Holi Carnival 2019 at Rock Castle Banjara Hills

Holi Carnival 2019 at Rock Castle Banjara Hills

Hyderabad Marriott Hotel & Convention Centre, Tank Bund Road, Opposite, Hussain Sagar, Lake, Hyderabad, Telangana, India February 14, 2019
Love Forever – Valentine’s Day Dinner at Marriott Hotel Hyderabad Express your love to your special someone amidst the perfect ambiance at Marriott Hyderabad. Read More GMR Convention Center, Mamidipally, Shamshabad, Hyderabad, Telangana, India March 23, 2019
Sunburn Arena with DJ Snake & Mercer – Hyderabad Sunburn Band is the most famous and the most loved bands amongst all. Read More Indian Foodies HUB, Road Number 12, NBT Nagar, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad, Telangana, India November 11, 2018 12:00 pm To 5:00 pm
La Musica – Eat with Beats at Indian Foodies Hub Hyderabad Live music, Board games, Delicious multi – cuisine food and three types of different ambiances at… Read More Events Calendar

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Calling all foodies, festival fans for the Pakistan Food Festival – TheChronicleHerald.ca

Calling all foodies, festival fans for the Pakistan Food Festival Heather Laura Clarke Published: 9 hours ago Updated: 9 hours ago There’s plenty to try and experience at the Pakistan Food Festival. This year’s event takes place on Saturday, March 23. – Contributed
Get ready to dig into tasty samosas, butter chicken, kebabs and biryani. The Pakistani Canadian Association of Nova Scotia (PCANS) is preparing a celebration of Pakistani cuisine and heritage.
The Pakistan Food Festival is set for Saturday, March 23, at St. George’s Greek Orthodox Church on Purcells Cove Road.
“This is our third event, but it’s going to be very different this year, as we’re using food as our main theme,” says Anila Najaf, president of PCANS. “We have invited lots of small businesses who don’t have money for big promotions, so we’re trying to help them promote their business.”
Participating food vendors will be serving up dishes from Pakistan, the Middle East and India. And restaurants like Aladdin and Basha will be selling food as well.
Najaf says there will be classics, like chicken rolls, shawarma and donairs, as well as delicacies like haleem (a stew made with meat and lentils), mango lassi (a refreshing Indian drink that includes mangoes, yogurt and cardamom) and chaat (a crunchy, savoury snack).
The Pakistan Food Festival will include live music and dance performances, African drummers and a fashion show, as well as cultural display stalls with henna, clothing and gota jewelry for sale. There will be a shark mascot to entertain kids, along with face painting, games and arts and crafts.
Najaf says admission is just $2 and free for children under 12. She hopes a lot of people turn up to learn about Pakistani cuisine and heritage. “We’re doing our best to make this an event to remember.”
If you go When: Saturday, March 23, from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. Where: St. George’s Greek Orthodox Church, 1146 Purcells Cove Rd., Halifax Admission: $2 (free for children under 12) on eventbrite.ca More Community stories

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Turkish meals served at Oscars 2019

Turkish meals served at Oscars 2019 March 18, 2019 World famous celebrities enjoyed the Turkish meal during Oscar awards night held at Los Angeles 2019. As a result of the tremendous efforts of the Turkey One Association, this year the world popular Turkish meals made it to the Oscar menu.The Turkish meals were served after the successful completion of 91 st Oscar awards, which was prepared with the contribution of the Celebrity chef of Oscar awards ceremony, Mr. Wolfgang Puck. Turkish cuisine is often regarded as one of the greatest in the world. Its culinary traditions have successfully survived over 1,300 years for several reasons, including its favourable location and Mediterranean climate. Some of thewell-known Turkish meals such as “ Ali Nazik” eggplant puree with yoghurt served with seasoned ground meat, Sea bass served on grape leaves, “ YaprakSarmasi ” Olive oil stuffed rice in wine leaves, “Yag Mantisi ” , Baklava and famous Ottoman pomegranate drink“Serbet”were served to the elite guests at the Oscar awards. The Head of T-ONE Association,Ms. DemetSabancıCetindogan mentioned that as a result of the efforts, they are very proud of serving Turkish meal to the participants of Oscar award. Every year famous hollywood actor, actress, producers, directors and top management of the film industry participate to Oscar awards which is organised by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science since 1929.The Oscar awards which was broadcasted live in 200 countries and watched by millions of viewers has turned into an enormous show. Turkey’s rich history is evident in its food. With its Ottoman past, it has a lot in common with cuisines from the Caucasian, Circassian, Central Asian, Middle Eastern, Balkan and Greek regions.India has emerged as a big feeder market for Turkish cuisine. In recent years, there has also been an increase in popularity for Turkish beverages and coffee, sweets and goodies. More & more Indians have developed a taste for Turkish offerings and the inclusion of Turkish meals in Oscars menu will give it a huge boost in India “In the last few years, Turkish cuisine has become popular in India with a plenty of restaurants in major cities serving Turkish meals. In addition to being the refined product of centuries of experience, Turkish Cuisine has a very pure quality. The variety and simplicity of the recipes and the quality of the ingredients are guarantees of delicious meals. We look forward to more opportunities of serving Turkish cuisine to a larger audience” said H. Deniz ERSÖZ, Culture & Tourism Counsellor, Turkish Culture and Tourism Office in India. SHARE

