How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation?

How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation?

How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation? By Priya Krishna • 3 hours ago Chickpea flour is gaining attention thanks to its gluten-free binding properties. But the ingredient has been a staple of cooking for Indians, Pakistanis and many others for centuries. Pinkybird / Getty Images
There’s a specific section of my family’s fridge that is reserved for the large, seemingly bottomless tub of chickpea flour — or as we and lots of other Indians who also rely on it call it, besan — that my parents keep on hand. We’re not gluten-free, nor do we do a lot of baking. Yet chickpea flour shows up everywhere in our food. It’s the nutty coating for my mom’s green beans spiced with earthy ajwain , the key ingredient in her creamy, tangy, yogurt-based soup, kadhi , and the base for our favorite variety of laddoos , sweet, fudge-like balls flavored with ghee, sugar and nuts.
Across the many regional cuisines in India, chickpea flour is a common denominator: Gujaratis turn it into pudla , thin, savory crepes laced with turmeric and chilies. In Karnataka and Maharashtra, it can be found in jhunka , a spicy porridge. And in Andhra Pradesh, it is the thickener in Senagapindi Kura , an onion-heavy stew. For the country’s large vegetarian population, where eggs are often considered non-vegetarian, chickpea flour mixed with water serves as a convincing omelet replacement.
Indians — along with the Nepalese, Pakistanis, Italians, the French, and many others — have been cooking with chickpea flour for centuries. Americans, on the other hand, only seem to have woken up to the ingredient in the last decade or so. And they’ve woken up in a big way.
It’s hard to trace the exact origin of chickpea flour’s sudden popularity in the U.S. Anna Stockwell, the senior food editor of the publications Epicurious and Bon Appétit , said she first started seeing chickpea flour around 2009 on gluten-free blogs. Stockwell is gluten-free herself, and was excited to find a recipe for savory chickpea pancakes.
She didn’t know much about chickpea flour’s culinary heritage, but she was immediately excited. “Its binding power was magic,” she recalls. “All you have to do is combine chickpea flour and water, and suddenly you can make flatbread, or fritters or vegetable pancakes.” Still, Stockwell saw it as a niche ingredient — something only gluten-free consumers cared about. She wasn’t even allowed to call for it in Epicurious recipes.
Slowly but surely, that started to change. In 2010, one of the more popular recipes from Plenty , Yotam Ottolenghi’s bestselling cookbook, was a chickpea flour pancake, or socca , as it’s known in France, layered with tomatoes and onions. In 2015, food and fitness writer Camilla Saulsbury wrote the popular book The Chickpea Flour Cookbook . That was followed a year later by Chickpea Flour Does It All , by blogger Lindsey Love.
Lani Halliday, the founder of Brutus Bakeshop, a gluten-free Brooklyn bakery, says she noticed a huge uptick in the number of chickpea flour-based, gluten-free sweets available about a decade ago. For baked goods, chickpea flour worked uniquely well, “as it can hold air bubbles and hold moisture,” she says. Plus, “it was cheap, it was accessible, and it was versatile.”
Halliday launched her bakery in 2015. One of her bestselling items among both gluten-free and non-gluten-free customers was a chocolate cupcake made with chickpea flour.
Stockwell believes the mainstreaming of chickpea flour is directly linked to one company in particular — Banza. The company started producing its chickpea flour-based pasta in 2014, and by 2017, it was in 8,000-plus grocery stores and had raised $8 million in funding. The key to the company’s success? It didn’t exclusively market itself as a gluten-free product. Instead, it was branded as health food. And it was one of the first alternative pastas that had a smooth, al dente texture, just like the real thing.
“I had friends who had never heard of chickpea flour, but now they eat Banza,” Stockwell says. “It’s not because they are trying to eat gluten-free but because it’s a delicious and higher-protein pasta. It’s a substitute for empty carbs.”
This year, Epicurious was finally allowed to publish recipes with chickpea flour. Dennis Vaughn, the CEO of Bob’s Red Mill, says that in the past five years, chickpea flour has become a clear bestseller among the company’s sundry flour options.
“My grocery store doesn’t even carry red meat,” Stockwell says, “but they carry Bob’s Red Mill” chickpea flour.
In many ways, it has been weird to watch this ingredient that has always felt so quotidian to me become so ubiquitous so quickly in the U.S. This is certainly not the first Indian ingredient or dish this has happened to. Consider turmeric, chai, or khichdi , which have all been claimed by the wellness community and food bloggers as their own, often times without giving due credit to Indian cuisine. It baffles me that the vast majority of people I talk to are shocked to hear that chickpea flour has long been a common ingredient in my family’s cooking.
On the other hand, it was important to me when I was writing my new cookbook, Indian-ish , that people could find the ingredients for the dishes in their average grocery store. Because chickpea flour is now so common, I could include recipes like those addictive chickpea flour green beans, and the silky, soupy kadhi .
I’m not against chickpea flour entering the mainstream. But I wish that more of the stories I read about it, or the recipes I saw that featured it, didn’t frame it as a brand-new discovery, and completely ignore its heritage.
No one culture can “own” an ingredient — I’m literally writing this with a box of Banza chickpea pasta in my kitchen cabinet — but let’s not treat food like it exists in a vacuum. There’s context for that chickpea flour flatbread you’re making for dinner. Don’t take it for granted.
Priya Krishna is a food writer who contributes to The New York Times, Bon Appétit , and others. She also serves as one of the hosts of Bon Appétit’s video series, From the Test Kitchen . She is the author of the cookbook Indian-ish: Recipes And Antics From A Modern American Family . Follow her on Twitter and Instagram @ PKgourmet Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org. KANW Call: 505-242-7163 Address: 2020 Coal Avenue, SE Albuquerque, NM 87106 © 2019 KANW

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How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation?

