Grove Stand: Profiling Chef Niven Patel of Miami’s Ghee Indian Kitchen

Grove Stand: Profiling Chef Niven Patel of Miami’s Ghee Indian Kitchen

by Laura Reiley | June 26, 2019 Grove Stand: Profiling Chef Niven Patel of Miami’s Ghee Indian Kitchen Chef Patel ignores the warnings, joins the industry and then revolutionizes what we know of Indian food. Niven Patel; Photography by Andres Acero
Niven Patel is a conundrum. On one hand, his history has elements of a traditional Indian immigrant’s story. And on the other, what he’s managed to do feels new and disruptive.
His family is from Gujarat, India’s westernmost state. In the mid-1970s, along with so many other Indians, they migrated to the United States, shoring up in Valdosta, Georgia. A family friend had a little hotel. They got into the business, building up properties and going into the convenience store business as well. (Interestingly, about a third of American motels are owned by folks with the surname Patel—look it up.) With intentions of joining in the huge family affair, Patel trotted off to business school in Jacksonville in 2003 hoping to serve in the operation eventually. And yet, it didn’t feel right.
He decided to go to the Culinary Arts School at The Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale. His parents were distraught. His grandmother said, “What girl is ever going to marry you?” He had to convince six aunts and uncles, but his ace in the hole was that his mother’s sister lived in Fort Lauderdale and would keep an eye on him. He got his bachelor’s degree in culinary arts and found a mentor in chef Dean Max at the Fort Lauderdale Marriott Harbor Beach Resort & Spa. He never thought he’d cook Indian food professionally; that was for family gatherings, the exotic but humble Gujarati dishes synonymous with home.
He worked salad stations and shucked oysters (allergic to shellfish, he told no one). He went to Italy and worked in Florence for six months. After that, he moved back to Jacksonville to dive into the family business and create restaurants at his relatives’ properties, as his original family plan dictated. Max gummed up the works, convincing Patel to take a sous chef job at Cheeca Lodge & Spa in Islamorada, where he ended up becoming executive chef and staying four years before moving on in 2010 to head the kitchen at another Max venture, The Brasserie in Grand Cayman. At Ghee, Niven Patel specializes in dishes made with the fruits and vegetables he grows himself. Photography by Andres Acero
“That’s where I really found my style of cooking. It was modern American food, but we had our own farm and two of our own fishing boats. To this day I cannot find the quality of fish that we had there—wahoo, yellowfin tuna, different varieties of amazing snapper, like black snapper from 1,200 feet of water. The owners were 100 percent all-in. I immersed myself in Bahamian food and made it my personal goal to embrace all the beauty around us.”
At this point Patel’s wife Shivani (see, his grandmother isn’t right about everything) was in nursing school stateside and was hoping he’d come join her. He contacted Miami’s famed Michael Schwartz, who in 2014 gave him a chef de cuisine job at Michael’s Genuine Food & Drink, where Patel stayed for 3 1/2 years.
Still, no Indian food at work. Instead, he started a backyard farm at his house in Homestead and one night invited friends over for a traditional Gujarati meal—roti; khichdi made of yellow mung beans and basmati rice; yogurt soup with curry leaves, black mustard seed and chickpea flour; and baby eggplant with potatoes and tomatoes.
“My friends were like, ‘What is this?’ I went to Michael [Schwartz] and said I wanted to do an Indian restaurant.” Read more about chefs that are changing Florida’s culinary scene here .
The result, opened in May 2017, was Ghee Indian Kitchen in Dadeland. A second location opened in Miami’s Design District at the end of 2017. It was instantly something new and exciting, and Patel garnered “rising star” accolades from various organizations and a coveted spot as a 2019 James Beard Award semifinalist for best chef in the South.
“People think we’re fusion cuisine because we’re using a lot of ingredients that normal Indian restaurants don’t have. But it’s dishes I had as a kid. People from Gujarat say it brings them back to their childhoods. I do that same eggplant dish I did for my friends.”
The look of the restaurant doesn’t say “Indian”: It’s industrial chic, spare and edgy, with warmth delivered by rows of jars crammed with beans and pickles and spices. And with Patel’s own two-acre working farm supplying an array of exotic produce, it has seriously ambitious farm-to-table aims. And there’s more. Patel is personally responsible for supporting a whole village near Bardoli in Gujarat, where the green millet he cooks with in his restaurant is produced. Patel’s farm at his home in Homestead. Photography by Andres Acero
“They burn wood and make hot ash and put huge stalks of millet to dry. They put the stalks in bags, then harvest all the kernels, then sift out the husks. It’s couscous-like and pops in your mouth like caviar. We saute it in olive oil, mix it with cilantro chutney and housemade yogurt with crispy chickpeas on top. It’s very traditional to that area.”
