Head Chef

Head Chef

February 08, 2019
Versatile Consultancy – Dubai – We are urgently hiring a ‘Head Chef’ for an upcoming Bar & Restaurant in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Designation: Head Chef Package: AED 15K plus Accommodation plus Transport plus Food Industry Preferred: Food & Beverage/ Restaurant Note: The candidate must have a standalone work experience at a Restaurant. The candidate must have a Modern Indian Background. Must have experience in preparing Indian/ Continental/ International Cuisines. He/ She must be able to do a creative fusion of International & Indian cuisines. Key Responsibilities: Overseeing Operations: Executive chefs oversee the daily operations of the staff and kitchen. Innovation: To be financially viable, an executive chef must create new menu items that reflect innovation. Direction: All kitchen staff are under the direction of the executive chef. Cultivating Business: Since responsible for culinary arts, executive chefs consider the needs and desires of the customers. Purchasin…

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ATUL KOCHHAR TO LAUNCH NEW RESTAURANT ‘KANISHKA’ ON MAYFAIR’S MADDOX STREET

Health & Fitness search Atul Kochhar, the first Indian chef in the world to receive a Michelin star, is set to launch Kanishka on Mayfair’s Maddox Street this March. His first venture with Tina English, another recognised innovator of London’s Indian dining scene, Kanishka aims to explore lesser known regions of Indian food, showcasing cuisine from the country’s more remote territories and borders.
Kochhar first hit the London spotlight upon winning a Michelin star at the acclaimed Tamarind of Mayfair in 2001. He left to open Benares in 2002, which was awarded its own Michelin star four years later. Now a celebrated restaurateur, television personality and cookery book author, Kochhar attributes his success to his use of regional Indian flavours alongside the best British produce, a practice which he will develop further in his latest venture. Kanishka will showcase the cuisine of territories previously unexplored by London’s restaurants, particularly the Seven Sister States in the most easternmost region of India.
Kochhar’s menu will explore the flavours, ingredients and cooking methods of the states, as well as the influences had on these by neighbouring countries such as Nepal, China, and Bangladesh.
Using seasonal and locally sourced British produce where possible, signature starters will include the likes of Kachela Maas, a Sikkim inspired venison tartare with mustard oil mayonnaise, naan crouton and onions, with mains such as Samundri Khazana Alleppey, a dish of pan seared seafood, Alleppey sauce and smoked cabbage poriyal. To finish, desserts will continue to showcase unique Indian flavours with the likes of a Chocolate rasmalai, a milk-based dessert popular in eastern India and neighbouring Bangladesh and Pakistan.
Not to be overlooked, drinks will be a key element in Kanishka’s offering, with expert mixologists at the bar creating standout serves that make it a destination in its own right.
Signature cocktails include the likes of the Roast Banana Old Fashioned, made from Tandoor roasted banana with cinnamon, orange and pecan bitters, maple, and the more savoury Ingrita, made from Mezcal served alongside a chilled lightly spiced tomato broth.
Meanwhile, ‘Kanishka’s World of Imagination’ puts the mixing in the hands of the drinker, allowing customers to create their own highball drink from a menu of herb and spice distillates, mixed with a choice of naturally flavoured tonic waters and their spirit of choice.
For something stronger, Kanishka’s extensive whisky menu showcases over 50 types of whisky, with a unique selection sourced from India.
Named after King Kanishka, an emperor of the Kushan dynasty in the second century, Kanishka is inspired by the ruler’s use of Buddhist values, including kindness, fairness, honesty, humbleness and a sense of equality. These themes are explored through the interiors, designed by Fabled Studio with the aim of creating a nostalgic sense of ritual and tradition.
Guests will be greeted by whimsical topiary elephants and an antique front door, whilst inside will feature verdant foliage against calming shades of blue and intricate beaded details. Split across the ground and basement floors, the 127-cover space includes a bar, a terrace at the front, and an intimate, 12-cover garden room downstairs. Kochhar and English are delighted to be working together, bringing their wealth of knowledge in the Indian dining sector to the new site. Speaking of the opening, Kochhar says, “Kanishka is a very exciting project for us – it’s a great opportunity to continue to showcase Indian flavours alongside quality British produce, but also introduce London’s diners to the unique flavours of territories previously unexplored by Indian cuisine in the UK.” Opening Hours: Monday to Saturday, 12.00 – 14.45pm and 5pm – 11pm Sunday, 5pm – 11pm

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NOT WORTH FOR THE AMOUNT BEEN CHARGED

