How these Singaporeans are keeping their heritage alive

How these Singaporeans are keeping their heritage alive

From preserving heirloom recipes to documenting the history of Pulau Ubin. Tay Suan Chiang Kevin Lee and Poon’s Chilli Sauce. Father and son. Char Siew Pao. Paper wrapped chicken.
By day, Kevin Lee runs Invisible Photography Asia, a platform for photography and visual arts which organises events, exhibitions and workshops to shine a spotlight on emerging photographers in the region.
But on the weekends, you are more likely to find Mr Lee, 46, slaving over a stove, frying up Poon’s Chilli Sauce – a fiery concoction of chilli, spices, peanuts and Sichuan peppercorns – named after his late father. Since he started in June, he’s sold about 200 bottles, the proceeds of which will go towards a cookbook tribute to his Dad.
The elder Mr Poon – due to poor record keeping, father and son have different last names – was a successful restaurateur in Fiji before he retired and moved to Singapore. He died of heart failure in 2018. Mr Lee, a naturalised Singaporean says, “I feel indebted to him so I decided to cook 100 meals and recipes as a project in his memory.”
Father and son were close, if not affectionate. “He was an old-school father. I remember him going to the markets every morning in Fiji to buy fresh produce for the restaurant, and staying with him late into the night until the last customer left so we could close shop and drive home,” recalls Mr Lee.
He hopes to finish the cookbook, titled Hundred Daughters, Hundred Patience, A Hundred Meals , by the end of 2019. It will be self-published with a print run of 500 to 1000 copies.
The title comes from his father’s name. Mr Lee’s grandparents had named their son Pak Nui, or ‘hundred daughters’ in Cantonese, to fool the demons a soothsayer told them were out to get their only son. His father later changed it to Pak Noi, or ‘hundred patience’.
The recipes are inspired by the family’s history – from the rice farms of Kaiping, China, where Mr Lee’s father was originally from, to the sugar cane fields of Fiji, to Singapore’s HDB heartlands. He includes family recipes as well as those from his father’s restaurant, and even those he picked up while living in Singapore. Examples include Kokoda, a tangy chilli Fijian fish ceviche, and Scrap Pot Curry, a spicy curry made from chicken bones, prawn heads and discarded parts that became a staff meal in his father’s restaurant.
For the book, Mr Lee would cook and photograph a dish a day at home in Tiong Bahru, ending up with 150 dishes in all. Some failed, some took time to perfect and finally, he whittled the list down to the final 100. “My mother, wife, sister and helper were my food critics,” he laughs.
Mr Lee hopes that those who buy the book will be inspired to try the recipes and learn “not only my family’s history, but a universal story of migration and identity which are relevant topics today”. It would be even better, he adds, “if they took the recipes and adapted it to reflect their own taste and history.
Order Poon’s Chilli Sauce from kevinwylee.com/100recipes . Kevin Martens Wong started the Kodrah Kristang movement. Kristang classes have attracted young and senior participants.
The next time you meet a Portugese-Eurasian pal, say “Oi, teng bong?” Chances are he may be able to understand that you are saying “Hello, how are you” in Kristang.
Kristang is a creole of Portuguese and Malay that evolved after the Portuguese conquered Malacca in 1511. With intermarriage, a new pidgin evolved that combined the two languages, with influences from Hokkien, Dutch, Konkani, Malayalam, Hakka, Cantonese and Indian varieties of Creole Portuguese. Kristang was commonly spoken among the Eurasians as recently as a century ago, but by the 1930s, started to decline as English emerged as the lingua franca.
Kevin Martens Wong, 27, a teacher at Eunoia Junior college, is the founder of Kodrah Kristang (Awaken, Kristang), a revitalisation initiative to keep Kristang alive.
The Eurasian-Chinese linguistics graduate who speaks several other languages, picked up Kristang from older Eurasians, and could speak it fluently in two months. For the past three years, together with a small group of Kristang speakers, they started to run classes at Cairnhill Community Club, and have taught about 500 students since.
Along the way, Mr Wong has also held a Kristang Language Festival, produced a Kristang online dictionary and a board game.
Two-thirds of their Kristang language students are Eurasians of all ages, including entire families.
“I studied linguistics in junior college and university, and for me, learning and teaching Kristang is my way of preserving Singapore’s linguistic diversity,” says Mr Wong, who converses in Kristang with this grandparents.
“I’m greatly encouraged that Kodrah Kristang has helped create stronger interpersonal relationship among Eurasians and get even non-Eurasians to be interested in the culture,” he says.
For example, Mr Wong’s distant cousin Andre D’Rozario, felt disconnected from the Eurasian community before he learnt Kristang. “I heard about Kristang but didn’t know where to learn it before. But now I speak it to my grandpa and aunts,” says Mr D’Rozario, who has been teaching Kristang for the past year.
Mr Wong’s plans for Kodrah Kristang are to keep classes going, do more research on the language, and to expand resources for Kristang.
Follow facebook.com/kodrahkristang for class schedules. Syazwan Majid Syazwan Majid, a Pulau Ubin community liaison officer A Malay kampung house. Volunteers for the Pulau Ubin Kampong Clean-up. Kampong Clean-up. View of the Main Village during the annual Tua Pek Kong Festival.
As a child, Syazwan Majid wasn’t entertained with fairy tales or nursery rhymes. Instead, his mother would tell him stories about kampung life in Pulau Ubin, where she grew up.
The stories used to irk the now 22-year-old who failed to see the relevance “given how I was growing up in modern Singapore in the 2000s.” But as he grew older, he began to appreciate his mum’s nostalgic pining for kampung life.
His mum, Noorriah Sulong, lived on Pulau Ubin for over 30 years before moving to the mainland in 1989. During the school holidays, the family made day trips to Pulau Ubin, when she would rent a tandem bicycle, and they would have a picnic by Chek Jawa before visiting former neighbours.
(RELATED: There’s Tudor-style Architecture in Singapore at Chek Jawa, Of All places )
“It was mum’s vision of a kampung being her true home that sparked in me a desire to find this joy that she missed,” says Mr Syazwan, who made more frequent visits to the island in the last few years to learn more about his late grandparents and the family’s former home.
In 2018, he started an online journal to document his visits and interaction with Ubin residents.
He also set out to find 818K, the family’s old home. He succeeded after a few months with the help of old archival maps and speaking with residents. The wooden house had been abandoned for three decades, and only the foundation stones remained.
“Even then, I was so relieved and excited. I felt like I was reconnected to a heritage I had long been apart from,” he says. “I felt the same as my mum did at my age, and I felt a closeness to my grandparents just to be at the exact spot where they raised my mum and her siblings.” His mum was on the verge of tears when she saw that the house her father built from scratch was no more.
Mr Syazwan is now a Pulau Ubin community liaison officer, “engaging with the residents to find ways to improve their quality of life while advocating for the preservation of the rustic charm of kampung life,” he says.
(RELATED: Singapore risks destroying its past in race to build, says top archaeologist )
He has also started a monthly cleanup exercise on the island with a group of volunteers, helping elderly residents to trim their yards and clear bulky refuse. “It’s the least I can do for them to help maintain the beauty of their kampung homes,” says Mr Syazwan.
“I hope that my journey of retracing my family heritage will inspire others to do the same,” he says. “Everyone has their own stories and it is in each of these stories that we’re able to build our own identity.”
See details of WUJ Kampong Clean-up at wansubinjournal.blogspot.com . Raymond Khoo Raymond Khoo, executive chef and founder of The Peranakan. Super Sedap High Tea set at The Peranakan. Retail area at The Peranakan. Tok Panjang at The Peranakan Gallery.
Having dabbled in French, Indian, and Spanish cuisine during his 30 years in F&B, and after some years working in Macau, Raymond Khoo hankered for a cuisine closer to his heart, namely Peranakan.
Five years ago, Mr Khoo, 56, started The Peranakan restaurant on Orchard Road, cooking up decades-old recipes that were handed down by the Nonyas and Babas in his family.
The restaurant serves classics such as ayam buah keluak and babi pong teh . On weekends, it is popular with families, while corporate clients make up the majority of customers on weekdays. The restaurant gets a mixed bag of guests from all over.
While the older generation are familiar with such dishes, he finds that younger diners are often lost as to what to order. “It is not good enough to just have older diners. We want younger ones because food is a way to keep traditional heritage alive,” he says. So he started a high tea menu that includes toast with buah keluak and nasi ulam to introduce diners to Peranakan cuisine.
(RELATED: Peranakan restaurants in Singapore modernise traditional fare to attract younger customers )
To make his menu more inclusive, he has also introduced a vegetarian version, using mock meat in dishes such as ayam pongteh and fish assam pedas . He is happy to cater to vegetarians, “so that more people can enjoy Peranakan food,” he says.
Mr Khoo’s push for Peranakan culture doesn’t stop at just food. This year marks the third Peranakan Festival, which he organises, for people to discover more about the Peranakan culture. There are special menus created, including wine and sake pairings to show the versatility of Peranakan cuisine.
He also has invited experts to give talks on porcelain, textiles and how to invest in Peranakan jewellery.
He has also taken it upon himself to open a gallery dedicated to all things Peranakan. Located next to the restaurant, The Peranakan Gallery features an elaborate 20-seater Tok Panjang table set with exquisitely-crafted Nonya ceramics, Chinese porcelain and Waterford crystalware; and other artefacts such as tiffin carriers and enamel chamber pots. Mr Khoo has also set up a small retail area outside the restaurant selling kebayas, brooches and beaded slippers.
He hopes to start language and beading classes later in the year at the Gallery, and maybe even offer cooking lessons.
Mr Khoo is waving the Peranakan flag high on his own, because he feels the promotion of Peranakan culture done by associations is limited to their members. “The associations do good work, but I want to reach out more to the public,” he says.
He adds that it has been challenging promoting Peranakan culture on his own, but “the biggest satisfaction has been the ability to create this curiosity with a wider audience.”
The Peranakan is at 442 Orchard Road, Level 2, Claymore Connect. Details of The Peranakan Festival at theperanakanfestival.com .

