Here are 9 American-style diners and burger bars you need to try in and around Blackpool – Blackpool Gazette

Here are 9 American-style diners and burger bars you need to try in and around Blackpool – Blackpool Gazette

Blackpool Blackpool’s food scene has plenty to choose from, including; Italian, Indian and Chinese cuisine – but sometimes you just want a burger! Monday 01 July 2019 14:47 Kira Ainscough
So, if you are looking for a taste of America in town, then you can’t go wrong with these diners and burger bars in and around Blackpool. All featured bars and diners have been rated as good or very good by the Food Standards Agency. 1. West Coast Rock Cafe Located at 7 Abingdon Street, the West Coast Rock Cafe serves all kind of food, such as: chips and melted cheese, burgers, Fajitas and steaks; giving the full Tex-Mex mix. other Buy a Photo 2. Morgans Diner This vegetarian friendly diner located at 375 Promenade serves meals all day, including: burgers and salads, along with their famous steak pie. other Buy a Photo 3. Captain Jacks With their extra wide pork ribs and freshly stacked burgers, Captain Jacks, based in Coral Island, Central Promenade, offers entertainment for the kids too. other Buy a Photo 4. Frankie and Benny’s At Festival Park, Rigby Rd, you will find yourself at this Italian-American restaurant. Frankie and Benny’s offers a variety of foods, including vegan dishes. other

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Above and beyond: visiting Sri Lanka

Home / Around DB Articles / Escapes / Above and beyond: visiting Sri Lanka Above and beyond: visiting Sri Lanka Posted in : Escapes on by : Around DB Comments: 0
“You need eggs? I’ll get you some eggs. Be right back,” is the reply that comes from an independent grocer in Hikkaduwa, on Sri Lanka’s southwest coast. We’re staying at a rented villa just off the town’s main strip and have run out of eggs.
It’s a sweltering afternoon and, after hopping in his tuk-tuk and returning with a dozen eggs (where from remains a mystery), the owner steers the conversation to Sri Lankan inflation, his worries about his daughter’s schooling, and his hopes the country can find its way through the mire after 30 years of civil war. Needless to say, going in search of eggs for a bunch of tourists is above and beyond the call of duty.
But that’s the thing about Sri Lanka and Sri Lankans. Above and beyond is par for the course. Elephant-spotting at Yala National Park
Colombo city tour
The cautious among us will advise against travelling to Sri Lanka in the wake of April’s terror attacks, but they shouldn’t. While not detracting from the tragedy, Sri Lanka actively practises tolerance, and for now, it’s an affordable, diverse and delicious vacation destination ideal for individuals and families alike.
Most international visitors start in Colombo, and most brush it off far too quickly. Located on a harbour that was once a strategic port for Portuguese, Dutch and British traders – and is now a Chinese Belt and Road stop – Colombo has more going for it than it’s given credit for.
Start with a stay at the ShangriLa Hotel, Colombo (with serviced apartments for families) to get a lay of the land. The hotel sits walking distance from Galle Face Green, a 12-acre urban park, where you should sample Sri Lanka’s representative street food, kottu – a grilled mix of shredded chicken, vegetables, noodles, egg and roti – while sitting by the sea. A few minutes further and the Khan Clock Tower identifies Pettah Market, a bazaar that puts Mongkok’s Ladies’ Market to shame and must simply be experienced.
Colombo is also an architecture buff’s dream, so dive into history at the 19th-century Italianate National Museum of Colombo and move on to renowned Sri Lankan architect Geoffrey Bawa’s 33rd Lane home. Among the most influential Asian architects of his generation, Bawa is widely credited with creating tropical modernism, and thus shaping the look of modern-day South East Asia.
The next day, tour Colombo Fort with knowledgeable, loquacious local guide Mark Forbes of Colombo City Walks. He’ll regale you about how after the Civil War ended newly unemployed Sri Lankan soldiers were drafted into restoring the Old Colombo Dutch Hospital – home to trendy local brands and one of Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants (Ministry of Crab). Mark’s tour stops at the magnificent colonial General Post Office and Cargills department store, and winds up at the luxurious Grand Oriental Hotel, for a gin and tonic. Galle Face Green
Most delightfully, Mark points out the teahouse where ’80s new wave band Duran Duran shot the classic video for Hungry Like the Wolf. Maybe leave the kids behind for this one.
The question after Colombo becomes one of which way to go. Heading inland towards Kandy is always a good idea given Sri Lanka’s tea reputation. But if you’ve got kids, you might prefer to bask in the country’s diverse wildlife. Make your way south, either by train or on the new west coast highway, to the beach town of Tangalle and start adventuring there.
Elephants and treehouses
Sri Lanka is home to 26 national parks, each with unique charms, but Yala National Park is the second largest and most visited. Located on the southeast coast around three hours’ drive from Tangalle, Yala has some of the most varied animal life of all of the parks in the country, including elephants, sacred langurs and endangered Sri Lankan leopards.
Yala has a permit-based entry system but a murky web presence. Fortunately, dozens of local tour operators are picking up the slack. A good one is Lanka Tracker, and if you’re lucky you’ll have guide Indu’s eagle eyes spotting animals hidden in the bush.
Lanka Tracker will come pick you up from your hotel if you’re in the Yala area, and nothing says wildlife safari like a stay in a treehouse. For a naturalist experience, spend a few days at Saraii Village, which stays true to its word. Rooms are accessed by crooked ladders made from branches, floors are woven together branches, walls exist in spirit only and bathrooms have dirt floors.
Saraii puts ecology first, so powersucking air conditioning and overlyprocessed soaps are out. But if ‘rock-a-by baby’ isn’t your cup of tea, there are mud huts – on the ground. Either way you’re going to hear all manner of wildlife running around outside overnight. Hikkaduwa
Spas and cooking classes
Sleeping in trees should be rewarded with pampering and, with Sri Lanka becoming a hotbed of luxury spa resorts, plenty of decadent options exist. Among the best are the high-end Amanwella and the Bawa-designed Anantara Peace Haven Tangalle Resort, both stops on the way back from Yala.
Peace Haven has plenty to keep kids amused, with one of its most engaging ‘excursions’ being ‘Spice Spoons,’ an outing to a local market first thing with the hotel’s chef followed by lessons in making lunch.
Sri Lankan cuisine is distinct from Indian, and involves heaps of coconut and coconut milk, making it somewhat milder. Even the rice is different: fat-grained and almost nutty. Must-haves (aside from kottu) include pani pol – a dessert crepe made with coconut milk and stuffed with palm sugar and shredded coconut – and jackfruit curry. Yes. Jackfruit.
Admittedly cooking for oneself isn’t entirely vacation-y, but watching Sri Lankan dishes come together with the same few ingredients is worth the work. Anantara has a second hotel in Sri Lanka at Kalutara – also by Bawa and perhaps the most exemplary of his work, which also offers its cooking class.
Beach bums and batik
Hit the road and head for a town like Hikkaduwa. With its tourist-friendly beach bum vibe, it’s popular for swimming and surfing.
The town is a good place from which to explore the old Dutch stronghold of Galle Fort (30 minutes by train), visit sea turtle sanctuaries and tour Lunuganga, Bawa’s Country Estate (about an hour).
Also around Hikkaduwa is a clutch of traditional Sri Lankan wax-dyed batik makers. If Alponso Batiks is closed when you visit, don’t worry. A neighbour will call Alponso and tell him he has customers. He’ll race down on his moped to see how he can help you. At the family-run Genuine Batik (Jungle Workshop) close by, you’re likely to get offered fruit and tea, while you browse Hirantha’s incredible artisanal work.
See? Above and beyond.

