Guidelines For Selecting Vegan Restaurants Appleton WI

Guidelines For Selecting Vegan Restaurants Appleton WI

By Timothy Patterson
As a vegan, you need to find an eatery that can serve the sort of meals that you take. It is quite daunting to find a restaurant specialized in serving such meals. However, the process of identifying whether the restaurant is ideal enough is similar to usual selection methods. Continue reading this article to acquaint with a few guidelines for selecting vegan restaurants Appleton WI that you can consider.
Check the sort of meals that you need to take. Any meal that excludes animal product falls under the vegan category. There are particular cuisines which identity with this sort of diet. One of the most renowned cuisines that have a lot of vegan dishes are the Indian cuisines. Other cuisines that fall under such a category include a couple of Mexican, Turkish and Italian dishes.
Find a place that can accept vegan orders. The fact that it is hard to identify a restaurant that maintains a specific meal does not guarantee that you will not get your order. One can decide on a place that accepts special orders even though they have not specialized in vegan foods. Confirm whether they provide such services by evaluating their menu.
Identify an eatery that is easy to access. You should choose a place that is accessible to avoid spending too much time and money, reaching out to the eatery. You should also find a place with ample parking, and one can identify from far. The internet offers services that will help you identify a diner that fits precisely to your expectations.
Check the needs of your partner. If you intend to take someone for an outing, you have to consider their obligations to make a remarkable dining experience. So, ask your partner the sort of meals that he or she has an interest in and determine which type of diner to choose. If the partner has similar choices as yours, then you can find a specialized restaurant. If one has a different option, pick an eatery that accepts orders.
Evaluate the ambiance of your favorite cafeteria. There are quite a lot of aspects that define a remarkable ambiance. First, check whether it has a quality decoration that matches your standards. It should also have enough sitting space, a sitting arrangement that allows privacy and fresh air circulation. It should also provide an open setting where you can take your meals.
Confirm if the eating place is clean. There are possibilities of having dirt related infections if you dine in a dirty location. So, you should check various aspects to verify whether the diner maintains hygiene. Start by identifying whether it has a clean floor, clean toilets, clean tables, and whether the workers maintain cleanliness as well. You can go further into asking whether that place has undergone inspection and has acquired a certificate as a result of its hygiene.
Beware of your expenses. You should be careful not to spend more than your expectations when making your choices. Therefore, take note of the prices provided in the budget and confirm whether it matches your expectations. You can access the menu from the website of the restaurant of your choice.
About the Author:
Get excellent tips on how to pick vegan restaurants Appleton WI area and more info about a fantastic restaurant at http://www.javawarung.com right now.

Read More…

India doubles import quota for pulse imports: minister

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – India has decided to double the import quota for pigeon peas and sell some stocks on to the market to bolster the supply and prevent any shortages of the lentil, a staple in Indian cuisine, the food minister said on Tuesday.
The import quota will rise to 400,000 tonnes and the government will sell up to 200,000 tonnes of the lentils into the local market, Ram Vilas Paswan said via Twitter.
The government will also import 175,000 tonnes of pigeon peas from Mozambique, Paswan said.
(Reporting by Mayank Bhardwaj. Editing by Jane Merriman)

Read More…

Date with Dad at The Westin Mumbai Garden City

Date with Dad at The Westin Mumbai Garden City By 0 New Delhi, June 12, 2019: This Father’s Day, Seasonal Tastes at The Westin Mumbai Garden City pays ode to all the dads in town by offering an exclusive 50% discount! Spend quality time with the true hero of your life and make him feel extra special on this memorable day. Treat your father to a luxurious brunch experience with an array of delectable dishes made to perfection. Indulge in an afternoon of fun, from live music to live food counters curated by the culinary maestros at the property. The menu will feature delicious and enticing cuisines from across the globe like – Indian, Continental and Asian (Thai and Chinese) and a selection of desserts to end your brunch on a sweet note. Gift your dad a much needed break and pamper him to a scrumptious brunch at Seasonal Tastes, The Westin Mumbai Garden City. Venue : Seasonal Tastes, The Westin Mumbai Garden City Date : Sunday, 16 th June 2019 Time : 12:30 pm – 4:00 pm Price : 2450 + taxes (non-alcoholic brunch) | 2950+ taxes (alcoholic brunch) Reservation contact : 9004496577