Traditional in Gujarat, but in the context of Miami’s restaurant scene, it’s something approaching revolutionary. Ghee Indian Kitchen

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Exploring Jaisalmer through its best eateries

Exploring Jaisalmer through its best eateries From laal maas to bruschetta, here’s where to eat in the Golden City Published: Jun 27, 2019 | 11:00:11 IST Laal Maas, photo by Santhosh Varghese / shutterstock
Jaisalmer might be surrounded by the barren Thar Desert, but its restaurants and cafés do a good job of making it resemble a land of plenty. A wide variety of menus feature the best of local, traditional fare, often combining it with the staples of global cuisines. Here’s a culinary guide to help you eat your way through Jaisalmer: The Trio
Wandering within the Jaisalmer Fort, it’s easy to lose its sense of scale. Head to this restaurant to take in the sweeping vistas of the majestic fort, while enjoying dishes from its vegetarian and non-vegetarian menu. Try the classic laal maas (mutton curry), washed down with a cold beer or a bottle of wine. Jaisalmer Kitchen
This all-day-dining restaurant, located inside Jaisalmer Marriott Resort & Spa, can cater to your every imaginable culinary fantasy. From its lavish breakfast spreads, Indian and international lunch menus to the dinner buffet, Jaisalmer Kitchen will satisfy your cravings before and after your city tours. Desert Boy’s Dhani
This special place has its tables set around a stone-paved courtyard inside a walled garden, making for a cozy setting. Indulge in special Rajasthani and other Indian vegetarian dishes, as you watch the live Rajasthani music and dance performances (every night, 8-10pm). The Mithai Company – Chaat Centre
With its sweet or savoury snacks and artisanal teas or gourmet coffees, this little café inside the Jaisalmer Marriott Resort & Spa, will make sure that your break from all the exploring and shopping in the city is a refreshing one. German Bakery
Located near Fort Gate, the German Bakery has a decent selection of sandwiches, cakes, including croissants, and coffee. Get your caffeine and sugar hit in one go, to put a spring in your step for all the sightseeing to come. Jaisal Italy Restaurant
When you want a break from the traditional Rajasthani menu that you’re bound to encounter everywhere, head to Jaisal for some decent Italian food. This beautifully decorated restaurant serves pastas, pizzas, salads, bruschetta and desserts. And for those who change their mind at the last moment, there are also Indian dishes to choose from. A win-win situation. The Traveler’s Cup Premium Coffeeshop
One of the rare spots in Jaisalmer that serves proper coffee, this café has everything going for it—the menu, its quirky décor as well as the mini library. It’s a great break from the burning sun and the bustling city at any time of the day. Dunes Bar
End your day with a soothing drink in hand at the sophisticated Dunes Bar, inside Jaisalmer Marriott Resort & Spa. Their artistically crafted cocktails and a great selection of wines will make sure you have a soothing evening, as you sit with your friends and family to reminisce the day’s adventures.

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42nd Asian American International Film Festival Announces Full Lineup

Home » ADORABLE » ANIMATION » CUTE » EDUCATION » GENERAL » RELIGION » 42nd Asian American International Film Festival Announces Full Lineup 42nd Asian American International Film Festival Announces Full Lineup Thursday, June 27, 2019 ADORABLE , ANIMATION , CUTE , EDUCATION , GENERAL , RELIGION Edit 42nd Asian American International Film Festival Announces Full Lineup – Hallo friend REFERENCES FILM CHILDREN , In the article you read this time with the title 42nd Asian American International Film Festival Announces Full Lineup, we have prepared well for this article you read and download the information therein. hopefully fill posts Article ADORABLE , Article ANIMATION , Article CUTE , Article EDUCATION , Article GENERAL , Article RELIGION , we write this you can understand. Well, happy reading. Title : 42nd Asian American International Film Festival Announces Full Lineup see also 42nd Asian American International Film Festival Announces Full Lineup JUNE 27, 2019, NEW YORK – Presented by Asian CineVision, the 42 nd Asian American International Film Festival (AAIFF42), and taking place July 25 – August 3 in New York City, has announced its full film lineup. The first and longest running Asian interest film festival in the country, AAIFF42 will be presenting 12 narrative features, 9 documentary features, and 67 short films, from 19 countries. OPENING NIGHT : YELLOW ROSE Directed by Diane Paragas – USA Rose, an undocumented Filipino girl, dreams of one day leaving her small Texas town to pursue her country music dreams. Her world is shattered when her mom suddenly gets picked up by Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Rose, facing this new reality, is forced to flee the scene, leaving behind the only life she knows, and embarks on a journey of self-discovery as she searches for a new home in the honky tonk world of Austin, Texas. YELLOW ROSE will screen on