How to make Korma – Food Blog

How to make Korma – Food Blog

Writing by Vikram Karve from Pune India How to make Korma – Food Blog Simple Curry – Mutton Korma – Easy to Cook – Tastes Delicious Dear Reader: Let me delve into my “Foodie Archives” and pull out my recipe for one of the first dishes I learnt to cook as a young boy… HOW TO COOK MUTTON KORMA A Simple Recipe By Vikram Karve Simple Curry – Mutton Korma – Easy to Cook – Tastes Delicious Long back – more than 50 years ago – in the late 1960’s – or maybe in the beginning of 1970’s – in Bareilly – we once went for a meal in a restaurant called “Rio” – if I remember correctly. (I wonder if “Rio” Restaurant still exists in Bareilly) Everyone ordered chicken and vegetarian dishes. I wanted to have mutton that day. On the menu – in the list of the usual mutton dishes – I spotted Mutton Korma – and – I decided to eat it. Being an inquisitive person – I wanted to know what “Korma” meant. So – I asked the cooks over there what was the meaning of “Korma”. They told me that: Korma means gravy made without Haldi (turmeric) Is this a fact…? Can some culinary expert tell us more about this – is this true – or is it just a myth…? If you google “Korma” – you will see that “Korma” is defined as a mildly spiced Indian curry dish of meat or fish or vegetables marinated in yogurt or curds. But – I will stick to the definition that the cooks in Rio Restaurant Bareilly told me – more than 50 years ago – that “Korma means gravy made without Haldi (turmeric)” RECIPE FOR MUTTON KORMA I was curious – so the cooks allowed me into the kitchen – and they let me see this simple dish being prepared. This is the first non-veg recipe I learnt – and I used to make it often – because it is simple and straightforward to cook. In fact – I have learnt most recipes by watching the dishes being made in restaurant kitchens – and later – when I was in the Navy – I used to observe talented Navy Cooks prepare typical Navy Cuisine Dishes in Ships’ Galleys. Now coming back to Korma – let me share the recipe for a simple Mutton Korma with you. In a nutshell – Korma is a braised dish – the meat is first fried in spiced sauce (comprising masalas and pastes) – and then – it is stewed slowly in a closed container. So – first let us start with frying the masalas, pastes and mutton. Place a thick bottomed vessel on your stove – add a generous quantity of pure ghee – yes – pure ghee (clarified butter) – switch on your stove – turn on the heat – and – heat the pure ghee till it is hot. (I prefer not to “pressure cook” meat – as I feel – slow cooking brings out the tast e best). Add the whole masalas [tejpatta (bay leaf), choti and badi elaichi (small and big cardamom), laung (cloves), dalchini (cinnamon), kali miri (peppercorn)] Saute the whole masalas – till they start crackling. Then – put in lots of finely chopped onions – and fry the onions till brown and crisp. Add ginger-garlic paste, red chillies – and fry till the moisture evaporates. Then add the mutton pieces – and stir lightly – and gently roast the mutton in its own juices till dry. Now add some whipped curd (yoghurt).
Let the mutton cook in the curd – stirring very slightly from time to time. When the gravy becomes dry – and starts sticking to the bottom – lower the heat – add water to cover the mutton. Then – cover the vessel – and simmer on slow fire – stirring once every few minutes. If required – you can add a bit of water so that the mutton does not stick to the vessel. Cook slowly – till the mutton is done You must keep sampling to see that the mutton is done to your taste – and the cooking process should take between 20 to 40 minutes – depending on the quality of mutton – and how you like it done. When almost ready – add salt to taste – sprinkle a little cardamom powder for flavour – and give a final simmering boil to the curry – take off from the fire – and then – as a final touch – garnish with fresh green coriander leaves. The Mutton Korma is ready to eat with chapati, roti, pav, or rice – whatever you like. I used to like cooking and eating Mutton Korma. It is simple to cook – no fancy laborious time-consuming preparations and marinades – it is not too spicy – korma tastes nice and mild – and the dish is ready to eat in less than an hour. KORMA
What is the true meaning of Meaning of “Korma”…? About the “turmeric” part – will someone please enlighten us…? Is it true that:
“Korma means gravy made without Haldi (turmeric)”
as the cook in Bareilly had told me more than 50 years ago…? I cook KORMA without Haldi (turmeric).
But I have seen recipes of korma which include turmeric. Try out this simple dish – you will relish the freshly prepared delicious steaming mutton korma with piping hot chapatis/rotis/phulkas or fresh fluffy pav or buns/bread or even rice. You can improvise a bit – add cashew paste to make the Korma thicker and yummier – or like they do in South India – add coconut milk to get a distinctive “Coastal” flavour. I love a vegetarian dish called Navratan Korma too – it is nice and sweetish. I don’t know how to make Navratan Korma.
But from the taste – it seems that Navratan Korma too doesn’t contain Haldi (turmeric) So maybe – the definition of Korma as told to me by the cook in Bareilly is correct: “Korma means Gravy made without Haldi (turmeric)…” Happy Cooking and Blissful Eating…! VIKRAM KARVE 1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve 2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post © vikram karve., all rights reserved. Disclaimer: This is an “experimental” recipe – so try itat your own risk. I suggest you vary the Exact Quantity/Proportion of ingredients as per your culinary experience and taste. All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the stories are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental. Copyright Notice: No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright. Copyright © Vikram Karve (All Rights Reserved) Link to my original post in my Blog Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2017/05/how-to-cook-korma-simple-recipe.html © vikram karve., all rights reserved. Updated Version of My Recipe MUTTON KORMA posted by me Vikram Karve online earlier a number of times in my various Blogs including at urls: http://creative.sulekha.com/simple-cooking-mutton-korma_329697_blog and http://creative.sulekha.com/delicious-mutton-korma-curry_377866_blog and https://vwkarve.wordpress.com/category/bareilly/ and http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2011/07/delicious-mutton-curry-korma-made.html and http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2012/06/cooking-made-simple-mutton-korma.html and http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2012/11/mutton-korma-made-simple-easy-cooking.html and http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2016/01/mutton-korma-simple-recipe.html etc Share this:

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Richmond definitely doesn’t have the best place for Viet, Indian, or Thai food. And definitely cuisine from other Asian countries as well.
Very hypocritical statement by the judge. Saying how they don’t like the fact that Chinese food is painted as a monolith but then process to paint Asian cuisine as one.

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Ramadan 2019- Iftars to Try in Dubai

May 16, 2019
Ramadan Kareem to everyone. This year the holy month of Ramadan started on 6th May . It is a month of fasting, prayers and celebrations. Ramadan is the time I look forward to Iftar .
Iftar is the meal with which Muslims break their daily fast during Ramadan. Traditionally the fast is broken with dates and water before prayers, followed by Iftar. Nothing can match a delicious Iftar at home but there are many restaurants and hotels offering sumptuous Iftar buffets and set menu.
Here’s a roundup of some of the Iftars that I tried this year:
1 Iftar at Constellation Ballroom in Address Dubai Marina features a lavish buffet with live cooking stations filled with Middle Eastern delicacies and international favorites in a contemporary setup and live traditional music.
Price: AED 199 per person, 50% off for kids aged 6-11 years and kids aged 5 and below are free.
Time: 7pm-9pm
888 3444 or email dine@emaar.com
2 Iftar at Khaymat Al Bahar in Jumeirah Al Qasr offers a sumptuous buffet that promises diners an authentic Lebanese Iftar experience in beachside setting.
Price: AED 195 per person, group rates available.
Time: Sunset till 9pm
For reservations call: 800-666-353 or email jrgreservations@jumeirah.com
3 Iftar at Zefki Levantine Eatery in Number One Tower Suites is a set menu with soup, cold and hot appetizers, main course, dessert with beverages in a lovely and relaxing atmosphere.
Price: AED 115 per person
Time: 7pm-12am
330 2288 or email tastelevant@zefki.ae
4 Iftar at Walnut Grove in both their branches- The Dubai Mall and Citywalk is a set menu with a choice of starters, mains and desserts. You can expect their signature tomato soup, dip platter with freshly baked pita bread. The menu is available for dine-in and take-away.
Price: AED 129 per person
Time: 6:45pm-8:45pm
526 0452 or 04 526 0633
5 Iftar at Puerto 99, Bluewaters Island unveils a unique Mexican Iftar set menu featuring signature menu that is perfect for sharing with loved ones in a vibrant Mexican-inspired atmosphere.
Price: AED 180 per person
Time: Sunset till Midnight
557 6627
6 Iftar at Fusion Restaurant in The S Hotel Barsha offers a good selection of traditional as well as international dishes and live cooking stations. Their Iftar buffet changes every day.
Price: AED 99 per person
Time: 7pm-9pm
871 2222 or email reservations@s-hotelsinternational.com
7 Iftar at Gurkan Sef Steakhouse, Citywalk Dubai offers an authentic Turkish Iftar with a 3-course set menu in a fabulous atmosphere. Expect fresh and delicious Turkish food.
Price: AED 149 per person
Time: 6:45pm-8:30pm
526 0426
8 Iftar at Carnival by Tresind, DIFC serves up a fabulous Indian Iftar with juices, cold buffet and a special set menu throughout the holy month of Ramadan.
Price: AED 149 per person
Time: Sunset till 9pm
526 0323
9 Iftar at Eshak in Citywalk Dubai is a great option for both Iftar and Suhoor. This Uzbek cuisine restaurant offers Uzbek and Middle Eastern Fusion food and for Iftar they have a set menu with soup, starters, middle course, main course and desserts along with cold and hot beverages.
Price: AED 125 per person
Time: 6:45pm till 9pm
526 0764
10 Iftar at The Daily At Rove is an open buffet inclusive of Ramadan juices. They’ve a special campaign this month called “Pass it on” where a person having Iftar at any of their 4 locations in Dubai receives a voucher that they can pass it on to their friends or family or they themselves can visit again for Iftar on a complimentary basis.
Price: AED 99 per person
Time: 6:30pm till 11:30pm
561 9000 Advertisements