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St. Patrick’s Day parties, ShrimpFest, craft beer, surfing contest top events this weekend

Last Slide Next Slide In downtown Fort Pierce, the St. Patrick’s Day Block Party on Second Street starts at 2 p.m. Saturday and continues until midnight. The party from 2nd Street Bistro and Sailfish Brewing Company includes live music, special beer releases, a full bar, Irish food, a vendor village, a children’s area and a bagpiper from 8-9 p.m. For more information, go to www.facebook.com/sailfishbrewingcompany. Sailfish beer releases include Timmy McDaniel’s dry Irish stout; Sheetfaced IPA, a collaboration with Butter Love Cakery (brewed with two sheet cakes and treated with Vero Beach lemons and Plant City strawberries); Zest-A-Peel sour ale (treated with tangor limes and Vero Beach honeybells); and Irish Cream White Marlin Wit (treated with vanilla, chocolate and coffee). Earlier that day, St. Paddy’s Day on Marina Way starts at 8 a.m. in the lot next to the future Bottom’s Up Public House at 208 Avenue A. The morning kicks off with $1 Guinness drafts from 8-10 a.m., followed by live music starting at 10 a.m. For more information, go to www.facebook.com/bottomsuppublichouse .
More newsletters The next day, the St. Patty’s Day Party at Pierced Ciderworks is 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. at 411 N. Second St. The party includes green cider, a food truck, drink specials and live music from noon to 9 p.m. For more information, go to www.facebook.com/piercedcider . In Port St. Lucie, the St. Patrick’s Day Festival at the Port St. Lucie Civic Center is 5-10 p.m. Friday and 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday at 9221 S.E. Civic Center Place. Enjoy traditional Irish cuisine, beer, live Celtic rock music, Irish dancing, carnival rides, vendors and a parade at 11 a.m. Saturday featuring the first Miss Irish Rose Pageant. Admission is free. For more information, go to www.cityofpsl.com . The next day, the indoor and outdoor St. Patrick’s Day event at Shindig Irish Restaurant Pub begins with breakfast at 7 a.m. Sunday at Shindig Irish Restaurant Pub at 464 S.W. Port St. Lucie Blvd. The party lasts until midnight and includes five live bands playing Irish music, food, Irish beer on tap and giveaways. Cover charge is $5 from 3-5 p.m. and $10 after 5 p.m. For more information, call 772-785-6202 or go to www.shindigpub.com . Also, the third annual St. Patrick’s Day Celebration at the Port St. Lucie Applebee’s is 2-10 p.m. Sunday at 10501 S. U.S. 1. The celebration has live music and a vinyl party from Sounds Good Music, as well as two-for-one drinks, raffles and giveaways. Tickets are $10 each. Proceeds benefit BlueBird Educational Foundation. For more information, call 772-337-0408 or go to www.facebook.com/snorkelcorn . In downtown Vero Beach, the St. Patrick’s Day Alley Party starts at noon in the alley between Kilted Mermaid at 1937 Old Dixie Highway and Southern Social at 1932 14th Ave. The party includes green beer, Irish whiskey, a special menu, entertainment, live music from 6-9 p.m. and bagpipers at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. For more information, go to www.facebook.com/eatsouthernsocial . Photos: Fun and green highlight the 12th annual Jensen Beach St. Patrick’s Day Parade and Festival Shrimp and beer Buy Photo
The ShrimpFest Craft Brew Hullabaloo is this weekend at Riverview Park in Sebastian. (Photo: XAVIER MASCAREÑAS/TCPALM) The ShrimpFest Craft Brew Hullabaloo is 3-9 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday at Riverview Park at 600 U.S. 1 in Sebastian. The festival features Florida shrimp prepared in different recipes by local restaurants, as well as non-seafood and kid-friendly food options all for sale. It also has live music, children’s activities and craft beer from across Florida. A craft beer tasting from 1-5 p.m. Saturday includes unlimited samples of 30 local breweries and homebrewers. Tickets are $25 plus tax before the event and $30 plus tax the day of the event. Proceeds benefit the Rotary Club of Sebastian and the Exchange Club of Fellsmere. A trolley to and from additional parking areas runs from noon to 7 p.m. Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, go to www.shrimpfestfl.com . Photos: ShrimpFest Craft Brew Hullabaloo kicks off in Sebastian Surfing competition Buy Photo
The Single Fin Showdown and the Shore LB. Throwdown is this weekend at Stuart Beach. (Photo: J. PATRICK RICE/SPECIAL TO TCPALM) The 11th annual Single-Fin Showdown starts at 8 a.m. Saturday at the south end of Stuart Beach at 825 N.E. Ocean Blvd. It typically attracts more than 150 competitors and 1,500 spectators. The showdown was created by the Ohana Surf Shop in 2009 with a small group of surfers riding vintage single-fin surfboards for bragging rights and has grown into one of the largest one-day, amateur surf and skim festivals in Florida. The contest has become so popular that more divisions have been added, but the single-fin and longboard divisions are the biggest draws as spectators watch competitors ride vintage boards provided to them at random before each heat. Proceeds benefit Brooke Thabit, a member of the Ohana family who fractured her neck in 2012 and immediately suffered paralysis. For more information, call 772-287-0041 or go to www.facebook.com/singlefinshowdown . Also, the 2019 Skim USA Tour kicks off this weekend with the Shore LB. Throwdown, a two-day skimboarding contest, at Stuart Beach. Riders meet at 8:30 a.m. Saturday and hit the water at 9 a.m. Finals are Sunday. For more information, go to skimusa.org . More: Last year’s Single-Fin Showdown raises $12,000 for Brooke Thabit County music concerts
The Lonestar concert is Friday night at the Sunrise Theatre in Fort Pierce. (Photo: JOHN RUSSELL, Associated Press) On Friday, the Lonestar concert starts at 8 p.m. at the Sunrise Theatre at 117 N. Second St., in Fort Pierce. Tickets are $35, $45, $55 or $65, depending on seating location. To get tickets, call 772-461-4775 or go to www.sunrisetheatre.com . Lonestar, which includes Richie McDonald, Michael Britt, Keech Rainwater and Dean Sams, burst onto the country music scene in the mid-1990s with “No News,” “Come Cryin’ to Me,” “Amazed,” “Smile,” “What About Now,” “Tell Her,” “I’m Already There,” “My Front Porch Looking in” and “Mr. Mom.” On Saturday, the Flat Natural Band with Bruce Hunter performs from 1-4 p.m. at Summer Crush Vineyard Winery at 4200 Johnston Road, north of Fort Pierce. Admission is free. Proceeds benefit Save The Chimps. Then, the T.G. Sheppard concert begins at 7 p.m. Gates open at 5:30 p.m. for opener Tom Jackson from 5:45-6:45 p.m. Tickets still available are $35 or $42, depending on seating. Both shows have food trucks. For more information, call 772-460-0500 or go to www.summercrushwine.com . Laurie’s Stories: How to see 7 classic country concerts within 3 months on the Treasure Coast Homegrown: Summer Crush Vineyard Winery in Fort Pierce turns native muscadine grapes into wine Airport history Buy Photo
Airport Heritage Day is noon to 4 p.m. Saturday at the Vero Beach Regional Airport at 3600 Cherokee Drive. (Photo: LAURIE K. BLANDFORD/TCPALM) Airport Heritage Day is noon to 4 p.m. Saturday at the Vero Beach Regional Airport at 3600 Cherokee Drive. Activities and displays are designed to celebrate the airport’s 90-year history during the Vero Beach Centennial. The event includes aircraft displays, exhibits and a flight simulator. Admission is free. C.J. Cannons Restaurant Lounge opens at 11 a.m. with a special menu for the day. For more information, call 772-978-4930 or go to verobeachairport.org . More: U.S. Navy Blue Angels announce their return to Vero Beach Air Show Garden show The second annual Garden Antique Show and Sale at McKee Botanical Garden is 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday at 350 U.S. 1 in Vero Beach. More than 25 antique and art vendors from the Eastern U.S. showcase a range of furniture, paintings, garden benches, fountains, accessories, statuary and estate jewelry on display through the garden. Admission is $12 for adults, $11 for seniors, $8 for kids ages 3-12 and free for McKee members and kids younger than 3. For more information, call 772-794-0601 or go to www.mckeegarden.org . More: View Seward Johnson’s ‘Celebrating the Familiar’ sculptures at McKee Botanical Garden Manatee run Buy Photo
The 11th annual Manatee Center 5K is Saturday at the Manatee Observation Education Center in Fort Pierce. (Photo: LEAH VOSS/TCPALM) The 11th annual Manatee Center 5K starts at 8 a.m. Saturday at the Manatee Observation Education Center at 480 N. Indian River Drive in Fort Pierce. It’s followed by refreshments, an awards ceremony and a drawing. First place can celebrate at the downtown St. Patrick Day Block Party with $50 to Sailfish Brewing Company and $50 to 2nd Street Bistro. Registration is $35 for adults and $15 for kids ages 17 and younger. Proceeds benefit the Treasure Coast Manatee Foundation. For more information, call 772-429-6266 or go to www.manateeeducationcenter.org . Laurie’s Stories: How to show visitors the best of Fort Pierce in one weekend Comedy for charity Comedic Relief Night to raise money for United Against Poverty is 7-10 p.m. Friday at the Sunrise Theatre’s Black Box at 117 S. Second St., in Fort Pierce. The night includes headliner Grandma Lee, a finalist on NBC’s “America’s Got Talent.” Tickets start at $27. For more information, go to upslc.org/event/comedic-relief-night . Exotic birds The 22nd annual Exotic Bird Expo is 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday at the Martin County Fairgrounds at 2616 S.E. Dixie Highway in Stuart. The expo includes a variety of birds, cages, feed, toys, speakers, show, raffles and a silent auction. Admission is $5, but kids younger than 10 get in free. For more information, go to www.facebook.com/tcebc1989 . Laurie K. Blandford is TCPalm’s entertainment reporter and columnist dedicated to finding the best things to do on the Treasure Coast. Read her weekly column, Laurie’s Stories , on TCPalm.com . Follow her on Twitter at @TCPalmLaurie or Facebook at faceboook.com/TCPalmLaurie .