Firstly i would like to bring to notice that to commute to this location is quite painful as it is in the middle of nowhere and the roads are pathetic once you reach the property it has a beautiful view but nothing like that makes you feel mesmerized,staff was very helpful,quality of food was alright with good Indian cuisines but not so great with international selection as compared to the price charged ,no hot water in the shower ,no safe box to keep personal belongings,lot of late night noise coming from the common area overall the stay was not worth for the amount spend as there are more better options in this price category

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48 Hours In Park City, Utah

48 Hours In Park City, Utah 7 mins ago 0
Research from the University of Utah reveals that this Western U.S. state produces the greatest snow on earth for skiing and riding, thanks to an ideal combination of snow water content and climate conditions. Park City, Utah is one of the premiere destinations in the States to partake in winter activities and during the annual Sundance Film Festival (January to February), the slopes empty out as attention shifts indoors and onto the big screen.
We can’t think of a better opportunity to jump on a plane and experience the greatest snow on earth – discover our tips and recommendations for visiting Ski City.
Where to stay For a warm, budget friendly and local experience book a stay at Torchlight Inn Bed and Breakfast , which is situated a five minute walk from Park City’s Historic Main Street. Owners Chris and Russ are super hosts, who have turned the building’s former shell to a charming B&B with a beautiful view of the city and its slopes. For ski-in and ski-out access and accommodations, consider staying at the über luxurious St. Regis Deer Valley or at one of Deer Valley Ski Resort’s multiple lodgings .
Where to ski Drive approximately 20 minutes south from Park City to cross country ski at Soldier Hollow Nordic Center , the venue of the Salt Lake 2002 Olympic Winter Games. Soldier Hollow offers 30 km of groomed tracks for all skill types, from beginner to Olympic level; the purchase of an all-day cross country ski pass and rentals is quite reasonable here. Downhill skiers have a plethora of slopes to choose from in and around Park City. Deer Valley Resort is a long time city fixture and is a premiere ski destination, consistently voted #1 in guest services among ski resorts in North America ( SKI magazine ). The resort spans the length of six mountains with more than 2,000 acres and 103 trails.Snowboarders can suit up at Park Mountain Resort to shred its 7,300 acres and 300+ trails.
Where to eat Night time skiing is not offered at Park City ski resorts, therefore when the slopes go dark it’s time to après ski! The food scene in this former mining town offers a surprising array of cuisines from American fusion to Japanese. During the Sundance Film Festival, restaurants get very busy and you’re strongly encouraged to make reservations in advance. For a fine dining experience book a table at Handle and order its addictive General Tso cauliflower. During your midday ski break, head to the popular High West Distillery & Saloon and sample the High West Flight, a sampler of four of the brand’s namesake whiskeys. To satisfy your sushi cravings step into Yuki Yama Sushi , a high energy and happening spot – reservations here are an absolute must. Lastly, wrap up your trip and jump into a snow cat to nosh at The Viking Yurt . Established in 1999 this Nordic themed restaurant sits 1,800 ft up a mountain and sells out all winter long. On the menu is a six course, prix-fix gourmet dinner set inside a warm and cozy yurt which offers stunning views of Park City at night.
Where to shop Historic Main Street is where you’ll find all the action and film festival buzz. The shops here are charming and unique – no big box stores here! Independent and local establishments line the street and are one of the many features which make Park City delightful and special. We recommend stopping into a few local gems such as Burns Cowboy Shop which makes authentic cowboy boots, buckles and customs hats. Southwest Indian Traders is a two storey, cavernous shop lined from floor to ceiling with Western themed apparel and souvenirs. If you’re shopping inside this store during Sundance, you’re sure to sport a few celebrities here such as David Arquette trying on a leather cowboy vest. Kimberly Lyn
Kimberly Lyn is a freelance writer based in Toronto. Her worked has appeared on StyleList Canada, 29 Secrets and GlobalNews.ca. She is also founder of the highly successful fashion blog The Souls of My Shoes , where she provides insights and thoughts on this world with a concentration on footwear. Find her at www.thesoulsofmyshoes.com and on Twitter @kimberly_lyn .

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Here are the six restaurants in Bradford in the finals of the English Asian Food Awards 2019