Read More…

Hotel Giraffe Rises Above the Crowd

Accommodations , Online Exclusives As one of New York’s premier boutique hotels, it goes a long way to please
When I think of a peaceful retreat in midtown Manhattan, my thoughts drift to the lobby lounge of the Hotel Giraffe.
With balconies overlooking the corner of South Park Avenue and East 26h Street, the 12-story, red-brick hotel proved to be the perfect base of operations for my recent visit to New York. Its glassed-in lobby was a cheery place to have breakfast, enjoy the nightly wine-and-cheese reception, and just hang out and read newspapers and my Frommer’s EasyGuide to New York City . The Hotel Giraffe offers a nightly wine-and-cheese reception in the lobby.
The Hotel Giraffe offers a nightly wine-and-cheese reception in the lobby.The evening reception in the hotel’s comfy living room—featuring a vegetable tray, irresistible mixed nuts and six kinds of cheeses and crackers—was such a pleasant way to end the day that I didn’t want it to end. The conversation was low-key, the atmosphere convivial. Accented with orchids and other potted plants, the room was furnished with couches, easy chairs, and wood, glass and marble-top tables. A pianist serenaded on a black baby grand. The beautiful lobby lounge is the setting for breakfast and the evening wine-and-cheese reception, and has 24-hour snacks, coffee and tea.
Server Gabriella from Slovakia lit up the clubby room and made every guest feel special. After pouring my wine the first night, she remembered on the next that I liked the CK Mondavi & Family Cabernet Sauvignon. She also remembered my breakfast preferences the second day. Many guest rooms have balconies that overlook Park Avenue South or East 26th Street
It’s that personal service that makes the 72-room hotel stand out. Also helpful were friendly front desk staffers Stefan and Nicholas, who displayed a lot of patience as they helped me book and then change a Super Shuttle bus reservation to La Guardia Airport.
You have to like any place with Giraffe in its name. Hotel owner Harry Kallan named the hotel for his favorite animal. Its giraffe references, though, are subtle. The computer for guest use in the lounge has a giraffe screensaver, one wall sports a black-and-white photo of a giraffe, and a shelf behind the bar displays wooden African animals, including the gawky but graceful creature. The bookshelf in my 10th-floor room (an in all guest rooms)contained Tall Blondes: A Book About Giraffes by Lynn Sherr, a former correspondent for ABC News. The hotel logo incorporates a giraffe image as well, and there’s a large giraffe in the Rooftop Garden. The Hotel Giraffe’s Rooftop Garden is a popular place to hang out in the summer.
My room (1007) looked out on Park Avenue South and the New York Life Insurance Building, known for the gilded cupola that graces Manhattan’s skyline. The balcony, high ceilings and large mirror above the long granite desk gave my nest a lofty feel. Nice touches were the robe, slippers, refrigerator, potted bamboo and velvety chair with matching footstool.
Staying at the Hotel Giraffe opened up for me a whole new Manhattan neighborhood—NoMad—a hip pocket of New York well removed from the tourist crowds of Times Square and Rockefeller Center. But the No. 6 subway, only two blocks from the hotel, provides easy access to other parts of Manhattan. The Herman Melville Square street sign by the hotel recalls the author of Moby Dick , a resident of the neighborhood from 1863 until his death in 1891. Not far away is the Flatiron District and famous Flatiron Building with its triangular footprint.
Another discovery: a two-block stretch of Lexington Avenue called Curry Hill, an easy walk from the hotel. A fan of Indian cuisine, I salivated upon hearing about the bevy of ethnic restaurants and food shops clustered there. A signboard declaring “Best lunch buffet in NYC includes up to 22 items” lured me into Haandi restaurant, where I feasted in plain surroundings on chicken tikka masala, chicken biryani, potato samosas and other Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi dishes for $12. Another day I opted for Indian fast food at Curry in a Hurry.
Bread & Tulips, the Hotel Giraffe’s in-house restaurant, has a cozy, cellar-like vibe, offering brick-oven pizza, pastas and antipasti, along with duck, salmon and other dishes. Hotel guests get a 20 percent discount.
Just down the block is one of several locations of Sarabeth’s, renowned as one of New York’s best places for breakfast and brunch (and for its gourmet jams sold across the country). Hotel Giraffe guests can have a hot breakfast delivered from Sarabeth’s, which counts eggs Benedict and Fat and Fluffy French Toast among its prized staples. Continental breakfast is served in the Hotel Giraffe’s lobby lounge.
The Hotel Giraffe’s complimentary continental breakfast is served buffet-style in the lobby. Arranged on the bar, the spread includes fresh fruit salad and whole fruit, yogurt, oatmeal with berries, cold cereals, boiled eggs, croissants and bagels. Available at the bar all day are cookies, pastries and fruit, along with coffee and tea. Continental breakfast in the Hotel Giraffe’s lobby lounge.
Now that’s a lobby lounge to write home about.
For more information on the Hotel Giraffe, call 212-685-7700 or log on to https://hotelgiraffe.com .
The Hotel Giraffe is part of the Library Hotel Collection, which includes three other Manhattan boutique hotels—the Library Hotel, Casablanca Hotel and Hotel Elysee. Also in its portfolio are the Aria Hotel Budapest, Aria Hotel Prague and new Hotel X Toronto. ( https://libraryhotelcollection.com )
By Randy Mink, Senior Editor,
Leisure Group Travel Magazine,
Photos courtesy Library Hotel Collection.