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Best Indian Cookbooks – Chowhound

With its multitude of spices, cooking techniques, and regional variations on flavor, Indian cuisine can feel like an intimidating one for home chefs. Luckily, we’ve been blessed with an incredible number of cookbooks that carefully break down the different varieties of lentils , for example, or the best ways to create the perfect curry mix .
It’s impossible to encapsulate all of India—a country with twenty-nine states and a population of over 1.3 billion—with one neat list, so consider this a humble starting point. The essential cookbooks included here range from regionally and “ authentically ” Indian to Indian-influenced. They also range from beginner-friendly to ambitious, which means that there’s something for everyone. “An Invitation to Indian Cooking” by Madhur Jaffrey, $15.54 on Amazon Amazon
Jaffrey is often credited as one of the pioneers who introduced western audiences to Indian cuisine. Though she’s since written dozens of excellent cookbooks, her very first one has become one of those must-have essentials for any home cook. Among the favorite recipes, which primarily highlight the food of Delhi, are whole wheat samosas, kheema, and tomato chutney. At the end of each, Jaffrey also offers serving suggestions and a few other dishes to pair, which makes this book especially great for hosts who love planning sophisticated dinner party menus . Buy Now “Indian Cookery” by Sameen Rushdie, $9.98 on Amazon Amazon
Though the original version was published in the U.K. in the 1980s, “Indian Cookery” was only recently reprinted and released in the U.S., complete with a gorgeous bright cover. Rushdie’s brother, who provides the foreword, is the novelist Salman Rushdie, and glimpses of the family writing gene become apparent throughout the eloquent descriptions, explanations, and stories about each ingredient. As with Jaffrey’s book, photos are eschewed in favor of instructions, so brainy home chefs who prefer histories over visuals will want to add this to their shelves. Buy Now “660 Curries” by Raghavan Iyer, $22.05 on Amazon Amazon
This hefty compilation is likely the most comprehensive curry bible you will ever read. In addition to penning cookbooks, Iyer is also a home cooking instructor, so each recipe is like receiving a mini lesson in cooking. The first few chapters lay out the foundations of building a good curry, from spice mixtures and pastes to accompanying sauces, then dives into the dizzying variations. Whether you’re a super advanced chef or one just starting out in the kitchen, there’s a curry here for you. The cookbook also fits nearly any diet; there are recipes for vegetarian and pescatarian curries, others featuring red meat and poultry, and various combinations of all of the above. In case that isn’t enough, there are also recipes for biryanis, aromatic rices, and breads like baati and naan . Buy Now “Asma’s Indian Kitchen” by Asma Khan, $20.53 on Amazon Amazon
You might recognize Khan as the first British chef to be featured on the Netflix show “Chef’s Table.” Her debut book of recipes, released in 2018, demonstrates why. The unifying theme of the cookbook is feasts, inspired by the central role of food in Indian celebrations. As Khan writes in the introduction, “… there is no reason why each and every meal should not be a feast fit for royalty.” Fittingly, most every dish in the book is vibrant, joyful, and perfect for an everyday feast. Standouts include a magenta beetroot raita and a fragrant saffron chicken korma, both of which are also satisfyingly Instagrammable. Buy Now “Fresh India” by Meera Sodha, $19.24 on Amazon Amazon
Indian cuisine is known for excelling at the plant-based food game—which makes sense, given that India has the highest percentage of vegetarians out of any country. Sodha’s second cookbook focuses exclusively on vegetarian dishes, with 130 approachable recipes that’ll knock any herbivore out of their salad blues. There are variations on daal, curries, pickles, and chutneys, not to mention beverages like ginger tea and fruit lassis. Best of all, her recipes emphasize approachability with easy prep and minimal steps—which is probably why the book is a Chowhound community favorite . Buy Now “Chetna’s Healthy Indian” by Chetna Makan, $19.47 on Amazon Amazon
Fans of the notoriously chill and supportive baking competition , “The Great British Bake-off,” will recognize Makan from season five. In her newest cookbook , Makan puts down her cake pans and turns her attention to family meals, addressing the perception that Indian food is unhealthy or greasy. She writes in her introduction, “But this is the opposite of what you would find in any Indian home kitchen!” The impending recipes, most of which are plant-based and involve minimal amounts of oil, prove her point. Dishes like stuffed okra, yogurt curry, and cumin paneer salad are flavorful and refreshing. Your sweet tooth won’t be disappointed either—the book closes with a chapter on desserts like coconut barfi and spiced chocolate bark. Buy Now “Indian-ish” by Priya Krishna with Ritu Krishna, $18.14 on Amazon Amazon
As reflected by the playful title, Krishna’s cookbook focuses on food through the lens of Indian flavors and techniques, rather than attempting to define purely “authentic” Indian food. Most of all, it prizes family memories, hilarious stories, and comic pop illustrations courtesy of desi artist Maria Qamar. The result is homey and approachable recipes—like saag feta and roti pizza—that can easily be made on busy weeknights . They also provide a great introduction to a few common spices and cooking techniques that can be a starting point for further inspiration and experimentation. Buy Now “Tiffin” by Sonal Ved, $22.48 on Amazon Amazon
Named after the cylindrical stacked lunch pail that’s commonly used for packing lunch across India, “Tiffin” seeks to highlight the defining tastes of the country’s distinct regions. The resulting 500 recipes are organized geographically and include at least one from each of India’s states (a rather rare feat among Indian cookbooks in the west). Among the standouts are kutchi kadak, a spicy toast and potato concoction from Gujarat, and macrolyun patata, a Sindhi macaroni dish. If you’re looking to diversify your knowledge of Indian cuisine, “Tiffin” is a brilliant introduction to the sheer diversity that’s out there. Buy Now “Season” by Nik Sharma, $19.77 on Amazon Amazon
On Twitter, Sharma once quipped that he had to leave America to be seen as an American chef. Scan through a few of the recipes in “Season,” though, and you’ll understand just how uniquely American his food is. Through dishes like masala chai apple cake, bacon salt, and bombay frittata, Sharma combines flavors from his childhood in Mumbai with his life across the U.S., from the Midwest and Washington, D.C. to California. The cookbook is also packed full with gorgeous photography that Sharma took himself, making it especially great for visual home chefs (or budding food photographers ). Buy Now “Rasika: Flavors of India” by Ashok Bajaj, Vikram Sunderam, and David Hagedorn, $22.48 on Amazon Amazon
Fans of the modern Indian restaurant Rasika in Washington, D.C., rejoiced when the chefs released this cookbook and finally spilled the secret recipe to their famous palak chaat , or fried spinach. Of course, there’s a reason why Rasika is an award-winning establishment—the recipes here are often more time-intensive and complex than in some other picks on this list, involving more steps, longer wait times, and prep. But a handy glossary of ingredients and detailed instructions guide those willing to put in the time, and ambitious home chefs will be well-rewarded for their blood, sweat, and tears. In addition to palak chaat, dishes like sweet potato samosa purses and an eggplant lasagna might even change the way you view Indian cuisine. Buy Now