4 comments A TOTAL of six restaurants and takeaways in the Bradford are have been shortlisted for the inaugural English Asian Food Awards 2019.
Finalists for the first ever English Asian Food Awards have now gone live after an influx of public nominations.
Restaurants, takeaways and other food establishments across England are being recognised for working hard to service the Asian food industry, promote Asian cuisine, and connect communities through food and culture.
The awards aim to celebrate the achievements of these businesses and individuals, commemorating the difference they make to England’s culture and economy.
The list of finalists has been compiled and announced based on hundreds of nominations received by the public and includes more than 300 establishments across a number of categories.
The local finalists for the English Asian Food Awards 2019 are: 5 Star Indian Restaurant of the Year, North: Royal Delhi Restaurant in Brighouse : Chinese Restaurant of the Year, North: The Imperial Chinese in Shipley ; 5 Star Indian Takeaway of the Year, North: Future Balti in Bradford; Pakistani Restaurant of the Year: MyLahore, PIND Restaurant and Jinnah Bradford.
The awards will be held at the Mercure Piccadilly Hotel in Manchester on Monday, February 11.
They aim to showcase the success, entrepreneurial spirit and creativity that fuel the English Asian Food industry, with categories ranging from Japanese Restaurant of the year, Outstanding Indian Restaurant and Asian Fusion Restaurant of the year.
The English Asian Food Awards 2019 are organised by Oceanic Consulting – the UK’s leading ethnic consulting and promotions organisation. The organisation is also responsible for the British Muslim Awards, which are to be held in Bradford shortly.
A spokesman said: “All finalists shortlisted for the English Asian Food Awards should feel proud to be recognised for hard graft and talent at the first event of its kind, for they bring joy and entertainment through delicious food which represents England’s rich culture and heritage.
“These awards honour and give thanks to those individuals who give their all to deliver outstanding services and continue to act as an inspiration to others aspiring to succeed in the Asian Food industry. We wish all our finalists the very best of luck and are looking forward to a great night of celebration.”

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The Best Things to Do in Metro Phoenix This Weekend: February 8-10 | Phoenix New Times