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Cloud 9 Hills Resort, Lonavala – A Break From the Ordinary

in Lifestyle , Travel
In this day-to-day hustle through life, we often miss out on the chance to appreciate and experience the art of doing nothing. To breathe in purity and gaze upon the night sky, hoping to witness a miraculous shooting star. I mean, it’s not like we’ve forgotten about it but just that spending a day in serenity is next to impossible in these fast-paced metropolitans. Lucky for me, I finally planned a trip (AND EXECUTED IT) to the hills of Lonavala with my old college friends, after about three long years.
The most crucial part of planning a one night road trip to a nearby hill station, is the property you pick to unwind at. I, fifty minutes and some caffeine later, stumbled upon this gem of a place – Cloud 9 Hills Resort, Lonavala and finalised it. I mean, the property offers a breathtaking view of the mountains & has bathtubs in every room! How could I not?
My friends and I embarked on our little adventure around 7am, sleep-deprived yet excited. Lots of traffic and burgers later, we reached our home for the day – A Duplex at Cloud 9 Hills Resort. First thought as my eyes eagerly scanned the property? Every inch of this place looks way better than in its photographs. It’s true, especially the Duplex. Wooden interior, cabin stairway, antique decor and cozy bathtubs, I couldn’t help but think of instagram-ming every corner of it (and I did, you know it if you follow me on Instagram).
This property offers various types of cottages and villas as per your requirements. Ours had a capacity of over ten people, with a television, AC and bathroom in each of the three bedrooms. The living room is extremely spacious with couches and cozy stool balls. We took a walk through the property that has a game room, swimming pool, gazebo, terrace restaurant and a spa. Surrounded by greenery, the garden along the villas add to your pleasant view. The staff is extremely assistive and swift to make sure you have a comfortable stay.
Apart from the Duplex, Cloud 9 Hill Resort has an array of well-furnished 1BHK to 3BHK cottages that gives you the liberty to pick according to your requirements.
Now I have a very simple way of judging a property which reveals the true excellence of it. It’s not the view, it’s not the electronics but the bed. Yes, the bed will tell you all you need to know about a hotel. Spotless white sheets, fluffy pillows and 5-inch cozy mattresses show that attention to details have been paid. So after fighting for the room with a view (you know who won), my friends and I geared up for a fun photoshoot. Yes I’m blessed with a lot of talented and patient friends.
P.S the view from my room, which had a balcony too, was an absolute delight. All of the hills covered in greenery and shadowed by spotless clouds was it. I can’t wait to visit this place during the Monsoons. This property is a few kms away from the market of Lonavala city which is why the serenity and unaltered fresh air adds to the positivity of the break you deserve.
We spent our evening playing table tennis and carrom on a loop for three hours straight and that literally was the highlight of my weekend. I’ve loved playing table tennis since I was a kid but I hadn’t in years and this just made me so so happy.
Well, my legs sort of gave up after fourteen hours of work and play so I did what I was most looking forward to – A hot bath in the tub. Was I ready for more post that? You bet, but for a wide spread of vegetarian Indian cuisine served at their restaurant. We went for the classic Paneer Tikka Masala, Butter Naan, Biryani, Veg Kolhapuri and Dal. Piece of advice for spicy food lovers – Do not ask them to make the food spicier, it’s awesome enough. I asked them to though and sat with a dripping nose throughout (no regrets).
After dinner we spent the night laughing over nothing, cozied up in the living room, in warm yellow lights with some snacks, cocktails and loud music. Just like our college days, it felt so peaceful to just breathe in the moment, unbothered about deadlines. A break in true sense. But the best was yet to come. Stargazing at 3am in Lonavala? An idea that wasn’t in sync with my lazy and tired body but thank God my friends were annoyingly persistent. We grabbed the camera and its tripod and climbed up to the highest open seating area at the property. We also managed to get some shots of the moon and the stars while continuing to laugh and shiver in the cold weather. Just before sunrise we went back to our cozy beds, tucked in for an unaltered sleep.
Slept for a couple of hours only to wake up to an amazing breakfast buffet of fruits, toast, masala dosa, oats and lots of coffee. It was time to leave but not before a couple of more table tennis matches. Around noon, we bid Cloud 9 Hill Resort adieu, only to go back home and plan another one for the next month. Because it wasn’t enough and I will definitely go back as I missed out on experiencing the rain dance, pool and the Spa.
My weekend was perfect. How about yours? I’m adding this property’s links below in case you too need a break from the city;
Cloud 9 Hills Resort Lonavala – Book Online , Facebook , Instagram .
Until next time, Happy Poss-ing! Related

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30 Creative Ramadan Recipes On Sharjah Ladies Club Branches Youtube And Instagram

Posted by admin
The Kalba Ladies Club and Dibba Al Hisn Ladies Club have uploaded recipes of dishes, both local and international, prepared during Ramadan on their YouTube channels and Instagram accounts (@slcbranches). The videos offer creative, simple and easy-to-make recipes for Ramadan, which are on the menu of Marasi , the main restaurant of the 10 branches of Sharjah Ladies Club .
The recipes were selected from various cuisines including Indian, Asian, Arabic and Turkish, among others.
Chef Ghada Daoud, Kalba Ladies Club said: “During the holy month of Ramadan, housewives always look for delicious, healthy and easy recipes. Through our YouTube channel and social media accounts, we decided to offer a variety of one-minute recipes that meet the needs of housewives and saves their time.”
Chef Elham Mustapha , Dibba Al Hisn Ladies Club : “The Ramadan menu is unique and must contain a variety of salads and soups, in addition to the main course. Through our recipes, we try to make it easier for our followers to prepare food during Ramadan. We have provided a selection of traditional foods prepared in the Arabian Gulf countries, especially from the UAE, to meet different tastes and also introduce to them the most famous dishes we offer at Marasi restaurant, which can also be home delivered.”
Marasi offers a wide variety of traditional and modern dishes prepared by highly experienced chefs. The restaurant is the perfect venue for meeting friends, hosting business meetings, or celebrating special events.
The Marassi Restaurant at the Sharjah Ladies Club branches offers home delivery and buffet services for all types of corporate and social events. All orders are delivered in special vehicles to ensure that the meals conform to the highest food, health and safety standards.