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July 4th 2019: How a tax on playing cards and a thwarted tea shipment led to American Independence Day

July 4th 2019: How a tax on playing cards and a thwarted tea shipment led to American Independence Day Telegraph Reporters Rebellions over taxes led to full-scale revolutionary war in the North American Colonies – AP More July 4 1776 was a prominent day in American history, as the 13 colonies successfully claimed their independence from the British Empire. In what is now known as Independence Day, the US’ most beloved national holiday is celebrated annually on the Fourth of July, with millions of Americans coming together to celebrate the anniversary of the birth of their nation. From the history behind America’s independence to the modern celebrations, here is everything you need to know. What is Independence Day? Independence Day commemorates the day the Declaration of Independence was adopted in 1776. Introduced by the Second Continental Congress, the statement outlined that the 13 American colonies were united, independent states, who were no longer subject to British monarch. Recognised annually by Americans, fireworks, parades and other patriotic celebrations are held every year on the Fourth of July to celebrate the colonies breaking free from British control. Why did the Americans want independence? The relationship between the settlers and British had been amicable, however tensions started to escalate over the imposition of British laws and taxes. To help control settlements in the western territories, King George III introduced the Royal Proclamation of 1763, preventing the colonists settling along the Appalachian Mountains. After the French and Indian War came to a close, the Quartering Act was passed in 1765, ordering the American colonies to help house the British soldiers. Also in 1765, Britain then introduced the Stamp Act to help handle war debts; this required colonists to pay a tax on printed paper including newspapers, licenses and playing cards. Colonial governor Thomas Hutchinson (1711 – 1780) escaping from local rioters after demanding Stamp Tax from them Credit: Getty Images/Hulton Archive More Unsurprisingly, the colonists were not pleased. ‘No taxation without representation’ became the cry around 1765 after a rise in Britain’s national debt forced the colonists to raise import tariffs and crack down on smuggling to raise funds. There was also a growing sense of nationalism in these largely agricultural colonies and acts of American colonial defiance began in the form of rebellions, fighting and protests. Social unrest escalated further in 1773, when patriots in Boston famously destroyed a shipment of tea by boarding three ships in Boston harbour and throwing 342 chests overboard in protest over the Tea Act. This became known as the ‘Boston Tea Party’. These rebellions over taxes led to full-scale revolutionary war. What happened in the Revolutionary War? Determined to fight for their independence, Great Britain’s 13 North American Colonies fought for control over colonial affairs. They included: New Hampshire South Carolina Georgia George Washington led the American forces to victory and, thanks to the diplomatic efforts of Thomas Jefferson, France and Spain acted as allies, providing arms for the war. Independence was formally declared on July 2 1776; on July 4 1776, the final version of the Declaration was approved by Congress, announcing that the 13 colonies were free from British rule. While the Fourth of July marks the adoption of the Declaration of the Independence, most of the Congress members actually signed the document on August 2, 1776. Following the Declaration of Independence, they went on to become the United States of America – however conflict continued up until 1783. How is the day celebrated in the US? In what was a simple but powerful mark of respect to each of the colonies, 13 gunshots were fired as part of the first celebration of independence on July 4 1777, a year after the Declaration of Independence was approved. George Washington commemorated the Fourth of July the following year in 1778 by ordering a double ration of rum for his soldiers at Ross Hall, near New Jersey. Meanwhile outside the US, Benjamin Franklin and John Adams organised a celebratory dinner for Americans in Paris. The Fourth of July was officially acknowledged as a state celebration by the Massachusetts General Court in 1781, and Moravians in North Carolina, observed the day with The Psalm of Joy music programme in 1783. Nearly 100 years on from the Declaration’s approval, Independence Day was made an unpaid holiday for federal employees in 1870, and it was later established as a paid holiday by US Congress in 1938. Nowadays it’s typically marked by patriotic activities – usually outside. Think parades, camping, barbecues, beers and fireworks, with as much red, white and blue as possible – all punctuated with a backing track of “Star spangled banner”, “Yankee Doodle” and “God Bless America”. Politicians also like to make a point of appearing at Independence Day celebrations and praising the nation’s heritage, history and people. Who celebrates it apart from Americans? The Philippines and Rwanda also observe Fourth of July anniversaries for their own reasons. The US gave the Philippines independence on that day in 1946 and the Rwandan genocide ended with US help on July 4 1994. Rather more bizarrely, Denmark also celebrates the US version – it started with European expats in 1911, but now is just an “excuse for a nice day out” . When is Britain’s Independence Day? Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage made a case for the 23rd June to be Britain’s Independence Day in 2016, because that was the date of the 2016 Brexit vote in which he said the nation “took back control” from the European Union. However, he was criticised by some who pointed out that liberation from colonial ownership was not really equivalent to Brexit. And the point that most independence anniversaries around the world celebrate breaking from the British Empire has also been well made. Best American recipes for Independence Day From sweet treats to traditional dishes, the US is famous for its cuisine, with Americans tucking into an array of classic foods every year on Independence Day. If you’re celebrating the Fourth of July in the UK, here are some of our favourite American recipes to try and taste with your family and friends.