Read More…

10 Different Types of Eggplant

Pin 0 0 shares
Eggplant is a food that you probably either love or hate – for most people, there is no in between.
The early history of eggplant’s cultivation and use by humans is somewhat murky. The plant is believed to have originated in India where it grew (and still grows) wild, and there is some evidence that it was domesticated and grown there and in East Asia since before recorded history. The first known mention of the eggplant, however, only dates back to Chinese writings of the 3 rd century B.C. Eggplant made its way through the Middle East to the Mediterranean in the early Middle Ages (mostly as a medicinal plant) and finally into Europe in about the 12 th century. From there it spread throughout the world.
Today, over 50 million tons of eggplant (called aubergine in the UK and brinjal throughout Asia and Africa) is commercially cultivated worldwide with China (at about 32 million tons) accounting for well over half of that total. Other major producers include India, Turkey, Egypt, and Iran. Interestingly, although it is a very popular plant with gardeners and some varieties grow well throughout the US and Canada, less than one half of one percent (around 100,000 tons) of worldwide eggplant production is accounted for by the United States.
Normally characterized as a vegetable for culinary purposes, eggplant is actually a type of berry from a flowering vine in the Solanaceae family of plants. A nightshade plant, eggplant is related to tomatoes, bell peppers, and potatoes. The seeds and the skin, as well as the flesh of most eggplant, can be eaten. While it is most often consumed after being cooked, some eggplant can be eaten raw, although it may cause intestinal distress in some people due to it containing solemine – a mild toxin. It also has a quite bitter taste in its raw form. Nutritionally, on its own eggplant is an excellent source of dietary fiber and not much else.
Eggplant can range in color from a dark, almost black purple to pure white. Most common varieties will be egg-shaped (hence the name), have a relatively thick edible skin and a spongy white flesh. The seeds, while edible, have a bitter taste and are often removed before cooking. The thick flesh of most eggplant allows it to absorb oils and juices (and therefore flavors) well while cooking, accounting for its use in hundreds of dishes in dozens of cuisines around the world.
So, what are some of the most common types of eggplant? Purple Globe Source: Produce Market Guide
Also sometimes called the American eggplant (for its popularity in the US) the Purple Globe is probably what comes to mind when you think of an eggplant, and what you will most often find in the produce section of your supermarket. First cultivated in Asia in the 14 th century (and still primarily cultivated there), Purple Globes range from one to five pounds and will usually grow up to 10 inches in length and up to six inches in diameter. They are probably the most widely commercially cultivated eggplant in the world today.
The skin of the Purple Globe is (not surprisingly) a dark purple and usually very smooth, while the flesh is a creamy white with a somewhat firm, spongy texture and a slightly bitter taste after cooking. It is a very adaptable eggplant and is used in almost endless cooking applications throughout the world. It can be baked, roasted, broiled, pan-fried or grilled. A very ‘meaty’ eggplant, they are often used as a meat substitute in vegetarian pasta sauces and dishes, stir-fries, incorporated into meat or poultry-based stews and soups, and served as a vegetable with a variety of meat, chicken and baked fish dishes. They are also used in the production of meatless ‘veggie burgers’. Italian Buy On Amazon
Italian eggplant is the name widely used throughout the United States and Europe for any one of about a dozen closely related eggplant cultivars popular for their use in Italian and Western European cuisines. Probably originating in India or China, they first arrived in Italy in the mid-9 th century.
Resembling the Purple Globe in both shape and color, Italian eggplant varieties are smaller (usually about half to three-quarters the size) with a thinner skin and a slightly sweeter flavor. The flesh tends to be ivory in color and very porous, allowing these eggplants to easily soak up the often heavy oils and sauces used in Italian cooking. Italian eggplant is widely used in pasta dishes and sauces (both with and without meat), is often pickled, and is used as a main ingredient in the eponymous eggplant parmesan. Although this eggplant stands up to cooking well, it is fairly fragile in its natural raw state. It can normally only be stored at room temperature for about three days, and will suffer chill damage if refrigerated. Graffiti Source: Melissa’s
The Graffiti eggplant probably originated in Central India, and is today a favorite with home gardeners throughout the Western world due to its unique appearance. The skin of this aptly named eggplant will usually be either predominantly purple with white striping, or ivory with purple striping when raw (the striping will usually disappear during cooking). Normally about the same shape and size as its Italian cousin, the Graffiti has a creamy, less spongy ivory flesh that has a relatively sweet and fruity taste, making it one of the eggplant varieties that are sometimes eaten raw – particularly in parts of Europe and Asia. Their sweetness increases when cooked, making them good for use in vegetable medleys, as a standalone vegetable with richer meat (such as lamb and veal) based dishes, and are sometimes topped with melted cheese. Indian Source: Etsy
