy, a way of thinking and a way of organizing your business and your mind. The customer is the king (Iverson, 1989). According to Kotler (2000, Ch. 1), satisfying the customer is a priority in most businesses. But all customers cannot be satisfied. There has to be a proper selection of customers which enable the restaurants to meet its objectives.In the Restaurant industry, many people confuse marketing with advertising and sales promotion. It is not crotchety to hear restaurant managers say that they do not believe in marketing, when they actually mean that they are disappointed with the impact of their advertising. In reality, sell and advertising are only two marketing functions, and often not the most important. As Kotler said in his book, Marketing for Hospitality and tourism (1996, Chapter-1), advertising and sales are components of the promotional element of the marketing mix. separate marketing mix elements include product, price and distribution. Marketing also includes research, randomness systems and planning.The aim of the marketing is to make selling superfluous. The aim is to know and understand customers so well that the product or go fits them and sells it self.(Drucker,1973,p. 64-65) The only way selling and promoting will be effective is if we first define customer targets and needs and then prepare an easily accessible and available value package.The purpose of a business is to create and maintain profitable customers. customers are attracted and retained when their need are met. Not only do they turn in to the same restaurants but they also talk favorably to others near their satisfaction. Customer satisfaction leading to profit is the central goal of Hospitality Marketing.(Kotler Bowen Makens, 1996, Chapter- 1) less repeat customers and bad words of mouth are deeds of the manager who interprets profits above customer satisfaction. A successful manager will consider profits only as the result of running a business well, rather then its sole purpose. So in this improvement based industry (Indian restaurants) the entrance of corporate giants with mesmerizing marketing skills have increased the splendor of marketing within the industry. Now lest see how far these Hospitality marketing stunts can save the appalling scene in the industry.2.2 Service QualityDaryl Wyckoff has defined operate quality as, Quality is the academic degree of excellence intended, and the control of variability in achieving that excellence, in meeting customers requirements. ( Wyckoff, 1984, p 81) This theorem of quality is however not accurate as experts says Quality is whatsoever the customer says it is and the quality of a particular product or service is whatever the customer perceives it to be (Powers,2000, p 179). So the main accent is on the customer and perceived quality.A more professional way of looking at quality is by conceptualizing it broadly along the two critical proportions i.e. technical quality and interpersonal quality. Technical Quality is generally the minimum expected from a hospitality operation.(Did things go right, Was the food hot) (Powers, 1997). This dimension of quality is relatively objective in nature and is thus measurable.Interpersonal Quality is a comparatively difficult dimension (Was the waiter favourable? Did the service staff go out of their way to be assistive? Did the customer feel welcome or out of place?) As Gronroos (1980) points out Even when an excellent solution is achieved, the firm may be unsuccessful, if the excellence in technical quality is counteracted by badly managed buyer-seller interactions. And vice versa the charm in this world will not make up for bad food or a lost reservation. So each dimension is critical.2.3 Concept of building customer satisfaction through qualityThe fundamental strategic decision to be taken by the Indian Food manufactures at the outset is to consider the service system any standardized or routine/customized. In the former, more importance is addicted to technical quality, operation goes by the book and little importance is compensable to employees discretion. While the later gives importance to both qualities and mor e discretion is prone to the employee.Customized system of service is recommended to the restaurants as consumers go to the restaurant that they believe offers the highest customer delivered value or customer satisfaction i.e. the difference surrounded by total customer value and total customer cost* The customer derives value from the core products, the service delivery system and restaurants image.* The costs to the customer include money, time, energy and physic costs.Quality is made up of two components that is to say technical and interpersonal. Managers must keep in mind that in the end the customer perceptions of the delivered quality are what is important. Customers assess delivered services against their expectations. If perceived service meets expectations, they view the service as good quality. If perceived service fall short of expectations, they view the service as poor. Expectations are formed by past experiences with the restaurants, word of mouth, the restaurants external communication and publicity.A widely used model of service quality is known as the five flutter model. This model defines service quality as meeting customer expectations. The prescript behind the formation of this model was to discover the expectation of the customer which is perhaps the most critical step in delivering service quality. This model is closely think to marketing since it is customer based. This model has five gaps, fault 1 Consumer expectations versus Management PerceptionGap 2 Management Perception versus Service Quality SpecificationsGap 3 Service Quality Specifications versus Service preservationGap 4 Service Delivery versus External CommunicationsGap 5 Expected Service versus Perceived ServiceThe detail study of this 5 gap model is out of the boundary of this research. But the question is whether this aspect can solve the issue, can it benefits the industry? The answer is discussed in Chapter 4.2.4 Supply ChainMost Important aspect for increasing s ervice Quality performance is Supply Chain Integration. Effective Supply Chain Management can-* Cut Down The Total Cost Significantly.