EXPAND Dressed for success. Benjamin Leatherman The Best Things to Do in Metro Phoenix This Weekend Cara Pencak , Jason Keil , Lynn Trimble , Benjamin Leatherman | February 8, 2019 | 6:00am The best part of the week has arrived — the weekend. This weekend, you can find your center at Nature as Therapy, do some good at Phoenix Volunteer Fest, or enjoy a delicious aftertnoon at Sausage Fest. For more things to do, visit Phoenix New Times ’ calendar .
EXPAND Checking out last year’s festival. Lynn Trimble Continue Reading Chinese Culture and Cuisine Festival
Celebrate the Year of the Boar as community members converge on Hance Park, 1202 North Third Street, for the Chinese Culture and Cuisine Festival. The three-day festival kicks off on Friday, February 8, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday’s lineup includes exhibits, performances, demonstrations, and hands-on activities for children. While you’re there, check out koi fish and dragon boat displays, the city’s giant panda sculpture, and a lovely tea garden. Or try your hand at the chopstick challenge. The festival continues through Sunday, February 10. It’s free, but bring money if you want to enjoy authentic Chinese cuisine while you’re there. Visit phoenixchineseweek.org. Lynn Trimble
DJ Fact 135 John Carbis Beats, Rhymes, and Donuts
This year would have been J Dilla’s 45th birthday. A party for the late rapper and beatmaker titled Beats, Rhymes, and Donuts is being thrown to mark the occasion. Presented by The Blunt Club, there will be performances by Elzhi, Bronze Nazareth, and DJ Reflekshin, to name a few. Since this is also the 13th anniversary of the Detroit-born hip-hop producer’s landmark album Donuts , there will be samples of the doughy breakfast food served courtesy of Welcome Chicken + Donuts.
Dilla says go at 7 p.m. on Friday, February 8, at Crescent Ballroom, 308 North Second Avenue. Tickets are $15 to $20. For more information, visit crescentphx.com . Jason Keil
Leslie Nielsen NBC Leslie Nielsen: From the Flies of Leslie Nielsen!
Before establishing his slapstick acting style in the classic comedy Airplane! , Leslie Nielsen was an accomplished Canadian actor who starred in everything from the ’50s science-fiction classic Forbidden Planet to the disaster epic The Poseidon Adventure . Dan Stone of The Unfathomable Film Freakout has captured the thespian’s finest moments — everything from his numerous television guest appearances to playing a villain opposite Barbra Streisand will be included in this collection of clips titled Leslie Nielsen: From the Files of Leslie Nielsen!
The show will surely begin at 10 p.m. on Friday, February 8, at FilmBar, 815 North Second Street. Tickets are $9.95. For more information, visit thefilmbarphx.com . And don’t call us Shirley. Jason Keil
EXPAND All smiles at last year’s Phoenix Idiotarod. Benjamin Leatherman Phoenix Idiotarod
Supermarket managers of the Valley, don’t be surprised if a shopping cart or two has gone missing from your store recently. There’s a chance they’ve been, um, borrowed by the racers of this year’s Phoenix Idiotarod. Don’t worry, though, they won’t be destroyed, just redecorated and put to good use during one of the Valley’s more gonzo outdoor events.
The Phoenix Idiotarod is an urban shopping cart race that’s equal parts bar crawl, cosplay fest, and countercultural event (with a bit of Cannonball Run and Jackass thrown into the mix). Teams of costumed pranksters will pilot colorfully modified shopping carts around the downtown Phoenix area, hitting up several bars and pit stops along the way. Each five-person squad features a different theme riffing on pop culture and there are plenty of shenanigans involved during the race.
This year’s Phoenix Idiotarod happens on Saturday, February 9, and will start off at Margaret T. Hance Park, 1134 North Central Avenue, with 20-plus teams participating, including some inspired by Bird Box , David Bowie, and GLOW . Check-in is at 11 a.m. and the race kicks off at noon. It’s $50 per team to participate or free to spectate. See azcacophony.org/idiotarod to sign up or for more info. Benjamin Leatherman
EXPAND The grass is always greener… Courtesy of McDowell Mountain Preserve Nature as Therapy
People have mixed feelings about green, especially when it comes to kale, shower tiles, and ugly Christmas sweaters. But nearly everyone appreciates the chance to get outdoors to experience the calming effect of nature. Head to the Gateway Trailhead at the Sonoran Mountain Preserve to see for yourself at a 90-minute Nature as Therapy walk is happening from 1:45 to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, February 9. You’ll cover about 1.5 miles, surrounded by fellow nature lovers who’ve also decided to forgo screen time for sunshine. The free walk starts at 18333 North Thompson Peak Parkway in Scottsdale. Visit mcdowellsonoran.org . Lynn Trimble
D-backs Fan Fest
It hasn’t been easy being an Arizona Diamondbacks fan lately. The team finished last season at 82-80. Paul Goldschmidt and A.J. Pollock are both gone. And, for all intents and purposes, it looks like the D-backs are headed into a rebuilding period.
All that said, there’s reason to be excited about this year. Players like Zach Greinke, Eduardo Escobar, and David Peralta are all coming back, so there’s always the possibility the team could have a great year.
The D-backs faithful can get hyped for the upcoming season on Saturday, February 9, at Salt River Fields, 7555 North Pima Road in Scottsdale, during this year’s D-backs Fan Fest. The afternoon-long event, which runs from noon to 4 p.m., will offer the chance to hobknob with players, coaches, and team personnel, as well as get autographs and photos with them. Baseball activities, batting cages, face painting, and an Arizona Diamondbacks Foundation yard sale are also planned.
Admission to the event is free. Call 602-462-3378 or see dbacks.com/fanfest for more details. Benjamin Leatherman
VNSA Annual Used Book Sale
Did you know that over 7,300 boxes of books, albums, magazines, maps, and DVDs are unloaded one week before the VNSA Annual Used Book Sale? Now in its 63rd year, it takes a legion of volunteers a week to unpack and organize the massive inventory of the biggest secondhand sale in the Southwest. This means you will easily find what you are looking for, whether it is a used copy of your favorite Michael Crichton novel or the season of Frasier that is missing from your collection, with books starting at $1.
The sale runs from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, February 9, and from 8.a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday, February 10, at Arizona State Fairgrounds’ Ag Center, 1826 West McDowell Road. This is a free event, but there is a cash-only fee to park. For more information, visit vnsabooksale.org . Jason Keil
EXPAND Do good. Courtesy of DT PHX Inc Arizona Strong Beer Festival 2019
For fans of malt and hops concoctions, it’s one the most wonderful times of the year. The annual Arizona Beer Week is on tap from February 7 to 16, offering local brew-lovers the chance to wet their whistle at a large variety of events across the Valley.
The centerpiece of the week is the Arizona Strong Beer Festival 2019, on Saturday, February 9, at Steele Indian School Park, 300 East Indian School Road. More than 130 breweries will serve a multitude of microbrewed and craft beers, all of which will offer stronger flavors and a serious kick, including several created just for the event. Live music, food vendors, and other beer-themed activities will take place.
Tops will pop from 1 to 5 p.m. General admission is $60 and includes 40 tasting tickets; VIP admission is $80 and features early-bird entry at 11:30 a.m., 40 tasting tickets, access to a private area, a food voucher, and swag. Designated drivers can get in for $10. See arizonabeerweek.com for complete details. Benjamin Leatherman
Phoenix Volunteer Fair
Despite living in the sunniest state, the shorter days can cause seasonal affective disorder in Arizonans, symptoms of which include fatigue and depression. To those feeling the gloomy effects, doctors recommend getting lost in charitable work. The Phoenix Volunteer Fair is one way to get matched up with the local causes you care about. Over 100 nonprofit organizations will be there, including the American Humane Society, Phoenix Center for the Arts, and the American Red Cross.
You can find your next charitable opportunity from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday, February 10, at The Van Buren, 401 West Van Buren Street. This is a free event. For more information, visit dtphx.org . Jason Keil
EXPAND A beautiful day in the neighborhood. Alex Rentzis Sausage Fest
If you’ve been through Arcadia lately, you know The Porch, with its casual mix of comfort food, games, and cocktails, is the perfect addition to one of Phoenix’s most posh neighborhoods. The restaurant is partnering up with its neighbor Arcadia Meat Market and Huss Brewing Company for their first Sausage Fest. Pours of Orange Blossom and Koffee Kolsch will be paired with various cased meats for a delicious afternoon prepared by Executive Chef Paul Lindsay.
Grind out some fun from noon to 2 p.m. on Sunday, February 10, at 4017 East Indian School Road. Tickets are $10. For more information, visit dtphx.org . Jason Keil
Willo Historic District Home Tour
Saunter your charming self over to the Willo neighborhood on Sunday, February 10, if you want to check out a dozen charming homes during the Willo Historic District Home Tour and Street Fair happening from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. You can get advance tickets online, or buy a ticket at Third Avenue and Monte Vista Road on tour day. Advance tickets are $18 a person or $50 for two (that last option also gets you four drink tickets). The tour also includes a historic firehouse, and more than 100 vendors are expected to share the local love that day. Bring cash for lunch, because 20 food trucks are showing up at lunchtime. Visit willophx.com . Lynn Trimble
Throwback to the 2017 championship. Lynn Trimble World Championship Hoop Dance Competition
Most of us struggle with keeping a hula hoop from falling to our feet. Imagine the agility and athleticism it must take to perform complex hoop dances with up to 50 hoops arranged in intricate patterns. Some of the finest American Indian and Canadian First Nation hoop dancers, whose performances reflect unique variations in tribal cultures, are taking part in the Heard Museum’s two-day World Championship Hoop Dance Competition. Grab your lawn chair or blanket and head over to the museum, 2301 North Central Avenue, on Sunday, February 10, when competition hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Dancers will be judged on showmanship, creativity, speed, and more. Single-day tickets are $18, which includes museum admission. Visit heard.org . Lynn Trimble
So many elaborate costumes. Courtesy of Arizona Renaissance Festival