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MANDI “The Varanasi In Himalayas”

“अजिसबआयाएकहीघाटसे, उतराएकहीबाट.. बीचमेंदुविधापड़गयी, होगएबारहबाट.. घाटेपानीसबभरे, अवघटभरेनकोय.. अवघटघाटकबीरका, जोभरेसोनिर्मलहोए ..” -कबीर Yes you heard that right “Varanasi in Himalayas”. There is Varanasi in the great Himalayas ranges too. Nested in the north-west Himalayas at an average altitude of 850 meters (2,790 ft.), experiences pleasant summers and cold winters. Mandi, “The Varanasi of Himalayas” or “Choti Kashi” of India or “Kashi of Himachal as there are 81 temples in Mandi whereas 80 temples are there in Kashi (Banaras or Varanasi). Spiritually enlightening and amazingly photogenic, Mandi is decorated with shimmering lakes, pious temples and breathtaking landscapes. The city has a remarkable collection of religious sites that draws inspiration from a variety of religious denominations. The historically eminent, spiritually significant and amazingly panoramic Mandi is spread out along the banks of River Beas. Lying on the banks of River Beas, Mandi also displays some old palaces and exquisite form of colonial architecture. With a blend of warm and cold weather, the city housing the lakes and gardens provide for its travelers a breath of fresh air. Serving as a gateway to some famous valleys such as Kullu, Manali, Lahaul and Spiti. Mandi the Varanasi of Himalayas, has no dearth of places that can provide relief to both the mind and soul. River Beas, Mandi Distance :- The distance of Mandi from national capital New Delhi is 435 km (270 miles) approx. Mandi is connected from Chandighar via NH205 and NH154 which is 184 km (115 miles) approx. Distance from Pathankot is 220 km (137 miles) approx. HOW TO REACH :- Mandi is very well connected by Road and air by through all the places of North India. You could reach Mandi through road, rail and air any medium. By Road :- Mandi is very well connected by road through all of north India, and all the major town of India. All buses traveling to Manali from New Delhi or Chandighar stops there. Or you can hire a taxi from New Delhi or Chandigarh buy that costs you more than HRTC bus. There are frequently Volvo AC or Non AC HRTC buses from New Delhi and Chandigarh. From New Delhi it takes almost 11 hours and costs you 1250 rupees approx. (HRCT HIMSUTA AC VOLVO) and 575 rupees approx. (HRTC ORDINARY). From Chandighar it takes almost 7 hours and costs you 700 rupees approx. (HRTC HIMSUTA AC VOLVO) and 340 rupees approx. (HRTC ORDINARY). By Air :- Mandi is also connected by air, the nearest airport from Mandi is Bhuntar airport Kullu. Which is about 60 km (38 miles) from Mandi. From Bhuntar airport you can hire a taxi or travel by bus. By Rail :- Nearest broad gauge railway station is Chandighar, which is 184 kms. From there you have no other choice left either you can travel by HRTC bus or hire a taxi. But if you are a hardcore train lover you can travel by train to Pathankot from New Delhi. From there a narrow gauge mountain railway junction joints Pathankot to Joginder Nagar which is 165 kms (103 miles) long and takes more than 8 hours. The distance from Joginder Nagar to Mandi has to be covered by road which is 55 kms (35miles). But I advise you not to travel by train. It’s Slow and Time consuming. Traveling by road is faster and better, because first – it’s fast and second – it’s cheap. Hotels Map Beautiful City of Mandi Widely known for the International Mandi Shivaratri Fair and the first heritage city of Himachal Pradesh. Mandi, “The Varanasi of Himalayas”. The town was founded in 1526 AD and at the creation of Himachal Pradesh on 15 April, 1948 it made the district headquarter by merger of the two princely states of Mandi and Suket. The one time capital of the princely state of Mandi formerly known as Madhav Nagar, is a fast developing city that still retains much of its original charm and character. The city also has the remains of old palaces and notable examples of ‘colonial’ architecture. The city had one of the oldest buildings of Himachal Pradesh. Mandi is almost at the geographical center of Himachal Pradesh, lying along with the left bank of the river Beas in the foothills of Shivalik ranges of Himalayas. Packed with a thick green cover of pine and deodar trees. Surrounded by the Shivalik ranges of Himalayas, Mandi is decorated with shimmering lakes, pious temples and breathtaking landscapes. There are more than 300 temples in Mandi which are dedicated to Hindu god and goddesses. For its temple architecture, old palace and rich traditions, Mandi is so often considered as the cultural capital of Himachal Pradesh. Victoria Bridge, Mandi Colors of Mandi Those who love to enjoy the landscapes and natural beauty, than Mandi is the place for them. Mandi is blessed with some of the most breathtaking and picturesque views of Shivalik ranges of lower Himalayas and valleys. Mandi,”The Varanasi of Himalayas” situated at the junction of Kullu and Dharamshala. Here, you can enjoy adventurous activities like trekking, night safari and mountaineering. You can go for trekking at Janjhehli, which is almost 100 kms (62 miles) from Mandi and located at an elevation of 3300 meters (10825 ft.) above sea level. For wildlife enthusiasts, there is the famous Shikari Devi Wildlife Sanctuary, which is almost 110 kms (68 miles) from Mandi, is home to multiple species of animals including leopard, Goral, black bear, barking deer, musk deer and Himalayan black bear. On the trip to Mandi, you can immerse yourself in Himachal Pradesh’s religious heritage, tradition and culture. If you wants to step away from the city for a quiet getaway, then you must include Mandi in your travel wish list. The Blue River of Beas Top View of Mandi The Old Side of Mandi CLIMATE :- Mandi city falls in the lower most climatic zone of the Himalayas. Mandi experiences pleasant summers and cold winters. Most probably having hot summers and cold winters. The average temperature during summer is between 18.9 °C (66.02 °F) to 39.6°C (103.28 °F). But in winter the temperature can dip to 3 – 5 degree Celsius and heavy woolen clothing is essential. During the monsoon Mandi experience heavy rain fall around 101.6 millimeters, the total yearly average rain fall is around 832 millimeters. All Colors In One Pic Where to Eat :- Mandi is a small city but it is also the commercial hub of Himachal Pradesh with its fair share of good restaurants and eating joints which serve continental, north Indian and local cuisines. There are some of the best restaurants in Mandi which offer scrumptious and delicious food. Hotels Map The Gravy Momo’s A small cafe which is basically serve Chinese and Tibetan food, but the taste they have, you’ll not going to found in whole Mandi. Noodles is more than good but Momos were must try. Hotels Map The Royal Place to Eat Previously a part of the residence of the Royal Family of Mandi now turned into a hotel. Raj Mahal Palace with its well-kept gardens and classical music playing in the background is one of the better places to relish a meal. As it is a palace so they serve all kind of cuisine such as Himalayan, North Indian, South Indian, Chinese, Tibetan and continental. The food is very delicious and mouthwatering. Hotels Map Located in the heart of main market, this is the place where you must eat once. Although there is “Himalayan” in their name but they basically serves Chinese and continental food and some shakes which are very delicious. You must try white sauce pasta here because I found it slightly different from the others. Hotels Map Cafe Treat The cafe has an antique colonial feel to it. The specialties include Chinese and Italian cuisines. It’s also worth mentioning that the coffee and tea here are great also. The prices are also not too high Night Life :- If you are a party animal or a person who love a city’s night life, than you are not alone there are so many people comes to Mandi as tourists to enjoy Mandi’s night life. Although Mandi is a small town but the whole city become alive after the sun goes down. In the evening citizens and the tourist all come on the streets of the main market. There are also some bars in Mandi which became alive by the crowd of tourist after the dark. Mid Night In Mandi The Suken Garden, Mandi The Raj Mahal Palace offers the chance of a civilized drink in the gazebo of a tree-shaded garden, which looks far more appealing after dark. Tourists, Everywhere