Thursday, July 25 at 7:00pm at Asia Society. CENTERPIECE : MS. PURPLE Directed by Justin Chon – USA From award-winning filmmaker Justin Chon ( Gook , 2017), MS. PURPLE is a poignant drama about Asian American sister and brother, Kasie (Tiffany Chu) and Carey (Teddy Lee), who were raised and are now seemingly stuck in Koreatown, Los Angeles. Abandoned by their mother and brought up by their father, the siblings continue to struggle with deep emotional wounds from the difficulty of the parental dynamic. Now, with their father on his deathbed, the estranged Carey comes home to help Kasie care for him. As they reunite over their dying father, Kasie and Carey confront their shared past, attempting to mend their relationship. MS. PURPLE will screen on Saturday, July 27 at 7:30pm at Asia Society. Closing Night: HAPPY CLEANERS Directed by Julian Kim & Peter S. Lee – USA HAPPY CLEANERS is about the Choi Family living and surviving in Flushing, Queens. We observe the day-to-day lives of the Choi Family members as they navigate through their respective struggles, cultural clashes, inner angst, all while trying to keep the family dry cleaning business afloat. HAPPY CLEANERS will screen on Friday, August 3 at 7:00pm at Asia Society. RETROSPECTIVE & SPECIAL PRESENTATIONS FRESH KILL Directed by Shu Lea Cheang – USA, Taiwan Described by the director as “Eco-Cyber-Noia,” FRESH KILL centers around a non-nuclear family anchored by mothers Claire (Erin McMurtry,) Shareen (Sarita Choudhury) and their daughter Honey (Nelini Stamp.) A wild ride involving corporate conspiracies, pollution and community activism, Shu Lea Cheang’s debut is a must see. FRESH KILL will screen on Friday, July 26 at 8:30pm at Asia Society. MERATA Directed by Hepi Mita – New Zealand A documentary portrait of the pioneering indigenous filmmaker and activist Merata Mita, MERATA is an intimate tribute from a son about his mother that delves into the life of the first woman from an Indigenous Nation to solely direct a film anywhere in the world. Known as the grandmother of Indigenous cinema, Merata’s independent political documentaries of the 70’s and 80’s highlighted injustices for Maori people that often divided the country. MERATA will screen on Wednesday, July 31 at 8:45pm at Regal Essex. MISSISSIPPI MASALA Directed by Mira Nair – USA, UK Mississippi Masala is a tale of how prejudice makes victims and instigators of us all. In 1972, Indian Jay (Roshan Seth), a resident of Uganda, is forced by the bigoted Amin regime to take his family and flee the country. He vows to hate and distrust all blacks–at least until he is able to reclaim the real estate stolen from him by the Ugandan government. Flash-forward to 1990: Jay and his family have settled in Mississippi. Seth’s daughter Mina (Sarit Choudhury) makes the acquaintance of African-American Demetrius (Denzel Washington), the prosperous manager of a carpet-cleaning business. MISSISSIPPI MASALA will screen on Wednesday, July 31 at 8:15pm at Regal Essex. THE SLANTED SCREEN Directed by Jeff Adachi – USA Hollywood has a long tradition of cultural prejudice, particularly when it comes to depicting Asian peoples. For Asian actors, only limited roles are available, and they are often pigeonholed into depicting ethnic stereotypes. The struggle against these stereotypes, as well as the dilemmas facing actors forced to succumb to them, are explored through interviews with Asian actors and filmmakers and in a series of archival film clips covering a century of American film. Paired with the short film THE RIDE Directed by Jeff Adachi and Jim Choi THE RIDE takes viewers on a personal and intense ride through the underbelly of the criminal injustice system, seen through the eyes of SF Public Defender Jeff Adachi, who is one of the nation’s few elected public defenders. THE SLANTED SCREEN and THE RIDE will screen on Tuesday, July 30 at 6:15pm at the Museum of Chinese in America. NARRATIVE FEATURES CITIES OF LAST THINGS Directed by Wing Ding Ho – Taiwan, France In reverse chronology, CITIES OF LAST THINGS tells the story of an ordinary man through three extraordinary nights. Each story, set in the future, present, and past, examines his relationships with women and how they have influenced his life. CITIES OF LAST THINGS will screen on Friday, August 2 at 8:15pm at Regal Essex. DEMOLITION GIRL Directed by Genta Matsugami – Japan A high-school student, living in a small town in Japan, takes on an unusual side job to shoulder the weight of her family’s financial burdens and her university costs. She is forced to face one difficult decision after the next, which eventually culminate in one night of mayhem. DEMOLITION GIRL will screen on Monday, July 29 at 8:30pm at Regal Essex. EMPTY BY DESIGN Directed by Andrea A. Walter – Philippines, USA EMPTY BY DESIGN is about the struggle of identity experienced living and growing up in multiple places surrounded by different cultures, and what it means to call a place home. The film takes place in Manila, Philippines and follows Samantha, a recent University Graduate who moves back home after her parents have passed away, and Eric, a Hollywood Stuntman and Body double who comes back to shoot a new film. EMPTY