HT IMAGINE FEST 2019: The World-Class Cultural Event For ‘Attainable Art’

HT IMAGINE FEST 2019: The World-Class Cultural Event For ‘Attainable Art’

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The most unique and spectacular art festival of the country- HT Imagine Fest 2019 has finally come to the capital city bringing in the best of art and culture. Hindustan Times Imagine Fest 2019 is a ground-breaking cultural fest with a strong focus on ‘Attainable Art’ that would bring people together in Delhi to create extra-ordinary experiences. The second edition of the two-day HT Imagine Fest will commence over a cerebral weekend on 23rd & 24th February 2019 taking place in PSOI Club Nehru Park.
“We are extremely delighted to curate the second edition of HT Imagine Fest 2019. People are inspired by original pieces of art but as they are usually high-priced, art fairs become as good as museums. Allowing people to access attainable, affordable and original art pieces ranging from INR 5,000 to under INR 2 lakh, will enable people to buy and enjoy art that is aesthetically pleasing to them.” says Ruchi Sibal, co-founder of Palate Fest Pvt. Ltd.
“We wanted to bring art to a broader audience and encourage people to see the relevance of art in the world around them. Our vision for HT Imagine Fest is to focus on all art forms and offer inspirational talks by celebrities, art walks, affordable art for city aficionados, art workshops and an enticing array of International cuisines.” says Aditi Kapoor, co-founder of Palate Fest Pvt. Ltd.
HT Imagine Fest 2019 comprises a series of carefully curated talks and splendid experiences, which will be the major highlights of the event- To keep the audience entertained, the festival will host talk sessions by eminent celebrities like the sensational singer Sonu Nigam , the very successful television producer Ekta Kapoor on 23rd February ‘19 followed by the prodigious filmmaker Madhur Bhandarkar on 24th February ‘19 to inspire us all.
Along with exploring the magnificent display of diverse artwork, the extravaganza introduces a unique concept “A Palette of Palate” that will bring culinary joy from some of the finest and esteemed restaurants like Fat Lulus, Orient Heritage, Dragon Wagon, Baba Rolls, Veda, Vadapav Junction & More, Teahues, Whole Foods, Wild Water Vitamin, Keventers, Giani and Mahesh products and much more offering delectable range of Indian and International cusine at the festival.
Aditi Kapoor and Ruchi Sibal in collaboration with Hindustan Times have successfully curated the second edition of a world-class cultural event- HT Imagine Fest, building one-of-a kind art festival exhibiting the original work of the young and upcoming artists and making it accessible to the patrons of the city.

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Niharica Raizada dives into an enthralling food fest at The Ren Hotels in Nashik

Niharica Raizada, last seen in the Friday release ‘Total Dhamaal’ inaugurated ‘The Ren Hotels Food Festival 1.0’ in Nashik.
The actress interacted with media at the inauguration of ‘The Ren Hotels Food Festival 1.0’ on Friday.
Niharica who recognizes herself as a big foodie was excited to be part of the biggest food festival this weekend, she said, “I love to eat Indian desi dishes like Rajma Chawal, Curry, Butter Chicken. I love our staple north Indian diet. I also enjoy trying new cuisines so I am looking forward to trying both veg and non-vegetarian dishes.”
From Luxembourg, Niharica said, “Even though vineyards and wines are a big part of where I come from I haven’t consumed wine at all. But wine goes with seafood the best and I love eating seafood so, I will definitely try it sometime soon.”
Some of the other personalities present there will be Mr. Sudhir Krishnan and Mr. Sujith Shetty the Directors of The Ren Hotels.
From delicious food to endless music, and carnival performances the festival lasts for the entire weekend until Sunday night, from 22nd Feb 2019, 12:30 Pm at The Ren Hotels
The Festival is driven by enthusiasm and passion for local food culture and seeks to promote all the cuisines from their kitchen at The Ren Hotel

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Seekh Kebab – Indian Food Sydney by billusydney

Indian food is loved by very country people to enhance there taste Billu Restaurant has bought up with delicious Indian food in Parramatta so than people living in their origin taste the Indian Cuisines.

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The importance of the ‘kick’ of mustard oil in a dish