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Taj steps foot in Himachal Pradesh

Taj steps foot in Himachal Pradesh February 7, 2019
The Indian Hotels Company (IHCL), South Asia’s largest hospitality company is introducing the iconic Taj brand in Himachal Pradesh with the opening of Taj Theog Resort & Spa, Shimla. Nestled amidst thick cedar forests and spread over five acres, every nook and corner of the hotel offers mesmerising views of the mighty Himalayas.
Puneet Chhatwal, Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer, IHCL, said, “We are delighted to open our first hotel in Himachal Pradesh, often referred to as the Land of Gods. This will be the Company’s first mountain resort. With this new addition, we have expanded our resort portfolio which is the largest in India. The State has great tourism potential and we look forward to expanding our footprint to showcase the pristine beauty of this region.”
Taj Theog Resort & Spa’s design and architecture echoes colonial charm reminiscent of hill station appeal. Surrounded by the deodar forest, with pathways through apple orchards and terraced gardens, the resort is the quintessential luxurious home in the hills. Each of the 99 rooms, with warm wooden furniture, traditional rugs and tall French windows offer spacious balconies overlooking snow peaks and quaint villages. The hotel is conveniently located at a comfortable drive from the two key cities of Shimla and Chandigarh.
“Taj Theog Resort & Spa is a sanctuary amidst Conifers, Cedars and tiny hamlets with the stunning skyline of the Himalayan range as a backdrop. It serves as an ideal location for guests seeking a mix of adventure and relaxation coupled with Taj’s legendary service” said Naveen Barthwal, General Manager, Taj Theog Resort & Spa, Shimla.
Guests have a choice of distinctive culinary options which include an all day dinner – Tragopan that offers the robust Pahari cuisine along with global cuisines and comfort food – Peony, the oriental restaurant offers Sichuan and Cantonese cuisines. Theog Junction, the pub is an imaginative tribute to the classic narrow-gauge toy train that chugs from Kalka to Shimla.
The resort also houses an expansive Jiva Spa, Taj’s award winning spa brand that is deeply rooted in India’s rich heritage of wellness, a temperature controlled pool with a sun deck and specially curated local experiences to ensure a memorable stay. SHARE

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Chinese food is mostly gloopy shite here, I always feel shite after it. Think the last one I actually enjoyed was Chop chop a few years back. They done some sort of garlic aubergine dish that was tremendous.
Indian, I love Indian food and the more I try I keep finding my way back to a dhaal. Simple but done right hard to beat.
I like Thai spices nam pla,line, chilli and coriander etc, probably a cuisine I need to explore more though.
Steak. Ribeye M/R pepper SC.