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In many south indian vegetarian feasts for such events as the OP is planning, there will be one salsa (thick chutney consistency) dish made from gudametige [ googled and found out that it is also called asthisamhari, asthisamhrta • Tamil: perandai .] He can ask the chef about it. This is a good chutney/salsa to eat a small dose everyday — with toast, idly etc.. for good bone health. In feasts it serves the purpose of a digestive aid. There are recipes for how to make this on the internet-youtube, especially in Tamil. There is also another TVprogram recipe on youtube for this same chutney that uses a lot of curry leaves with the gudametige. The tender top pieces of the plant give a nice dish; the thicker mature pieces need more sauteeing before the chutney is ground in the mixie.
This is a wild cactus like plant growing in arid climates (deccan plateau in the south), and is widely used in medicines, especially to accelerate bone growth, and relieve pain in joints and to rebuild bone density in aged people. The juice of this plant is used when we made urid papads at home. This is especially useful to increase the cohesive strength of the rolled out papad (it is oily as it is rolled) so that it can be peeled off the wooden/stone rolling surface, and transferred to a white cloth (usually a dothi). Aunties used to say that the strength comes from gudametige juice.
In USA, I took an elder relative to the various exotic food shops in town, and she found Nopales as the closest substitute, and made quite a nice series of chutneys with it. Nopales is used in Mexican cuisine for salsas (to eat with corn chips). This is also high in natural Calcium mineral, and the native “indians” in Morelos area (Mexico) used this in various foods, and to raise strong runners and soccer players. This is easily available (even the spines already-removed variety) in grocery stores that serve hispanics. A typical chutney can be made with sauteed finely diced nopales, ginger, onion, curry leaves, sambar powder (chili+coriander), cumin seeds, asafoetida and salt. Tomatillos, tomatoes, etc.. add the colors that you want in your chutney.
Good travels.

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WEEKLY MENU PLAN (#192)

WEEKLY MENU PLAN (#192) – A delicious collection of dinner, side dish and dessert recipes to help you plan your weekly menu and make life easier for you! In these menu plans, we will be sharing some of our favorite recipe ideas for you to use as you are planning out your meals for the week. Just click any of the recipe titles or pictures to get the recipe. A little about how we plan our week and our menu plan: Mondays are soup and salad. Tuesdays we are bringing you delicious Mexican cuisine. Wednesdays are a taste of Italy. Thursdays are designed around yummy sandwiches, burgers, and wraps. Fridays are a no cook day around here. Going out with friends and loved ones is something that we think is important. It’s your night off from cooking- enjoy! Saturdays are an exotic food night, it’s a great night to try something new, from cooking with seafood, to trying Indian or Thai dishes. Sundays are a traditional old fashioned all American family dinner- think meat and potatoes. 🙂 There will also always be a couple of delectable desserts to use any day you wish. A new weekly menu plan will be posted every SUNDAY morning so be sure to check back each week! CLICK ON THE LINKED RECIPE TITLES OR PHOTOS TO GET THE FULL RECIPE WEEK #192

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Insight Details | McCain USA Foodservice