Indian eggplant (called Brinjal or Ratna) have been cultivated in their native India for hundreds – and quite probably thousands – of years. A small roundish oval eggplant rarely reaching over 3 inches, the Indian has a moderately thick, smooth dark red to purple skin and a crisp, firm white flesh. Normally only found at specialty markets outside of Asia, the Indian eggplant has a mild sweetness when cooked. They are often used in curry dishes, dipped in breadcrumbs and fried, and sometimes stuffed with herbs and rice. Because of their sweetness when cooked, they are often used to offset some of the stronger spices used in many Indian and Middle Eastern dishes. They are also sometimes grated, and used in traditional Ayurvedic medicine , particularly in the treatment of stomach ailments. White Source: Bonnie Plants
Originating in Eastern India and what is now Bangladesh, White eggplant has probably been cultivated in these and neighboring regions since before recorded history. Today there are dozens of cultivars of White eggplant widely grown throughout Asia; some of the more familiar cultivars to Western taste buds include the Albino, Japanese White, Ghost Buster, White Beauty, and Tango. Most cultivars will be between five and seven inches long, and an oblong shape that tapers towards the stem. White eggplant will have white or ivory-colored skin and a creamy white flesh that will usually have a less bitter taste than the purple varieties. The skin is often thicker and firmer on some varieties than purple eggplants, and will most often need to be peeled off and discarded before cooking. White eggplant is used in many of the same dishes as its purple relative, as well as in traditional Ayurvedic medicine, often to treat asthma symptoms. Thai Source: Melissa’s
The Thai is a small, cylindrical eggplant that is usually about the size of – or just a bit larger than – a golf ball. The thin skin can be varying shades of green, and is often mottled or streaked with white, while the flesh will usually be a creamy white with a relatively crunchy texture and a mild, slightly bitter flavor. Widely cultivated throughout China and Southeast Asia (particularly Thailand and Indonesia), the seeds tend to be quite bitter, and are often removed prior to cooking. The Thai is often used in soups, curries and stir fry dishes, and –unlike most eggplant – sometimes used raw in salads. Thai eggplant is not as durable as many other varieties, and will normally need to be used within a day or two of purchase. Japanese Purple Buy On Amazon
Also sometimes called the Japanese Long Purple, or just Long Purple, the Japanese Purple probably made its way to Japan (from whence it took its name) from China, and is today cultivated throughout the Far and Near East. An elongated (often up to ten inches) thin eggplant, it has a deep purple thin skin that sometimes ranges to black, and a mild, fairly sweet flavor. Very popular in soups, sir fry dishes, and stews throughout Asia, the Japanese Purple is also often grilled or pan fried and served as a side dish to meat, poultry, and some fish dishes. Known for having fewer seeds than many other varieties, they are also often pickled and consumed in this form as a snack. Garden Egg Source: True Love Seeds
A native of sub-Saharan Africa first introduced to Europe in the mid-14 th century by Ottoman traders, the Garden Egg is a small white to yellowish eggplant with a thin, very tight skin and a mild, slightly bitter tasting flesh. Widely grown throughout Central and Northern Africa, Southeast Asia, Brazil, and parts of Europe, the Garden Egg has also recently enjoyed increasing popularity in the US, particularly as a garden vegetable. Used in many traditional African dishes, they are also often used in stir-fries, stews, soups and are sometimes grilled and served as part of a medley. In many parts of Africa, they are consumed raw. Turkish Source: Burpee
Another eggplant of African origin and today most widely cultivated in parts of Asia, Turkey (for which it is named) and Brazil, the Turkish is a small round eggplant (normally about 3 inches) with an orange / red skin when fully ripe, and yellowish firm flesh. In most cases, Turkish eggplant is harvested while still a greenish color before they fully ripen, at which point the flesh is fairly sweet and quite tender. If left until they are orange, the flesh – and particularly the seeds – become quite bitter. When they are harvested young, Turkish eggplant (also called Gilo or Jilo in Brazil) are often used in stews and soups, and as a vegetable side dish. When mature, they are often hollowed out and stuffed with grains, ground meats or other vegetables and baked. Kermit Source: Johnnyseeds
A fairly recent hybrid of the Thai eggplant, the Kermit (also known as the Kermit F-1 and reputed to have been named after Kermit the Frog of Muppet fame) was developed in the United States and is both commercially cultivated and grown in backyard gardens there. A very small, round eggplant usually about an inch in diameter, the Kermit’s skin is green and white and its flesh is crunchy with a mild flavor. The Kermit was developed to be used both raw and cooked, and is frequently used in green salads, battered or breaded and fried, and used in parmesan and marinara dishes.