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[NSW] 50% off Drinks, All Night, Every Night at The Colonial British Indian Cuisine [Darlinghurst and Neutral Bay] Restaurants

[NSW] 50% off Drinks, All Night, Every Night at The Colonial British Indian Cuisine [Darlinghurst and Neutral Bay] Restaurants 1 0 Go to Deal Associated JW80Foodie on 03/07/2019 – 15:02 www.thecolonialrestaurant.com.au (34 clicks)
Hi Guys – The Colonial is running a campaign this month offering 50% OFF drinks, all night, every night.
Here is the link to the webpage: https://www.thecolonialrestaurant.com.au/half-price-drinks
Things to keep in mind with this offer; No BYO Can’t use any other discount vouchers, coupons or promos Some drink exclusions apply (example: some cocktails may not be on the half price list) Must purchase food with drinks (for licensing compliance)
Examples of costs (as no pricing on the website)
-Darlinghurst restaurant location Beer is from $9 schooner/bottle (local and imported) some are $10 – with this offer you pay from $4.50 – $5.00 a beer!! Wine is from $9 glass (can be up to $13 a glass) so with this offer, you pay from $4.50 to $6.50 a glass of wine (all wines by the glass on the menu)
Neutral Bay is slightly more – so for a schooner of beer you’ll pay $6 with the offer and wine will be from $6.50 a glass!
It’s not a bad deal if you like to get drinks with your dinner – think these prices are better than most pubs and rsl clubs!!
Valid every night – including Fri/Sat evenings!
Happy Drinking? Happy Dining and Drinking!! LOL

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The 101 on eating your way through Japan, according to Chef Thomas Zacharias

Regional Indian cuisines and glorious local produce come together to create a new gourmet language at The Bombay Canteen . From the need to promote and highlight indigenous wild produce to regional Indian breakfasts recreated to suit the modern palate, The Bombay Canteen is at the forefront of everything contemporary. To top it off, the restaurant is every Instagram influencer’s delight and is the first thing tourists hit when they land in Mumbai. In the current times of extreme clutter, such popularity is hard to come by for any food establishment and it’s all credit to Executive Chef Thomas Zacharias . A penchant for cooking since his childhood, inspired by his grandmother and her ‘superpower’ of making people happy with food, led Chef Zacharias to the Culinary Institute of America and the Michelin-starred Le Bernardin in New York . Back home, he worked with the Olive group for a few years before joining The Bombay Canteen in 2014. Over the last five years, Chef Zacharias has ensured that the restaurant serves impeccable fare that’s built on innovation. Chef Thomas Zacharias Also a travel enthusiast, you can catch him with his hashtag #ChefOnTheRoad on Instagram . Having recently returned from a three-week trip to Japan, where Zacharias combed through Tokyo, Kyoto, Osaka, Fukoka, and Rikuzentakata, we got him to share his food guide for the next time you’re headed to the Land of the Rising Sun. Tokyo Tokyo Cowboy Image: Courtesy Tokyo Cowboy (Instagram) “While this is principally a top-notch butchery located a little out of the way in a residential neighbourhood of Tokyo, I would advise everyone to trek all the way there for their Roast Wagyu Beef Sandwich, a rich brioche stuffed with some of the finest beef in Japan and balanced with sharp, vegetal shiso leaves, and creamy Japanese mayo.” Spice Cafe Image: Courtesy Spice Cafe (Facebook) “Spice Cafe is a fantastic, Japanese-Indian restaurant run by Kazushiro Ito in the Shitamachi neighbourhood of Tokyo. Ito-san took a four year sabbatical at the age of 27 to travel across the world and fell in love with India and its food so much that he came back and decided to open a restaurant that showcased Indian flavours and techniques through Japanese ingredients. The result, as I had tasted, is food that isn’t instantly recognisable as Indian, but still rooted in our traditions. Ito-san’s ways of handling spices and building flavours is better balanced and more restrained than I’ve experienced in most Indian restaurants in India, and that’s a lesson for us all. From a beautiful spring vegetable biryani to a tofu rasam and of course, the Kerala meen pollichathu, every dish sang the tunes of India. And what delicious tunes they are.”