3 WAYS TO BREW EXCITEMENT AT HAPPY HOUR March 01, 2019 More than just a way to fill restaurant seats at slow times, happy hour is a showcase for the kitchen and bar. And when a happy hour is leveraged with powerful trends such as food and beer pairing , the craft beer boom and the fascination with global flavors, it becomes a highly effective marketing tool and revenue producer for the operator. Promote happy hour beer pairings to boost sales The happy hours with the highest sales typically feature food and beverage choices that play off each other and invite pairing. That’s the idea at Red Star Tavern in Portland, Ore., part of the Kimpton Hotel & Restaurant Group. A happy hour from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. daily invites guest to enjoy menu items with big flavors and complementary craft beers, signature cocktails and boutique wines. Red Star’s dozen-item Oregon draught beer selection, priced at $2 less per glass at happy hour, includes robust styles such as hoppy IPA, heady strong ale and chocolatey, roasty stout. They dovetail with zestful nibbles like Pinwheel Fries with Steiny’s Sauce (fried potato wedges with a house dipping sauce of mayonnaise, chili sauce, pickles, onion and fresh herbs), fried chicken sliders with pickled cabbage and smoked wings with a sriracha and honey glaze. Happy hour signature cocktails like Willamette Weak Sauce (gin, French vermouth, lemon, orange blossom honey and Serrano syrup) and The Forgery (bourbon, sherry, pomegranate and lemon) have the spirited backbone and fresh mixers to stand up to rich, zesty fare as well. Each is priced at $7 during happy hour. “Well-thought-out drinks give people a taste of what our bar program is all about,” says Brandon Lockman, lead bartender at Red Star. He also notes that patrons find the happy hour noshes so enjoyable that they often stay for additional plates and drinks in the dining room. That’s a welcome upsell for the house as well as a more enjoyable experience for the guest. Win happy hour fans with bold flavors Happy hour promotions at the dining and drinking establishments of Chicago-based Heisler Hospitality market the marriage of beer and vibrant foods. Pub Royale, a Heisler spot known for Indian-inspired cuisine, draws happy hour fans with appetizers and snacks laced with lively flavors that go famously with cold brew, like the following example: Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday : From 5 pm. to 7 p.m. “Flights and Bites” include veggie samosas, $2; salt cod samosas, $3; and 4-ounce “duos” of rotating beers, $6. “[Happy hour] is a great way to encourage customers to try something outside their comfort zone,” says Graham Heubach, Heisler beverage director. “You get to show off what makes your place unique.” Here are more examples of promoting the alchemy of full-flavored beer and food at happy hour: At Punch Bowl Social in Denver , happy hour guests create tongue-tingling combos with choices like these:
• Green Chorizo Fries, $11. Green chorizo, Monterey jack, pickled Fresno chiles, cilantro, crema and sea salt.
• Sheet Load of Nachos, $9. Corn tortilla chips, adobo marinated squash, poblanos, tomatoes, frijoles charros, Monterey jack, queso cotija, crema, salsa roja.
• Those shareable munchies go great with classic American lager beers, $2.50; well drinks, $5; and house wines by the glass, $5. Boneyard Bistro in Sherman Oaks, Calif., offers a 25 percent happy hour discount on draft brews and a menu of piquant morsels that includes:
• Jalapeño Popper Chicken Nuggets, $8. With bacon, jack, cheddar and cream cheese, chipotle ranch.
• White Bean Hummus, $7. With olive tapenade, za’atar spice and pita chips.
• Cuban Pork Empanada, $6. With rice, beans and mojo de ajo crema. As the above items suggest, operators have great freedom to create flavor-filled happy hour menus that pair with beverages. One of the special opportunities is promoting appetizers and snacks that feature craft beer as a flavoring. For example, IPA beer-battered cheese bites and onion rings complement a wide variety of brews and enhance the enjoyment of beer fans. Stand out from competitors with distinctive marketing A happy hour needs a vigorous push to connect with customers, says Kiva Wenig, assistant general manager of Il Porcellino, a Lettuce Entertain You Enterprises restaurant in Chicago. That’s why the Il Porcellino team plans to visit area offices to hand out a squeezable stress ball shaped like the $3 Italian sub sandwich featured at happy hour. The memento will bear the message: “Stressed? Come relax at Il Porcellino Happy Hour.” “Door-to-door marketing is not dead,” says Wenig. A well-conceived happy hour boosts a restaurant’s patronage and bottom line. Featuring exciting food and beverage pairings will help operators stand out from the crowd and enhance the guest experience. Related Solutions

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For Aging Immigrants, Food From Their Homelands Is Key to Happiness