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From bratwurst to insect burgers: Snack bar culture in Germany – KatiaZev News

Everyone in Germany is familiar with it: the greasy sausage stand on the main shopping strip where you think twice about actually picking up a snack. The selection is limited anyway: bratwurst, currywurst and french fries. And only mustard, ketchup or mayonnaise to go along with it.
The classic “imbiss” or snack bar was ubiquitous in Germany for decades; but, just like the classic “kniepe” or corner pub, they’re slowly dying out. They’re being replaced by modern, bright eateries with flair that offer a “burger of the week” with grilled antipasti vegetables, basil pesto, hazelnut mayo and grilled scamorza cheese. Truffle-Parmesan french fries are served with it.
But the journey from sausage to vegetable burger has been an odyssey. Planet Berlin: Venezuelan street food Small car
Chance brought Sharon Schael from her homeland across Mexico and Spain to the German capital. As a DJ, she came to the right place. But she grew tired of Berlin’s relentless nightlife and dreamt of opening a cafe. Settling instead on a food truck, Schael initially nicknamed it “El Carrito,” or small car, a name that’s stuck until today. Planet Berlin: Venezuelan street food Blank slate
When Sharon Schael explains what arepas are, she describes them as bread pockets that can be filled with anything that tastes good, meaning diverse fillings that brim with her own signature flavors. The pockets are baked exclusively from cornmeal and are thus practically gluten-free. Planet Berlin: Venezuelan street food Savory fillings
Sharon Schael actually focuses on six homemade fillings for her arepas. It’s never easy to decide between, for example, the “Con Todo” with black beans, beef, avocado and cheese; or the “La Reina” with chicken avocado salad. One way or the other, Schael’s homemade salsa, a souvenir from her time in Mexico, will be the crowning glory.
From medieval carts to ‘rubble’ stalls
The snack is nothing new. Mobile snack stalls came about in the Middle Ages in Germany, with food offered for sale from carts at markets. But on days where the outdoor markets were closed, getting food on the go was by no means the norm.
“Since Germany, like all of Central Europe, was a society of scarcity for centuries, there was only just enough to eat,” Gunther Hirschfelder, cultural anthropologist at the University of Regensburg, told DW. This resulted in a fixed meal schedule. Food was eaten according to fixed rules, at fixed times and at home. “It was considered indecent to trot through the countryside and munch on something.”
Read more : Berlin 24/7: What’s the currywurst cult all about?
This rigid system only relaxed in Germany after the Second World War. During reconstruction, a new form of out-of-home consumption was created in the ruins of German cities: the so-called “rubble stalls.”
In Cologne, for example, there was the “Puszta Hütte” in the late 1940s, where goulash was served from pots. Eating outside of the home was still generally frowned upon, but the foundation was laid for a change in habits.
US soldiers were simultaneously setting a new standard in the country. Not only had they brought along with them their casual manner, their chewing gum and their chocolate, but also their own food culture. Germans were becoming more familiar with eating on the road from the “diners” depicted in the US films of the time as well.
Mass motorization and the snack boom
Another stone for modern German snack culture was laid in the mining towns of the Ruhr area as early as the 19th century. Clean mineral water was offered in so-called “drinking halls” because normal drinking water was unpalatable. Later, coffee, tea and magazines were added to the selection. After the war, workers would stop as such places for a cigarette and a beer on their way to or from work. Soon, sandwiches were on offer to go along with it.
The actual triumph of the snack bars finally began in the 1960s with the economic upswing. Meat consumption became the norm, and the trend toward french fries was spreading from England and the Netherlands to Germany. The demand for a quick snack too grew dramatically.
The mass motorization and new desire to travel that accompanied the postwar “economic miracle” in Germany were doing their bit as well. Guest workers from Italy, Greece and Turkey opened their first fast food restaurants and stalls in large German cities and industrial centers.
The bratwurst soon faced competition from pizza and gyros, later from the popular döner kebab. In 1971, the first German McDonald’s restaurant opened in Munich. Fast food culture was at its peak in the 1970s and 80s, a time when speed of service subsumed flavor, and sustainability.
A classic “drinking hall” in western Germany
Slow food, health and environmental consciousness
At the turn of the millennium, snack culture changed noticeably. Classic greasy and salty fast food was considered unhealthy and got a bad rap. A demand for vegetarian and vegan food grew and the stalls and snack bars adapted, with a lot more falafel or tofu on the menu.
Nowadays snacks run the gamut of classic bratwurst at the soccer stadium stall, to vegan Indian food at a music festival, to insect burgers from the food truck.
“In our lifestyle society, one’s individual lifestyle is expressed in their nutritional style,” said Gunther Hirschfelder. In his opinion, the “permanent snacking” and eating out trend will continue due to new forms of mobility and the growing number of single households.
But he adds that the trend is moving away from exoticism and toward an “apolitical re-nationalization” and regionalization of German snack bar culture. Pretzels from the local bakery are cool again, as are french fries , though cooked in clean, saturated fat-free oil. Though food trends are fickle, snacks have found a permanent place in a fast-evolving culinary culture. 8 foods with unexpected origins Swedish meatballs’ Turkish origins
ikea restaurants made them famous all over the world: Köttbullar, or Swedish meatballs. Sweden has now revealed that the recipe for its iconic dish actually came from Turkey. It was brought to the Scandinavian country by King Charles XII, who lived in exile in the Ottoman Empire in the early 18th-century. Unlike in Turkey, Swedes — and Ikea — often dish up meatballs with gravy and ligonberry jam. 8 foods with unexpected origins English muffin: an American invention
The English muffin actually doesn’t come from England, though its creator did. Samuel Bath Thomas moved to the United States from England in 1874. It was only after crossing the Atlantic that he created the popular breakfast food that was baked on a griddle rather than in an oven. English muffins were imported for years into the UK from the US before British producers started making their own. 8 foods with unexpected origins Döner Kebab: somewhere between Germany and Turkey
Döner Kebab can be found worldwide, and many say the popular grab-and-go meal originated in Germany. Kadir Nurman, a Turkish-born restaurateur who lived in Berlin, is said to have been the first person to take traditional Turkish spit-roasted meat and stuff it into a flatbread. While many contest his 1972 “invention,” Nurman definitely helped make the meal a German — and a global — culinary hit. 8 foods with unexpected origins Croissant: imported into France
What reputable French bakery would dare to not offer croissants? After all, the buttery, crescent-shaped pastry is practically synonymous with French baked goods. But the croissant actually comes from the Austrian “kipferl.” This was brought to Paris by an Austrian artillery officer who adapted it into the croissant. And the “kipferl”? Its origins supposedly lie with the Ottomans. 8 foods with unexpected origins Fajitas and chimichangas: north of the border creations
The Spanish word “faja” means belt or sash, and “fajita” refers to the strips of beef skirt steak used in this dish. While prevalent on menus at Mexican restaurants today, the sizzling meal can actually be traced to West Texas cattle ranchers. The Tex-Mex chimichanga (above), a deep-fried burrito, has a similar story, though it is neither Texas nor Mexican — it was invented in Arizona. 8 foods with unexpected origins Bagel: aka the beigel
Round with a hole in the middle; boiled, then baked: that’s the bagel we know today. For many, it’s a New York City specialty, or an American one at least. But the bagel actually traces its roots to Jewish communities in Poland. The name “bagel” comes from Yiddish, which was influenced by German dialects. Bagels were a mainstay of Polish cuisine before Polish Jews brought them to the US. 8 foods with unexpected origins Fortune cookies: a Chinese dessert, but not in China
These crisp, hollow cookies that contain lucky numbers, words of wisdom or prophecies are served after a meal in Chinese restaurants in nearly every country — except for China, that is. They are not a tradition there. The sugary oracle is thought to have been first made by Japanese immigrants in California in the late 19th or early 20th century. A similar cookie is served in parts of Japan. 8 foods with unexpected origins Hummus: controversial chickpeas
While hummus’ ingredients are easy enough to identify (chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, lemon, garlic, salt), its origins are anything but clear. In fact, they can be downright controversial. Tension over the dip’s origins even spiraled into a “Hummus war” after Lebanese and Israel both laid claim to it. The fact remains that hummus can be found widely across the Middle East and Mediterranean. Author: Cristina Burack

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Meet Garima Arora: The Indian Chef Lighting Up Bangkok’s Culinary Scene