Read More…

Restaurant review: At Little Tibet, home tastes like blood sausage and beef broth

Save
To make the blood sausage at Little Tibet, owner Namgyal Ponsar and her brother, chef Thinley Tenzing, don’t grind the beef.
“We chop it by hand into really small pieces, so you feel like you’re chewing on it,” said Ponsar.
Ponsar makes gyuma, Tibetan blood sausage, with blood she gets still in liquid form from UW Provisions. Each sausage is so dark it’s almost black, stuffed and seasoned with garlic, oats, yerma (Sichuan pepper) and tsampa, roasted barley flour Ponsar calls “the staple food of Tibet.” On the side, a sauce of tomato and chilies makes the sausages taste even more intense and earthy than they do on their own.
For black sausage, Ponsar said, her customers are mostly Tibetan, like she is.
“I feel like I’m making sausage mainly for them,” said Ponsar, who expanded her Tibetan food cart into a cozy restaurant at 827 E. East Johnson St. earlier this year. “It’s heavy, very traditional, very Tibetan.”
The front dining area at Little Tibet is flanked by a sculpture, made by the owners, of the four noble truths of Buddhism. MICHELLE STOCKER
Last spring, Ponsar and her family — another brother, Therten Tsering, oversees the front of the house — turned the former location of La Taguara and The Spot into a home for handcut Tibetan noodles and bone broth, fresh cucumber/tomato salad and meaty dumplings. To widen the restaurant’s appeal, they’re also making Nepalese thali sampler plates and a little Bhutanese food, namely ema datshi ($9), a chili cheese stew.
Ponsar’s brothers sculpted the words in clay that now greet diners who climb the steps and enter the first part of the dining room, tightly packed with wooden booths. Tibetan script spells out the four noble truths of Buddhism, sayings about misery and pain and how to find the way out of it.
Ponsar admits that suffering seemed like an odd theme at first.
“I said, ‘Why do you want to put that in the restaurant?’” Ponsar said with a laugh. “But that’s the point of the universe. That’s the reality.”
Little Tibet’s food is about comfort and heft. Aside from the blood sausage ($7 for a small plate, $10 for a large), there are bowls of beef bone broth, with an almost gelatinous roundness in the mouth. Some cooks make it clear, but Ponsar likes the flavor of barley in her broth.
Chicken sausage momos at Little Tibet are served with a tomato-chlii sauce and pickled radish. MICHELLE STOCKER
The broth accompanies simple meat momos, round, pinched little packages steamed to piping hot. Madison is short on yak meat, so Little Tibet fills each dumpling with either chopped beef or chicken sausage ($9 for eight). Ponsar shapes vegetarian momos ($8 for eight) into crescents. This helps the kitchen tell them apart, she said. A recent special with mushrooms, paneer cheese and chives makes a satisfying appetizer.
Ponsar likes to make things by hand. In a bowl of veggie thupka ($10), a broth-based soup with mushrooms, celery and bok choy, homemade egg noodles sprung out of our mouths as we bit into them. The kitchen makes noodles fresh every other day.
Ping alla at Little Tibet is a savory crepe stuffed with cabbage, mung been noodles and carrots. MICHELLE STOCKER