For Aging Immigrants, Food from Their Homelands Is Key to Happiness Stories from California’s immigrant seniors clinging to the flavors of their past Sarada Ramachandran, the author’s mother, stands in her kitchen contemplating options for lunch // Photo by Andrea Campos “Do you have drumsticks?” my 85-year-old mother asks the cashier at the checkout counter at Madras Groceries in Sunnyvale, California. The woman points to a pile of long, narrow, cylindrical vegetables near the counter. A half-hour later, a quick inventory of my mother’s cart reveals drumsticks, taro roots, squash, long beans, okra, winter melons, pointed gourd, snake gourd, spices, snack packets of murukkus and a bag of brown basmati rice.
Vegetables from Madras Groceries in Sunnyvale, the local Indian supermarket // Photo by Andrea Campos Food bought, cooked, served and eaten is collectively the barometer of my mother’s moods, which are intricately entangled with her health. When she’s bustling around the kitchen, cooking sambar , kootu or olan with squash and winter melon, and boiling snake gourd or sautéing long beans to serve as a side dish, she’s cheerful and animated. On the days when the stove top stays cold, she sits near her bed dispiritedly, complaining about the insipid flavors of leftovers.
My mother, who immigrated to America in her late 70s from India, views the world through the lens of food. The act of eating or drinking is not only one of survival; it’s an emotional configuration. She is happiest when she has access to the foods she once ate back home, as though harnessing the taste of her memories.
She has never tried pasta, pizza, burritos, sandwiches or salads. Vegetables that she has not encountered in her previous life are anathema, including mushrooms, broccoli or brussels sprouts. She keeps a very close, if obsessive, vigil on her Indian vegetarian palate.
And she is not the only one.
Gopala Pillalamarri worked as a journalist for 40 years in India before retiring and moving to Palo Alto, California, to live with his son and daughter-in-law in the ’90s. Now in his 80s, Pillalamarri has a long list of ailments and is confined to his room in his son’s house, needing round-the-clock palliative care. When I met him, he was glancing over headlines in the local newspaper. A frail man, wearing a crisp white-striped shirt, he brightened when he saw me. “A daughter has come to visit,” he announced.
“No western shit for me,” he said bluntly, shaking his head with a mischievous smile. “It has no spice.” Pillalamarri grew up in Tenali, a city in Southern India, well-known for its spicy foods and pickles marinated in chilies. Till he came to the United States, he had never lived anywhere else.
“Have you ever tried pizza?” I asked Pillalamarri. “No western shit for me,” he said bluntly, shaking his head with a mischievous smile. “It has no spice.”
Dr. Rita Ghatak, a psychologist and an associate director at the Optimal Aging Center in Palo Alto, is Pillalamarri’s daughter-in-law. With over a decade of experience directing Stanford’s Adult Aging Services program, Ghatak has observed that among immigrant families, one of the biggest preoccupations is food.
She noted that her father-in-law’s “food habits have not deviated, not even one standard deviation, from what they were when he was living in India.”
For many adults who migrate later in life, familiar foods close the gap between countries left behind and countries arrived at. Remembered flavors stave off a fugue-like state of withdrawal from the new environment. So tastes are preserved carefully.
When Pillalamarri had a nasty fall and had to be admitted to ManorCare Health Services in Sunnyvale to recuperate, he begged to be taken home. He couldn’t tolerate the hospital fare and looked listless and unhappy until his son began to cook and deliver meals to him every day.
Gopala Pillalamarri looks out the window of his room in his son’s house in Palo Alto // Photo by Andrea Campos Globalization and immigration patterns are changing the makeup of the elderly in America. As America ages, so does the immigrant population. By 2030, older adults will outnumber children. In 2010, more than one in eight adults 65 years and older were foreign born, according to the Population Reference Bureau.
This changing population requires a rethinking and recalibrating of how we deliver elder care. While there is much research on seniors and social isolation, there’s not much attention given to seniors and the issue of cultural isolation, and, in particular, its linkage to food. The Migration Policy Institute reports that in 2010, California had the most number of foreign-born seniors (1.3 million) in the country. It is predicted that people of color, primarily Latinos and Asians, will make up 55 percent of California’s senior population by 2035, compared to 41 percent today.
This changing population requires a rethinking and recalibrating of how we deliver elder care. While there is much research on seniors and social isolation, not much attention is paid to seniors and the issue of cultural isolation, and, in particular, its linkage to food.
Despite the lack of research, however, nutrition programs in California are aware of what it takes to satisfy immigrant seniors.
The Senior Nutrition Program (SNP) of Santa Clara county runs 38 “congregate meals sites” that serve a weekday lunch. At several of its locations in the Bay Area, the menu is adjusted to suit the needs of the clientele.
Milton Cadena, the program director at the Eastside Neighborhood Center in San Jose (a SNP site run by Catholic Charities), said that they mostly have Latinos in their program and that many of their menu options tap into this group’s preferences—chile verde, corn tortillas, Spanish rice, chicken enchiladas and more.
“When the food served at our centers mirrors the food [the clientele] grew up with or are accustomed to in their own culture, it is easier for them to accept it, and they appreciate it — and more importantly do not waste it,” he said.
At Stevenson House — a low-income senior housing project in Palo Alto — La Comida mostly serves a senior Chinese population. On the March menu, however, there were few Chinese options.
“One of the challenges is preparing Chinese meals,” admitted Mary Ruth Batchelder, site manager of the La Comida program. The prep work is complicated. There’s a lot of braising and marinating, and the ingredients are different. “We cook baked fish, which is Chinese inspired. One of the problems is in keeping it low in sodium and soy sauce,” Batchelder said, adding that they are incrementally working toward a Chinese-inspired menu. But “our food doesn’t keep Asians away,” she said while pointing at the room filled with Asian diners.