22 – Advertisement – It’s plain to see why Garima Arora has been showered with accolades for her first restaurant Gaa.
Photography courtesy of Gaa
Chef Garima Arora didn’t come to Bangkok to open a restaurant. She studied at the Cordon Bleu in Paris and held several jobs, including a career-defining two-year stint at Noma in Copenhagen, where Arora was hand-picked by culinary powerhouse Gaggan Anand to head his flagship Indian restaurant in India. The Mumbai native joined Gaggan’s eponymous restaurant in Bangkok to prepare for the new project, but the plan fizzled before it ever got off the ground.
Arora found herself in a country with which she discovered a surprisingly deep affinity. “In India, we have a very superficial view of what Thailand is” – a view that she shared at the time. But she observes, “There is a strong connection between Thailand and India culturally. The people, the history, are very similar. There are so many words that are similar to Hindi.”
With that connection, the idea to stay in Bangkok seemed like a perfectly natural choice to her. “I think Thailand makes a good backdrop to work with Indian cuisine,” she says. She fell in love with local ingredients, from egg fruit to greens foraged in the jungle. “I think my pivotal point was meeting Num,” she said, using the nickname of Chef Weerawat Triyasenawat of Samuay and Sons in Udon Thani in northeastern Thailand, known for his creative use of foraged ingredients. “Seeing all these ingredients made me change my whole idea about whether I could live here and work here.” She concedes that would be the case no matter where she was cooking. “If I were in another part of the world, I would do just that, work with what’s around me.” Gaa sits across the lane from Gaggan, Asia’s best restaurant from 2015 to 2018 – Advertisement –
She moved into a couple of shophouses opposite Gaggan’s restaurant and had free rein to design her restaurant from the ground up. Among other techniques, she embraced fermentation, one of the signatures of Noma, as a key to her unique flavour profiles, something she emphasised when Gaa opened its doors two years ago. “We still do. It’s a big part of who we are.”
Arora’s own personality really shines through when she reimagines her Indian heritage. “Indian cuisine can be much more than comfort food. It has the resources to give chefs the means to make something completely new, different and modern.” She doesn’t serve rich gravies and stacks of bread, but rather uses her memories of food from home as a starting point.
She points to the braised jackfruit with pickles, the crayfish head, and her take on a beef taco as examples of dishes that owe a debt to her Indian roots yet are decidedly her own. She also singles out the betel leaf, an ingredient used both in Thai and Indian cuisine, that she uses at the start and end of the meal in original ways. Sweet betel leaf covered in dark chocolate and fennel powder
“They’re like bookends. You start your meal with the savoury betel leaf like you would in Thailand and you finish it sweet like in India. That’s the connection and I think it tells that story beautifully. They are not traditional recipes by any stretch of the imagination, but the reference points are in the cultures.” They are also visually stunning and are among the most photographed of her dishes. Chilled tomato and Marian plum soup with fennel, black salt and coriander oil
Recognition of her intensely personal work didn’t take long. After just a year and a half, she won a Michelin star, an historic first for a woman from India. “I went from being a line chef to having my own restaurant,” she says, looking across the lane in the direction of Gaggan’s kitchen. Soon after she picked up the star, she received a call from the organisers of Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants saying she had been selected as 2019’s Best Female Chef in Asia. Would she accept the honour?
“I thought about accepting or not,” she says candidly. “I have strong feelings about many issues. I am absolutely against positive discrimination.” She bristles slightly when asked if she sees herself as a role model. In the end, she decided to accept because the exposure gave her a new platform to talk about Indian food in a modern context. In addition to the Best Female Chef award, she also entered the 50 Best list at number 16, the highest new entry this year. Burnt coconut sugar ice cream
Despite the attention, she is determined to stay focused. She has no plans to expand. “It’s one day at a time,” she states. She also doesn’t want to lose sight of her continued research in the kitchen. Her eyes light up when she takes the example of the humble besan or chickpea flour. “As a starch, there is so much potential. We fry it, we steam it, we poach it. It can be reinterpreted in a modern way.” It’s a challenge she relishes. But she is against changing just for the sake of change. “For me, menu changes only make sense when you have something worthwhile to say.”
She hastens to point out that it hasn’t been all smooth sailing. She has had to learn about managing expectations of partners, staff and customers. She has had to “deal with figures,” she says, rolling her eyes. But the added responsibility has given her focus and grounding. Arora, who also found time to get married while starting a new business, notes with a laugh that “my husband says I’m much more patient since opening the restaurant.”
It’s safe to bet that a besan -based dish will make its way to the menu when she’s ready. “Am I working on it? Yes! Have I got anywhere? No!” But there is no doubt in her voice that she will find a solution. “How else do you push yourself if you don’t look for something new and something different?”
Cook Like A Chef
Chef Arora shares her Spicy Chicken Liver Pâté On Toast.
Ingredients: 250ml milk (or enough to cover the chicken liver) 1-2 curry leaves

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Best Indian Cuisine Restaurant: South Indian Food Orlando

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Test of Indian Food Orlando: Weekend Lunch Buffet

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Are you in Orlando and find the place to spend your quality time with quality food then visit Eat at Rasa. Eat at Rasa serve you delicious Indian multi-cuisine food. Best Indian Find Dining Place in Florida. Persian Food Las Vegas : Shiraz Restaurnt Restaurant – Food Service Las Vegas (Nevada) July 3, 2019 Check with seller
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Shiraz is one of the best Pakistani Restaurant in Las Vegas which is conveniently located in Decatur Blvd, Las Vegas. We offer a wide range of Desi and Asian food and also Persian dishes that are sure to delight the palate. Our food is full of flavor… Call : (702) 870-0860 22:31