How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation? By Priya Krishna • 3 hours ago Chickpea flour is gaining attention thanks to its gluten-free binding properties. But the ingredient has been a staple of cooking for Indians, Pakistanis and many others for centuries. Pinkybird / Getty Images
There’s a specific section of my family’s fridge that is reserved for the large, seemingly bottomless tub of chickpea flour — or as we and lots of other Indians who also rely on it call it, besan — that my parents keep on hand. We’re not gluten-free, nor do we do a lot of baking. Yet chickpea flour shows up everywhere in our food. It’s the nutty coating for my mom’s green beans spiced with earthy ajwain , the key ingredient in her creamy, tangy, yogurt-based soup, kadhi , and the base for our favorite variety of laddoos , sweet, fudge-like balls flavored with ghee, sugar and nuts.
Across the many regional cuisines in India, chickpea flour is a common denominator: Gujaratis turn it into pudla , thin, savory crepes laced with turmeric and chilies. In Karnataka and Maharashtra, it can be found in jhunka , a spicy porridge. And in Andhra Pradesh, it is the thickener in Senagapindi Kura , an onion-heavy stew. For the country’s large vegetarian population, where eggs are often considered non-vegetarian, chickpea flour mixed with water serves as a convincing omelet replacement.
Indians — along with the Nepalese, Pakistanis, Italians, the French, and many others — have been cooking with chickpea flour for centuries. Americans, on the other hand, only seem to have woken up to the ingredient in the last decade or so. And they’ve woken up in a big way.
It’s hard to trace the exact origin of chickpea flour’s sudden popularity in the U.S. Anna Stockwell, the senior food editor of the publications Epicurious and Bon Appétit , said she first started seeing chickpea flour around 2009 on gluten-free blogs. Stockwell is gluten-free herself, and was excited to find a recipe for savory chickpea pancakes.
She didn’t know much about chickpea flour’s culinary heritage, but she was immediately excited. “Its binding power was magic,” she recalls. “All you have to do is combine chickpea flour and water, and suddenly you can make flatbread, or fritters or vegetable pancakes.” Still, Stockwell saw it as a niche ingredient — something only gluten-free consumers cared about. She wasn’t even allowed to call for it in Epicurious recipes.
Slowly but surely, that started to change. In 2010, one of the more popular recipes from Plenty , Yotam Ottolenghi’s bestselling cookbook, was a chickpea flour pancake, or socca , as it’s known in France, layered with tomatoes and onions. In 2015, food and fitness writer Camilla Saulsbury wrote the popular book The Chickpea Flour Cookbook . That was followed a year later by Chickpea Flour Does It All , by blogger Lindsey Love.
Lani Halliday, the founder of Brutus Bakeshop, a gluten-free Brooklyn bakery, says she noticed a huge uptick in the number of chickpea flour-based, gluten-free sweets available about a decade ago. For baked goods, chickpea flour worked uniquely well, “as it can hold air bubbles and hold moisture,” she says. Plus, “it was cheap, it was accessible, and it was versatile.”
Halliday launched her bakery in 2015. One of her bestselling items among both gluten-free and non-gluten-free customers was a chocolate cupcake made with chickpea flour.
Stockwell believes the mainstreaming of chickpea flour is directly linked to one company in particular — Banza. The company started producing its chickpea flour-based pasta in 2014, and by 2017, it was in 8,000-plus grocery stores and had raised $8 million in funding. The key to the company’s success? It didn’t exclusively market itself as a gluten-free product. Instead, it was branded as health food. And it was one of the first alternative pastas that had a smooth, al dente texture, just like the real thing.
“I had friends who had never heard of chickpea flour, but now they eat Banza,” Stockwell says. “It’s not because they are trying to eat gluten-free but because it’s a delicious and higher-protein pasta. It’s a substitute for empty carbs.”
This year, Epicurious was finally allowed to publish recipes with chickpea flour. Dennis Vaughn, the CEO of Bob’s Red Mill, says that in the past five years, chickpea flour has become a clear bestseller among the company’s sundry flour options.
“My grocery store doesn’t even carry red meat,” Stockwell says, “but they carry Bob’s Red Mill” chickpea flour.
In many ways, it has been weird to watch this ingredient that has always felt so quotidian to me become so ubiquitous so quickly in the U.S. This is certainly not the first Indian ingredient or dish this has happened to. Consider turmeric, chai, or khichdi , which have all been claimed by the wellness community and food bloggers as their own, often times without giving due credit to Indian cuisine. It baffles me that the vast majority of people I talk to are shocked to hear that chickpea flour has long been a common ingredient in my family’s cooking.
On the other hand, it was important to me when I was writing my new cookbook, Indian-ish , that people could find the ingredients for the dishes in their average grocery store. Because chickpea flour is now so common, I could include recipes like those addictive chickpea flour green beans, and the silky, soupy kadhi .
I’m not against chickpea flour entering the mainstream. But I wish that more of the stories I read about it, or the recipes I saw that featured it, didn’t frame it as a brand-new discovery, and completely ignore its heritage.
No one culture can “own” an ingredient — I’m literally writing this with a box of Banza chickpea pasta in my kitchen cabinet — but let’s not treat food like it exists in a vacuum. There’s context for that chickpea flour flatbread you’re making for dinner. Don’t take it for granted.
Priya Krishna is a food writer who contributes to The New York Times, Bon Appétit , and others. She also serves as one of the hosts of Bon Appétit’s video series, From the Test Kitchen . She is the author of the cookbook Indian-ish: Recipes And Antics From A Modern American Family . Follow her on Twitter and Instagram @ PKgourmet Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org. © 2019 WABE 90.1 FM

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Indian fashion designer Dhruv Kapoor on where to shop in India, his spring/summer 2019 collection, and love at first sight