According to Judy Chang, a member of the board of La Comida, immigrant seniors are willing to experiment with cuisine if they’ve been in the country long enough. Or if getting and preparing hot meals is a problem. “If you have to have a full belly, then you go with whatever you get, as long as it’s not offensive to your palate,” Chang said, and for many of the La Comida patrons, this is the only hot lunch they get.
Nourishment is merely the outer skin of the peeling onion that explains immigrant seniors’ complex relationship to food. What works for the native-born population will not necessarily work for the immigrant cohort.
Fresno-born octogenarian Hank Thielmann, of Ukrainian-Russian origin, lives in Stevenson House. He described his mother’s twice-baked crisp zwieback bread with equal parts sadness and nostalgia. “I’d slather butter and jam on the zwieback before eating it,” he recalled. He likes the food served by La Comida. “I choose to enjoy it,” he clarified. “But if you know of any Russian restaurant?”
Psychologist and gerontologist Dr. Rita Ghatak in her home office Patty May is 90 years old, and her translucent skin gleams in the afternoon light. She sits at the entrance of the dining hall, handing out bread to the La Comida patrons as they walk in, murmuring greetings in Chinese and English. She grew up in Oklahoma City but lived in China for 15 years and prefers Chinese food. Her favorite meal at La Comida is Lion’s Head Meatballs, a Shanghai specialty made of pork and cabbage, but she likes everything served.
“I don’t like American food,” he said firmly. Like Thielmann and May, many aging seniors are nostalgic for the foods of their younger days. But adults who migrate later in life feel alienated if the cuisine they are accustomed to is not available to them.
Huiming Tang also lives in an apartment at Stevenson House. “I pay attention to my food. I take it seriously,” he said through an interpreter. “I like Chinese food. I eat it all the time. I don’t like American food,” he said firmly.
Chinese food has bold complexity, Tang said. Each province in China lends its own aesthetics to the food. “The noodles in Shanghai are different from the noodles in Canton or Beijing,” and there’s more meat and vegetables in Chinese cooking, he said.
Tang came to America in the late ’90s to live with his son and daughter in the Bay Area after retiring from his job as a professor at Shanghai University. He cooked his own meals initially. When asked about his favorite La Comida meal, Tang picked up his utensils and cut into the marinated pork loin on his plate before responding, “I come here because I’m 88 years old.”
San Jose resident Aida Vigo came to America in 1992 after retiring as a physician in Bataan, a city in the Philippines where thousands perished in 1942 during a brutal Japanese-enforced 65-mile march to prison camps. Vigo was four years old at the time and calls herself a child of the war. She grew up at a time when privation and scarcity were ways of life. Most people she knew ate only the food that they raised, with fish and vegetables being staples.
Aida Vigo at the Northside Community Center, where lunch is served most days // Photo by Andrea Campos Vigo prefers simple flavors and fresh ingredients. When she first arrived in the United States, she often cooked adobo and sinigang for her children and grandchildren , both stock-based “one-dish meals” with fish, beef, pork, chicken or vegetables.
Waiting for her food to be served at the Northside Community Center near downtown San Jose, Vigo revealed why she comes for the senior lunch meals: “The cook here is Filipina. I know how she cooks it. The taste is not overpowering.”
Seniors waiting for lunch at Northside Community Center in San Jose Iggy Ignatius, chairman and founder of ShantiNiketan, a retirement community for Indian Americans in Tavares, Florida, is well on his way to building an empire on the simple premise that as immigrants age, they will want comfort food and a back-to-the-roots lifestyle. He is on his third phase of development, to be completed next year. The demand is so high, Ignatius said, that he’s begun to expand to other cities, including New Jersey, Houston and even Singapore. “The market will only grow,” he assured me. He has several California customers.
The biggest selling point is the Indian vegetarian food that ShantiNiketan offers, one of the few Indian American senior facilities with an in-house kitchen. Ignatius believes that affinity retirement homes are not non-assimilative, but places where people go to confront the twilight years of life among people who share the same kinds of life experiences and are able to relate to each other.
That relational experience boils down to food and socialization. Ignatius echoed Ghatak’s theory on seniors and their preoccupations: “Food is the major concern for Indian American seniors, in my opinion, and then comes socialization.”
For my mother, who cooks for herself, food is a pipeline to her emotional and physical health. But I can see that her cooking days are numbered. Shopping for her favorite vegetables has begun to exhaust her, even though it’s her favorite place to go. My mother in an Indian grocery store is like a child in a candy store. Her eyes dart from shelf to shelf, taking in the familiar scents and array of colors. And she looks energized.
After paying for the groceries at Madras Groceries, my mother and I make our way a few doors down to Madras Café. “How are you, Aunty?” the young man at the counter greets my mother when she steps forward to order a plate of vadas (deep-fried lentil balls) and chutney to take home. It’s one of the few restaurants my mother consents to eat at, and I soon discover why.
“I haven’t seen you in a while,” the man says in Tamil. My mother nods shyly without responding. As I help her to a chair, he goes in and comes back carrying a steel tumbler of steaming coffee. “While you wait,” he says, offering it to her. My mother takes a sip of the coffee and looks at me, her eyes shining.
For Aging Immigrants, Food From Their Homelands Is Key to Happiness was originally published in The Bold Italic on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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Instant Pot Salmon Tikka Masala (Gluten-Free, Paleo and Keto Friendly)