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Taste of Australia in India

Contact us Taste of Australia in India
Austrade recently ran a month long “Taste of Australia” promotion campaign in India. The campaign was organised in partnership with a premium gourmet retail chain across major Indian cities. 18 Australian brands across gourmet categories participated in the promotion
Austrade recently ran a month long “Taste of Australia” promotion campaign in India. Taste of Australia is a global marketing promotion of Australian products, delivered by Austrade, highlighting the clean, safe and reliable nature of Australian food products. The month-long promotion of Australian gourmet food products was organised in partnership with Foodhall – India’s premium gourmet retail chain. The promotions were organised in New Delhi, Mumbai and Bangalore. Premium Australian pasta, cereals, cheese, honey, gluten free cake mixes, vinegar, salad dressings, gluten free and sugar free cookies were featured in the promotion. The promotions featured tasting and cooking sessions involving chefs and consumers 18 Australian brands including Weet Bix, San Remo, Jaycroix, Orgran, Melrose, Mulwarra, Old El Passo and Capilano participated in the promotion. Speaking about the promotion, Mark Morley, Trade Commissioner – India & Pakistan, Austrade said, “Indian consumers have a greater preference for healthier, convenient and contemporary cuisines. The time is right for Australian brands to enter India with premium, quality and innovative food products. There is a growing awareness for clean, green, safe and reliable produce from Australia” This promotion helped to reinforce Australia’s reputation as a high-quality and reliable supplier of safe food and beverage products.

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MeFi: “It feels like you are in India, you see your community all around.”