Image: Instagram 12.05.19
Beyond dressing celebs including Sonam Kapoor, Deepika Padukone and M.I.A., Indian fashion designer Dhruv Kapoor is fascinated by imbalanced representations of masculinity and femininity, both at home and abroad. His spring/summer 2019 collection, New Butch , is unusual — almost subversive, even — in its refusal to neatly conform to traditionally ‘masculine’ or ‘feminine’ fashion categories; everything is colourfully blended together, in a manner he describes as typically Indian. We spoke to Kapoor about his homeland’s long love affair with colour and texture, where to shop while in India, and refashioning tradition below.
Who is Dhruv Kapoor? I’m an extremist, laidback and hyperactive at the same time. Mostly, it’s my visions that drive me; the closer I get, the clearer they become, and I can begin to see further beyond them. I am always open to different experiences, but authenticity consistently moves me.
Did you grow up wanting to make clothes? I’ve wanted to make clothes since the eighth grade. Initially, I wanted to work with jewellery , but somehow ended up switching to clothes. It was an expansion of the same idea, I guess — the more I learn, the broader my vision gets.
What was the first piece you ever designed? Was it a piece of jewellery from before you changed your focus, and do you still have it with you? I designed a new take on Indian wedding attire for myself. I wanted to retain the traditional fabrics, but to try something a little different. I ended up using some vintage brocade to construct a bomber jacket, and added some almost alien, 3D embroidery on top. I paired that with a knee length shirt in the same brocade, and silk pyjama bottoms. I’m pretty sure that outfit is still in storage somewhere!
Speaking of new takes on traditional clothing, what’s the first thing that you think comes to people’s minds when they think ‘Indian designer’. Is that image is representative of who you are? From what I know and have witnessed, people are skeptical about quality when it comes to Indian brands. They also think we only specialise in traditional clothing, and that’s completely inaccurate. India’s fashion industry is a vast, ever-growing one, and I will say that the international market’s openness to us has come a long way since I started my label in 2014.
That’s good to hear, although, Singaporeans generally aren’t familiar with Indian fashion. Do tell us: what is Indian fashion to you? The love of colour and mixing elements. For us, oversized, statement cotton or linen shirts and tunics work all year round, and embellished outerwear in technical fabrics are popular during winter months.
Where should visitors to India who are seeking such items shop? Ogaan, Ensemble, and Good Earth in New Delhi, and Clove and Le Mill in Mumbai are must-visits.
And where should they drink and dine in New Delhi, where you’re based? Perch Wine & Coffee Bar has a perfectly relaxed vibe and great food, while TK’s Oriental Grill at the Hyatt offers terrific pan-Asian cuisine.
Tell us about your spring/summer 2019 collection, New Butch . Spring/summer 2019 is about a new form of masculinity that’s based on nurturing, empathy, and love. The collection’s distinctive visual language combines pop and romantic elements, and features a mix of custom-made and internationally-sourced fabrics.
It seems like the collection was a reaction to something in the zeitgeist. What concerns you, in the fashion industry specifically? The fast pace of it all. Being a smaller business in the process of expanding, we sometimes miss out on tiny details that would normally receive more attention if not for the tight timelines.
Do you have a favourite fragrance? L’Immensité by Louis Vuitton, which is extremely refreshing.
What are you currently reading? Autobiography of a Yogi , by Paramhansa Yogananda.
What’s on your bedside table? Water and hand cream, a couple of remote controls, lots of junk food and painkillers. [Laughs]
What’s the first thing you think of when you wake up…? Going for a run, which I force myself to do regularly. Then again, I’m not that big a fan of sleeping.
… And the last thing you think of when you go to sleep? I review how my day went, and think about what I need to work on.
Who was the last person that you texted, and what about? I texted a close friend, to coordinate brunch.
Who was the last interesting person you met? I’m not jinxing it, but I had an instant connection with somebody special that I’m currently working on. [Laughs]
If you could meet anyone, anywhere, who would it be? The list of candidates is a long one. Could I plan a big dinner for them all, somewhere secluded and far from distractions?
After you’re done with this interview, what are you going to do? I’ll finish some work, have brunch, and perhaps get a haircut!

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How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation?