The importance of the ‘kick’ of mustard oil in a dish Share Google +
A few weeks ago, after a meal at a Bengali eatery in Delhi, I found myself struggling to find the right word to describe my disappointment with the shorshe-maach ( mustard fish ).
My co-diner, a friend, could not understand what the fuss was all about. After all, the dish was delicious in its own right.
To me, however, the mustard fish did not have the right amount of kick — that was the closest expression, I could come up with to describe what the meal lacked.
My friend thought my criticism was unfair. A few more green chilies would have thrown the spice quotient askew, more oil would have made the fish unnecessarily greasy. She was right. The problem lay with me. At times like this, I rue my lack of proficiency in my mother tongue. Try as much as I did, I could not summon the right Bangla expression to convey my sentiment.
I knew this wasn’t just about the palate. The word I was yearning for had to do with the communion between fire, mustard oil (shorsher tel) and the senses. The craft of cooking with the mustard seed is an art
At times, it begins when the oil is poured into a hot wok. The vapours pierce the air, stir up the sinuses and throw the salivary glands into a tizzy, even before the taste buds have had their say. At other times, the raw oil rouses the tear ducts into acting as a flavour-messenger.
Once the murky yellow cooking medium begins to lose colour, it’s time to add one’s preferred masalas — ginger, garlic, poppy seed paste, turmeric, cardamom, chopped onions, or the signature spice mixture of several Bengali dishes, paanch phoron.
Today, mustard oil chases you across a variety of Bengali cuisine. But, writes food historian Chitrita Banerji in Life and Food in Bengal (1991), “In 19th-century Calcutta, many of the great feudal families would die rather than serve food cooked in mustard oil, which was considered only fit for the poor.”
There is, perhaps, something very elemental about the oil. In rural Bengal, or in the homes of plebeian classes, a variety of leaves and stems were cooked in shorsher tel to serve as an accompaniment to rice. Widows proscribed from eating meat or spicing food with onion and garlic would impart zest to their meal by using mustard paste in dantaachachchari, a medley of the stems of leafy vegetables.
Add a dash of the oil to a mixture of mashed potatoes and onions to jhal muri, even dal, and the dish has an effect that is very different from luxuriant cooking media such as ghee : It stings the palette, rather than coat it, and leaves a sharp after taste. This eccentricity apparently worked in shorsher tel’s favour when Bengali middle-class cuisine came into its own to forge what writer Amit Chaudhuri describes as a “delicate combination of the vernacular and the sublime”.
Mustard demands respect. Heat the oil a little more than what is required, chances are that it will turn bitter, grind the seeds a little more, the paste will leave an incongruous taste in your mouth.
Nowhere is the deference to balance more in demand than in extracting the oil. Mustard has four varieties: rai, brown sarson, the reddish brown toria and the yellow sarson. Writes food historian KT Achaya in The Illustrated Foods of India (2009), “They are never crushed singly for oil, but always in a judicious admixture so as to yield a mustard oil of distinctive flavour in high yield, to which each seed contributes something distinctive”.
Once assured of deference, mustard oil lavishes sensitivity in equal measure. The carp, catla and perch revel in its zing, its pungency enhances the sweet-salty taste of the hilsa and shorsher tel becomes one with the flavours of a variety of vegetables ranging from pumpkins and flat-beans to the bitter gourd. This is also why it has been the preservative of choice for pickle-makers.
On my next visit to the Bengali eatery, I asked the chef his reasons for playing down the oil’s sharpness. “Only to cater to the tastes of a variety of customers,” he said. I don’t have a verdict on that answer. But, I got the word I had been looking for.
The Bengali language describes the kick associated with mustard oil — and some spices — as jhaanj.
Written by Kaushik Das Gupta |New Delhi | Indian Express

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Chilli Idli

Print Recipe Chilli Idli is delicious and easy snack made using Idli in Indo-Chinese flavours. Idli is one of the most popular breakfast items in India, know more about Idli here. . and Indo-Chinese cuisine , a fusion between the Indian and Chinese flavors has made its own place in between the various Indian cuisines. Indo-Chinese snacks like Manchurian , Chilli Paneer , Chowmein are some of the most popular Indo chinese snacks that a favourite among all the age groups. Chilli Idli gives a spicy makeover to the plain leftover idlis. It is also a great option for party snacks and appetizers. My family is loves Indo-Chinese dishes and kids love to take Chilli Idli or Masala Idli for lunch. Another favorite Indo-Chinese version is Idli Manchurian. I always make extra idlis whenever I make Idlis with Sambhar and make either Masala Idli or Chilli Idli for the evening snack or dinner or packing in kids lunchbox.
Chilli Idli like Masala Idli can be prepared by using either the Idllis prepared by fermentation method or Instant Idllis. Many people like to deep fry Idlis for making Chilli Idli or Masala Idlli. But avoid deep-frying due to much of oil it absorbs and we like the non-fried version more, as it light on stomach too. You can adjust the level of spice in the dish as per requirement. Adding green chillies is also optional. Let’s see how I make this Indo-Chinese version of Idli.. Chilli Idli Print Recipe Chilli Idli Chilli Idli recipe. A spicy Indo-Chinese version of Idlis. How to use leftover Idlis.Stepwise method for making spicy Indo-Chinese version of Idlis. Prep Time 10 mins Keyword: Fusion Food, Fusion Recipe, How to use leftover Idlis, Indo-Chinese Idli recipe Servings: 4 people 1 Cup Cubed mixed Bell Peppers 1 tbsp Finely chopped/crushed garlic 2 tbsp Olive Oil or any flavorless Vegetable oil 2 tbsp Soy Sauce 1/4 tsp Black Pepper powder Salt to taste Spring Onion Greens for garnish optional Instructions Cut Idli into quarters. You can also make fresh idlis if you don’t have any leftover Idlis. Mix all the sauces in the bowl and keep aside. In a pan, heat oil and add garlic. Saute for few seconds then add onions. Add cubed bell peppers and saute for 1-2 minutes. Do not overcook the bell pepper, keep it crispy. Add sauces and mix . Add little salt, as it is already present in the sauces. Adjust the amount of salt as per your taste. Add idli pieces and add to the pan and mix. take care not to break or mash the pieces. Garnish with spring onion greens.
So whenever you have some leftover Idlis from breakfast or lunch do try this spicy version. Or, make some Instant Idlis to make Chilli Idlis for party or light weekend dinner.
Sharing Chili Idli with my #97Blogging Marathon group for Week 4 Day 1 post for the theme.. Fusion at it’s Best!! Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing this BM#97
Let me know how you liked my non-fried version of Chilli Idlis. Whenever you try these , do post a picture of the dish. I will love to see the pics on any of my social media pages.. FB or tag me on Instagram(#foodtrails25) . You can also Pin the recipe for later use. Join me in my food trails .. follow the blog and my social media accounts. If you like my work do share this with your loved ones.
Thanks for stopping by!!