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Instant Pot Salmon Tikka Masala takes about 30 minutes to cook on a busy night and it has rich flavors with nutritious Omega-3 fatty acid. It’s a great way to add more fish to your meals!
My family loves LOVES Indian food. We often go to our favorite Indian restaurant which happens to be in our town but we also order in on weekends too.
We even have their phone number on speed-dial and whenever we call to order, the manager answers, “Hi Dr. Lee! How are you?” Well, recently, he started answering, “Hi Andrew! The usual?” since my son started ordering too! True story.
We love the rich and aromatic flavors of Indian cuisine so much that I started experimenting with a few recipes and included some of our favorites in “ Keto Cooking with your Instant Pot ” We still order takeout from our beloved Indian restaurant occasionally, but I make it at home most of the time with the authentic spices I buy from a local Indian market.
So imagine my delight when I discovered this amazing Indian cookbook using my favorite kitchen appliance, the Instant Pot by a talented author and blogger Archana Mundhe of Ministry of Curry called “ The Essential Indian Instant Pot Cookbook ” The Essential Indian Instant Pot Cookbook
When you think of Indian food, you might think of hundreds of spices simmering for hours and hours to get the authentic flavors. But what if I told you that it’s not the case when you use the Instant Pot to reduce the cooking time to almost NO TIME at all? And that Archana makes it so much easier with her modern recipes that use fewer ingredients while keeping authentic flavors intact?
This cookbook does exactly that.
The classic dishes such as Butter Chicken, Spicy Lamb Vindaloo, Curried Coconut Shrimp, Salmon Tikka Masala, and vegetarian and lentils recipes that are modern, quick and delicious are in this cookbook and it has all-time favorites in simplified versions for the Instant Pot.
I made Fennel-and-Saffron-Spiced Mussels and my daughter and I devoured it with naan bread even before the boys came home from work.
But I did make this yummy Salmon Tikka Masala – of course, I Paleotized it – and my family just loved it! What a refreshing way to eat salmon! Seriously, who would have thunk to use salmon with tikka masala sauce?
Not me.
If you want 75 authentic Indian recipes PLUS Indian spices primer, and how to use the Instant Pot with timetables, buy this hardcover beautifully photographed cookbook. Instant Pot Salmon Tikka Masala (Paleo and Keto Friendly)
Note: To make this recipe Paleo friendly, use coconut cream instead of heavy cream. And to make it keto-friendly, use cauli rice instead of white rice. Use paleo friendly or keto friendly bread of your choice to sop up the sauce. You won’t want to waste any sauce! Trust me.
The recipe below is a long one because Archana gives us the recipe for Garam Masala too! But if you don’t want to make it, you can easily find it at Whole Foods or any spice markets or Amazon. Links are in the recipe.
And please, if you make this recipe, come back and rate it so others will know how delicious it is! Instant Pot Salmon Tikka Masala Tikka masala combines two iconic Indian dishes: makhani and tandoori. It is essentially tandoori-spiced meat in a makhani sauce. And it turns out that making it in the Instant Pot is so much easier and just as tasty as making it on the stove. Salmon holds up to the layers of spice and retains its shape in the sauce. A splash of heavy cream rounds out this sharp and spicy curry. 0 from 0 votes