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Dosa Hut Docklands

/ Gastrology Having opened since 2006, Dosa Hut has won the hearts of Footscray locals and other Melbournians who travel from near and far for their Indian fix. Today, there are 20 locations around the globe and the restaurant continues to serve classical Indian dishes with a fresh twist, focusing on quality ingredients. Fresh and full of spices is the name of the game and it is easy to understand why their restaurants are almost always bustling and full to the brim. We loved visiting their Docklands outlet. As the name suggests, the dosa is the heart and soul of the eatery. Dosa is a popular South Indian pancake which is celebrated all over India. The menu started off simple but today, Dosa Hut boasts a menu of over 100 types of dosa. We loved sampling their unique Masala spring roll dosa which was expertly made. Paper thin and perfectly crisp, these crepes were filled with potato, onion, coriander and cut into rolls. Just yum! Apart from Dosa Hut’s legendary dosa, an absolute must have is their hyderabadi dum biriyani (an extremely popular item which sees 600 serves per location on a weekend). The goat biriyani in particular impressed with its luscious morsels of tender goat served alongside perfectly cooked basmati. Dosa Hut also serve a range of popular street foods and Tandoor including the flavour bomb, Papdi chaat which is a plate comprising of deep fried puffed wafers topped with chickpea gravy, yoghurt mint and tamarind sauce. If you can’t decide from the various claypot oven dishes then the Tandoor Mixed Platter is the way to go – It’s a beautiful selection of tender chicken tikka, seekh kebab, paneer and fish. If you love your curries, these guys do an amazing variety. Our top picks include the Chicken Chettinad and Lamb Vindaloo. Both taste wonderfully authentic and are just a treat when enjoyed with fluffy naan. Last but certainly not least, our favourite items on the Dosa Hut menu were the Indian-Chinese fusion dishes – brilliant. An adaptation of Chinese seasoning and cooking techniques to Indian tastes, the result is an explosion of flavour that leaves you wanting more. Days later and we’re still salivating over the Chicken 65 – spicy, deep-fried boneless morsels of chicken. Just yum! Dosa Hut presents a vivid illustration of Indian cuisine of today. Led by founders Anil and Praveen, Dosa manages to add to its successful original eatery in Footscray without compromising on quality or flavour. Location: Shop CW G07, 440 District Docklands Phone: 03 9642 7983

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In Matheran mood.! – A Wanderer Wall

Post Views: 25 Hello all,
Recently I have visited Matheran, it’s my second visit to this place. It is a great place in the Western Ghats to visit near Pune for a weekend in monsoon. It has a wide range of travelers, one can trek for 3KM and 600M elevation to reach Matheran from Ambewadi or few other places else can reach the top of the hill (Aman Lodge) in own/ rent vehicles, from Aman Lodge to Matheran need to walk or can choose a horse ride or hand-pulled rickshaws to reach the market place or center of the village.
Matheran in monsoon time, continual rains will play hide and seek. So, please prepare your self to drain in the rain not to impact on your mood and make sure mobile, a wallet, etc packed in a waterproof cover/bag. A trail through deep woods
Visiting Places, please strike off this from your mind because it offers you spectacular views all around where ever you stand at the edge of the hill, it’s a crazy combo of steep hills and foggy forest pathways, but one specific scenic point Louisa Point has a view of the giant waterfall, overflow water of Charlotte lake fall from the height 600M. View Form Louisa Point Waterfalls from Charlotte Lake
There are around 30 named views points on the Matheran hill, like One tree hill, echo point, panorama point, etc. where ever at the edge of South-West can feel the high wind speeds, they may blowdown a person, so be careful here. The reverse flow of water from a waterfall can experience at Marjorie nook.
One sunset point is there but in monsoon, having thought to see the sunset this will be a joke. Because it’s a dense cloudy area. For a bit of adrenaline rush climb the One tree hill, bit care full because it is surrounded by a deep valley. If you are lucky then clouds will clear so, you can feel the view. My Friend posing with the Toy train
Indian Railways offers a Toy train raid on the edge of the hill will cover more than half distance, so people who can’t walk much can enjoy the view of deep valleys with a countless number of waterfalls.
For the stay, you can have modern hotels in the village but my suggestion is to find a hotel of British time(before independence) which offers you a decent amount of spacious halls and a vintage look including good quotations with great hospitality. Please go to this hotel link, it may blow your mind. hope hall hotel
Along with tourists a lot of monkeys roam around for snatching food from hands. Oh forgot about food, ah… Coming to this, a wide range of Chinese, North Indian cuisines and lip-smacking Marathi snacks, Famous Lonavala Chekki, local fruits and good varieties of ice gola also available there. I have tried Misal Pav it is tasty, try to avoid rice items from the outlets.
**PLEASE DO NOT LITTER, IF POSSIBLE COLLECT SOME PLASTIC TRASH WITH YOU**

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Are Ghost Kitchens the Future?