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World Pulses Day 10 February 2019

World Pulses Day 2019
World Pulses Day 10 February 2019 உலக பருப்பு வகைகள் தினம் – பிப்ரவரி 10 International Year of Pulses 2016 Recognizing all its values, in 2013 the General Assembly declared in its resolution 68/231 the International Year of Pulses 2016, which raised the role of pulses in contributing to sustainable food production aimed towards food security and nutrition. 10 February World Pulses Day In 2018, the UN General Assembly decided that 10 February will mark World Pulses Day, keeping alive the positive momentum surrounding these healthy, nutritious, protein-rich, nitrogen-fixing legumes after FAO’s successful 2016 International Year of Pulses Campaign. World Pulses Day 10 February
What are Pulses?
Pulses are a type of leguminous crop that are harvested solely for the dry seed. Dried beans, lentils and peas are the most commonly known and consumed types of pulses. Pulses do not include crops that are harvested green (e.g. green peas, green beans)—these are classified as vegetable crops. Also excluded are those crops used mainly for oil extraction (e.g. soybean and groundnuts) and leguminous crops that are used exclusively for sowing purposes (e.g. seeds of clover and alfalfa). Pulses include all varieties of dried beans, such as kidney beans, lima beans, butter beans and broad beans. Chick peas, cowpeas, black-eyed peas and pigeon peas are also pulses, as are all varieties of lentils. Staples dishes and cuisines from across the world feature pulses, from hummus in the Mediterranean (chick peas), to a traditional full English breakfast (baked navy beans) to Indian dal (peas or lentils). Why are pulses important crops?
Nutritional value Pulses are essential crops for a number of reasons. They are packed with nutrients and have a high protein content, making them an ideal source of protein particularly in regions where meat and dairy are not physically or economically accessible. Pulses are low in fat and rich in soluble fibre, which can lower cholesterol and help in the control of blood sugar. Because of these qualities they are recommended by health organizations for the management of non-communicable diseases like diabetes and heart conditions. Pulses have also been shown to help combat obesity.
Food security
For farmers, pulses are an important crop because they can be both sold and consumed by the farmers and their families. Having the option to eat and sell the pulses they grow helps farmers maintain household food security and creates economic stability. Furthermore, the nitrogen-fixing properties of pulses improve soil fertility, which increases and extends the productivity of the farmland. By using pulses for intercropping and cover crops, farmers can also promote farm biodiversity and soil biodiversity, while keeping harmful pests and diseases at bay.
Climate change mitigation
Pulses can contribute to climate change mitigation by reducing dependence on the synthetic fertilizers used to introduce nitrogen artificially into the soil. Greenhouse gases are released during the manufacturing and application of these fertilizers, and their overuse can be detrimental to the environment. However, pulses fix atmospheric nitrogen in the soil naturally, and in some cases free soil-bound phosphorous, thus significantly decreasing the need for synthetic fertilizers. Sources: https://www.un.org

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Photothread: British vs Thai vs Korean…