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8 gastronomic experiences not to be missed at Asian Masters 2019, Food

The first Malay fine-dining restaurant in Singapore was called Aziza’s, and its chef, 69-year-old doyenne of Malay cuisine Ms Aziza Ali, will make a rare return for this year’s Asian Masters (see point #3 below).
Asian Masters 2019, which runs from March 1, 2019 to February 29, 2020, is presented by Citibank Singapore, in partnership with The Straits Times and Lianhe Zaobao Best Asian Restaurant Awards, Gastronomic Treasures, Feast Asia, and Mixology Asia. With official wines and spirits purveyor Malt & Wine Asia on board as well, featuring alcohols from Brown-Forman, expect nothing but the best pairings you can find on your dining table.
Apart from Ms Aziza’s highly-anticipated comeback, other highlights in the year-long series of events include a wine supper in Geylang (point #2), dining in a private chef’s home (point #4), and the chance to revisit long-standing establishments integral to Singapore’s heritage (point #1).
Whether you are a casual foodie or a discerning gourmand, you will surely find something that entices you at the seventh edition of Asian Masters.
Still undecided? Perhaps these eight reasons will convince you to make a date with Asian Masters 2019:
#1: Meet heritage heroes
Chicken with Minced Prawn from Spring Court. PHOTO: SPRING COURT
At the ripe old age of 90, Spring Court is the oldest Chinese restaurant in Singapore.
Respected food critic and Senior Food Correspondent of The Straits Times Wong Ah Yoke is hosting a special dinner on March 12 that features an eight-course spread of well-loved signature dishes paired with wines from Handpicked Wines.
Each diner will also be presented with a bottle of Handpicked Regional Selection Pinot Noir worth $48.
Sit down for a six-course dinner at Teochew Restaurant Huat Kee that includes dishes off the regular menu. PHOTO: TEOCHEW RESTAURANT HUAT KEE
Then there’s family-run Teochew Restaurant Huat Kee, which celebrates 50 years of dishing out authentic Teochew fare this year.
On March 7, sit down for a six-course dinner that includes dishes off the regular menu. The culinary symphony is curated by mother-and-son duo Madam Loh Hock Eng and Mr Lee Chiang Howe.
The experience will be complete with the accompaniment of whiskies from The GlenDronach, which will include The Sherry Cask Connoisseurs. Each diner will also be presented with a bottle of The GlenDronach Original 12 Years worth $138.
#2: Have a wine supper in Geylang
Have a one-of-a-kind experience at JB Ah Meng in Geylang. PHOTO: JB AH MENG
What exactly is a wine supper? Well, Michelin Bib Gourmand Malaysian Chinese zi char joint JB Ah Meng will be defining this new culinary experience on March 22 with its late night endeavour held in conjunction with Veramonte Wines. This is a never-seen-before event in the Asian Masters line-up.
Come join fellow supper lovers for the excellent soul food, make new friends and renew old bonds over famed zi char favourites. The eight-course supper featuring staples like San Lou Bee Hoon and White Pepper Crab (much-lauded by the late celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain) demands that diners get comfy (dress code: casual) to enjoy a truly relaxed dining experience in the heart of foodie central Geylang.
#3: Rub shoulders with legends
Chef Aziza Ali returns to present an exclusive Malay fine dining menu at the Grand Hyatt Hotel. PHOTO: AZIZA ALI
Making a grand, albeit short, return to the active dining scene is Chef Aziza Ali.
She’s the pioneer of the first formal Malay dining establishment in Singapore set up circa 1979 (Aziza’s, along Emerald Hill Road), cookbook author, food consultant, television personality, painter, artist, jewellery designer and Singapore Women’s Hall of Fame 2016 inductee.
Catch her at the Grand Hyatt Singapore on March 19, where she will present an evening of good food with a hint of music and art. Relish her exclusive Malay fine dining menu imbued with all her decades of experience, and her latest “My Heritage Kitchen” cookbook will also be available for sale that evening.
Celebrity chef Violet Oon will be showcasing her British Hainanese cooking prowess. PHOTOS: VIOLET OON SINGAPORE
Then get to know another veteran — celebrity chef Violet Oon, who has honed her craft for over 50 years and now owns four restaurant outlets.
Usually known for her aromatic and inventive Singaporean Nonya cuisine, she’ll be showcasing her British Hainanese cooking prowess on March 1. Robust gems by Handpicked Wines will complement her dishes.
#4: Home cooking can be haute too
Savour renowned make-up artist Tinoq Russell Goh’s (left) style of “kampung cooking”. PHOTOS: TINOQ RUSSELL GOH