BY DESIGN will screen on Saturday, July 27 at 5:00pm at Asia Society. GO BACK TO CHINA Directed by Emily Ting – China, USA When spoiled rich girl Sasha Li blows through half of her trust fund, she is cut off by her father and forced to go back to China and work for the family toy business. What simply begins as a way to regain financial support soon develops into a life-altering journey of self-discovery, as Sasha learns the family business from the ground up, and more importantly, learns to reconnect with her estranged family. GO BACK TO CHINA will screen on Friday, August 2 at 8:15pm at Regal Essex. IN A NEW YORK MINUTE Directed by Ximan Li – USA IN A NEW YORK MINUTE follows three strangers as they accidentally discover the solution to their problems lies in a single pregnancy test. Amy is haunted by a past breakup that has manifested into an eating disorder. Angel is caught between a loveless marriage to an American businessman and a passionate affair with a Chinese writer. Nina moonlights as an escort in order to support herself. IN A NEW YORK MINUTE will screen on Saturday, August 3 at 4:30pm at Asia Society. K.D. Directed by Madhumita Sundararaman – India KD an 80-year old village overhears his children say they want him dead to claim their inheritance. Realising he has never lived for himself, KD runs away from home. He encounters an 8-year-old orphan and together they discover the meaning of life and friendship. K.D. will screen on Tuesday, July 30 at 8:30pm at Regal Essex. LAST SUNRISE Directed by Wen Ren – China, USA A future reliant on solar energy falls into chaos after the sun disappears, forcing a reclusive astronomer and his bubbly neighbor out of the city. As temperature goes subzero, oxygen depletes, the only hope is a miracle at their final destination, District Four. Akin to the orphan planet earth, they gravitate forward in search of light in the perpetual darkness. LAST SUNRISE will screen on Sunday, July 28 at 9:00pm at Asia Society. LUCKY GRANDMA Directed by Sasie Sealy – USA Set in New York City’s Chinatown, an ornery, chain-smoking Chinese grandma goes all in at the casino, landing herself on the wrong side of luck – and in the middle of a gang war. LUCKY GRANDMA will screen on Sunday, July 28 at 6:45pm at Asia Society. SONG LANG Directed by Leon Le – Vietnam Set in 1980s Saigon, Song Lang is a gritty underworld noir hiding a tender, romantic heart. At the film’s core is the unlikely bond that develops between hunky, brooding Dung (Lien Binh Phat), a tough debt collector for a ruthless loan shark, and Linh Phung (popular V-pop singer Isaac), a charismatic young opera singer for a struggling company that performs cai luong, a modern form of traditional Vietnamese folk opera. SONG LANG will screen on Thursday, August 1 at 8:30pm at Regal Essex. DOCUMENTARY FEATURES AMERICAN HASI Directed by Laura Asherman – USA, India After losing his day job, comedian Tushar Singh decides to pursue stand-up comedy full-time. Singh maps out a 35-day tour of India, taking part in India’s flourishing stand-up scene and drawing on his unique perspective as the son of conservative Hindu parents in Huntsville, Alabama. AMERICAN HASI will screen on Thursday, August 1 at 6:00pm at Regal Essex. BEI BEI Directed by Marion Lipschutz From the moment Bei Bei Shuai steps out of jail on the arm of her lawyer Linda Pence, their lives are consumed by an impending murder trial. If they lose, Bei Bei will go to jail for 45 years to life, setting a precedent that will affect all pregnant women who, intentionally or not, terminate their pregnancies. But if they win, it will be a landmark in blocking a long standing stealth movement to end abortion, at any stage of pregnancy. BEI BEI will screen on Monday, July 29 at 8:30pm at Regal Essex. EATING UP EASTER Directed by Sergio M. Rapu – Chile, USA In a cinematic letter to his son, native Rapanui (Easter Island) filmmaker Sergio Mata’u Rapu explores the modern dilemma of their people, descendants of the ancient statue builders, as they face the consequences of their rapidly developing home. EATING UP EASTER will screen on Friday, August 2 at 6:15pm at Regal Essex. JERONIMO Directed by Joseph Juhn – USA, Cuba Born in 1926 to Korean indentured servant parents in Cuba, Jeronimo joins the Cuban revolution and crosses paths with Fidel Castro and Che Guevara, before turning to his Korean roots and identity. JERONIMO will screen on Tuesday, July 30 at 6:00pm at Regal Essex. LOVE BOAT: TAIWAN Directed by Valerie Soe – USA, Taiwan LOVE BOAT: TAIWAN is a coming-of-age film that looks at the Taiwan Love Boat, one of the longest running summer programs in the world, where college-aged Taiwanese Americans get closer to their history, their culture and each other. Throughout its history the Love Boat has served as a political tool for Taiwan’s government, as a means for Taiwanese American parents to ensure the preservation of Taiwanese bloodlines, and as a site for romance for young Taiwanese Americans, reflecting Taiwan’s history as well as the history of the Taiwanese American community. Paired with the short film SPRING BUD Directed by Candy Chan – China, USA Through the power of education, one woman’s vision