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Joining hands for a world of peace

Joining hands for a world of peace Tuesday, 2019-05-14 13:58:04 Font Size: | Print The 16th UN Day of Vesak Celebrations 2019 in Vietnam gathers more than 1,600 international delegates from 112 countries and territories around the world. (Photo: VNA) Font Size: | NDO – The 16th United Nations Day of Vesak Celebrations 2019 took place successfully at the Tam Chuc Buddhist Cultural Complex in the northern Vietnamese province of Ha Nam. Under the theme “Buddhist Approach to Global Leadership & Shared Responsibilities for Sustainable Societies”, the event honoured and called for the promotion of the spiritual values of the Buddha, contributing to bringing peace and stability to the world. Nhan Dan newspaper introduces some opinions of the international delegates at the UN Day of Vesak 2019.
Armida Salsiah Alisjahbana, Under-Secretary General of the UN:
Strengthening connection for sustainable development
Alisjahbana expressed her honour to be in Vietnam for the 16th UN Day of Vesak Celebrations 2019. On the occasion, she emphasised the message of tolerance and social justice. She said the world is witnessing increasingly frequent conflict, stating that people should not be “heartless” concerning this issue. Alisjahbana noted that increased social inequality and extremism have been affecting socio-economic development in many countries, leading the poor to suffer increasing inferiority and to become more vulnerable. She stressed the request for shared responsibilities to deal with the situation, saying that Buddhist teachings encourage people to act for a united world. The UN is always willing to accompany countries to strengthen cooperation and connection for sustainable development, the official affirmed.
Alisjahbana noted that Vietnam has achieved many significant achievements in socio-economic development over recent years, which have been highly appreciated by the international community, partly owing to Vietnam’s enhancement of inclusive and sustainable development. The UN official congratulated Vietnam on its gains, voicing her hopes for the country’s continuous growth in the future.
Most Venerable Prof. Dr. Phra Brahmapundit, President of the International Council for Day of Vesak (ICDV):
Consolidating peace and stability around the world
Most Venerable Phra Brahmapundit expressed his gratitude to the Government and people of Vietnam and the Vietnam Buddhist Sangha (VBS) for having organised the UN Day of Vesak Celebrations 2019. Vietnam has left positive impressions through its three times hosting the event, he said, recalling that, not long ago, he came to Vietnam and saw a number of works in service of the UN Day of Vesak 2019 that had yet to be finished, but in a short period of time, all the workload had been finalised to serve the event.
The Most Venerable stated that Vietnamese Buddhism is increasingly developing, actively contributing to global Buddhism. The theme of this year’s Vesak event is closely related to the UN’s sustainable development goals (SDGs), demonstrating Buddhism’s contributions to the development of the world, he noted. The SDGs were built into topics of discussion sessions within the framework of the event, he said, stating that delegates gathered to raise ideas and messages from the Buddhist point of view, aiming to consolidate peace and stability for the world.
Venkaiah Naidu, Vice President of India and Chairman of the Rajya Sabha, the upper house of the Indian Parliament:
Sharing responsibilities for a good society
Vice President of India Venkaiah Naidu hailed the UN Day of Vesak 2019 as a sacred occasion and an opportunity to contribute to the creation of peace, connecting Buddhists around the world, and promoting the values of Buddha’s teachings, thus working to help the world to avoid violence and conflict and move towards a full and happy life.
He noted that the theme of the 2019 Vesak event on shared responsibilities for sustainable society is appropriate to continue implementing the teachings of the Buddha and to take joint action. The world is discussing and finding solutions to ensure sustainable development, the leader said, stating that the goal could only be achieved if focus was put on protecting justice in society, developing production and consumption in a sustainable way, staying away from “greed, hatred and ignorance”, and promoting peaceful values by effectively applying the Buddha’s thought on kindness, compassion, gratitude, integrity and uprightness.
R. Tuladhar, a Buddhist from Nepal:
Vesak event’s success stems from meticulous preparations
Many ideas during the seminars affirmed that the core values of Buddhism are also reflected through its participation in addressing the common issues of the world, Tuladhar said. He emphasised that promoting the resolution of conflict and ensuring sustainable development is not only the duty of each individual, country and territory, but also needs the joint hands of the whole world. He stressed the need for a global vision and leadership aiming to cope with common challenges.
The Nepalese attributed the success of the 16 th UN Day of Vesak Celebrations 2019 to Vietnam’s meticulous and thoughtful preparations. The Vesak 2019 space is very majestic and joyful, he said, hailing Tam Chuc as an ideal place to organise major Buddhist events. Tuladhar said when he returns to Nepal, he will tell his friends and relatives about Vietnam, voicing his belief that many tourists would continue to choose Vietnam as their destination.
R. Thero, a Buddhist from Sri Lanka:
An opportunity to explore Vietnamese culture
The UN Day of Vesak 2019 shows Buddhism’s efforts to integrate and share responsibilities in resolving conflicts and global issues, Thero said, adding that the theme of Vesak 2019 highlights the role of Buddhism and honours Buddhism’s humanistic values.
He praised the organisation work of Vietnam, which, he said, has created favourable conditions for thousands of international delegates.
He expressed his delight to return to Vietnam for the second time, adding that he again feels the hospitality of the Vietnamese people. Thero revealed his plan to experience Dharma practice in Vietnam, as well as visit various famous places in the country and enjoy Vietnamese food after the conclusion of Vesak 2019. The organising committee’s sponsored cultural tours to Trang An-Bai Dinh, Yen Tu and Sapa gave the international delegates a great opportunity to explore Vietnamese landscapes and culture, he said.
A. William, a Buddhist from Australia:
Raising awareness of the environment
William said that, as home to many large Dharma practice centres, Vietnam emerged as a great choice to host the UN Day of Vesak 2019. He hailed Vesak 2019 in Ha Nam province as an ideal opportunity for him to gain more knowledge about Buddhism in a Southeast Asian country. The Australian expressed his impression at Vietnam’s miraculous transformation as well as its hospitable people and enthusiastic volunteers.
Environmental protection was one of the issues discussed by delegates at Vesak 2019. He stressed that it is an essential task to raise awareness of protecting the planet, as environmental pollution and deforestation are threatening people’s lives. William voiced his belief that Vesak 2019 will enable people to instill more of the Buddhist doctrine of being responsible for the environment and living close to nature. He also hailed the event as a good occasion to raise public awareness of environmental issues.
M. Duric, a Buddhist from Serbia:
A top choice for many Buddhists and tourists
Duric said Vietnamese Buddhism has a long history and depth in terms of doctrine and spirituality, stating that the successful organisation of the UN Day of Vesak Celebrations has contributed to improving the role of Vietnamese Buddhism in international integration, as well as affirming Vietnam’s policy of religious freedom. According to him, alongside its significant development achievements and a variety of international languages used in the country, owning a lot of beautiful scenery is also an advantage to help Vietnam to be chosen by the UN to host the Vesak Celebrations.
Ha Nam’s Tam Chuc Pagoda, the hosting venue of Vesak 2019, is one of Vietnam’s prominent landmarks, Duric said, expressing his belief that, after the event, the Southeast Asian country will continue to be known to a great number of people around the world, and will be a top choice for Buddhists and international visitors who want to experience Dharma practice, explore culture and enjoy beautiful sceneries.
G. Efande, a delegate from Cameroon:
Advertising culture and enhancing the country’s position
Efande expressed her satisfaction on her maiden attendance at a Vesak event, noting that the presentations of scholars on the occasion highlighted the ideology and spirit of Buddhism related to many global issues, notably the role of Buddhism in sustainable development, or consumption culture in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Vesak 2019 is also an opportunity for the international community to raise voice against racism, one of the emerging issues over recent times, she said.
The Cameroonian delegate stated that by attending Vesak 2019 in Vietnam, she learned more about Vietnamese people, culture and cuisine, especially its vegetarian food. She said she believed that the hosting of Vesak 2019 would help Vietnam advertise its culture and image, thus improving its position in the world.