There will be more than one first in this year’s edition of the Asian Masters. A prolific home chef will be opening his home to guests, and an award-winning author be bringing the recipes in his cookbooks to life.
In recent years, booking a private dining experience in a stranger’s home is all the rage. The unsurpassed hospitality, personalised menu and convivial atmosphere keep diners coming back for more.
Join renowned make-up artist Tinoq Russell Goh and his partner Dylan Chan in Tinoq’s quirky Tiong Bahru HDB home (it also has a backyard community garden) on March 27 to savour his style of “kampung cooking”. In your wine glass: fabulous vino from Handpicked Wines.
Chalk Farm’s co-founder and award-winning writer Bryan Koh will delight diners with his cookbook creations. PHOTOS: CHALK FARM
You’ve probably heard of Chalk Farm, a nine-year-old local confectionery that turns out elegant cakes and kuehs like its creamy durian salat. On March 21, its co-founder Bryan Koh, avid traveller and award-winning writer, will delight diners with his cookbook creations at Andaz Singapore.
Taste, touch, smell and savour his South-east Asian dishes such as Khai Look Khoey (Thai “Son-in-Law” Eggs with Strawberry and Tamarind) and Laphet Thoke (Fermented Tea Leaf Salad), paired with unique whiskey cocktails by the talented bartender team at the hotel.
For the locavores among us, locally-farmed produce like barramundi from home-grown fish farm Kuhlbarra and strawberries from urban farming company Sustenir are also part of this dinner’s menu.
#5: He will take you to new heights
Chef Edward Chong is known for his elegant and artistic presentation style, and ability to draw out each ingredient’s unique flavours. PHOTOS: PEACH BLOSSOMS, MARINA MANDARIN SINGAPORE
He took over the reins at Peach Blossoms Cantonese restaurant as its executive Chinese chef just last year, but the fresh-faced Chef Edward Chong has already proven his mettle, steering his team to new heights.
Among the rising chef’s signature dishes are Flambéed Chinese Wine Spring Chicken, and an uncharacteristically-Chinese Roasted Tomahawk Steak in “Xinjiang” Style accompanied with Green Papaya Salad. He’s also known for his elegant and artistic presentation style, and ability to draw out each ingredient’s unique flavours.
His creations for the Asian Masters dinner on March 28 will be paired with the cult wines of Orin Swift — Mannequin Chardonnay, 8 Years in Desert Blend, Slander Pinot Noir, and more.
#6: Experience a new dimension to gastronomy
Enjoy PeraMakan’s Peranakan cuisine with Royal Selangor’s Nonya pewter collection. PHOTO: PERAMAKAN
Adding to the gastronomic experiences at PeraMakan and The Song of India are, respectively, a pewter specialist and a luxury car.
Complementing the storied heritage of Peranakan cuisine on the March 5 dinner at PeraMakan is Royal Selangor’s showcase of its Nonya pewter collection. Enjoy a night of culture as you savour the culinary creations of fourth-generation Peranakan chef Kathryn Ho and sip on the silky wines of Vinedos Veramonte.
Whet your appetite with Vinedos Veramonte’s Sauvignon Blanc, which carries a citrusy aroma meshed with floral notes. Another bottle to look out for is the Vinedo’s Primus collection, with its mixed berries aroma, and velvety texture and volume.
Spice up your life with the contemporary Indian dishes at The Song of India and the latest dream drive from INFINITI. PHOTO: THE SONG OF INDIA
The next day (March 6), check out the latest dream drive from INFINITI, the all-new QX50 at one Michelin-starred The Song of India.
Chef Manjunath Mural will once again take diners on an unforgettable sensory voyage with his perfectly executed contemporary Indian dishes, paired with the best bourbons of Woodford Reserve and ever-popular Jack Daniel’s whiskies.
Pamper your palate with the plethora of spices, as well as the mellow and robust character of the Jack Daniel’s whiskey, and the creamy, full-bodied premium bourbons from Woodford Reserve.
#7: A new way to savour Japanese and Nanyang delights
Let the chef surprise you at Hashida Sushi. PHOTO: HASHIDA SUSHI SINGAPORE
Gin lovers and Japanophiles won’t want to miss the unusual pairing of top botanical concoctions with a superb omakase meal.
On March 13, Chef Kenjiro Hashida will be serving the finest Japanese food made with pristine seasonal ingredients at Hashida Sushi’s bigger and better home at Mohamed Sultan Road. Presented that evening are exclusive gin cocktails created by Chef Hashida with Ferdinand’s gin, The London No. 1 Original Blue Gin, and MOM Gin.
And when you leave, take home a bottle of Ferdinand’s Saar Dry Gin worth $99.
Nanyang-style dishes like the Roast Irish “Silver” Hill Duck shine at Famous Treasure. PHOTO: FAMOUS TREASURE