* addition the productivity and Performance.* Improve time and labour economy.* Can differentiate Service quality.* Can provide optimum Speed and comfort in quality Service delivery.In other words it provides better economy of scale and competitive advantage.The Value ChainSource Johnshon and Scholes, 2004The Value Chain will be discussed in the essence of the Supply Chain Management Issues.These elements of a snitch are illustrated in 1.It has long been recognized that products have meanings for consumers beyond providing mere functional utility. Symbolic consumption was recognized by Veblen (1899) in his Theory of the Leisure Class and termed conspicuous consumption. Noth (1988) quotes Karl Marx and his metaphor of the language of commodities in which the linen conveys its thoughts (p. 175) while Barthes (1964) discussed a semiotic threshold with the semiotic quick above the utilitarian or functional aspects of objects.Given the symbolic practice of brands it is no surprise that semiotics, as the study of signs in society, is increasingly creation used in understanding consumer behavior. Initially used in facilitating understanding of the consumption behavior surrounding cultural products such as put down and other works of art (Holbrook and Grayson, 1986) and fashion (Barthes, 1983), its widespread usage to interpret symbolic consumption in all aspects of consumer behavior is anticipated (Mick, 1986).The possibility behind this research technique is that brand equity is built on consumers perception of the emotional benefits or brand affinity, combined with physical orConcrete benefits The performance delivered by the product or service offered. The technique attempts to evaluate each of these two aspects in detail, providing a clear understating of its importance for the category under investigation as well as for th e brands in that category.During the development of this technique we identified and coded the emotional factor that repeatedly appeared in all markets in the study, allowing us to conclude thatThey are valid for close to any product or service category when the subject is brand equity evaluation. These aspects can be classified into three groups brand causationity, take aim of identification that the substance abuser or consumer has with its positioning, and level of social approval it offers to its user or consumer.Authority might be defined by the brands heritage or long-standing reputation and leadership, by the trust or confidence it inspires to consumers, and by aspects associated to innovation or technological development as perceived by consumers.Thus all the branding theories leads to the consumers Perception.3.2 Consumer Perceptions Of FoodsInvestigation and analysis of food get and consumption is well-documented within the discipline of consumer behavior. Studies in this area tend to taste the complexity of factors which drive food-related tastes and preferences, and some authors have proposed models which attempt to categories and integrate these factors and so offer insights into the formation of food preferences and choices. Shepherd. R, (1989) provides a review of such models, from Yudkin, J. (1956), which lists physical, social and physiological factors, to Booth and Shepherd (1988) which summarizes the procedurees influencing, and resulting from food acceptance, and lists factors relating to the food, the individual and the environment. However, none of these models incorporated a consideration of the role of place in food, and consumer perceptions of this attribute.It may be noted that, by their very nature, food products have a land-based geographical origin (Brard, L. and P. Marchenay 1995), which would suggest that people readily make strong associations between certain foods and geographical locations. On the other hand, the proc ess of delocalization of the food system in the twentieth century, as described by Montanari , (1994) has weakened the traditional territorial and symbolic links between foods and places. The inference is that the concept of Indianity in foods may no longer be important or lovely to the modern food consumer, who is faced with such a wide raiment of exotic and international products all year round. Thus it may be that in the mind of the consumer, specific names, production methods or presentational forms of particular foods are no longer associated with the geographic areas from which they originate. An opposing view is taken by Driver, (1983) however, who describes resurgence in the interest in traditional Indian dishes in the UK, which perhaps reflects the symbolic importance that particular foods have in our lives and culture. These debates highlight the need for empirical investigation of peoples perceptions and understandings of Indianity in food. Linked to this debate of the p erceived meaning of Indianity in foods is the concept of authenticity. If Indian foods are linked in some way to origins and tradition, it implies that producers of Indian foods are involved in providing and communicating intangible attributes of heritage, tradition and authenticity in their product offerings. These require careful management, particularly in view of authors such as MacCannell 1989, Hughes, (1995) and Urry, (1995), who, in relation primarily to tourist experiences, point out the difficulty in defining what is authentic, and in communicating this to an increasingly sophisticated and diverse consultation of consumers. In relation to Indian foods, information is needed on consumer perceptions of allot attributes of products, which are the most attractive and why.CHAPTER 4METHODOLOGY A-RESEARCH PHILOSOPHY onslaughtIn