As counter-service brands grapple with rising rents and shrinking margins amid a crush of off-premises demand, some are ditching the dining room altogether and buying into the virtual kitchen model.
You can see the appeal. Virtual—also called cloud or ghost—kitchens are stripped-down commercial cooking spaces with no dine-in option. Functioning as hubs for online delivery and catering orders, they circumvent the need for costly buildouts in premium locations. Less prime real estate also means more space to accommodate delivery and catering vehicles that would otherwise jockey with customers for parking space. It’s an ever-more-appealing prospect as the $17 billion U.S. online food delivery market climbs toward a projected $24 billion by 2023, according to data portal Statista.
But does it work for everyone?
“Virtual kitchens reduce the burden on restaurants’ four walls,” says Craig Cochrane, executive vice president of marketing for Pasadena, California–based virtual restaurant facility Kitchen United, which just opened a second location in Chicago. The company’s two-part model comprises shared kitchen space for companies looking to test and launch new products and a multi-kitchen virtual restaurant to help brands expand delivery or cheaply and quickly get into new markets. Securing a $10 million investment last year led by Google Ventures, Kitchen United aggressively aims to open 10-15 facilities by year-end.
Kitchen United charges a monthly membership fee that covers rent, infrastructure and commercial equipment, and services like dishwashing, food receiving, and cold storage. To ease restaurants’ unrelenting labor burden, kitchens are designed to have just one or two cooks running the line. They fire orders from a cloud-based stream that accommodates orders from restaurants’ systems or third-party delivery platforms. Kitchen United employees retrieve food from the line and bring it out to delivery drivers or customers. Customers can also place orders on-site at kiosks and pick them up—a notable difference from most virtual restaurants that lack a consumer-facing element.
Some tech-savvy brands are building cloud kitchens into their own business models as a means to streamline systems and get a jump on unit and off-premises growth. Bay Area fast-casual chain Bamboo Asia opened a 10,000-square-foot cloud kitchen in Oakland in January 2018, largely because its catering arm was growing so fast that its then-two locations couldn’t handle demand.
“As a small business, putting the investment up to build out something that isn’t going to offer a return as quickly as restaurants with revenue on day one was a bit of an investment decision,” says Sebastiaan van de Rijt, cofounder and CEO of Bamboo Asia. “But we’re so happy we did it.”
Cooks prepare all dishes using eight huge sous vide baths before they’re picked up for catering or third-party delivery, or dispatched to Bamboo Asia’s three locations, where they’re finished sous vide. Because stores feature dishes from three cuisines (Vietnamese, Japanese, and Indian), the brand built its own inventory solution software, which tracks hundreds of mostly locally sourced ingredients. It integrates with Bamboo Asia’s POS, which helps track inventory depletion and prep needs based on historical data.
“You can only do that with the cloud, where every process is handled centrally rather than individually at each store, which helps us manage all processes and alleviates work that would be taken care of at the restaurant level,” he says.
It also helps keep his labor cost around 19.5 percent, even as minimum wage has increased 50 percent locally over the last five years. About 90 percent of Bamboo Asia staff are customer-facing. The cloud kitchen also acts as a staging area for new locations, which speeds up construction. Sous vide cooking also eliminates the need for costly ventilation retrofits.
Even chains that have counted on traditional commissaries to support their growth find space perpetually at a premium, leaving room for virtual kitchens to offer clever, if pricey, on-demand solutions.
Chicago café and pie shop Bang Bang Pie & Biscuits opened a centralized kitchen a year after its 2012 debut to support its thriving business. Its two small Windy City shops churned out 5,000 pies over the two-day Thanksgiving holiday alone while still growing retail and wholesale arms that sell whole pies, biscuit mix, hot sauce, and jam. Throw in a smattering of events each year, from James Beard Awards parties to weddings, and owner Michael Ciapciak often finds himself at capacity.
“If I get an opportunity like Lollapalooza, the last thing I want to do is turn it down just because I don’t have the space.”
One option he’s exploring is cloud-kitchen rentals, like that provided by local nonprofit incubator The Hatchery. The 67,000-square-foot facility on Chicago’s Near Northwest Side houses 56 private kitchens leasable by month, as well as dry/cold storage, loading docks, coworking space, and five shared kitchen spaces rentable by the hour. It’s intended to launch local food and beverage startups, but is ideally suited to the Thanksgiving crush.
“When push comes to shove, and I need a high production space for a short amount of time, I could reach out to a friend and bake when their shop is closed, or I could go there and crank it out,” he says, noting that it was surprisingly inexpensive. Rentals typically start at $20 an hour.
“We’re a very small space that can only put out so much food so fast,” he says. Delivery still pales in comparison to Bang Bang’s on-premises performance. Plus, friendly service and buttery aromas of baking biscuits is where the shop’s true magic lies. “On days we would be busy in the shop, why would I jeopardize that and give 30 percent to Caviar for a product that’s degraded?” Read More

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From bratwurst to insect burgers: Snack bar culture in Germany | Culture| Arts, music and lifestyle reporting from Germany