“It feels like you are in India, you see your community all around.” July 1, 2019 8:23 AM Subscribe posted by filthy light thief (37 comments total) 64 posted by filthy light thief at 8:25 AM I just drove through Nebraska and was wondering about that restaurant! The whole “Jay Brothers Truck Stop Taste of India” thing certainly piqued my interest. If I’m ever traveling through there sans dog I’ll have to stop! posted by obfuscation at 8:33 AM on July 1 The L.A. Times articles mentions a few notable restaurants, for truckers and travelers alike. I’ll promote one location in New Mexico: Bombay Restaurant and Buffet Truck Stop on the west side of Gallup, which is in what looks like a former truck stop diner. Really good food, and when I was there a few years back, it was playing an Indian TV channel from NYC, which confused me at first, because there was an ad for an Indian grocery store, which surprised me to hear there was such a shop in Gallup. Then they mentioned the address, and it all made sense. posted by filthy light thief at 8:36 AM on July 1 [ 1 favorite ] There is a truck stop near downtown Oklahoma City that has had an Indian restaurant and grocery store for years. posted by Quonab at 8:41 AM on July 1 [ 1 favorite ] I had some really great Indian food from a gas station in West Virginia once, and it never occurred to me that it might have been because it was also pretty near a trucking depot. posted by thecjm at 8:54 AM on July 1 [ 4 favorites ] Yup. Truckers treated like shit with bad pay and conditions ( one of many articles on this topic), so only people willing to do that (i.e., immigrant cultures) will take the jobs. posted by Melismata at 9:02 AM on July 1 [ 5 favorites ] As the number of drivers of Indian heritage increase, so do the number of Indian food restaurants in truck stops I’ve watched Indian grocery stores also increasingly become more and more mainstream. Whereas most cities I’ve lived in would maybe have one, it’s now pretty common for a city to have at least two or three, if not a full on franchise/chain of stores. It’s something that makes me smile. Thanks for this lovely post. posted by Fizz at 9:05 AM on July 1 [ 5 favorites ] Please give me trucker countrybollywood music! posted by thegirlwiththehat at 9:05 AM on July 1 [ 14 favorites ] Looks like trucker music videos already exist: Long Route posted by exogenous at 9:27 AM on July 1 [ 1 favorite ] One of the places we’d always stop on road trips, in northern Iowa, went under and was sold to the owners of that truck stop in Nebraska! It sounds like they are planning on opening an Indian restaurant there and I am so excited to check it out on our next trip through the area. posted by beandip at 9:56 AM on July 1 Ha! My brother-in-law and his family live in North Platte while we live in the Tuck. We meet at this restaurant for lunch at least once a month because, while it is closer to him, it is the best Indian food west of Omaha. posted by Fezboy! at 9:56 AM on July 1 [ 1 favorite ] This is super interesting but i do wish American reporting on Indian-ness could do a bit better with some of the nuance. The “Punjabi-style” style restaurant run by Gujaratis isnt Punjabi-style because that food is close to the food the proprietors grew up with – its Punjabi because thats what, presumably, their largely Sikh (and, by association Punjabi) clientele wants. posted by Exceptional_Hubris at 9:59 AM on July 1 [ 8 favorites ] I’m surprised that the only one of these stories that includes the word dhaba is the one from Al Jazeera. posted by jocelmeow at 10:01 AM on July 1 [ 6 favorites ] In Boston, Indian food is generally seen as high end (because it isn’t boiled to death and has actual flavor – not something you’re supposed to indulge in every day.) So the restaurants are decorated and priced with that in mind. Except for one place. It’s called the Punjabi Dhabba, and it is deliberately dressed down and priced to appeal to homesick Indians, and deliberately looks like an Indian truck stop. If every town had one of those, I’d actually consider driving a truck for a living. Normally truckers commit slow suicide behind the wheel, and slow suicide eating diner fare at every town. Replacing the diners with Indian dhabbas would actually make trucking a decent occupation. posted by ocschwar at 10:02 AM on July 1 [ 6 favorites ] Please give me trucker countrybollywood music! posted by mit5urugi at 10:47 AM on July 1 As I commented in a previous post, I drove and dispatched ag trucks for a few summers in college. Working in California’s Central Valley, the driver pool was diverse. There were two demographics that grew every year. The first were drivers from former Soviet states, since the fall of communism, a large number of Ukrainians emigrated to the central valley. It isn’t easy to verify employment when they drove the Russian Steppes for 20 years. That wave has probably tapered off. The other group were the Sikhs. You learned first names because almost all had the last name of Singh. If it wasn’t Singh, it was Gill. The main difference is that there was already a sizable South Asian community in California, so it didn’t really have to flower along the interstates and trucking hubs. posted by Badgermann at 10:55 AM on July 1 [ 4 favorites ] This is not the first time men from the Punjab cave come to the US to do work others werent interested in: posted by Exceptional_Hubris at 11:07 AM on July 1 [ 6 favorites ] When i read the first sentence of the first post, my first thought was “that explains how Truck Stop 40 has been able to stay in business” and then lo and be hold, there is an article about them in the second post. My impression of the owners has been that they are pretty savvy and it is an impressive feat that they are holding their own against the big chains of Love’s, Flying J and TA of America, all of which have a location with a couple miles of them. posted by domino at 11:17 AM on July 1 I haven’t had a chance to try it, but there is one of these just off I-40 in Mulberry, Arkansas. Kountry Xpress/India Restaurant posted by lilywing13 at 11:28 AM on July 1 [ 2 favorites ] For more info on the India Restaurant in Mulberry Arkansas, see t his Oral history with its proprietor, Satish Sharma. (I do love the southern foodways alliance something fierce). They do some of their shopping in nearby Fayettville and for other products either go to Kansas City of back to Chicago (where they lived before moving to Arkansas). My nephew goes to one of the Central Lakes College two-year programs for heavy equipment operation . He earned his commercial license (CDL) at the start of his first year, and already has received offers to drop out and drive a semi full-time for $60,000. (Granted the kid has a great hand backing up a trailer, but still! ) He’s been told that nation-wide, the estimated shortage is 100,000 qualified drivers of big trucks. *boggle* (Note: said nephew is not Sikh; he is a 6’7″ kid from the Twin Cities.) posted by wenestvedt at 12:09 wenestvedt : My nephew goes to one of the Central Lakes College two-year programs for heavy equipment operation. He earned his commercial license (CDL) at the start of his first year, and already has received offers to drop out and drive a semi full-time for $60,000. (Granted the kid has a great hand backing up a trailer, but still!) He’s been told that nation-wide, the estimated shortage is 100,000 qualified drivers of big trucks. *boggle* That’s on the high end for current shortages, but definitely in line with future forecasts. From the NPR link: The American Trucking Associations figures companies need about 60,000 drivers, a number that could top 100,000 in just a few years. …”It’s certainly a natural market reaction whenever there’s a shortage — pay goes up, and we’ve seen that,” says Bob Costello, chief economist for the American Trucking Associations. Costello says trucking companies boosted pay sharply last year. Gordon Klemp, president of the National Transportation Institute, figures that increase was close to 10 percent on average, which would make average driver salaries crest at $60,000 by his estimates. And Costello says truckers are demanding more than good pay.”If you’re not getting a 401(k), health care, paid time off, you need to get a different job, because you can get all of that,” says Costello. Still, a grueling job. 11 to 12 hours in the truck per day is tough, and I’m glad folks are doing it. posted by filthy light thief at 12:44 thought long haul trucking was supposed to be totally automated soon? posted by Marky at 1:05 We provided CDL training as one of our “in demand” with a good standard of living for relatively little training required at my non-profit. It is in danger of being automated out, but that is still a ways off. Soon is relative when you can get a CDL and start making much more than you would at a retail job. We also had electrical certification and CNA certification, I believe. Some other stuff too. posted by OnTheLastCastle at 1:13 Marky : I thought long haul trucking was supposed to be totally automated soon? Just like the rest of connected and autonomous vehicles (CAV) discussions, autonomous truck freight has seen its share of speculation, forecasts, and tech demos. As noted in that article, “driverless trucks are now used extensively in the mining industry and it’s certain this technology will impact other parts of transport and distribution.” But mines are closed, controlled sites, quite the opposite of public roadways. Still, a semi-autonomous truck made it from Los Angeles, CA to Jacksonville, FL, with “minimal human intervention” in Feb. 2018 ( The Drive ), expanding Embark’s Frigidaire refrigerator delivery route from El Paso, Texas, to a distribution center in Palm Springs, California ( Wired, Nov. 2017 ). But as with Teslas that allow you, unofficially, to sleep at the wheel ( Ars Technica ), there’s some point where human interaction is still needed, for now. That “last mile” for deliveries, and for CAV certainty, is what will take the longest, as there are plenty of scenarios where autonomous vehicles aren’t great … yet. So in the meantime, federal hours of service regulations ( FMCSA ) that currently limit how long a trucker can drive could possibly be extended for semi-autonomous big rigs, to help patch or stretch driver capacity to reduce the driver shortage, and make the job less stressful. posted by filthy light thief at 2:44 There was a MeFi post previously about a series of YouTube videos by a young Indian man who decided to hitchhike around America. He has other videos in which he hitchhikes in Malaysia, Russia, and Thailand, so he figured the USA would be a breeze. He is almost completely unsuccessful. Nobody picks up hitchers anymore. His tried-and-true technique is to hang around truck stops, but every trucker tells him the same: “the company won’t let us take passengers anymore; it’s a liability thing.” His only luck is with the occasional independent operator, or with CouchSurfing hosts who are happy to pick him up and take him places. Until he discovers the Punjabi Trucking Brotherhood . He runs into one of those guys in the TV lounge of a truck stop, and when that guy finds out what he’s doing, it’s “hop on board!”, company policy be damned. As they drive the long haul through small-town America, the trucker gets on the CB to his Punjabi buddies, and our hero’s got his rides taken care of for the rest of his trip. The YouTuber is from South Asia, not a Sikh, if I remember correctly, but it doesn’t matter — none of them are going to let a fellow-countryman stand on the side of the road. So it’s one of those videos that turned into a documentary of something unexpected both for the viewers and the filmmaker. It’s the Sherman’s March of Indian hitchhiker vids. posted by Harvey Kilobit at 2:48 PM on July 1 [ 20 favorites ] I saw the LA Times article right before an I-5/Oregon road trip this weekend! So far, Oregon is currently the northernmost site west of the Mississippi on this Punjabi Trucking food map . Was going to stop at Cottage Grove, OR’s Spice of India (off exit 174) yesterday, but we got hungry earlier and hit Roseburg’s “Shanti’s Indian Cuisine” off exit 125. Amazing naan. Randevs run it according to their business cards, so there’s a chance that it’s Punjabi-run. posted by ivan ivanych samovar at 3:50 Please give me trucker countrybollywood music! And containerloads delivered by lavishly painted flower-bedecked juggernauts. posted by acb at 4:00 Unfortunately none of the ones on that map are on any of my usual driving routes, but hopefully the expansion will continue. posted by Dip Flash at 5:18 PM on July 1 ACB – I just came here to say the same thing. Imagine Convoy with these rigs and with the highway diner fight scene done like this (warning: proper bonkers). posted by Devonian at 5:31 PM on July 1 This echoes the beginnings of the adoption of ‘Indian’ cuisine within the UK. Just as the food became more Anglicised as it became more popular, with UK only creations such as chicken tikka masala, then I expect the same to happen in the US. Seek out the authentic (mainly if not exclusively vegetarian) stuff while you can. posted by epo at 3:39 AM on July 2 Well, it’s still going to be authentic, it’s just going to be authentic Indian-American. But I do feel lucky that there’s a number of South Indian restaurants in my area, as I do adore a good dosa, and more meat-friendly Indian cuisines seem likely to be the ones that go national. posted by tavella at 2:38 PM on July 2 [ 2 favorites ] Many years ago in Seattle, where Sikh taxi drivers were common at the time, I saw a cab driven by a turbaned man, with a bumper sticker that read: “Sikh Transit.” posted by spitbull at 8:02 PM on July 2 [ 1 favorite ] Did I miss something in this thread? What part of Indian food prepared by Indian American restaurant/truck stop owners for Indian American drivers is inauthentic? And who the fuck are you (is anyone) to say that? Dhabas, India’s culinary signposts Dhabas are an inseparable part of our road journeys. Fauji dhaba, Pehelwan dhaba, Sher-e-Punjab — the names line our highways and stay in our memories. … The origin of the dhaba is nebulous. It is said they sprouted on either side of The Grand Trunk Road and other highways during the 20th century, essentially to serve the truckers. The menu reflected the fact that most truckers came from Punjab. Interestingly, many iconic dhabas are not located on the highway. For instance, Amritsar’s famous Kesar da Dhaba was founded in 1916 in Sheikhupura, Pakistan and moved to the walled city of Amritsar after Partition. Today, waiters serve its famous dal fry and chapatti in red T-shirts. In a sense, dhabas are part of our shared heritage with Pakistan; something the Delhi to Lahore dhaba trail from December 23-28 seeks to relive. (See box) Several dhabas have now acquired legendary status. Puran Singh Ka Mashhoor Vishal Dhaba (near bus stand, Ambala Cant), Sharma Dhaba on the Jaipur-Sikar road and Sukhdev Dhaba at Murthal are some names that spring to mind. The upward mobility of dhabas is part of the larger India growth story. At many places, charpoys have made way for gaudy plastic chairs and tables. Some dhabas now even have a separate air-conditioned section. Many dhabas have upgraded their wares and expanded their menus. Note how several gourmet eateries and five-star restaurants replicate the dhaba look. posted by Mrs Potato at 1:15 AM on July 3 « Older Dangerous But Not Unbearably So | Orcs are my problematic fave. Newer » You are not currently logged in. Log in or create a new account to post comments. Related Posts