The only ingredients in the batter for ping alla ($6) are egg, flour, water and a little baking powder. The batter has to be made at least three hours in advance, Ponsar said, to have the right, slightly chewy texture. It’s presented as a savory crepe, wrapped around mushrooms, cabbage, carrots and bean thread noodles.
The ping alla reminded me most of banh xeo, a savory Vietnamese pancake made with rice flour. Here the flavor was slightly more sour, contrasting the earthiness of mushrooms and sweet carrots. According to “The Lhasa Moon Tibetan Cookbook,” ping alla were born at that restaurant in San Francisco to “satisfy the Western desire for appetizers.” At our table they were a universal hit, served sliced into flat rounds like Tibetan American sushi.
Tenzing trained in India, and the lamb curry on a Nepalese thali platter ($15) had the rich depth of Indian spices with aromatic top notes of ginger and cardamom. Thali , the name of both the platter and the dishes on it, is like getting a bunch of small plates at once. Little Tibet features paper-thin crispy papadum, roti (flatbread), lentil soup, sauteed kale, pickled potatoes and a mound of rice. There’s a mildly spicy chutney in the center of the plate and a bowl of cool rice pudding for dessert.
The curry’s unquestionably the star, but beyond that, thali a perfectly self-contained, customizable meal. Ponsar said some restaurants make thali bottomless, like a personal buffet, but she wanted to keep both portion size and price in check.
With a less familiar cuisine like this, it was hard to know whether tingmo, a steamed bun that comes with sizzling short ribs ($15) on a metal platter, should be so chewy, almost gummy in texture. Ponsar said no, they’re meant to be fluffy, but that lasts only about 10 minutes. Execution, she said, can be tough.
There’s also a fine line between comforting and boring. Because Little Tibet aims at a range of palates, spice levels were all fairly low, though they could be brought back up again with a chili condiment on the table.
Still, stir-fried noodles with beef and bell peppers ($12) tasted bland and a touch greasy. Thin-sliced fried potatoes ($5) with curry ketchup tasted almost like French fries. With the rest of the food, it was weight we didn’t need.
For some, though, weight is the point. Ponsar said some tables order a whole thermos ($12) of the Tibetan tea, a mix of butter, milk and salt. (As my friend pointed out, it’s the things that go into mashed potatoes to make them delicious, but without the potatoes). Little Tibet lightens theirs a touch with steamed milk, but the savory tea is an acquired taste.
“Some people say it tastes like a soup,” she said. “It’s supposed to be thick and buttery and dense.”
Little Tibet keeps dessert simple, topping bananas and caramelized ginger with scoops of chocolate ice cream ($5) and fruit salad with whipped cream ($5).
That’s the whole idea, Ponsar said. Simple food, from home.
“I keep it very traditional, the traditional way of cooking,” she said. “None of us are professional chefs or anything like that. We’re trying to cook what’s in Tibetan homes. That’s what we’re trying to present.”