How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation? By Priya Krishna • 46 minutes ago Chickpea flour is gaining attention thanks to its gluten-free binding properties. But the ingredient has been a staple of cooking for Indians, Pakistanis and many others for centuries. Pinkybird / Getty Images
There’s a specific section of my family’s fridge that is reserved for the large, seemingly bottomless tub of chickpea flour — or as we and lots of other Indians who also rely on it call it, besan — that my parents keep on hand. We’re not gluten-free, nor do we do a lot of baking. Yet chickpea flour shows up everywhere in our food. It’s the nutty coating for my mom’s green beans spiced with earthy ajwain , the key ingredient in her creamy, tangy, yogurt-based soup, kadhi , and the base for our favorite variety of laddoos , sweet, fudge-like balls flavored with ghee, sugar and nuts.
Across the many regional cuisines in India, chickpea flour is a common denominator: Gujaratis turn it into pudla , thin, savory crepes laced with turmeric and chilies. In Karnataka and Maharashtra, it can be found in jhunka , a spicy porridge. And in Andhra Pradesh, it is the thickener in Senagapindi Kura , an onion-heavy stew. For the country’s large vegetarian population, where eggs are often considered non-vegetarian, chickpea flour mixed with water serves as a convincing omelet replacement.
Indians — along with the Nepalese, Pakistanis, Italians, the French, and many others — have been cooking with chickpea flour for centuries. Americans, on the other hand, only seem to have woken up to the ingredient in the last decade or so. And they’ve woken up in a big way.
It’s hard to trace the exact origin of chickpea flour’s sudden popularity in the U.S. Anna Stockwell, the senior food editor of the publications Epicurious and Bon Appétit , said she first started seeing chickpea flour around 2009 on gluten-free blogs. Stockwell is gluten-free herself, and was excited to find a recipe for savory chickpea pancakes.
She didn’t know much about chickpea flour’s culinary heritage, but she was immediately excited. “Its binding power was magic,” she recalls. “All you have to do is combine chickpea flour and water, and suddenly you can make flatbread, or fritters or vegetable pancakes.” Still, Stockwell saw it as a niche ingredient — something only gluten-free consumers cared about. She wasn’t even allowed to call for it in Epicurious recipes.
Slowly but surely, that started to change. In 2010, one of the more popular recipes from Plenty , Yotam Ottolenghi’s bestselling cookbook, was a chickpea flour pancake, or socca , as it’s known in France, layered with tomatoes and onions. In 2015, food and fitness writer Camilla Saulsbury wrote the popular book The Chickpea Flour Cookbook . That was followed a year later by Chickpea Flour Does It All , by blogger Lindsey Love.
Lani Halliday, the founder of Brutus Bakeshop, a gluten-free Brooklyn bakery, says she noticed a huge uptick in the number of chickpea flour-based, gluten-free sweets available about a decade ago. For baked goods, chickpea flour worked uniquely well, “as it can hold air bubbles and hold moisture,” she says. Plus, “it was cheap, it was accessible, and it was versatile.”
Halliday launched her bakery in 2015. One of her bestselling items among both gluten-free and non-gluten-free customers was a chocolate cupcake made with chickpea flour.
Stockwell believes the mainstreaming of chickpea flour is directly linked to one company in particular — Banza. The company started producing its chickpea flour-based pasta in 2014, and by 2017, it was in 8,000-plus grocery stores and had raised $8 million in funding. The key to the company’s success? It didn’t exclusively market itself as a gluten-free product. Instead, it was branded as health food. And it was one of the first alternative pastas that had a smooth, al dente texture, just like the real thing.
“I had friends who had never heard of chickpea flour, but now they eat Banza,” Stockwell says. “It’s not because they are trying to eat gluten-free but because it’s a delicious and higher-protein pasta. It’s a substitute for empty carbs.”
This year, Epicurious was finally allowed to publish recipes with chickpea flour. Dennis Vaughn, the CEO of Bob’s Red Mill, says that in the past five years, chickpea flour has become a clear bestseller among the company’s sundry flour options.
“My grocery store doesn’t even carry red meat,” Stockwell says, “but they carry Bob’s Red Mill” chickpea flour.
In many ways, it has been weird to watch this ingredient that has always felt so quotidian to me become so ubiquitous so quickly in the U.S. This is certainly not the first Indian ingredient or dish this has happened to. Consider turmeric, chai, or khichdi , which have all been claimed by the wellness community and food bloggers as their own, often times without giving due credit to Indian cuisine. It baffles me that the vast majority of people I talk to are shocked to hear that chickpea flour has long been a common ingredient in my family’s cooking.
On the other hand, it was important to me when I was writing my new cookbook, Indian-ish , that people could find the ingredients for the dishes in their average grocery store. Because chickpea flour is now so common, I could include recipes like those addictive chickpea flour green beans, and the silky, soupy kadhi .
I’m not against chickpea flour entering the mainstream. But I wish that more of the stories I read about it, or the recipes I saw that featured it, didn’t frame it as a brand-new discovery, and completely ignore its heritage.
No one culture can “own” an ingredient — I’m literally writing this with a box of Banza chickpea pasta in my kitchen cabinet — but let’s not treat food like it exists in a vacuum. There’s context for that chickpea flour flatbread you’re making for dinner. Don’t take it for granted.
Priya Krishna is a food writer who contributes to The New York Times, Bon Appétit , and others. She also serves as one of the hosts of Bon Appétit’s video series, From the Test Kitchen . She is the author of the cookbook Indian-ish: Recipes And Antics From A Modern American Family . Follow her on Twitter and Instagram @ PKgourmet Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org. © 2019 WPSU

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How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation?

How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation? By editor • 2 hours ago Chickpea flour is gaining attention thanks to its gluten-free binding properties. But the ingredient has been a staple of cooking for Indians, Pakistanis and many others for centuries. Pinkybird / Getty Images
There’s a specific section of my family’s fridge that is reserved for the large, seemingly bottomless tub of chickpea flour — or as we and lots of other Indians who also rely on it call it, besan — that my parents keep on hand. We’re not gluten-free, nor do we do a lot of baking. Yet chickpea flour shows up everywhere in our food. It’s the nutty coating for my mom’s green beans spiced with earthy ajwain , the key ingredient in her creamy, tangy, yogurt-based soup, kadhi , and the base for our favorite variety of laddoos , sweet, fudge-like balls flavored with ghee, sugar and nuts.
Across the many regional cuisines in India, chickpea flour is a common denominator: Gujaratis turn it into pudla , thin, savory crepes laced with turmeric and chilies. In Karnataka and Maharashtra, it can be found in jhunka , a spicy porridge. And in Andhra Pradesh, it is the thickener in Senagapindi Kura , an onion-heavy stew. For the country’s large vegetarian population, where eggs are often considered non-vegetarian, chickpea flour mixed with water serves as a convincing omelet replacement.
Indians — along with the Nepalese, Pakistanis, Italians, the French, and many others — have been cooking with chickpea flour for centuries. Americans, on the other hand, only seem to have woken up to the ingredient in the last decade or so. And they’ve woken up in a big way.
It’s hard to trace the exact origin of chickpea flour’s sudden popularity in the U.S. Anna Stockwell, the senior food editor of the publications Epicurious and Bon Appétit , said she first started seeing chickpea flour around 2009 on gluten-free blogs. Stockwell is gluten-free herself, and was excited to find a recipe for savory chickpea pancakes.
She didn’t know much about chickpea flour’s culinary heritage, but she was immediately excited. “Its binding power was magic,” she recalls. “All you have to do is combine chickpea flour and water, and suddenly you can make flatbread, or fritters or vegetable pancakes.” Still, Stockwell saw it as a niche ingredient — something only gluten-free consumers cared about. She wasn’t even allowed to call for it in Epicurious recipes.
Slowly but surely, that started to change. In 2010, one of the more popular recipes from Plenty , Yotam Ottolenghi’s bestselling cookbook, was a chickpea flour pancake, or socca , as it’s known in France, layered with tomatoes and onions. In 2015, food and fitness writer Camilla Saulsbury wrote the popular book The Chickpea Flour Cookbook . That was followed a year later by Chickpea Flour Does It All , by blogger Lindsey Love.
Lani Halliday, the founder of Brutus Bakeshop, a gluten-free Brooklyn bakery, says she noticed a huge uptick in the number of chickpea flour-based, gluten-free sweets available about a decade ago. For baked goods, chickpea flour worked uniquely well, “as it can hold air bubbles and hold moisture,” she says. Plus, “it was cheap, it was accessible, and it was versatile.”
Halliday launched her bakery in 2015. One of her bestselling items among both gluten-free and non-gluten-free customers was a chocolate cupcake made with chickpea flour.
Stockwell believes the mainstreaming of chickpea flour is directly linked to one company in particular — Banza. The company started producing its chickpea flour-based pasta in 2014, and by 2017, it was in 8,000-plus grocery stores and had raised $8 million in funding. The key to the company’s success? It didn’t exclusively market itself as a gluten-free product. Instead, it was branded as health food. And it was one of the first alternative pastas that had a smooth, al dente texture, just like the real thing.
“I had friends who had never heard of chickpea flour, but now they eat Banza,” Stockwell says. “It’s not because they are trying to eat gluten-free but because it’s a delicious and higher-protein pasta. It’s a substitute for empty carbs.”
This year, Epicurious was finally allowed to publish recipes with chickpea flour. Dennis Vaughn, the CEO of Bob’s Red Mill, says that in the past five years, chickpea flour has become a clear bestseller among the company’s sundry flour options.
“My grocery store doesn’t even carry red meat,” Stockwell says, “but they carry Bob’s Red Mill” chickpea flour.
In many ways, it has been weird to watch this ingredient that has always felt so quotidian to me become so ubiquitous so quickly in the U.S. This is certainly not the first Indian ingredient or dish this has happened to. Consider turmeric, chai, or khichdi , which have all been claimed by the wellness community and food bloggers as their own, often times without giving due credit to Indian cuisine. It baffles me that the vast majority of people I talk to are shocked to hear that chickpea flour has long been a common ingredient in my family’s cooking.
On the other hand, it was important to me when I was writing my new cookbook, Indian-ish , that people could find the ingredients for the dishes in their average grocery store. Because chickpea flour is now so common, I could include recipes like those addictive chickpea flour green beans, and the silky, soupy kadhi .
I’m not against chickpea flour entering the mainstream. But I wish that more of the stories I read about it, or the recipes I saw that featured it, didn’t frame it as a brand-new discovery, and completely ignore its heritage.
No one culture can “own” an ingredient — I’m literally writing this with a box of Banza chickpea pasta in my kitchen cabinet — but let’s not treat food like it exists in a vacuum. There’s context for that chickpea flour flatbread you’re making for dinner. Don’t take it for granted.
Priya Krishna is a food writer who contributes to The New York Times, Bon Appétit , and others. She also serves as one of the hosts of Bon Appétit’s video series, From the Test Kitchen . She is the author of the cookbook Indian-ish: Recipes And Antics From A Modern American Family . Follow her on Twitter and Instagram @ PKgourmet