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Roots and Shoots

By Hugh and Colleen Gantzer
Everyone interested in tourism in Garhwal should copy the Garhwal Post’s editorial of 27 June 2019 (Rediscovering Roots); read it every morning; and repeat the last sentence like a mantra: “The government should be an enabler without interfering too much in the growth of this movement otherwise it would become less personal and lose the spontaneity that is making it possible.” Questing for one’s roots is a growing driver of international tourism: a fact not realised by our tourism babus. Here are some other suggestions based on our long study of the continued success of Switzerland’s Vaud – Lake Geneva region. 1. Tourism as a highly specialised industry can no longer be handled by generalists. It requires permanence, dedication, and a single-minded drive to find out what our generating markets want, followed by a fine-tuning of our product to meet their needs. That is marketing. Creating new destinations to suit a politician’s or a bureaucrat’s idea of what is necessary is not marketing, it’s selling. It is what the pavement vendor does: “Here’s what I’ve got: take it or leave it!” If we still try to sell our tourism then we will lose out. Create a Garhwal Tourist Office, manned by lateral entry professionals, not by lethargic babus and the chamchas of netas; pay them well; peg their tenure to their performance. Give them extensions if they deliver the goods, sack them if they don’t. That is how all successful tourism offices work world-wide without feather-bedding or the enforced job security of babudom. This may not have been possible in the past when offices were filled with their human Non-performing Assets. We, the Government believe that it is possible now. 2. Publicise the locations where movies have been shot. Increasingly, Uttarakhand is becoming popular with film makers. Create Location Tourism. Replicate familiar shots of stars in such locations with visitors made up as the stars in those films. This is an extension of our roadside photographers offering to take souvenir pics of tourists in “Hilly Costumes”. 3. Market village fairs and festivals. GP of 29th June carried a report of the Maund Fishing Festival held in the Aglar Valley. Are we publicising this? If this is a folk festival then it needs official protection as the Tamils had got for their Jallikettu. The GP report of 1st July says that Maund has been studied by experts for 20 years. If it is allowed to continue then use this opportunity to bring development to our hills. Build tourist facilities for visitors. Publicise it. Encourage local development around the festival: handicrafts, food, farm tours, hikes, all supported by basic pamphlets and trained local guides. 4. We return to our old hobby-horse: Garhwali cuisine. Our publicity promotes Garhwal as Dev Bhoomi under the trite slogan “Simply Heaven”. But if this is the home of our deities then they must have sustained themselves and their great powers on the food of this soaring land. Why are we not promoting the food of our mountains as the original, authentic, Dev Bhojan? Our government, aided by its catering experts, should then get a provenance certificate for our unique cuisine made from the very special ingredients grown in our worshipped Himalayas. If the fields of our high villages get revitalised, because the demands for their unique crops find new markets, then the sadly abandoned villages will live again. So we ask Minister Satpal Maharaj to have professional teams research Garhwal’s village customs, traditions, handicrafts, dress, jewellery, food and festivals. They should then produce readable, single-fold pamphlets as cheaply as possible, and as soon as possible, so that they can be distributed as widely as possible. Our Himalayas are a source of religious awe. All we have to do is to project our Garhwali people as the unique caretakers of this Divine Heritage, and say that they can be coaxed to share this ancient knowledge with the rest of India, and the world. For too long has tourism been viewed as a junketing opportunity for some members of the Indian Amateur Service. It’s time we respected it as the extremely sophisticated, swiftly evolving, high yielding profession that sustains Switzerland. It should also become Uttarakhand’s golden road to prosperity. SHARE

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