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Tandoori Flames showcases Indian cuisine

Tandoori Flames showcases Indian cuisine By Deborah Rose Published 12:00 am EDT, Wednesday, May 15, 2019
Spectrum/Vinjith Vikaram and Sagar Ahuja are the new owners of Tandoori Flames at 471 Danbury Road in New Milford. Plated above are vegetable samosas, seasoned potato fritters with peas. May 2019
Spectrum/Vinjith Vikaram and Sagar Ahuja are the new owners of Tandoori Flames at 471 Danbury Road in New Milford. Plated above are vegetable samosas, seasoned potato fritters with peas. May 2019 Photo: Deborah Rose / Hearst Connecticut Media Photo: Deborah Rose / Hearst Connecticut Media Image 1 of / 7 Close Image 1 of 7
Spectrum/Vinjith Vikaram and Sagar Ahuja are the new owners of Tandoori Flames at 471 Danbury Road in New Milford. Plated above are vegetable samosas, seasoned potato fritters with peas. May 2019
Spectrum/Vinjith Vikaram and Sagar Ahuja are the new owners of Tandoori Flames at 471 Danbury Road in New Milford. Plated above are vegetable samosas, seasoned potato fritters with peas. May 2019 Photo: Deborah Rose / Hearst Connecticut Media Tandoori Flames showcases Indian cuisine 1 / 7 Back to Gallery
The new owners of Tandoori Flames in New Milford are infusing authentic Indian flavors and recipes into the cuisine they serve.
“It’s one of our favorite restaurants,” said Ralph Gorman, of Sherman, who recently discovered the eatery after reading about it in the book “221+ Things to Do in and Around Sherman, New Milford and New Fairfield” by John Cilio.
“We ordered three dishes and each one was better than the other,” Gorman said of his first visit there.
Co-owners Vinjith Vikaram and Sagar Ahuja worked together at the 471 Danbury Road (Route 7) restaurant when it first opened last May.
They embraced the opportunity to purchase the business in December, so they can “add to the diversity of the town” and introduce patrons to food from their homeland, Ahuja said.
“We are trying to bring in our culture and express it through our food,” said Ahuja.
The menu showcases a variety of Indian dishes from both northern and southern India, from which Ahuja and Vikaram, who is also the chef, are from, respectively.
Appetizers, entrees and desserts are on the menu, which features a wide variety of vegetarian, vegan, chicken, seafood and lamb dishes. Rices, breads and a variety of sides, including sauces round out the menu.
Ahuja said the restaurant sells its sauces — tikka masala, vindaloo, korma, madras, chettinad and phall — to go, giving patrons an opportunity to use them on their own dishes at home.
Many of the dishes are inspired by or made from recipes belonging to Vikaram’s mother, Amma, who still resides in India.
Aloo Gobi, a classic Indian dish with spiced potatoes and cauliflower; Dal Tadka, a yellow lentils dish tempered with cumin seeds; Saag Paneer, a creamy spinach with homemade paneer cheese dish; chicken curry; and several of the side sauces are among Amma’s recipes.
Spices play an integral role in Indian cuisine. The owners said there is a misconception, though, that all Indian food is spicy.
Vikaram noted he prefers dishes made with milder spices while the majority of his family opts for spicier cuisine.
Ahuja described the southern spices as mustard seeds, curry leaves, whole red chilis and coconut, while northern spices include chick peas and cumin seeds.
Gorman praised the owners for their “accommodating service,” which includes serving dishes based on their preferred spice level.
After a recent first-time visit to the restaurant, Heather Hayden, of New Milford, said she will return.
“It was really good,” she said, noting she appreciates the extensive vegan and vegetarian options.
The restaurant features an Indian lunch buffet Tuesdays through Sundays, which allows customers a chance to sample a variety of cuisine. They can also order off the main menu.
Specialties are available for brunch on the weekends at the restaurant that draws patrons from Litchfield and Fairfield counties, as well as New York.
Several drinks, including a tamarind margarita, Indian spiced mojito and mango martini, are among the featured drinks at the bar.
“We had a really enjoyable lunch,” said Eric Gorman, of Sherman. “We sampled a bunch of dishes…It ranks up there as having really good Indian food. I’ll definitely go back.”
Ahuja said many customers have expressed interest in learning how to make Indian dishes. To that end, the restaurant is exploring the possibility of implementing periodic cooking demonstrations.
“We need to teach people how to make this at home,” Vikaram said. “We can introduce easy dishes that are really good.”
Vikaram has been in the U.S. for six years, while Ahuja has been here for five. They worked together for the past several years at restaurants in the region.
“I fell in love with the town,” Ahuja said of his move from New York to New Milford. “The people are really warm and welcoming.”
“He’s my first ever friend when I came to America,” Ahuja said of Vikaram.
Tandoori Flames, located at 471 Danbury Road in New Milford, is open Tuesdays through Fridays from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and Saturdays from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., and dinner Tuesdays through Thursdays and Sundays from 5 to 9 p.m. and Fridays and Saturdays from 5 to 10 p.m. For more information, call 860-210-0020. Most Popular