In the summer I had a very pleasant week in Hertfordshire and ate some great food. I live in Korea which has some nice food too. Lastly, I’m lucky enough to have the maniac wife’s cooking at hand on a daily basis.
Here are twelve random photos of food taken off my phone, tell me what your favourites are (and add your own):
Here in Korea they have this lamb on mini spits which is one of my favourite foods locally; works out $30 per person if there’s 4 or more of you – very often in Korea, the more people out eating together the cheaper it works out.
Bibimbab is a quick easy fix, $4 – it’s ok.
The wife does like to cook a pad seu, and I do like to eat it; not my favourite Thai dish, but preferable, to me, over most Korean dishes.
After a trip to HuaHin, eating on the pier restaurants, the wife decided to teach herself how to cook yellow seafood curry; very nice if you’re in the mood.
I’m fortunate that the wife will have a go at most types of food, and after complaining that the local Indian restaurant serves up a crap and over-priced chicken biryani she made one for me the next day – a lot better than the local Indian place.
The wife has a friend from Qatar. Her mother, from Nizwa, came over to Korea for a visit and cooked some Arabic food, so the wife learnt that too and now manages a very nice chicken dish; I really like this one, just about on a par with the one above.
Another home made Indian style dish. She has been known to throw a few butter rotis onto the plate too…
I went back to the UK in the summer and had a ‘proper’ Indian meal – this could be my favourite so far…
I
The parents live in a small Hertfodshire village, quite close to Cambridge, and they have a great bread shop and a great cheese shop. After living in Korea for 5 years, I can’t explain how much this simple meal below pleasured my palate – definitely my favourite so far.
Sometimes we go out for a samjipsal, and sometimes the wife does it at home (often with a bit of satay thrown in too). Here’s a home brew:
Amusingly, or not…, when we go out for a meal the wife like’s to tell the Koreans how to cook Korean food… Here’s the local samjipsal place, just across the road, it’s really good, maybe the most well-known in this city, and cheap as chips – costs about $12 for two people to get a big feed.
These late night Korean places sell a variety of mostly fried, but some boiled, stuff. I don’t like it at all, but the wife does…
Saving the best til last, I had a lamb Sunday lunch at a pub back in the UK in the summer. It was amazingly good:
Personally, Korean ranks in third. Thai is obviously excellent, and I do love British food; there’s a lot of great food in the UK, and a lot of great beers too. The wife does pretty well on the Thai side, so it’s her fault I’m too fat! Attached Images 20181003_202020.jpg (149.1 KB, 179 views) DSC_0005.jpg (67.7 KB, 171 views) DSC_0010.jpg (81.4 KB, 173 views) DSC_0014.jpg (77.4 KB, 169 views) DSC_0019.jpg (94.3 KB, 172 views) DSC_0020.jpg (63.9 KB, 167 views) DSC_0024.jpg (83.7 KB, 172 views) DSC_0044_1.jpg (111.9 KB, 171 views) DSC_0065.jpg (55.0 KB, 166 views) DSC_0066.jpg (109.9 KB, 168 views) DSC_0098.jpg (93.5 KB, 169 views) DSCPDC_0003_BURST20180826132825863_COVER.jpg (93.2 KB, 170 views) 1527758583902.jpg (145.2 KB, 168 views) Last edited by Bettyboo; 05-02-2019 at 09:28 AM . How do I post these pictures??? Reply With Quote: 05-02-2019, 09:35 AM #2 cyrille hangin’ around Join Date Oct 2006 Last Online @ Posts 14,361 Last edited by cyrille; 05-02-2019 at 09:53 AM . Reason: response to plies Reply With Quote: 05-02-2019, 09:46 AM #3 stroller restive member Join Date Mar 2006 Last Online @ Location out of range Posts 22,862 Originally Posted by Bettyboo there’s a lot of great food in the UK The pics of the Indian look really good. Reply With Quote: 05-02-2019, 10:02 AM #4 Bettyboo Member
Join Date Nov 2009 Last Online Yesterday @ 09:19 AM Location Bangkok Posts 28,491 Originally Posted by stroller The pics of the Indian look really good. Oh come on, tell me that Sunday lunch doesn’t look tasty! Reply With Quote: 05-02-2019, 10:31 AM #5 baldrick disturbance in the Turnip Join Date Apr 2006 Last Online Yesterday @ 10:57 PM Location Heidleberg Posts 20,276 Originally Posted by Bettyboo lamb on mini spits here in bumfcuk turkey I usually eat lamb barbequed like that – I get a kuzu duhrum which is a lamb wrap , so barbequed lamb skewers which are then wrapped in a pita bread ( lavush ) with lettuce and tomato and onion and then lightly toasted over the same coals – it is the wednesday take away – I will try and get photos tomorrow Reply With Quote: 05-02-2019, 10:31 AM #6 kmart Dec 2008 Last Online Yesterday @ 04:27 PM Location Rayong. Posts 10,170 Looks goood. You’re lucky your missus has a talent for lots of different cuisine. Reply With Quote: 05-02-2019, 11:30 AM #7 Bettyboo Member