Read More…

How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation?

By: Priya Krishna
There’s a specific section of my family’s fridge that is reserved for the large, seemingly bottomless tub of chickpea flour — or as we and lots of other Indians who also rely on it call it, besan — that my parents keep on hand. We’re not gluten-free, nor do we do a lot of baking. Yet chickpea flour shows up everywhere in our food. It’s the nutty coating for my mom’s green beans spiced with earthy ajwain , the key ingredient in her creamy, tangy, yogurt-based soup, kadhi , and the base for our favorite variety of laddoos , sweet, fudge-like balls flavored with ghee, sugar and nuts.
Across the many regional cuisines in India, chickpea flour is a common denominator: Gujaratis turn it into pudla , thin, savory crepes laced with turmeric and chilies. In Karnataka and Maharashtra, it can be found in jhunka , a spicy porridge. And in Andhra Pradesh, it is the thickener in Senagapindi Kura , an onion-heavy stew. For the country’s large vegetarian population, where eggs are often considered non-vegetarian, chickpea flour mixed with water serves as a convincing omelet replacement.
Indians — along with the Nepalese, Pakistanis, Italians, the French, and many others — have been cooking with chickpea flour for centuries. Americans, on the other hand, only seem to have woken up to the ingredient in the last decade or so. And they’ve woken up in a big way.
It’s hard to trace the exact origin of chickpea flour’s sudden popularity in the U.S. Anna Stockwell, the senior food editor of the publications Epicurious and Bon Appétit , said she first started seeing chickpea flour around 2009 on gluten-free blogs. Stockwell is gluten-free herself, and was excited to find a recipe for savory chickpea pancakes.
She didn’t know much about chickpea flour’s culinary heritage, but she was immediately excited. “Its binding power was magic,” she recalls. “All you have to do is combine chickpea flour and water, and suddenly you can make flatbread, or fritters or vegetable pancakes.” Still, Stockwell saw it as a niche ingredient — something only gluten-free consumers cared about. She wasn’t even allowed to call for it in Epicurious recipes.
Slowly but surely, that started to change. In 2010, one of the more popular recipes from Plenty , Yotam Ottolenghi’s bestselling cookbook, was a chickpea flour pancake, or socca , as it’s known in France, layered with tomatoes and onions. In 2015, food and fitness writer Camilla Saulsbury wrote the popular book The Chickpea Flour Cookbook . That was followed a year later by Chickpea Flour Does It All , by blogger Lindsey Love.
Lani Halliday, the founder of Brutus Bakeshop, a gluten-free Brooklyn bakery, says she noticed a huge uptick in the number of chickpea flour-based, gluten-free sweets available about a decade ago. For baked goods, chickpea flour worked uniquely well, “as it can hold air bubbles and hold moisture,” she says. Plus, “it was cheap, it was accessible, and it was versatile.”
Halliday launched her bakery in 2015. One of her bestselling items among both gluten-free and non-gluten-free customers was a chocolate cupcake made with chickpea flour.
Stockwell believes the mainstreaming of chickpea flour is directly linked to one company in particular — Banza. The company started producing its chickpea flour-based pasta in 2014, and by 2017, it was in 8,000-plus grocery stores and had raised $8 million in funding. The key to the company’s success? It didn’t exclusively market itself as a gluten-free product. Instead, it was branded as health food. And it was one of the first alternative pastas that had a smooth, al dente texture, just like the real thing.
“I had friends who had never heard of chickpea flour, but now they eat Banza,” Stockwell says. “It’s not because they are trying to eat gluten-free but because it’s a delicious and higher-protein pasta. It’s a substitute for empty carbs.”
This year, Epicurious was finally allowed to publish recipes with chickpea flour. Dennis Vaughn, the CEO of Bob’s Red Mill, says that in the past five years, chickpea flour has become a clear bestseller among the company’s sundry flour options.
“My grocery store doesn’t even carry red meat,” Stockwell says, “but they carry Bob’s Red Mill” chickpea flour.
In many ways, it has been weird to watch this ingredient that has always felt so quotidian to me become so ubiquitous so quickly in the U.S. This is certainly not the first Indian ingredient or dish this has happened to. Consider turmeric, chai, or khichdi , which have all been claimed by the wellness community and food bloggers as their own, often times without giving due credit to Indian cuisine. It baffles me that the vast majority of people I talk to are shocked to hear that chickpea flour has long been a common ingredient in my family’s cooking.
On the other hand, it was important to me when I was writing my new cookbook, Indian-ish , that people could find the ingredients for the dishes in their average grocery store. Because chickpea flour is now so common, I could include recipes like those addictive chickpea flour green beans, and the silky, soupy kadhi .
I’m not against chickpea flour entering the mainstream. But I wish that more of the stories I read about it, or the recipes I saw that featured it, didn’t frame it as a brand-new discovery, and completely ignore its heritage.
No one culture can “own” an ingredient — I’m literally writing this with a box of Banza chickpea pasta in my kitchen cabinet — but let’s not treat food like it exists in a vacuum. There’s context for that chickpea flour flatbread you’re making for dinner. Don’t take it for granted.
Priya Krishna is a food writer who contributes to The New York Times, Bon Appétit , and others. She also serves as one of the hosts of Bon Appétit’s video series, From the Test Kitchen . She is the author of the cookbook Indian-ish: Recipes And Antics From A Modern American Family . Follow her on Twitter and Instagram @ PKgourmet Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org . Submitted by NPR on Sun, 05/12/2019 – 06:00 Share this page