transforms the lives of a thousand girls in China’s rural Shaanxi Province. LOVE BOAT: TAIWAN and SPRING BUD will screen on Wednesday, July 31 at 6:00pm at Regal Essex. RITUALS OF RESISTANCE Directed by Tenzin Phuntsog, Joy Dietrich – Tibet RITUALS OF ASSISTANCE looks at the evolving generational responses by pacifist Tibetans under 65 years of Chinese occupation. Through first-hand oral accounts by three Tibetan exiles living in Nepal, the U.S., and India, the film traces the three paths of resistance from the active and the brutal, to the realm of the symbolic and sacrificial. Paired with the short film THE LITTLE GODDESS Narrative – Directed by Gauri Adelkar – India Durga and her family depend on the ‘Bahurupi’ – a dying folk art practiced in rural India – to survive. Every day they transform into mythological characters and perform skits in which Durga is the star performer. RITUALS OF RESISTANCE and THE LITTLE GODDESS will screen on Sunday, July 28 at 12:30pm at Asia Society. SEADRIFT Directed by Tim Tsai SEADRIFT documents the immigrant and refugee experience in the American South; something that the mainstream media almost never talks about. Focusing on Vietnamese immigrants who moved to the Gulf Coast of Texas after the end of the American conflict in Vietnam, we’re placed in the center of a world of racial tensions and constant violence that eventually ends in death. Paired with the short film THE TALE OF KIEU Narrative – Directed by Ray Leve – Vietnam In the years following the Fall of Saigon (1975), an exodus occurred in numbers of hundreds of thousands. Life under the Iron Fist was catastrophic – plagued by grave conditions of poverty and oppression. To escape Vietnam was to take to the seas and it was there that many had also perished. SEADRIFT and THE TALE OF KIEU will screen on Tuesday, July 30 at 8:15pm at Regal Essex. THE UGLY MODEL Directed by Doris Yeung – USA From the outside, Philly based Korean American adoptee and fitness model Kevin Tae-jin Kreider seems to have it all, Looks, Muscles, Chutzpah, Confidence and Charisma. He has a popular Instagram and vlog and has modeled around the world for the likes of Men’s Health, Gillette and Abercrombie & Fitch. Yet since childhood, he has always felt ugly and second best as an Asian male in America. THE UGLY MODEL examines the paradox of a handsome male model who feels ashamed, ugly and emasculated because of his Asian ethnicity in America. THE UGLY MODEL will screen on Friday, July 26 at 6:30pm at Asia Society. WHEN WE WALK Directed by Jason DaSilva – USA WHEN WE WALK is a compelling story of one man’s struggle to maintain his relationship with his son while also trying to maintain what’s left of his independence as he lives with a severe form of muscular dystrophy. WHEN WE WALK will screen on Saturday, August 3 at 2:30pm at Asia Society. SHORT FILM PROGRAMS Laugh Through It: Comedy Shorts In this year’s comedy shorts lineup, we plunge into a twisted exhibition, a panicked seminarian, a daughter’s interrogation, a dramatic dependency, a sensei’s heartbreak, an automated love story and a newfound respect for chicken. EXTINCT Directed by Veronica Dang – USA Black Mirror meets Odd Couple MASTERS OF DIVINITY Directed by Eugene Suen – USA. South Korea An ex-seminarian and now-struggling filmmaker begins to panic after his wife tells him that God wants her to quit her job SIGH GONE Directed by Jeannie Nguyen – Vietnam Without the guide of her “lost love”, Thuy is on the verge of death by boredom. Having no agenda, she finds odd ways to entertain herself in the bustling city of Saigon, Vietnam. FORBIDDEN TIKKA MASALA Directed by Rahul Chaturvedi – Canada, India A coming-of-old-age story that follows a devoutly religious vegetarian who finds a new lease on life after mistakenly eating chicken at her retirement party. THE INTERVIEW Directed by Bobby Yan – China, USA In order to meet her boyfriend, a young woman must pass a complex and incredulous series of questions from her mother, in what becomes, The Interview. MR. YOSHI’S TERRIBLE DAY Directed by Ken Lin – USA After a humiliating defeat in front of his students, a delusional “chi-energy master” struggles to regain his purpose. Inspired by true events. A LIFT STORY Directed by Viplav Shinde – India Santosh Kumar, a country boy who has found a job as a house help in Mumbai’s up market residential tower, falls in love with the female automated voice of the elevator believing the voice talks only to him and exists in real. The Laugh Through It: Comedy Shorts program will screen on Thursday, August 1 at 8:00pm at Regal Essex. Beyond Queer: LGBTQ+ Shorts We are more than our gender identity, sexuality or race. These shorts show the beautiful depth of the queer Asian diaspora. From the gorgeous exploration in “Kiss of the Rabbit God,” the hilarity of relationships in “I Think She Likes You,” to the reawakening of love in middle age in “Halwa,” this block showcases that we are all more than our labels. SPINSTERHOOD Directed by Jhanvi Motla – USA, India Sara Chatterjee is forced to come out to her family when her girlfriend Spencer discovers she secretly goes on dates with men to appease her parents. SAFE AMONG STARS Directed