the previous chapters, author has outlined research aim and objectives with examining the pertinent literature review. However, the successful complet ion of any study is heavily dependent on the choice of an appropriate research method and come near. Moreover, the appropriate research methodology provides guidance for the development and evaluation process of study. Wit the appropriate methodology the author can justify the achievement of the objective. question processThe research process adopted is based on exploratory betterment, but prior to that it is necessary to highlight upon the methodological pen work.The recognized exponents in this field are Hussey Hussey (1997), Zikmund (2000), Saunders et al (1997, 2000) and others who presented different methodological framework from which investigators can conduct their research. Most of these frameworks follow certain similar central theme. The author has adapted the below-illustrated methodological framework to fulfill the research aim and objectives. This is chosen, as it supports the author research design and process, Furthermore, methodology has been designed where inf o is stash away and interpreted. The findings and analysis with conclusions and recommendations at the end follow this.METHODOLOGYResearch aimThe main aim of the research is To assess the major issues that determines the performance and efficiency of the Indian foods/restaurants in UK.Research objectives To Assess the Service quality and the Supply Chain Management. To Assess the consumer Perception towards Indian Foods and the relevant Marketing Mix to exploit the opportunitiesResearch PhilosophyEasterby-Smith et al (1993) states three reasons why it is utile to state the research philosophy about proposed research before aggregation selective information* To clarify the research design-the method by which data is sedate and analyzed-taking a holistic view of overall configuration.* To help recognize which designs will work and which will not* To help identify and create research design to adopt research approach according to the required research aim and objectives.There are t wo main types of research philosophies in existing literature. They are Positivism and Phenomenological. They are different, if not mutually exclusive, views about the way in which knowledge is developed and judged as being acceptable. They have an important part to play in business and management research. (Saunders et al, 2005, p 83) The positivistic philosophy which seeks the facts or arouses of social phenomena(Hussey Hussey,1998) is more objective, uninflected and structured and the researcher is independent of the subject. (Remenyi et al., 199833). In addition, the quantitative data should be collected and statistical analyzed when test the certain theories.(Saunders et al, 2005, Hussey Hussey,1998)On the other hand phenomenological philosophy which understanding human behavior from the participants own frame of reference (Hussey Hussey, 1998) is more subjective and the researcher is dependent on their mind. qualitative method can be used such as a case study.It is import ant that which philosophy is better for my project. Saunders et al. (2005) state that no philosophy is better than others so choosing philosophy depends on the research question. Having considered the aims of this research project, I will choose phenomenological philosophy because this research question is How the Supply Chain helps the Indian Food Industry in UK in achieving efficiency and the meaning of Consumer perception to the marketing mix.The research will be qualitative. In order to answer the research question, I would do case study on Chinese and UK textile and clothing firms and collect data by using interviews.Research ApproachInductive or Deductive ResearchUndoubtedly the research approach is very important for the project. There are two research approaches, which is the deductive approach and the inductive approach.As mentioned in Saunders et al (2000), the major differences between the deductive and inductive approaches to research are as followsDeduction emphasisIndu ction emphasis Scientific principles romp an understanding of the meaning humans attach to eventsThe need to explain cause and effect relationship between variablesA close understanding of the research stage settingThe collection of quantitative dataThe collection of qualitative dataThe application of controls to ensure clarity of definition and highly structuredA more flexible structure to permit changes of research emphasis as the research progressResearchers independence of what is being researchedA realization that the researchers is a part of research progressThe necessity to select sample of satisfactory size in order to generalize conclusion Less bear on with the need to generalizeDeductive approach aims to develop a possibleness and or hypothesis and design a research strategy to test it. Deductive approach is a rigid methodology, which not permits alternative explanation. It emphasizes on scientific principles and moving from theory to data. It is a highly structured ap proach and need more operationalisation of concepts to ensure definition. Oppositely inductive approach is which the researcher would collect data and develop a theory as a result of data analysis. It is an alternative approach and theory building followed data collection. In addition, it is the better way to study the small sample because of concerning with the context in which the events are taking place. (Saunders et al, 2005, p 85) Easterby-Smith et al. (2004) state that if the researcher have interested in understanding why something happening the inductive approach is more appropriate. Having considered the aims of this research project, it seems that inductive approach is more suitable. Firstly, according to Saunders et al (2005), inductive approach is closely related to phenomenology. 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