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8 Popular Superfoods that You Might Want to Try

by Julianne / Fit Food , Fitness , Healthy Foods / 0 comment
An increasing number of people nowadays are becoming more health-conscious. One of the biggest ways we’ve been able to notice this as a society is through the food market’s options. Health food stores are popping up all around and are doing well, especially among vegetarian and vegan consumers. Various superfood crazes have developed as well. These are foods and supplements that are rich with essential nutrients, many of which are also really delicious. Read on to learn about 8 popular superfoods that you might want to try. Turmeric
Turmeric is a popular spice that is native to Southeast Asia and is particularly prevalent in a lot of Indian cuisine, especially in curries. Turmeric is considered by many to be a superfood because of its anti-inflammatory properties. It also possesses antioxidant properties for fighting thing like cancer and other diseases. Haritaki
Haritaki is another widespread superfood that people have been talking about. It comes from the terminalia chebula tree which, like turmeric, is found widely throughout Southeast Asia. The benefits of Haritaki have been utilized by those in Eastern medicine for hundreds of years. Haritaki is known to improve cognitive function, digestion, and more. Hemp
Although hemp comes from a strain of the cannabis sativa plant, it does not contain the THC that you would find in marijuana. Hemp can be used for a variety of purposes, including textiles and food. Hemp seeds are a superfood. These seeds contain approximately 5 grams of protein and 2 grams of fiber per 2 tablespoons. Matcha Matcha!
You may have seen that the matcha trend has found its way into popular coffee establishments, such as Starbucks. Matcha is kind of like green tea in a powder form and can be added to foods and drinks for its unique taste and texture. It is also full of antioxidants that help fight things like heart disease and viruses. Flax Seeds
One reason that flax seeds are a highly praised superfood is because they are easy to add to any dish, smoothie, baked item, and more. Flax seeds contain a lot of fiber, nutrients, and antioxidants. The seeds can also be used to create flaxseed oil. Flax has been thought to help lower your cholesterol. Chia Seeds
Chia seeds are full of fiber so they do a great job of keeping you full and focused. Chia seeds can be consumed a lot of different ways. They go well in breakfast items like oats, smoothies, yogurt, and more. They absorb a lot of water so some people add them to drinks as well. Acai Acai
Acai berries are a type of berry that can be found throughout South America. They have become a common addition to many dishes like granola bowls, smoothies, and more. The number of fun recipes out there for this little berry continues to grow. Acai berries have been praised for their abundance of nutrients such as heart-healthy fats, fiber, and antioxidants. Garlic
Many people are surprised when they hear that garlic is a superfood. Garlic contains many different nutrients and compounds, such as its various sulphur compounds. Garlic has been thought to help the immune system fight common sicknesses. Garlic has also been shown to help lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels.
Now that you have read about 8 common superfoods, go out and try them! You can be sure to find plenty of new recipes that feature some of these foods as key ingredients.
In addition to these popular superfoods, there are many other foods out there that are nutrient rich or have special health benefits that you can pair with these easy to blend superfoods. Actress and Founder of Girls on Food: I was born and raised in the suburbs of Sacramento, California. I grew up a typical “McDonald’s kid”. I was very picky about what I ate and refused to try new foods. No fun, I know. My Mom started taking me on trips to Europe when I was a teenager and that’s when my palate for finer foods began to develop. Some of my most memorable favorite meals include Veal Bolognese in Rome, Gyros in Athens, Paella in Lisbon and Duck L’Orange in Paris. While this helped me grow out of a fast food phase, I still eat out quite a bit. I know I should be at home cooking, but I love dining out. I started working in restaurants in various front of the house positions at age 15. Since my start, I’ve worked in every casual restaurant setting you can think of: a teriyaki stand, brewery, sushi nightclub, trendy Mexican, family-style Italian, American diner, pizza parlor and even a BLT themed food truck. I can’t help but notice that many of the LA food bloggers don’t have any sort of background working in a restaurant. A lot of my perspective on food and dining out comes from my years of experience in the biz. Since starting this blog, I have shot appearances on a couple of cooking competition shows as a taster (including MasterChef Junior and another upcoming show). We have also started producing a Youtube Channel. IMDb page here: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm2023647/ For this site I contribute content from all over Los Angeles (and the world) to showcase my favorite fine-dining spots, steakhouses, exclusive supper clubs, Hollywood nightlife and our very own #GOFx events, which I plan and coordinate.