by Jess X. Snow – USA A queer Chinese-American woman struggles to tell her immigrant mother why she left school. She teleports into her own galaxy where no violence can touch her. KISS OF THE RABBIT GOD Directed by Andrew Thomas Huang – USA A repressed Chinese restaurant worker falls in love with an 18th century Qing dynasty god who leads him on a journey of sexual awakening and self discovery. HALWA Directed by Gayatri Bajpai & Nirav Bhakta – USA An Indian Immigrant woman decides to rekindle her relationship with her childhood companion through facebook messages until her abusive husband finds out. ABLUTION Directed by Omar Al Dakheel – USA The bond between a disabled Muslim father and his son is tested when love is pitted against religion. PEPPER Directed by Jayil Pak – South Korea, USA When the Korean Goddess of Birth ushers one boy’s soul to grant a couple their son, an unforeseen ghost alters her plan. LIONHOOD Directed by Jason Karman – Canada A portrait of two teenaged hockey players which explores the intensity of adolescence – a time of unrestrained physicality and surging hormones, resulting in unchecked impulses and unseen emotions . I THINK SHE LIKES YOU Directed by Bridey Elliott – USA When Justine and Julia pick Jake up at a bar, it’s not quite the threesome he was expecting. The Beyond Queer: Queer Shorts program will screen on Saturday, July 27 at 2:15pm at Asia Society. Thicker than Water: Shorts In this eclectic, intimate selection of shorts, familial and national bonds are stretched to a breaking point. The siblings, cousins and neighbors of nail-biters like BESIEGED, and OUR HOME HERE are barely afloat in a sea of confusion, mistrust and isolation. Many are traveling or have arrived at a new place, like the Filipino immigrant family at the center of KAAWAY, and have only the other person as an anchor. Will they find a safe shore, or go under together? MAUKA TO MAKA Directed by Jonah Okano & Alika Maikau – USA Set in Kāneʻohe on the island of Oahu, two cousins grapple with their own internal struggles while trying to sell drugs to make a living. KAAWAY (ENEMY) Directed by Wester Demandante – USA In 1996, a Filipino boy is stuck behind enemy lines after a brawl at school. HEDIEH Directed by Sahar Sotoodeh – Iran Hedieh is a 14 year old girl who escapes from the school service in Iran. Her friend is now forced to explain Hedieh’s whereabouts in this tense classroom drama. OUR HOME HERE Directed by Angela Chen – USA Parallel stories of broken relationships between parents and their children striving for the American Dream all revolving around one explosive night at a fast food joint. BESIEGED Directed by Mengchen Niu – China A jealous actor begins to sabotage his musically gifted brother after he realizes they are auditioning for the same film role. The Thicker than Water Shorts program will screen on Monday, July 29 at 6:15pm at Regal Essex. The Phone or the Pen?: Art and Technology Stories In OUROBOROS, A DAY OF THE ARTIST, BUFFALO NICKEL, BEAST, HAVE A NICE DAY, and FIREBIRD we see how people struggle to find themselves in the modern world. Often, technology can keep you hemmed in and distanced from loved ones, but art and passion can set you free. In these films, we see art and tech interwoven into various lives, which help hold onto or further distance people from their families, both blood and chosen. OUROBOROS Directed by Trevor Choi – Hong Kong This is a story about a struggling stage director Choi trying to adapt Susan Or’s web fiction. A DAY OF THE ARTIST Directed by Byung Hoon Lee – Korea A day of film composer on the deadline. BUFFALO NICKEL Directed by Youthana Yuos – USA A bored and lonely Indian American woman unwittingly calls upon the powers of a Social Media Influencer who offers her a chance to change. BEAST – DANCE MOVIE Directed by Johnson Cheng – USA Carson, California is home to the reigning Krump champions of the world. They call themselves the “Beast Fam” — a crew made up of suburban Filipino and Mexican American youth who found both family and salvation through the electric street dance of Krump. HAVE A NICE DAY Directed by Lau Kok Roi – Hong Kong Babar, a Pakistani immigrant left with nothing, finds as he comes out of jail that his wife, Hina, and son, Ali, had left their home. Reluctantly, he seeks help from his good friend Numan, and learns that Hina wants to divorce him. FIREBIRD Directed by Mimi Lee – USA An Asian-American artist loses her identity as she navigates her way through a social-media driven world. The The Phone or the Pen? Art & Technology Shorts program will screen on Thursday, August 1 at 6:15pm at Regal Essex. Otherly Worlds: Genre Short Films Things aren’t always what they seem. What begins as everyday, quickly becomes an exploration of legends, beasts, future technologies, alter-egos, and the supernatural. Join us as we experience a twist on stories of triumph, friendship, deception, and self-discovery. ALTERNATE EGO Directed by David Chai – USA This film explores the possible dangers of social media and how the profile we see on our friend page could just be an alternate ego. THE LIE GAME Directed by Jyothi Kalyan Sura – USA, India After losing her boyfriend to