Read More…

The Verandah Kitchen: The Success of Indian Street Food

Tweet This
Ten years ago, Radhika Sule and her husband, Amit, took their craving for traditional Indian street food to Baltimore’s downtown Farmers’ Market.The popularity of their cuisine moved the couple to open a restaurant on the “Avenue” in Hampden. That was seven years ago. Now, 2019 finds even more growth with the opening in DE.CO Market in Wilmington, De., Baltimore’s revamped Broadway Market, and expansion into the Pratt Street Farmers’ Market.The Verandah Kitchen’s cuisine — Indian street food — offers vegans and vegetarians tasty options like samosas, chaats paratha, and wraps, as well as chicken and beef options for the carnivores.Pre-opening of the remodeled Broadway Market had Radhika showing off dishes like tiki chaat (potato patties, curried chickpeas, chutney, and samosas), chicken curry, papdi chaat (housemade tortilla, potatoes, onions, yogurt, and chutney), along with mango lassi drinks and Thai iced tea.
The Verandah Kitchen Locations: 842 W. 36th Street – Hampden/BaltimoreBroadway Market – BaltimoreDE.CO Food Market/Dupont Building – Downtown WilmingtonBaltimore Farmers Markets: Downtown & Pratt Street

Read More…

Tour of Turkey’s Delights at Feast Turkish cuisine is much more than Baklavas and Turkish Delights! The 9-day Turkish food festival at Feast, Sheraton Grand Bengaluru Whitefield Hotel and Convention Center is set to take you on a culinary tour of the West Asian country of Turkey to discover their extraordinary cuisine. Expert guest Chef Ibrahim introduces and presents variations of Turkish delights to the Indian palette. The festival includes an array of rich Mediterranean and Central Asian flavours that are unique to the senses. The menu features redolent food inspired from the Ottoman cuisine that have evolved through many generations. Feast will showcase authentic dishes like Haydari, Lamb Tandori, Baklava, Manti, Seesh kebab, Doner Kebab, Corba, etc. Don’t forget to try the signature Turkish Delight, a nougaty dessert served with a variety of flavours and fillings and often topped with powdered sugar. Relish the cuisine from the land of the Crescent Moon only at Feast, Sheraton Grand Bengaluru Whitefield Hotel and Convention Center. Date : 7 th June to 15 th June 2019 Time : Lunch – 12 pm to 3 pm Dinner – 7pm to 11 pm Venue : Feast, Sheraton Grand Bengaluru Whitefield Hotel and Convention Center Price : INR 1,399 + taxes Drinks INR 699 (All inclusive) (Special Package) About Marriott International: Marriott International, Inc. (NASDAQ: MAR) is based in Bethesda, Maryland, USA, and encompasses a portfolio of more than 7,000 properties under 30 leading brands spanning 131 countries and territories. Marriott operates and franchises hotels and licenses vacation ownership resorts all around the world. The company now offers one travel program, Marriott Bonvoy™, replacing Marriott Rewards®, The Ritz-Carlton Rewards®, and Starwood Preferred Guest®(SPG). For more information, please visit our website at www.marriott.com , and for the latest company news, visit www.marriottnewscenter.com . In addition, connect with us on Facebook and @MarriottIntl on Twitter and Instagram .