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North India vs. South India: Which Is Best for You? | Oyster.com

Taj Mahal; Paul Asman and Jill Lenoble/Flickr
India is a huge country, and unless you have months (or even years) to devote to your visit, you may want to focus on just one area. While South India generally refers to the states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, Tamil Nadu, and Telangana (i.e. the Dravidian parts of the country), the boundaries of North India aren’t as clearly defined (states such Goa and Maharashtra are frequently grouped together as Western India, while West Bengal and Orissa are part of East India). For the purpose of this article, we’ve primarily focused on areas that attract the most visitors and are the most accessible for first-time travelers. See how the two regions stack up against each other in a number of categories, including food, weather, transportation, attractions, events, and more. Transportation in India
Train in India; Belur Ashok, Flickr
Getting to India is quite a commitment, no matter where you visit. If you’re coming from the U.S. or Canada, you’ll likely have to switch planes at least once. People flying from the East Coast tend to be routed through Europe, while West Coast to India itineraries can go either way (though the cheapest flights often transit through China). However, more and more nonstop routes between North America and Delhi and Mumbai are starting to crop up. When it comes to getting around, however, there are a few more things to consider.
North India: Most people who head to North India hit up the hot spots, especially if they are visiting the region for the first time. Popular routes include the “Golden Triangle,” which consists of Delhi, Jaipur, and Agra. The three cities are connected by train and well-maintained National Highways (toll freeways). The train, which can be more comfortable, has toilets and sometimes even meal service onboard. However, many of North India’s most interesting attractions are up in the foothills of the Himalayas, in hilly areas that can’t accommodate train tracks. Plus, steep winding roads in this part of the country can be a nightmare for those prone to car sickness. Fortunately, there are airports near some of the most popular destinations, such as McLeod Ganj, where the Dalai Lama lives — just be prepared to pay a premium for the luxury.
South India: Conversely, most of South India is well-networked by train. Cities such as Chennai have excellent commuter trains that make traveling in the region a breeze. Like North India, there are a few hilly areas that are inaccessible by train, such as Munnar, a hill station known for its tea production (the closest rail link is 110 kilometers from here). The trains here are also generally reliable, though there are some routes that are notoriously late (the morning train from Hampi to Goa is one example). Weather in India
Ahmedabad, India; Emmanuel Dyan, Flickr
North India: India is huge, and as such, its weather patterns are diverse. If you’re set on seeing the Himalayas, particularly high-elevation places like Ladakh, you’ll have a very small window in the summer to visit, though it’s not uncommon to get snowed in even in July. The lower foothill regions, such as Himachal Pradesh, are lovely in April through June, while Delhi and the desert state of Rajasthan can be unbearable during the same period, with temperatures hovering well over 110 degrees Fahrenheit for days on end. On the flip side, North India can get quite cold in the winter, even in Delhi and Rajasthan. Delhi can suffer from awful pollution in the months of November and December, particularly after the annual Diwali festival. Monsoon season in North India starts in late June and goes through August and into September. Although there’s sometimes flooding in Delhi and Rajasthan, the northeastern and eastern parts of the country (where Kolkata is located) generally get hit the hardest.
South India: Unlike the northern plains and mountain regions of India, South India is tropical, with more consistently warm temperatures throughout the year. Temperatures hover in the high 70s or low 80s for much of the year (though high humidity often makes this part of the country feel much, much hotter). The winters tend to be driest, with relatively low rainfall between November and April. Rains are at their heaviest during peak Indian summer monsoon time, from June through August. Experiences and Attractions in India
Kerala backwaters; Ryan, Flickr
North India: If you’ve come to India to see the Taj Mahal, go north. This world-famous attraction is situated just a few hours’ drive south of Delhi, in Agra, which is also home to a number of other Mughal-era tombs and the gargantuan Agra Fort. It’s also a short drive to Fatehpur Sikri, the Mughal Empire’s beautifully preserved former capital. From here, you can easily get to the desert state of Rajasthan, full of magnificent forts, beautiful old palaces (some of which have been converted into hotels), and even sprawling animal sanctuaries, where you can take a safari and maybe spot a tiger in the wild. The mountainous area north of Delhi is great for trekking and yoga (the city of Rishikesh, located beside the Ganges River, is considered the yoga capital of the world). Meanwhile, the Punjab region boasts the Golden Temple, one of the most important gurudwaras (Sikh houses of worship) in the world. Khajuraho, known for its erotic temples and the holy city of Varanasi, is also in the northern part of the country.