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Plain Rava Idli Recipe – Instant Suji Idli With Eno, Curd

December 14, 2018T12/14/2018 03:10:00 PM Plain Rava Idli Recipe – Instant Suji Idli With Eno, Curd Recently I started making Instant plain rava idli (suji ki idli) without any seasoning for the sake of Raksha. This instant suji idli is a simple and quick version of our usual rava idli (semolina idli). It takes very less preparation time. All you have to do is to just mix a cup of Bombay rava, curd, ENO fruit salt, salt and water. You can also use chiroti rava / fine rava. Make idli batter and steam for 10 minutes. Your instant breakfast or dinner would be ready in no time. This recipe of plain rava idli is ideal for bachelors and working women to make food quickly. You can use roasted or unroasted rava. Both gives great results. This idli stays soft for few hours. So you can even pack it for your lunch box if you like. A mixed vegetable kurma or tomato chutney would be a great side dish for this rava idli recipe and makes it a wholesome, tummy filling breakfast or dinner. Most of my readers have asked me to post rava idli without curd and ENO. But I am not sure how it works. As this idli is an instant version without fermentation curd, ENO or cooking soda is necessary to make it soft and spongy. Even in hotels, cooking soda is used to make it fluffy and spongy. If you want to make rava idli without curd, you should increase the quantity of ENO. Similarly if you want to skip cooking soda or ENO, you must add more curd to retain the softness. Ok friends, lets check out how to make instant, plain rava idli recipe with curd and Eno. Do watch the video and refer the step by step pictures for better understanding. Don’t forget to try this instant, plain rava idli recipe and share your feedback with me. Check out my other instant idli recipes too ! Instant plain rava idli recipe – Suji idli with Eno, curd Instant plain rava idli with eno and curd. Its an easy, quick breakfast recipe. Cuisine: Indian Bombay Rava / Semolina / Suji – 1 cup Curd – 1 cup Eno fruit sal t / Cooking soda – 1/2 tsp Salt – as needed HOW TO MAKE PLAIN RAVA IDLI Heat a kadai and dry roast the Bombay rava(Semolina/ Suji) for few minutes without changing the color. Let it cool down completely. Roasting is completely optional. Add curd, water and salt. Make smooth batter without lumps. Lastly add fresh Eno fruit salt and mix well. It will bubble and make the batter light and frothy. Add some water and adjust the consistency of batter if its too thick. Take an oil greased idli mould. Fill the batter till 3/4 th of the mould. Boil water in an idli pot. Keep the idli plate and steam for 10 minutes till rava idli is cooked well. Remove the idli and serve hot with coconut chutney, tomato chutney, sambar or kurma. METHOD To make instant, plain rava idli you can either dry roast the rava/suji for 5 minutes in medium flame without changing the color OR you can skip roasting and make idli directly. Both works well. If you roast the rava, allow it cool down completely. Do not add curd if the rava is hot. If you are using unroasted rava, you can add curd immediately. In this recipe, I roasted the rava and used it. Add curd, salt and 1/2 cup of water to the rava. Mix without lumps. No need to rest the batter. Add ENO fruit salt and mix well. If the Eno is active, it should bubble up as soon as you add it to the rava, curd mixture. Mix gently till the batter is light. Check the consistency of batter and add some water (say 1/4 cup) to make it slightly thick and pourable. Grease idli plate with little oil. Pour the batter till 3/4th of the mould. Boil water in an idli pot. Place the idli plate and steam for 10 to 15 minutes till idli is cooked well. Remove the idli plate and rest for 2 minutes. Then remove the idli with a spoon. Serve hot with coconut chutney or tomato chutney, Sambar or kurma as you like. Enjoy ! Note You can use baking soda / cooking soda instead of Eno fruit salt. If you want to skip curd, add 1 tsp of Eno instead of 1/2 tsp. Do not make the batter too thick or too thin. It should be semi thick and pourable. The size of this idli increases after cooking. So fill the mould till 3/4th or 1/2 as per the size you need. Try this easy, instant plain rava idli recipe. You will love it. I served it with boiled tomato chutney and coconut chutney.

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