In the same vein, fans of Nanyang-style comfort food will flock to Famous Treasure on April 3 for an evening of local Chinese favourites and seafood paired with the rich and harmonious Highland and Speyside whiskies.
Feast on the restaurant’s mouthwatering signature dishes — Roast Irish “Silver” Hill Duck and Baked Flower Crab, just to name a few — as you discover The GlenDronach’s sweet, buttery aroma and BenRiach’s earthy oak wood aromatics.
The door gift is a Limited Edition bottle of The GlenDronach Cask Strength Batch 7 worth $168.
#8: Go for the best whiskey dinner ever
Chef Yong Bing Ngen’s culinary creations are sure to impress. PHOTO: MAJESTIC RESTAURANT
When a top chef and some of the most exquisite aged whiskies come together, magic happens.
Be part of this one-of-its-kind experience on March 26 when award-winning Chef Yong Bing Ngen of Majestic Restaurant teams up with High Aged Expression whiskies from The GlenDronach, Glenglassaugh and BenRiach in a rare partnership.
Chef Yong’s stunning creations include Arugula and Curly Kale with Crispy Chicken Skin, Pomegranate in Kwai Fei Lychee Dressing; and Japanese-inspired Braised Kombu Noodles with Lobster Bisque and Onsen Tamago.
The whiskies themselves are aged no less than 12 years; and the oldest 40, matching Chef Yong’s over 35 years of experience.
PHOTO: BLOSSOM, MARINA BAY SANDS SINGAPORE
Bonus: Other promotions to whet your appetite Attend exclusive masterclasses hosted by top chefs of Singapore Asian restaurants, such as the March 2 culinary workshop on the flavours of Asia at ToTT Century Square; Exclusive Feast Asia deals for Citi Cardmembers from March 1, 2019 to February 29, 2020 — enjoy year-long offers of 15 per cent off a la carte food items at a selection of 50 to 60 Asian restaurants across Singapore such as the one Michelin-starred The Song of India, as well as Jade at The Fullerton Hotel Singapore and more; and Keep a look out for Mixology Asia this July as some of the best bespoke bars in Singapore will be serving up Asian-inspired cocktails by mixologists who are not afraid to experiment. Upcoming events at a glance March 1, 7pm Handpicked Wines presents An Evening of British Hainanese Cuisine with Violet Oon Singapore Violet Oon Singapore @ 2 Orchard Turn, #03-22, Singapore 238801 March 2, 10am, 12pm, 2pm and 4pm The Flavours of Asia Culinary Workshop ToTT Cooking Studio @ Century Square, 2 Tampines Central 5, #02-14 Singapore 529509 March 5, 7pm An Evening at PeraMakan with Veramonte Wines PeraMakan @ 10 Bukit Chermin Road, Level 3, Keppel Club, Singapore 109918 March 6, 7pm INFINITI presents A World of Spice with Jack Daniel’s and Woodford Reserve Whiskies at The Song of India The Song of India @ 33 Scotts Road, Singapore 228226 March 7, 7pm Lianhe Zaobao presents The GlenDronach Dinner at Teochew Restaurant Huat Kee Teochew Restaurant Huat Kee @ #02-01 RELC Building, 30 Orange Grove Road, Singapore 258352 March 12, 7pm The Straits Times presents a Celebration Dinner at Spring Court with Handpicked Wines Spring Court @ 52-56 Upper Cross Street, Singapore 058348 March 13, 7pm Hashida Sushi presents an Omakase Evening with Premium Gins, Ferdinand’s, The London No. 1 and MOM Hashida Sushi Singapore @ 25 Mohamed Sultan Road, Singapore 238969 March 14, 7pm The Signature Creations of BLOSSOM with Handpicked Wines BLOSSOM @ Marina Bay Sands Hotel, Lobby Tower 2, #01-05/05A, 2 Bayfront Ave, Singapore 018972 March 19, 7pm A Taste of Exquisite Malay Cuisine with Aziza Grand Hyatt Singapore @ 10 Scotts Road, Grand Salon, Level 2, Singapore 228211 March 21, 7pm Award-winning Author Bryan Koh presents “0451 MB: An Evening of Food from His Books”, Accompanied by Woodford Reserve Cocktails Auntie’s Wok and Steam, Andaz Singapore @ 5 Fraser Street, Level 25, Singapore 189354 March 22, 9.30pm A Late Night Supper at JB Ah Meng with Veramonte Wines JB Ah Meng @ 534 Geylang Rd, Singapore 389490 March 26, 7pm Majestic Restaurant presents a High Aged Expression Whisky Dinner with The GlenDronach, Glenglassaugh and BenRiach Majestic Restaurant @ 5 Straits View, #04-01, The Heart (East Tower), Singapore 018935 March 27, 7pm A Private Dining Experience with Tinoq and Handpicked Wines Private Dining at Tinoq @ Blk 30 Jalan Klink, Singapore 160030 March 28, 7pm An Evening of Cantonese Treasures at Peach Blossoms with Orin Swift Peach Blossoms @ 6 Raffles Boulevard, Level 5, Marina Mandarin, Marina Square, Singapore 039596 April 3, 7pm The Signature Cuisine of Famous Treasure with The GlenDronach and BenRiach Famous Treasure @ 13 Stamford Road, #02-28 Capitol Piazza, Singapore 178905 Visit www.asianmasters.com.sg for more information on the various events and to register.
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Spicy, high-protein Andhra recipe: Nattukodi Pulusu with Ragi Sankati