depression, a computer scientist creates and anti-depression AI application and looks for funding to complete it. Following a string of failed interviews, she enters her final interview which turns into a bizarre challenge of lie detection. QUANTUM Directed by Ryan Willard – USA, Philippines When a boy battling a brain tumor is ready to give up, his little sister helps him discover a message of hope. THE VISIT Directed by Roxy Shih = Taiwan, USA A pregnant woman and her husband visit her lonely, aging grandmother in the rural mountains of Taiwan only to witness the older woman’s mysterious disappearance. DISAPPEAR Directed by Namroc Doan – USA A daughter gets manipulated by her mother to pull off a heist and struggles with the fallout of the crime. BALIKO Directed by Chris Chung – UK Mara, a once renowned photographer, journeys deep into the mountains in search of a mystical beast never photographed before. But while searching for a mythical beast, the beast she truly discovers is inside herself. The Otherly Words: Genre Shorts program will screen on Sunday, July 28 at 2:30pm at Asia Society. Off the Beaten Path Shorts In this collection of short films, we find ourselves in surreal spaces, odd predicaments, and obscure inner worlds, where bizarre and whimsy collide and we discover places we could never have imagined. ALBATROSS SOUP Directed by Winnie Cheung – USA, Japan, Hong Kong Albatross Soup is an animated short hybrid documentary film based on an entertaining yet disturbing lateral thinking puzzle. Over 50 people have been recorded trying to guess this riddle using only “yes” or “no” questions. BRUNCH WARS Directed by Kamran Khan – USA Three best friends meet every month for a cook off where they each prepare a dish and try and outdo one another. But this time, revenge is on the menu when unresolved issues from their past bubble to the surface. BUNNY MAN Directed by Athena Han – Canada A group of Taiwanese friends enjoy their meal in a Chinese restaurant while discussing the differences between FOB (fresh off the boat) and CBC (Canadian born Chinese). Then a mysterious Bunny mascot enters and disturbs the night. CHEAT Directed by Yeo Joon Han and Boris Kalaidjiev – China A woman tries to help a man overcome his suicidal thoughts by telling him her grandmother story. IN FULL BLOOM Directed by Maegan Houang – USA In Full Bloom is a surrealist short film about overcoming the loss of a partner within the parameters of living as a female Vietnamese immigrant. WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT THE WATER AND THE MOON Directed by Layla Jian Luo – China, USA During an attempted abortion, a girl gives birth to a live jellyfish. HOW TO LIVE YOUR LIFE CORRECTLY Directed by Xindi Lou – USA A troubled, neurotic teenager pins all hope for an existential breakthrough on winning the love of her rebellious hospital roommate. The Off the Beaten Path Shorts program will screen on Friday, August 2 at 6:00pm at Regal Essex. Made in NY Shorts New York City is where we started and where we continue to champion storytellers. We’re thrilled to present a diverse slate of shorts created by NY based filmmakers. AN AMERICAN FAMILY Directed by Kieu-Anh Truong – USA Three people. One kitchen. A family END OF SUMMER Directed by Serena Ku o – USA A teenager’s college move-in day takes an unexpected turn when her father is struck by a heart attack in the middle of the desert. DUE Directed by Anna Mikami – USA After assaulting a police officer to save his undocumented friend, a man chooses to live his last night of freedom in pursuit of the American dream with his pregnant girlfriend . SECRET LIVES OF ASIANS What does the “model minority” do after dark? (A screwball noir in 5 languages.) 24 HR WORKDAY Directed by Zishun Ning – USA In New York State, many home attendants–mostly immigrants and women–are forced to work grueling 24-hour shifts taking care of seriously-ill patients, with only half of the pay. GHOST Directed by SJ Son & Woody Fu – USA An Asian man learns he has more in common with a ghost than he thought. The Made in NY Shorts program will screen on Sunday, July 28 at 4:35pm at Asia Society Identities: Documentary Shorts What does it mean to be Asian, to be a part of the Asian diaspora? There’s no singular answer and the following shorts dive into various aspects of what makes up our identities. From what we cook for others to how we compete, these documentary shorts give us a glimpse of other lives. KOPITIAM Directed by Sancheev Ravichandran – USA Kopitiam follows the life of a coffee shop owner, Kyo Pang, and explores the daily struggles that she goes through in order to overcome her past while creating an unusual and perhaps unknown type of food in the area. ME Directed by Derek Kwan – Canada Two generations of moms create a new dish for the family restaurant carrying on their legacy through Vietnamese cuisine . NIGHTCALLER Directed by Alexander Humilde – Philippines, Canada Welcome to the call centre capital of the world. DONUTS FOR DOLLARS Directed by Daniel Luu – USA “Donut for Dollars” is about Cambodian donut shops, one of the most extraordinary ethnic economic niches in Los Angeles and all of Southern California. This