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How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation?

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How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation?

How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation? By Priya Krishna • 4 hours ago Chickpea flour is gaining attention thanks to its gluten-free binding properties. But the ingredient has been a staple of cooking for Indians, Pakistanis and many others for centuries. Pinkybird / Getty Images
There’s a specific section of my family’s fridge that is reserved for the large, seemingly bottomless tub of chickpea flour — or as we and lots of other Indians who also rely on it call it, besan — that my parents keep on hand. We’re not gluten-free, nor do we do a lot of baking. Yet chickpea flour shows up everywhere in our food. It’s the nutty coating for my mom’s green beans spiced with earthy ajwain , the key ingredient in her creamy, tangy, yogurt-based soup, kadhi , and the base for our favorite variety of laddoos , sweet, fudge-like balls flavored with ghee, sugar and nuts.
Across the many regional cuisines in India, chickpea flour is a common denominator: Gujaratis turn it into pudla , thin, savory crepes laced with turmeric and chilies. In Karnataka and Maharashtra, it can be found in jhunka , a spicy porridge. And in Andhra Pradesh, it is the thickener in Senagapindi Kura , an onion-heavy stew. For the country’s large vegetarian population, where eggs are often considered non-vegetarian, chickpea flour mixed with water serves as a convincing omelet replacement.
Indians — along with the Nepalese, Pakistanis, Italians, the French, and many others — have been cooking with chickpea flour for centuries. Americans, on the other hand, only seem to have woken up to the ingredient in the last decade or so. And they’ve woken up in a big way.
It’s hard to trace the exact origin of chickpea flour’s sudden popularity in the U.S. Anna Stockwell, the senior food editor of the publications Epicurious and Bon Appétit , said she first started seeing chickpea flour around 2009 on gluten-free blogs. Stockwell is gluten-free herself, and was excited to find a recipe for savory chickpea pancakes.
She didn’t know much about chickpea flour’s culinary heritage, but she was immediately excited. “Its binding power was magic,” she recalls. “All you have to do is combine chickpea flour and water, and suddenly you can make flatbread, or fritters or vegetable pancakes.” Still, Stockwell saw it as a niche ingredient — something only gluten-free consumers cared about. She wasn’t even allowed to call for it in Epicurious recipes.
Slowly but surely, that started to change. In 2010, one of the more popular recipes from Plenty , Yotam Ottolenghi’s bestselling cookbook, was a chickpea flour pancake, or socca , as it’s known in France, layered with tomatoes and onions. In 2015, food and fitness writer Camilla Saulsbury wrote the popular book The Chickpea Flour Cookbook . That was followed a year later by Chickpea Flour Does It All , by blogger Lindsey Love.
Lani Halliday, the founder of Brutus Bakeshop, a gluten-free Brooklyn bakery, says she noticed a huge uptick in the number of chickpea flour-based, gluten-free sweets available about a decade ago. For baked goods, chickpea flour worked uniquely well, “as it can hold air bubbles and hold moisture,” she says. Plus, “it was cheap, it was accessible, and it was versatile.”
Halliday launched her bakery in 2015. One of her bestselling items among both gluten-free and non-gluten-free customers was a chocolate cupcake made with chickpea flour.
Stockwell believes the mainstreaming of chickpea flour is directly linked to one company in particular — Banza. The company started producing its chickpea flour-based pasta in 2014, and by 2017, it was in 8,000-plus grocery stores and had raised $8 million in funding. The key to the company’s success? It didn’t exclusively market itself as a gluten-free product. Instead, it was branded as health food. And it was one of the first alternative pastas that had a smooth, al dente texture, just like the real thing.
“I had friends who had never heard of chickpea flour, but now they eat Banza,” Stockwell says. “It’s not because they are trying to eat gluten-free but because it’s a delicious and higher-protein pasta. It’s a substitute for empty carbs.”
This year, Epicurious was finally allowed to publish recipes with chickpea flour. Dennis Vaughn, the CEO of Bob’s Red Mill, says that in the past five years, chickpea flour has become a clear bestseller among the company’s sundry flour options.
“My grocery store doesn’t even carry red meat,” Stockwell says, “but they carry Bob’s Red Mill” chickpea flour.
In many ways, it has been weird to watch this ingredient that has always felt so quotidian to me become so ubiquitous so quickly in the U.S. This is certainly not the first Indian ingredient or dish this has happened to. Consider turmeric, chai, or khichdi , which have all been claimed by the wellness community and food bloggers as their own, often times without giving due credit to Indian cuisine. It baffles me that the vast majority of people I talk to are shocked to hear that chickpea flour has long been a common ingredient in my family’s cooking.
On the other hand, it was important to me when I was writing my new cookbook, Indian-ish , that people could find the ingredients for the dishes in their average grocery store. Because chickpea flour is now so common, I could include recipes like those addictive chickpea flour green beans, and the silky, soupy kadhi .
I’m not against chickpea flour entering the mainstream. But I wish that more of the stories I read about it, or the recipes I saw that featured it, didn’t frame it as a brand-new discovery, and completely ignore its heritage.
No one culture can “own” an ingredient — I’m literally writing this with a box of Banza chickpea pasta in my kitchen cabinet — but let’s not treat food like it exists in a vacuum. There’s context for that chickpea flour flatbread you’re making for dinner. Don’t take it for granted.
Priya Krishna is a food writer who contributes to The New York Times, Bon Appétit , and others. She also serves as one of the hosts of Bon Appétit’s video series, From the Test Kitchen . She is the author of the cookbook Indian-ish: Recipes And Antics From A Modern American Family . Follow her on Twitter and Instagram @ PKgourmet Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org. © 2019 MTPR