A diverse rang of snack bars and street food can be found in German cities these day. But it was long journey from greasy currywurst stand to vegan food truck. Here’s a look at German snack trends from past to present.
Germany’s evolving sidewalk snack scene Sausage stand Traditional German street snacks such as “currywurst” — and its less exotic relative, the “rostbratwurst” (grilled sausage) — are usually eaten at a tall bar table in front of the wurstbude (sausage snack bar). The wurstbude is especially widespread in western Germany and Berlin and serves as a recurring backdrop in the Cologne version of the popular TV detective series, “Tatort.”
Germany’s evolving sidewalk snack scene Currywurst Curry sausages (currywurst) are the traditional postwar snack for Berliners, and Ruhr area residents. It is often served in combination with french fries and has long helped shaped the identity of the working classes. The story goes that the street side pork sausage variant was invented in Berlin in 1949 when a British soldier gave an imbiss owner curry power that soon seasoned her snacks.
Germany’s evolving sidewalk snack scene Fish sandwich For northern Germans, fish rolls are the snack of choice. And they’re so easy to prepare: white herring (pictured), North Sea crabs or salmon are packed between two halves of the roll and garnished with salad and onions. That’s it! The fish roll sandwich is a classic German snack “to go” and has been around since the start of mass tourism in the 1960s.
Germany’s evolving sidewalk snack scene A cult thing The fish rolls are sold at fish stands like this one in Hamburg’s harbor. The maritime snack became a real cult after the former ill-reputed “Reeperbahn” red light district become a party street. Since then, the fish sandwich has been an essential part of any visit to Hamburg — especially after a long night out drinking.
Germany’s evolving sidewalk snack scene “Drink hall” snack stop You can find this mainstay of German snack bar culture all over the nation, but especially in the Ruhr area and in the Rhineland. These relaxed and casual locales see patrons stand at tall tables and chat after work over coffee, beer or sandwich.
Germany’s evolving sidewalk snack scene Pizza The quickly prepared, tasty Italian food began its triumphal march in Germany in the 1950s after the arrival of the first guest workers, which included Italians. It’s still one of the most popular snacks today, either as a takeaway slice or sitting down to a full serve of cheese and tomato goodness in a pizzeria.
Germany’s evolving sidewalk snack scene Insects to go In the meantime, contemporary foodie stalls and food trucks are springing up across German cities, and festivals, and cater for every diverse taste — and the environmentally conscious. Here someone is enjoying an insect burger in central Germany (Osnabrück) whose protein rich “flesh” was made from cereal leaf beetle larvae — a more sustainable but no less tasty form of animal protein.
Author: Philipp Jedicke (als)
Germany’s evolving sidewalk snack scene Sausage stand Traditional German street snacks such as “currywurst” — and its less exotic relative, the “rostbratwurst” (grilled sausage) — are usually eaten at a tall bar table in front of the wurstbude (sausage snack bar). The wurstbude is especially widespread in western Germany and Berlin and serves as a recurring backdrop in the Cologne version of the popular TV detective series, “Tatort.”
Germany’s evolving sidewalk snack scene Currywurst Curry sausages (currywurst) are the traditional postwar snack for Berliners, and Ruhr area residents. It is often served in combination with french fries and has long helped shaped the identity of the working classes. The story goes that the street side pork sausage variant was invented in Berlin in 1949 when a British soldier gave an imbiss owner curry power that soon seasoned her snacks.
Germany’s evolving sidewalk snack scene Fish sandwich For northern Germans, fish rolls are the snack of choice. And they’re so easy to prepare: white herring (pictured), North Sea crabs or salmon are packed between two halves of the roll and garnished with salad and onions. That’s it! The fish roll sandwich is a classic German snack “to go” and has been around since the start of mass tourism in the 1960s.
Germany’s evolving sidewalk snack scene A cult thing The fish rolls are sold at fish stands like this one in Hamburg’s harbor. The maritime snack became a real cult after the former ill-reputed “Reeperbahn” red light district become a party street. Since then, the fish sandwich has been an essential part of any visit to Hamburg — especially after a long night out drinking.
Germany’s evolving sidewalk snack scene “Drink hall” snack stop You can find this mainstay of German snack bar culture all over the nation, but especially in the Ruhr area and in the Rhineland. These relaxed and casual locales see patrons stand at tall tables and chat after work over coffee, beer or sandwich.
Germany’s evolving sidewalk snack scene Pizza The quickly prepared, tasty Italian food began its triumphal march in Germany in the 1950s after the arrival of the first guest workers, which included Italians. It’s still one of the most popular snacks today, either as a takeaway slice or sitting down to a full serve of cheese and tomato goodness in a pizzeria.
Germany’s evolving sidewalk snack scene Insects to go In the meantime, contemporary foodie stalls and food trucks are springing up across German cities, and festivals, and cater for every diverse taste — and the environmentally conscious. Here someone is enjoying an insect burger in central Germany (Osnabrück) whose protein rich “flesh” was made from cereal leaf beetle larvae — a more sustainable but no less tasty form of animal protein.
Author: Philipp Jedicke (als)
Everyone in Germany is familiar with it: the greasy sausage stand on the main shopping strip where you think twice about actually picking up a snack. The selection is limited anyway: bratwurst, currywurst and french fries. And only mustard, ketchup or mayonnaise to go along with it.
The classic “imbiss” or snack bar was ubiquitous in Germany for decades; but, just like the classic “kniepe” or corner pub, they’re slowly dying out. They’re being replaced by modern, bright eateries with flair that offer a “burger of the week” with grilled antipasti vegetables, basil pesto, hazelnut mayo and grilled scamorza cheese. Truffle-Parmesan french fries are served with it.
But the journey from sausage to vegetable burger has been an odyssey.
Planet Berlin: Venezuelan street food Small car Chance brought Sharon Schael from her homeland across Mexico and Spain to the German capital. As a DJ, she came to the right place. But she grew tired of Berlin’s relentless nightlife and dreamt of opening a cafe. Settling instead on a food truck, Schael initially nicknamed it “El Carrito,” or small car, a name that’s stuck until today.
Planet Berlin: Venezuelan street food Blank slate When Sharon Schael explains what arepas are, she describes them as bread pockets that can be filled with anything that tastes good, meaning diverse fillings that brim with her own signature flavors. The pockets are baked exclusively from cornmeal and are thus practically gluten-free.
Planet Berlin: Venezuelan street food Savory fillings Sharon Schael actually focuses on six homemade fillings for her arepas. It’s never easy to decide between, for example, the “Con Todo” with black beans, beef, avocado and cheese; or the “La Reina” with chicken avocado salad. One way or the other, Schael’s homemade salsa, a souvenir from her time in Mexico, will be the crowning glory.
From medieval carts to ‘rubble’ stalls