Home / Fitness / Spicy, high-protein Andhra recipe: Nattukodi Pulusu with Ragi Sankati Spicy, high-protein Andhra recipe: Nattukodi Pulusu with Ragi Sankati Try this Nattukodi Pulusu (chicken curry) recipe and serve it with ragi sankati (balls made with ragi flour). Editorial Team | Updated: February 25, 2019 9:20 am Tags: Andhra Pradesh Chicken South Indian dishes Spicy foods
You have got to try these traditional spicy delicacies from the southern region of India, Rayalaseema, in the state of Andhra Pradesh. The recipes are shared by Chef Valli of ibis and Novotel Bengaluru Outer Ring Road, who is originally from this region, will help you sample the fresh and feisty cuisine right in your kitchen! Nattukodi Pulusu with Ragi Sankati is essentially chicken curry served with ragi flour balls. Delicious, nutritious and high in protein, you have got to make this right away!
Nattukodi Pulusu with Ragi Sankati
Ingredients: For 2 portions Powder Masala: ( Mix all the ingredients below after slow roasting and make affine powder) Coriander seed: 1tbsp

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How many of these culinary trends have you tried already?

February 24, 2019 5:17 am Picture credit Destination El Paso From kombucha to the Josper oven, award-winning chefs shared must-try food cues with Neeta Lal Chef Tejas Sovani, The Oberoi, Gurugram Healthy living and healthful foods will continue to be the defining mantra in 2019. We will see more people opting for gut-friendly probiotics, one of the top food trends this year. Kefir as a probiotic is already being used widely because of its diversity and effectiveness for the lactose intolerant. Kombucha will gain popularity as a healthy drink. Millets have also made a strong comeback. The forgotten grain has a higher health quotient. The fibrous grain/seed is easily available and is here to stay along with ragi, bajra and jowar. Prolific use of the forgotten parts of vegetables (peel/ root/ leaves/ tendrils) has long been practised by Indian tribes. But these will soon find a way into commercial kitchens perhaps leading to some interesting innovations. Non-commercial regional cuisines of India — especially those of Kolhapur, Malvan, Himachal, Leh and Ladakh — will be seen more in the larger cities and this trend will be here to stay. As people increasingly eschew dairy, seed butters will gain in popularity. They are easy to make and can be crafted from pumpkin seed, almonds, pine nut and pistachio. They are also higher in protein, vitamins, fibre and healthy fats. Chef Zhang Hong Sheng, The China Kitchen, Hyatt Regency I expect 2019 to be a great year and envisage some interesting food trends making waves. Regional Chinese cuisines will continue gaining popularity. With growing awareness for fitness and health, I also foresee more and more people opting for the fresh, seasonal and local produce. Natural ways of preserving ingredients such as vegetables, edible leaves, and cheeses which create beautiful flavours and add an extra dose of good bacteria into your system will be popular. In terms of cuisines, I see Filipino gaining popularity. The dishes are delicious and flavourful while the ingredients used are inexpensive and easy to access. Vitamin C-enriched fruits are the flavour of the season, and even sweet desserts will now come with a sour tinge. Following suit from the trend boost in 2017 and 2018, this year will see more of regional flavours from lesser known cities and villages than international cuisines. Instead of dairy staples, commercial kitchens will look for alternative sources such as goat milk instead of cow’s. The focus is on lessening the burden on the already overused ingredients in the world by creating alternatives that are also superior in nutritional value. We’re incorporating many of these healthy trends at our newly-opened standalone restaurant The China Kitchen in Delhi. Shamsul Wahid, Group Executive Chef, Impresario Hospitality & Entertainment, Social and Smoke House chain of restaurants I foresee nootropic foods making a splash in the culinary world in 2019. These are versatile and bestow multiple benefits, including improved cognitive functions, increased focus, a better attention span and greater brain health. Some well-known nootropic foods include leafy greens like kale, omega-rich fatty fish like salmon, coffee and eggs. Gut-friendly foods will also be strong. Our gut is full of microbes, and they affect our body’s fat deposits, our brain functions and our mood, amongst other things. It is vital to consume these foods that are rich in good microbes — like probiotic and prebiotic foods. Foods like fermented cabbage and kimchi, fibre rich foods, kefir, broccoli and asparagus will also make their presence felt. We try and incorporate gut-friendly ingredients in our dishes, not only due to the health quotient but also because of taste. An emphasis on local ingredients and produce is another strong trend. I love discovering new flavour profiles and incorporating local Indian ingredients in an unexpected way, be it millets, chickpeas or seasonally available cuts of meat. Neeraj Tyagi, Executive Assistant Manager, Food and Beverage, Shangri La’s Eros Hotel Food trends in 2019 will be constantly evolving as people are consciously trying to adopt a healthier lifestyle. One of the most popular and exciting food trends this year will be charcoal activation. A related interesting food trend that is emerging is of ‘Josper oven’ from Spain. Josep Armangue and Pere Juli invented this oven. Its speciality is that it runs on charcoal which gives an appealing smoky flavour to the dishes. In terms of cuisine, `Nikkei’ will find resonance with more people. This combination cuisine is a Japanese and Peruvian culinary sensation that fuses the delicate Japanese cuisine with the freshness and spicy twist of Peru. People will also get attracted to Hydroponic agriculture which is extremely effective in creating highly nutritious vegetables and herbs. It is a modern technology involving vertical farming system in which plant growth and productivity is controlled by water. The well-balanced nutrients present in water are essential for plant growth and better yield. Guests can experience all these major food trends at our award-winning multi cuisine restaurant, Tamra this year. (Neeta Lal is a Delhi-based Editor)