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Talking food with top chef Sandeep Bhagwat from Four Seasons Resort Langkawi

Connect You are here: Home / Food & Drink / Chefs / Talking food with top chef Sandeep Bhagwat from Four Seasons Resort Langkawi Talking food with top chef Sandeep Bhagwat from Four Seasons Resort Langkawi By LLM Reporters on 12th May 2019
Born in Tanzania, Sandeep Bhagwatwas was appointed Executive Chef at the Four Seasons Resort Langkawi in August of last year. An accomplished chef, he brings a fresh gastronomic perspective and innovative approach to the acclaimed luxury resort, focusing on sustainable cuisine to elevate the epicurean experience.
He oversees all of the culinary operations at the resort, including the three distinct restaurants comprising of the signature Malaysian restaurant Ikan-Ikan, Serai featuring Italian and Mediterranean cuisine, the beach restaurant Kelapa Grill, and the ever-popular Rhu Bar.
We sat down with Sandeep and discussed everything from his favourite ingredients to cook with to his signature dish.
Tell us a little bit about yourself career wise?
I started my culinary journey at The Oberoi Hotels & Resorts in various locations in India before moving to The Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group in Geneva and then Shanghai. In Geneva, at the age of 28, during my tenure as Head Chef I secured a coveted Michelin Star and 16/20 points in the Gault Milau guide. I then moved onto Four Seasons Hotel Beijing where I held the position of Executive Sous Chef. I supported the Executive Chef with the extensive culinary operations of the 313-room hotel, six restaurants and lounges, and extensive banquet and catering spaces before joining Four Seasons Resort Langkawi as Executive Chef. Sandeep looks after the signature Malaysian restaurant Ikan-Ikan
What are the most important elements for you when crafting a menu?
Sustainable local products always feature on my menu. From my extensive travels I have learnt that it is important to keep the basics of any cuisine the same, but the key is to exploit the quality products. Keep it simple!
What/who were/are your main influences for seeking out a career in this renowned tough industry?
Everyone loves food; it is such a versatile subject, interesting and always satiating for any mood you are in. My parents, even though they were vegetarians, made me aware of my local Indian cuisine, often discussing and critiquing the food we had for dinner. I discovered my passion under various culinary tutors and many great chefs I was able to work with during my journey, which fuelled my curiosity to understand more about food. For me, being a cook is so wonderful, as it is not just a career, it’s a lifestyle.
Do you have a favourite time of year or set of ingredients that you look forward to working with?
Seasonal produce is great at every time of year. Citrus fruits in Winter, fresh morel mushrooms, asparagus and fresh berries in Spring, game meat, squashes and field mushrooms in Autumn and, of course, cooking festive treats towards the end of the year.
In Langkawi, I’ve been introduced to even more interesting and flavoursome fresh seafood and a bounty of herbs and spices such as the ginger torch, duan kadok, kesom and raw cocoa beans.
Do you have a signature dish?
Signature dishes are always evolving and thereby change for me.
Currently, however, with the freshest ingredients we serve at Four Seasons Resort Langkawi consist of percik marinated half roasted organic ‘Borneo’ chicken, braised purple kale and black beans, citrus chicken jus.
Chargrilled spiny lobster with ginger torch and pineapple béarnaise, glazed white asparagus-oyster mushrooms, is another notable signature dish. The beach restaurant Kelapa Grill is the under the creative control of Sandeep
What is your favourite dish to cook and why?
Any cooking that can be done from scratch to the finished product; whether that is cooking an egg for breakfast or barbecuing.
For example, marinating and grilling is a thrill as it’s very scientific and the settings change every time. So, the basics of the cooking must be well recited and executed, only then is the process melodious.
Currently I take special pride in grilling the lobsters for our guests during the lobster night. This is an experience where a fisherman arrives at our beach to deliver the lobsters, which we later grill. The cooking of fresh lobsters is a delight for every cook who in turn gets to see happy customers in the restaurant!
Do your personal preferences influence the menu at all?
My years of experience and know how is poured into every trademark menu I put to plate every day.