South India: South India is full of gorgeous old temples and beautiful scenery, and the state of Kerala on the southwestern tip of the country is the place to go if you’re interested in Ayurvedic treatments or getaways. Kerala is also known for its beautiful marshy backwaters, and overnight cruises on traditional houseboats are considered a quintessential South Indian experience. Major attractions in the region include the UNESCO World Heritage site of Mahabalipuram on the Bay of Bengal, a collection of Pallava dynasty monuments and temples, some of which date back to the seventh century. Hampi is another must-visit, with incredibly preserved temples dating from the Vijayanagara Empire. The South Indian city of Mysore, near Bangalore, is home to Mysore Palace, one of India’s most popular attractions and a fine example of Indo-Saracenic architecture, which blends Indian, Mughal, and Victorian Gothic elements. Special Events and Festivals in India
Indian Dance Festival, Mamallapuram; Arian Zwegers, Flickr
North India: Many of the same festivals are celebrated in both North and South India, but the traditions are often quite different. Popular North Indian celebrations include Diwali, which marks the victory of light over darkness. It’s observed with rituals, the lighting of oil lamps and candles, and plenty of fireworks. Springtime is ushered in with Holi, a hit with visitors, in which people gather to festively throw powdered colors on one another and in the air. Also popular is the annual Pushkar Mela, or Pushkar Camel Fair, in which thousands of camel and horse traders descend upon the desert oasis town of Pushkar to trade livestock. Yoga enthusiasts may want to plan their trip around the International Yoga Festival, held every year in Rishikesh in the first week of March.
South India: South India has a whole host of festivals and traditions, many of which are unique not just to the region, but to specific states. In Kerala, the annual Onam festival marks the harvest and is celebrated with rituals, music, folk performances, and boat races. Although Onam is traditionally a Hindu festival, members of Kerala’s large Christian community also join in on the fanfare. Also in Kerala, Thrissur Pooram takes place in the Vadakkunnathan Temple and features large processions with heavily adorned elephants. In the neighboring state of Tamil Nadu, Pongal is celebrated in early January and honors the sun god, Surya. Traditions include creating floor decorations using colored powders, exchanging gifts, and decorating cows and feeding them a dish of rice and milk (also called pongal). Food in India
Indian spices; Marco Verch via Flickr
North India: India has all sorts of regional cuisine, though North Indian food (think heavy curries and naan bread) typically gets far more representation outside of the subcontinent than South Indian fare. If you like your food spicy, meaty, and heavy, you’ll love North India. Here, you’ll find thick curries made from creamy gravies, spicy tandoor-fired kebabs, and all sorts of street snacks, from deep-fried, veggie-stuffed samosas to chole kulcha (chickpeas served with thick, fluffy flatbread) North Indian food is often served with flatbreads, and the rice in this part of the country is usually of the delicate basmati variety. North India is also a great place to get your fill of Indo-Chinese food, along with Tibetan treats such asmomos (steamed dumplings).
South India: South India is best known for its breakfast foods, including masala dosas (savory lentil and rice crepes stuffed with potatoes) and idlis (steamed rice cakes usually served with chutneys and a watery lentil stew known as sambar). Both of these items are easily available at breakfast buffets and South Indian restaurants across the country. However, South India offers much more, with plenty of intra-regional variations to boot. Food here is more frequently cooked with coconut oil (while mustard oil or plain old vegetable oil reign supreme in the north), and thicker, chunkier varieties of rice are more commonplace. Other items worth trying include idiyappam (rice noodles often served with sweet coconut milk) and medu vada (fried savory donut-shaped snacks made from lentil batter). South India is also a region of coffee drinkers, and the South Indian style of coffee is prepared with lots of milk and sugar.

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Quote: : I can’t recall seeing sheep in Asia. I’ve seen (live and at least semi-wild) deer in Japan, but I’ve never noticed venison on the menu except in French restaurants in Tokyo. One of the best restaurants in Tokyo is called ‘The Sheep Restautant’ and it is owned by a Japanese guy married to an HK lady whose family moved to India. Booking is a must.
I presume you mean the Far East, so I will just say lamb is a major staples of Sichuan and Hunan cuisine in Southwest China as well as Peking and Inner Mongolian food in the north. The Lamb from the Southwest is usually dripping in chillies (real Kung Pau Lamb not the timid imitation Chicken style one finds in the US) whereas in the North it is barbequed or roasted. Both are delicious.
For the rest of Asia you cannot get far from sheep anywhere in the Middle East, Iran, and Indian sub-continent.

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