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The organic food & sustainable dining you were looking for

Flipboard Google Plus The organic food & sustainable dining you were looking for After the first flush of faddish frenzy around organic food, a handful of chefs, restaurateurs and farmers are quietly working on sustainable dining to change how metropolitan India eats. By Updated: Feb 24, 2019, 11.06 AM IST 0 Comments The growing links between restaurants and chefs are benefitting local farm economies. It’s a windy Sunday morning. The winter chill is lingering in Delhi even in late February. Priya Paul is inspecting vegetables, fruit and cheese brought by a bunch of farmers to a weekly farmers’ market at her hotel, The Park. There are round Thumbelina carrots, green radish pods, strawberries, local feta cheese and ghee made from the milk of desi cows. “My interest in food ingredients and their origins, I think, comes from my interest in art,” she says, picking up some stuff for her home. Paul, chairperson of Apeejay Surrendra Park Hotels, collects ephemeral art — posters, printed advertisements, brochures. Some of the images are of food across various cultures and periods of time, including India’s colonial past. This love for food history translates into her personal dining choices as well. “I want to know where the fish I am eating in a Goan curry comes from. While there is nothing wrong in flash-frozen John Dory, I would rather eat something that is fresh and locally caught. It always tastes so much better,” says Paul. Her way of looking at and consuming food is the basis of an entire restaurant, Fire at The Park New Delhi, which was relaunched about a year ago as an “earth-friendly” restaurant. Almost 80% of the ingredients on its seasonal menus are organic or bought in a way that their source can be traced. These include fish caught from the sea and not farms, meats that can be traced to farms, grains bought from clusters of small farmers and local vegetables grown around the National Capital Region. Farmers and suppliers are all credited on the menu and a diner is fully informed about what she is eating. “Consumers increasingly want to know where their food is coming from. This is going to be a huge trend in the next three-four years,” says Paul. “Consumers increasingly want to know where their food is coming from. This is going to be a huge trend in the next three-four years” Priya Paul, chairperson, Apeejay Surrendra Park Hotels. Fire is arguably the first and only restaurant in India , of its scale, to have a dedicated focus on what is loosely called sustainable dining. There are plans to make the restaurant 100% sustainable this year and Paul says that because it has proved to be a success in its one year of functioning and has made a profit, she will now “push chefs” at her other hotels to follow suit. “It is a pain for them because they have to work hard at the supply chain instead of getting it all from one vendor, as it tends to happen in most hotels.”Slowly, steadily and often quietly, a bunch of dedicated chefs, restaurateurs and farmers are working hard to change how young metropolitan India eats out. Annamaya at the Andaz Delhi would have been another “coffee shop” but for executive chef Alex Moser’s relentless focus on Indian ingredients, grown or reared cleanly. Many guests at the hotel want to eat butter chicken and not millet biryani but “there is no reason why chicken, butter and tomatoes cannot be grown and sourced well,” says Moser. Better ingredients make for better taste as well. Hotels and restaurants often try to reduce their food costs by sourcing it cheaply but produce, which is grown with care by small farmers who do not have economies of scale, is more expensive. The high cost of such food is one of the big challenges for restaurants constrained by thin profit margins. Mahabhoj, made with different types of rice at Fire. In the past, faddish restaurants, which played up farm-to-fork or health trends, tripped up on their costing. These restaurants were dubbed elitist because of their higher pricing and attracted fewer customers. Some other restaurants did not take into account pop tastes while seeking a larger base of consumers and invariably flopped because, as many chefs point out, “homely” vegetables on restaurant menus work as a PR tool but people don’t necessarily go for these. These are two major reasons why big-format restaurants have not been able to plate up sustainability in a viable way in the past. Annamaya turned this paradigm of elitist, faddish, sustainable dining on its head. Constant kitchen trials with ingredients like amaranth, millets and seasonal greens by talented chefs specialising in Indian cuisines like Balpreet Singh, who heads the kitchen now, have resulted in popular dishes (biryani, chaat) cooked with not-so-common ingredients like millets or humble greens. Then, there is the price. At Rs 500-600 for a main course, the price is at par with standalone restaurants. “We didn’t want to make it an elitist restaurant. The ingredients we use are more expensive but what is the point in curtailing food cost if you do not have enough customers? The restaurant will never work in that case,” says Moser. “Sustainability is an entire cycle, from how food is produced to its seasonality, traceability, how