Join Date Nov 2009 Last Online Yesterday @ 09:19 AM Location Bangkok Posts 28,491 Originally Posted by baldrick here in bumfcuk turkey I usually eat lamb barbequed like that – I get a kuzu duhrum which is a lamb wrap , so barbequed lamb skewers which are then wrapped in a pita bread ( lavush ) with lettuce and tomato and onion and then lightly toasted over the same coals – it is the wednesday take away – I will try and get photos tomorrow Yeah, I bet that tastes great – I like meself a bit of Turkish style lamb kebabaqos.
Originally Posted by kmart Looks goood. You’re lucky your missus has a talent for lots of different cuisine. It’s taken her a fair few years, but she has branched out beyond Thai food with her Scottish Egg potentially being her best effort; sometimes, coming home to half a dozen freshly cooked Scotch Eggs (in Korea…) is bloody wonderful. Reply With Quote: 05-02-2019, 11:47 AM #8 Switch Aug 2017 Last Online Yesterday @ 08:03 PM Location Sumatra Posts 2,658 That Sunday roast is very similar to the one I enjoyed in Thailand, too often.
Still think British Indian and Chinese is best. The mild Thai curries are good too. Not a big fan of over spiced foods in general.
Cant believe you went to UK as a foodie and no mention of fish and chips. Reply With Quote: 05-02-2019, 12:14 PM #9 Bettyboo Member
Join Date Nov 2009 Last Online Yesterday @ 09:19 AM Location Bangkok Posts 28,491 I did eat at a pretty nice fish and chip shop in Hertford, proper fish and chip shop; cod and chips, but have no pictures… Reply With Quote: 05-02-2019, 12:15 PM #10 Bettyboo Member
Join Date Nov 2009 Last Online Yesterday @ 09:19 AM Location Bangkok Posts 28,491 I did, alas, miss out on another great British dish; 5 days in the UK and I didn’t have a kebab.
Reply With Quote: 05-02-2019, 12:42 PM #11 Switch Aug 2017 Last Online Yesterday @ 08:03 PM Location Sumatra Posts 2,658 Originally Posted by Bettyboo I did eat at a pretty nice fish and chip shop in Hertford, proper fish and chip shop; cod and chips, but have no pictures… My last experience of home cooked British food, Indian, Chinese and fish and chips was back in 2015. A trip that also cost me a 90 quid fine and 3 points on my license.
Its good that your other half is an accomplished chef, but I find that any substantial meal, like a Sunday roast, takes too long and too much effort. Especially when it’s available down the pub. lol Reply With Quote: 05-02-2019, 03:22 PM #12 Bettyboo Member
Join Date Nov 2009 Last Online Yesterday @ 09:19 AM Location Bangkok Posts 28,491 ^ for me, yes. But, the wife likes cooking; shopping for ingredients, cooking, eating together, she likes the whole end to end process, and she’s usually not talking while sh’s cooking, so that works for me too… Reply With Quote: 07-02-2019, 05:55 PM #13 baldrick disturbance in the Turnip Join Date Apr 2006 Last Online Yesterday @ 10:57 PM Location Heidleberg Posts 20,276 the local lamb wrap
Attached Images Kosu Duhrum_20190206_171452.jpg (138.3 KB, 66 views) Kosu Duhrum_20190206_174238_HHT.jpg (98.0 KB, 66 views) kosu duhrum_20190206_180453_HHT.jpg (88.6 KB, 66 views) Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 04:49 AM #14 Dillinger Thailand Expat Join Date Jul 2012 Last Online @ Posts 24,263 You’re a lucky guy Betty having a wife that can cook at all, unlike mine
She looks in great shape too, maybe you should copy her eating habits you fukkin cake arse, or is that Tom?
I’ll try and put my favourites in order but it’ll be in vain as the main thing you need is variety.
So in descending order
1- That British Indian spread
2- Lamb Sunday Lunch
3- Seafood yellow curry- but made with just crab and no shells
4- $60/50 euro Korean lamb skewers and a nosh off Tomcat in chequed shirt.
5- chicken biryani
6- other Indian food
7- cheese and pibkle sandwich
8 -Pad Thai
9- That Arabian shit that Cyrille probably lives on but never shows anyone
10- Bibinbab
11- those Korean go out and fuckin cook it yourself hotplates.
Looking forward to your review on Filipino fine dining and to see if you add any fare from your first holiday there to this thread. Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 05:02 AM #15 Dillinger Thailand Expat Join Date Jul 2012 Last Online @ Posts 24,263 Originally Posted by baldrick the local lamb wrap
Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 05:20 AM #16 Chittychangchang Utopian Expat
Join Date Nov 2013 Last Online @ Posts 12,033 Always ate Korean for lunch when I worked at Garden Island, Sydney.
$5 for three dishes and rice.
Fooking lovely it was. Remember the spicy chicken wings yummy.
Thai food has to be the Green Curry in a restaurant on Lamai beach, amazing.
English has to be the full monty followed by the roast chicken Sunday dinner.
Food from around the globe, I’ll push the boat out and go for the pepperoni pizza at Chez chitty Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 08:16 AM #17 Luigi Thailand Expat Join Date Dec 2014 Last Online @ Location Abuja Posts 20,702
This one. Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 08:54 AM #18 Dillinger Thailand Expat Join Date Jul 2012 Last Online @ Posts 24,263 ^A cheese sandwich?
its not even a Ploughmans and that guy thrusting his groin forward on the sofa is deeply worrying. Reply With Quote: Yesterday, 09:02 AM #19 Luigi Thailand Expat

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