The snack is nothing new. Mobile snack stalls came about in the Middle Ages in Germany, with food offered for sale from carts at markets. But on days where the outdoor markets were closed, getting food on the go was by no means the norm.
“Since Germany, like all of Central Europe, was a society of scarcity for centuries, there was only just enough to eat,” Gunther Hirschfelder, cultural anthropologist at the University of Regensburg, told DW. This resulted in a fixed meal schedule. Food was eaten according to fixed rules, at fixed times and at home. “It was considered indecent to trot through the countryside and munch on something.”
Read more : Berlin 24/7: What’s the currywurst cult all about?
This rigid system only relaxed in Germany after the Second World War. During reconstruction, a new form of out-of-home consumption was created in the ruins of German cities: the so-called “rubble stalls.”
In Cologne, for example, there was the “Puszta Hütte” in the late 1940s, where goulash was served from pots. Eating outside of the home was still generally frowned upon, but the foundation was laid for a change in habits.
US soldiers were simultaneously setting a new standard in the country. Not only had they brought along with them their casual manner, their chewing gum and their chocolate, but also their own food culture. Germans were becoming more familiar with eating on the road from the “diners” depicted in the US films of the time as well.
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Street food with flair: To-go cuisine in Germany Mass motorization and the snack boom
Another stone for modern German snack culture was laid in the mining towns of the Ruhr area as early as the 19th century. Clean mineral water was offered in so-called “drinking halls” because normal drinking water was unpalatable. Later, coffee, tea and magazines were added to the selection. After the war, workers would stop as such places for a cigarette and a beer on their way to or from work. Soon, sandwiches were on offer to go along with it.
The actual triumph of the snack bars finally began in the 1960s with the economic upswing. Meat consumption became the norm, and the trend toward french fries was spreading from England and the Netherlands to Germany. The demand for a quick snack too grew dramatically.
The mass motorization and new desire to travel that accompanied the postwar “economic miracle” in Germany were doing their bit as well. Guest workers from Italy, Greece and Turkey opened their first fast food restaurants and stalls in large German cities and industrial centers.
The bratwurst soon faced competition from pizza and gyros, later from the popular döner kebab. In 1971, the first German McDonald’s restaurant opened in Munich. Fast food culture was at its peak in the 1970s and 80s, a time when speed of service subsumed flavor, and sustainability.
Read more : Record for biggest kebab in the world set in Berlin
A classic “drinking hall” in western Germany
Slow food, health and environmental consciousness
At the turn of the millennium, snack culture changed noticeably. Classic greasy and salty fast food was considered unhealthy and got a bad rap. A demand for vegetarian and vegan food grew and the stalls and snack bars adapted, with a lot more falafel or tofu on the menu.
Nowadays snacks run the gamut of classic bratwurst at the soccer stadium stall, to vegan Indian food at a music festival, to insect burgers from the food truck.
“In our lifestyle society, one’s individual lifestyle is expressed in their nutritional style,” said Gunther Hirschfelder. In his opinion, the “permanent snacking” and eating out trend will continue due to new forms of mobility and the growing number of single households.
But he adds that the trend is moving away from exoticism and toward an “apolitical re-nationalization” and regionalization of German snack bar culture. Pretzels from the local bakery are cool again, as are french fries , though cooked in clean, saturated fat-free oil. Though food trends are fickle, snacks have found a permanent place in a fast-evolving culinary culture.
8 foods with unexpected origins Swedish meatballs’ Turkish origins ikea restaurants made them famous all over the world: Köttbullar, or Swedish meatballs. Sweden has now revealed that the recipe for its iconic dish actually came from Turkey. It was brought to the Scandinavian country by King Charles XII, who lived in exile in the Ottoman Empire in the early 18th-century. Unlike in Turkey, Swedes — and Ikea — often dish up meatballs with gravy and ligonberry jam.
8 foods with unexpected origins English muffin: an American invention The English muffin actually doesn’t come from England, though its creator did. Samuel Bath Thomas moved to the United States from England in 1874. It was only after crossing the Atlantic that he created the popular breakfast food that was baked on a griddle rather than in an oven. English muffins were imported for years into the UK from the US before British producers started making their own.
8 foods with unexpected origins Döner Kebab: somewhere between Germany and Turkey Döner Kebab can be found worldwide, and many say the popular grab-and-go meal originated in Germany. Kadir Nurman, a Turkish-born restaurateur who lived in Berlin, is said to have been the first person to take traditional Turkish spit-roasted meat and stuff it into a flatbread. While many contest his 1972 “invention,” Nurman definitely helped make the meal a German — and a global — culinary hit.
8 foods with unexpected origins Croissant: imported into France What reputable French bakery would dare to not offer croissants? After all, the buttery, crescent-shaped pastry is practically synonymous with French baked goods. But the croissant actually comes from the Austrian “kipferl.” This was brought to Paris by an Austrian artillery officer who adapted it into the croissant. And the “kipferl”? Its origins supposedly lie with the Ottomans.
8 foods with unexpected origins Fajitas and chimichangas: north of the border creations The Spanish word “faja” means belt or sash, and “fajita” refers to the strips of beef skirt steak used in this dish. While prevalent on menus at Mexican restaurants today, the sizzling meal can actually be traced to West Texas cattle ranchers. The Tex-Mex chimichanga (above), a deep-fried burrito, has a similar story, though it is neither Texas nor Mexican — it was invented in Arizona.
8 foods with unexpected origins Bagel: aka the beigel Round with a hole in the middle; boiled, then baked: that’s the bagel we know today. For many, it’s a New York City specialty, or an American one at least. But the bagel actually traces its roots to Jewish communities in Poland. The name “bagel” comes from Yiddish, which was influenced by German dialects. Bagels were a mainstay of Polish cuisine before Polish Jews brought them to the US.
8 foods with unexpected origins Fortune cookies: a Chinese dessert, but not in China These crisp, hollow cookies that contain lucky numbers, words of wisdom or prophecies are served after a meal in Chinese restaurants in nearly every country — except for China, that is. They are not a tradition there. The sugary oracle is thought to have been first made by Japanese immigrants in California in the late 19th or early 20th century. A similar cookie is served in parts of Japan.
8 foods with unexpected origins Hummus: controversial chickpeas While hummus’ ingredients are easy enough to identify (chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, lemon, garlic, salt), its origins are anything but clear. In fact, they can be downright controversial. Tension over the dip’s origins even spiraled into a “Hummus war” after Lebanese and Israel both laid claim to it. The fact remains that hummus can be found widely across the Middle East and Mediterranean.
Author: Cristina Burack