it is cooked and how the waste is minimised and managed” Prateek Sadhu, chef, Masque. To make sustainable dining even more pop, the chef is designing a new restaurant and takeaway dedicated to flat breads/ pizzas, using flours like ragi, amaranth, jowar and gluten-free rice, as well as local cheeses, organic tomatoes and innovative products like arugula oil (developed by Krishi Cress, which supplies greens and micro greens to many restaurants in the NCR). The toppings for these flat breads play with familiar tastes — chilli chicken, Mangaluru prawns with curry leaves and fresh coconut, and even a banana-peanut-chocolate variant. Called Soul Pantry, the outlet will come up in March. Beyond a Fad “Sustainable dining is such a loosely used term,” says chef Prateek Sadhu of the Masque restaurant in Mumbai. “You will find restaurants putting two ‘organic’ salads or ‘Indian’ vegetables on their menus and these are suddenly ‘sustainable’… slow clap.” When Sadhu, an alumnus of the Culinary Institute of America, set up Masque two years ago with the intent of working with seasonal ingredients that he sourced directly from farms, it was hailed as a break-through in India’s farm-to-fork movement. “Farm-to-fork” is as much abused as “sustainable” is. Chefs like Sadhu or Abhijit Saha of Bengaluru’s Caperberry, who are committed to the philosophy of sustainability, point to the big picture. “Sustainability is an entire cycle, from how food is produced, its seasonality, traceability, to how it is cooked and how the waste is minimised and managed,” says Sadhu, explaining why it is important for chefs believing in it to be involved in all the stages. Alex Moser, executive chef of Annamaya, is planning a new restaurant dedicated to flat breads/pizzas, using flours like ragi, amaranth and jowar Sadhu and his business partner Aditi Dugar have started a farm in Pune called Offerings, where the chef is directly involved in the growing of the food. Sadhu, who has sharpened his focus on ingredients and flavours from the Himalayan belt at his restaurant, also works with a cluster of 100 small farmers in Uttarakhand. To further promote the entire cycle of sustainable farming, Sadhu and Dugar have started Zama Organics through which they sell ingredients from the farms they work with to consumers and restaurants. In Bengaluru, Saha, known for his expertise in French and European gastronomy, is committed to sustainability. “The food system is responsible for 20-30% of global greenhouse gas emissions. We should contribute in ways that reduce this impact. When using animal-based products, it is best to find sources with less intensive feeding and raising practices. When using plant based products, one should stick to cleanly grown, pesticide-free produce as far as possible,” he says. At Fava, his Mediterranean inspired restaurant in Bengaluru, Saha serves food that is created with “fresh, pesticide-free, local and artisanal ingredients that can be traced to their place of origin and can contribute to local economies and sustainable livelihoods”. Almost 50% of the ingredients are sourced in this way: antibiotic-free chicken from Porna farm, cheese from Father Michael near the city and vegetables and fruit from local farms. Saha is also introducing global practices such as pouring half glasses of water until guests ask for more, to prevent wastage. However, the restaurant does not play up sustainable dining in its marketing. It exists as a buzzing, café-bar-restaurant at UB City Mall. Small Farmers, Ancient Grains The growing links between restaurants and chefs are benefitting local farm economies. A host of collectives and farmers working with dairy, vegetables and grains have caught the attention of India’s growing tribe of foodies. Meera Suri Sharma, managing partner of Gurgaon-based dairy farm Back-2Basics, says she plays Beethoven to the Gir cows she breeds for A2 milk. There is growing awareness around India-made cheeses, grains like bamboo rice (the seeds of bamboo plant after it flowers in 40 years or so) and spices like jhakia from Uttarakhand hills and teffal from the western coast. Raisin-Glazed Quail and Spruce at Masque. These links also put the spotlight on ingredients that disappeared from our tables. At The Park in Delhi, a collective of farmers is showcasing 30 varieties of ancient, nonhybrid rice from across the country. “There were around 1.5 lakh varieties of rice in the country at one point; most of these have been lost. Small farmers have been able to revive 1,500 of these. We have brought 30 to our market and are doing a festival of rice,” says Sneh Yadav of Tijara Farms in Rajasthan, who is the moving force behind the Delhi Organic Farmers’ Market and works closely with several restaurant chefs. At Fire, chef Abhishek Basu has tried and tested all 30 types of rice the farmers brought in. After two months of trial and error, he has perfected recipes using each of these in imaginative ways in Mahabhoj (feast). His Eggs Benedict, meanwhile, has a rice bun and accenting rice puffs. Deliciousness and sustainability need not be exclusive, after all. 0 Comments Want stories like this in your inbox? Sign up for the daily ET Panache newsletter . You can also follow us on Facebook , Twitter and LinkedIn . Read more on

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