Read More…

I’m white and I put hot sauce on almost everything I eat, but I can’t handle a true Indian or Thai spice level. But anyone who routinely eats spicy food will gain a tolerance for it. It’s just that cuisines from traditionally white places don’t tend to be very spicy.

Read More…

Malaysian Mushroom Korma

Cayenne How to make a delicious Malaysian Mushroom Korma:
There are no special skills needed, but make sure you have all of the ingredients, because each contributes to the unique flavor profile.
Also, make sure that you give the korma enough time on the stove, because the blended raw spices need to cook. Rushing things is just not a great idea. This curry takes under 45 minutes from start to finish, so you don’t really need to rush. What to serve with Malaysian Mushroom Korma:
You can serve the korma with any sort of bread — a flatbread like a grilled naan or a squash-stuffed naan or roti is great, but even a crusty French or Italian bread would not be amiss for dunking into this curry and scooping it into your mouth. Or drizzle it over rice or quinoa.
Serve with fresh salad or, better still, a vegan cucumber raita on the side.
The korma tastes even better the next day, once the flavors have had time to work themselves into tasty harmony, so this is definitely a dish you can make ahead. It freezes well too — thaw and warm before use. Malaysian Mushroom Korma Recipe: 5 from 2 votes Malaysian Mushroom Korma Malaysian Mushroom Korma is a beautiful curry, full of rich flavor, and it works for either a weeknight dinner or a special meal with family or friends. Prep Time 15 mins Cuisine: gluten-free, Malaysian, Soy-free, Vegan Servings: 8 1 large onion (thinly sliced) 2 cloves garlic (minced) 1/4 cup coconut milk 24 oz mushrooms (shiitake, portabella, crimini, oysters are all wonderful. Chop or slice the mushrooms according to your preference. If you use dry wild mushrooms, be sure to reconstitute them in hot water and reserve the stock to use in the curry) 2 medium potatoes (cubed) 4 shallots (or 1 medium red onion, chopped) 6 cloves garlic (chopped) 1 tsp coriander seeds 1-2 tsp cayenne (optional — if you can’t tolerate too much heat, leave this out because the peppercorns and the garam masala will add some heat) Instructions Place the ingredients for the spice paste in a blender and using just as much water as is necessary, process to a thick, smooth paste. Heat oil in a large saucepan. Add the onions, cilantro if using, ginger and garlic and a pinch of salt. Saute until the onions turn translucent. Add the garam masala and stir to mix. Add the spice paste and stir well. Cook, on medium-low heat, stirring frequently to keep the paste from sticking to the bottom. Cook about 10 minutes or until the paste is quite fragrant. Add the yogurt, potatoes and mushrooms. Mix well. Don’t add water at this point even if you think the curry looks dry because the mushrooms will express water, especially if you’re using fresh mushrooms. If using dry mushrooms, add 1/2 to 1 cup of the mushroom stock — the water remaining after you reconstitute the mushrooms. Cover and let the korma cook another 10 minutes. Check after five minutes to make sure there is enough liquid in the pot. If necessary, add some water or vegetable stock to thin out the korma to the consistency you like. Add the coconut milk and warm through before turning off the heat. Serve hot or warm. The korma tastes even better the next day! Nutrition Calories: 134 kcal | Carbohydrates: 16 g | Protein: 6 g | Fat: 4 g | Saturated Fat: 3 g | Potassium: 647 mg | Fiber: 4 g | Sugar: 4 g | Vitamin A: 2.1 % | Vitamin C: 13.9 % | Calcium: 5.2 % | Iron: 17.8 %
Filed Under: All Recipes , Bakes ‘n’ Cakes , Indian Vegan Recipes , Vegan Bread Recipes , Vegan Entrees , Vegan Kid Friendly Recipes , Vegan Malaysian Recipes , Vegan Middle Eastern Recipes About Vaishali
I cook and eat simple, tasty and nutritious plant-based food in my Washington, D.C. kitchen, but I never fight a craving for samosas or French fries. Follow me on Pinterest, Facebook and Instagram, and read more about me here.

Read More…