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Best Honeymoon destination in coorg

Where do I start? nnWithout any doubt it was the best resort I have ever stayed in. The staff was very courteous, and attentive in every way; ready to give exceptional service in every possible way. Their hospitality was beyond my expectation right from the stage of booking. Our queries and doubts were very well attended to by Mufida and she suggested the best honeymoon package available.nThe way from Sidhapur to Evolve Back was very beautiful, far from the crowd, noise and traffic.nWe were welcomed by Priyanka Desai who took us to our Lily Pool Villa which was in the best location of the entire 30-acre property.nIt had a private pool surrounded by lilies and a beautiful tented bed (Gazebo) next to the pool. Our amazing itinerary was set by Priyanka Desai and she somehow managed to accommodate all the activities that were possible in our 3-day trip. nSo it started with a bottle of sparkling wine. nThey serve you the best type of food spread out in 3 restaurants. “Granary”, which is open 24 hours, has both veg and non-veg options. “Plantain Leaf”, which is a pure veg restaurant which has set menu of South Indian & North Indian thalis. Then my personal favorite “Peppercorn” which serves more of Continental cuisines. The chef Mr Chandi personally comes to your table and takes feedback about the food. Special thanks to Ibrahim who took special care of us.nWe were served breakfast in bed, then went for a nature walk and a worker’s trail (special thanks to Gopal). They also have an ayurvedic spa in the resort.nThey have a coffee museum where you can taste 7 varieties of coffee. While returning to the villa after coffee tasting an amazing romantic bath was setup for us.nOther activities included Deck Dining at Peppercorn restaurant which was a romantic candlelight dinner, village visit on cycle and coracle ride in river Kaveri. Moonlight dinner for the two of us with live cooking was magnificent as well.nThe specialty of Evolve Back is that they have tried to maintain the natural beauty in their property. They have very well combined nature and luxury together. That attention to detail can be seen even in small things – they don’t use any music system in their cultural shows; no use of plastic bottles.nI want to thank the wonderful Evolve Back team who made our honeymoon unforgettable.

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