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Tresind (inspire BKC, Bandra Kurla Complex, mumbai)

Foodies world – If u love ur tastebuds, this is the place to be Tresind (inspire BKC, Bandra Kurla Complex, mumbai) yummraj India , Indian , Mumbai Leave a comment
In a NUtshell:
5/5 on showsha, great place to impress ur firang/ NRI friends who do not have much exposure to the real indian food, saw-tooth experience when it came to the food. It ranged from average to excellent. Nothing was outstanding in terms of taste, flavor & texture.
Address & other details: tresind
Meal for 2: ₹3000
Cuisine type : vegetarian & non vegetarian
Disclaimer: All restaurants / eateries reviewed by YUMMRAJ were visited by YUMMRAJ himself & he has paid for the full Bill & tips also. http://www.yummraj.com does not have even one featured / sponsored reviews. YUMMRAJ believes in going to a restaurant in anonymity, as a normal guest, experience everything & give a honest account of the same to you.
I rate all the food items & then give a final overall rating which is a simple average of the individual item ratings. What the ratings stand for: 5 = Excellent, 4 = Very Good, 3 = Good, 2 = Fair, 1 = Disaster
Short description- in case u r in a hurry
We got to know of this place while browsing Zomato. We called them to book a dinner on a Saturday. They said they serve only fixed menu on weekends. We agreed, in absence of a choice.
This restaurant is a part of a chain that started in the Middle East & is very popular there.
The restaurant is located in a not yet crowded location in BKC. So finding parking was easy.
The interiors were plush & nice. Nothing stood out but overall it looked good. The bar looked the best to me from a visual perspective.
The fixed menu was presented to us in a one sheet printout. It had really shortened names of dishes with no mentions of the accompaniments, forget having a description.
At the time of serving, the server was rattling off the description in rocket speed – sounded quite like rap. They had obviously mugged the description & hence probably feeling relieved after ‘quickly finishing it off’. Wud b nice to have this in a more conversation manner.
Staff were polite but not warm. The trainer / recruiter has a long way to go.
As we sat, a vessel with Pleasant smelling fumes was presented on the table for some time. It was visually delightful.
Some dishes were ok, some good, Some very good & others excellent!!! We experienced it all.
Though we were told this is a pan india cuisine, there was feeble representation of south india, none of Kashmir, none of north east & most importantly nothing from Maharashtra, where the restaurant is. Most of the dishes were north Indian restaurant food.
Detailed description – in case u hv the time to njoy reading:
We started with Snacks.
Kolkata ghugni tart with wasabi peas – we were told that wasabi peas are a substitute of the pungent mustard oil. The sev had to be sprinkled on top. The tart was good, so was the ghugni. The wasabi peas were nervous & cud not make their presence felt. The sev was average quality bought from regular market. Rate the dish 2.5/5
We absolutely loved the snack with Muhammara on top, potato chip on both ends, hung curd dip in the middle – it was like an oasis in the desert. Sheer brilliance of execution & of courses great thought. Rate it 4.75/5
Stuffed kulcha was average. The kulcha was soft & had a good texture. The stuffing was bland & directionless. It was nothing but a filler. Rate it 2/5.
Pani Puri bingsu – this was a deconstructed pani puri made with shaved ice, a concept they said was inspired by Korean bingsu. It had a lump of shaved ice with green Chutney & another lump with red Chutney. Crisp masala boondi acted as the substitute for crisp puri. They had also put kabuli Chana & boiled potato cubes. It was nice, interesting & very different. It was served on a moulded bowl made out of ice!!! Rate the dish 4.25/5
Prawn rasam was a very good rasam, slightly thicker than the usual Udupi restaurant ones. The prawns added good flavor but they were hard & chewy. It was nowhere close to the outstanding fresh seafood that mumbai has to offer. Rate the rasam 4.25/5. Rate the prawns 2.25/5. Overall rating averages out to 3.25/5
Lamb khari was an interesting dish – it had lamb in between two pieces of khari (a mumbai speciality), placed on a pool of thick flavourful & yumm Nihari (a mutton curry that is made by slow cooking meat, herbs & spices over a long time). The Nihari was thicker than all Niharis I cud remember having at kallu , Haji Shabrati , karims , rahim’s or idris bhai’s shop in Lucknow. It was very good to taste. Rate the dish 4.5/5
Chicken roomali was a roll with chicken in the middle. Average. nothing remarkable. Seemed to me like a filler. Rate it 2/5
Gujarati farsaan was served in a dry unique manner. It had a small piece of khandvi that stood perpendicular to the plate. Good to eat. Not different. The seasoned chilly was not hot as expected but it was flavorful. The spotlight was however on the sorbet that was made from Gujarati kadhi!!! It was excellent, unique & just too good. A papdi was placed on top, to remind if fafda. The tiny amount of papaya Chutney at the base was good too. Rate the dish 4.5/5
Ram Babu paratha was a mutton keema paratha. It was good but way short of great. The mutton filling was sub optimal. The guys at the kitchen were probably in a hurry to make the parathas faster than their ideal time on the tawa. The outside was mildly over cooked & the inside was sub optimally cooked. The atta did not have salt in it – do the parts where filling was less tasted bland. The paratha itself was very average. Loved the flavor of ghee though. The filling of mutton tasted good but not great. Rate the dish 2/5
The paratha came with a chicken curry & Bhuna gosht.
The chicken curry was just average. It did not have any particular flavor, too much red color in it, the chicken pieces were ok, not great. The curry was ok as well. Rate it 2/5.
The bhuna gosht was very good. The meat pieces were super soft & nice. The gravy was thick, robust & intense. Loved the flavors of meat. Rate it 4/5.
Then came the memorable Khichdi – for both taste & the presentation. First a map of india came in the trolley. It had small bowls placed at different parts of the map. Our server would pick up each ingredient , talk about it & add to the Khichdi. Some of the ingredients were genuinely from that place, like gunpowder from chennai, mustard oil from Kolkata, etc. some others sounded like a force fit – ghee from Haryana & butter (Amul) from Punjab!!!
After putting all ingredients the guy mixed it & served. It tasted very good. Each bite was different. Loved it. Rate it 4.5/5
For dessert we were served Guava chaat – Guava ice cream served inside frozen real guava bowls (made by scooping out the mid part). The red chaat masala was fab & so was the ice cream. Great dessert. Rate it 4.5/5
Pakang tod was a combination of 3 items.
Reduced milk solid sweet was excellent. Great taste & super rich feel. Rate it 4.5/5
Pan was good meetha paan. Rate it 3.5/5
The third was plain Thandai – good to taste. Tasted like industrially manufactured, nowhere close to manually made thandai at pandit Raja’s shop in Lucknow. Rate it 3/5.
Overall rating of food at tresind averages out to 3.5/5
Wud never revisit, unless I am treating an NRI / non indian work colleague to dinner after being refused a seat at K&K, peshavri, the Bombay canteen, ziya etc. Advertisements

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