video is part of the UCLA Center for Neighborhood’s goal to communicate scholarly empirical urban research to a broader audience, to use visual narratives to capture the lived experience of people and communities. FLY TO THE DREAM Directed by Takahisa Shiraishi – Japan “At the beginning of 2018, four of Japanese Wheelchair junior players traveled to Los Angeles, California, for an international friendly match where American and Canadian top players were waiting for them. Their mission is not only playing tennis but also traveling abroad without their parents and creating friendship with players from other people by speaking English.” UNSPOKEN Directed by Patrick G. Lee – USA Through letter-writing, a community discussion, and a drag performance, six queer and trans Asian Americans grapple with their queerness and consider what family acceptance might look like. PASSAGE TO WOMANHOOD Directed by Inaya Yusuf – Malaysia A group of Muslim trans women stand their ground against social marginalization in secular Malaysia. Redefining femininity in Islam they are painting painting their own portrayal of womanhood. PERIOD GIRL Directed by Jalena Keane-Lee – USA PERIOD GIRL is a short documentary that follows Nadya Okamoto, a 20 year-old Harvard sophomore who started the non-profit PERIOD Org, as she opens up about some of the personal trauma that helps fuel her work. The Identities: Documentary Shorts program will screen on Wednesday, July 31 at 6:00pm at Regal Essex. Generations Shorts Whether it be biological or chosen, family is powerful. These shorts explore how generations come together; clash and grow, for better or for worse. MOONWALK WITH ME Directed by Erin Lau -USA A story about a Korean American girl named Juno who is haunted by her father’s disappearance. Upon his return, Juno must decide to keep her drifting father grounded or to let him go. THE MOON AND THE NIGHT Directed by Erin Lau – USA In rural Hawaii, a teenage girl must confront her father after he enters her beloved pet in a dog fight. STAY Directed by Foroud Avazpour – Iran An old man suffer from amnesia and his children take him to the past if to find the present. THE DISTANCE BETWEEN US Directed by Jeffrey Wu – USA, China While visiting his grandmother in Beijing, a grandson explores how Alzheimer’s is changing his family and what it means to reconcile intergenerational relationships through language and culture in the face of irreversible memory loss. AH GONG Directed by Clifford Miu – Taiwan Eleven year old Chris arrives at the hospital only to realize that his mother and uncles have decided to pull the plug on his beloved grandfather. PLEASE TRANSLATE Directed by Kelsy Lua – USA Please Translate explores how language can act both as a barrier and an effective tool to help bridge the relationship between a Chinese immigrant mother, and her American-born daughter . LIFELIKE Directed by Haruna Tanaka – Japan Kamehachi, a jobless carver of Buddhist statues, earns his living by making lifelike figures for freak shows. A member of a local well-to-do family requests Kamehachi to make a doll of his fatally ill daughter Tsubaki to copy her mortal beauty as is . The Generations Shorts program will screen on Saturday, August 3 at 6:15pm at Asia Society. For Youth by Youth Shorts Featuring filmmakers under the age of 21, we celebrate the next generation of Asian diaspora storytellers in this shorts block. TUNDRA Directed by Carol Nguyen – Canada A mother dreams and hallucinates about her daughter, trying to cope with her loss. MR ORANGE & BABY SNOT Directed by Kana Rosemarie Hutchens – USA Mr. Orange lives a lonely life but finds companionship one day in the strangest place. FOR HERE OR TO GO Directed by Ryan Nguyen – USA A Vietnamese family discusses working in their restaurant as a way of preserving their culture and how they cope with the passing of its founder, a loving husband and father of four children. LUNCHBOX Directed by Tisya Sharma, Tian Yi (Amy) Shi, Annabelle Richens – Australia Sunny is having a tough time at school when her friends make fun what she has for lunch. Her mum helps her embrace her culture through food. DEAD HORSE BAY Directed by Sophia Wang – Canada An abandoned beach in New York City draws artists in with it’s history infused trash. DEPENDENT Directed by Drake Presto – USA Filipino daughters open up about their homelives and family experiences living with military fathers. AMERICAN BORN CONFUSED DESI Directed by Anvita Gurung – USA An insider’s look at the challenging world of expectations and stereotypes surrounding second generation Indian American youth. The For Youth by Youth Shorts program will screen on Monday, July 29 at 6:30pm at the Museum of Chinese in America. For the full schedule, please visit asiancinevision.org/aaiff . Passes and tickets are currently on sale. The 42 nd Asian American International Film Festival will run July 25 – August 3. Venues for the 42 nd Asian American International Film Festival Asia Society and Museum: 725 Park Ave, New York, NY 10021 Regal Essex Crossing & RPX: 129 Delancey St, New York, NY 10002 Museum of Chinese in America: 215 Centre St, New York, NY 10013 About the Asian American International Film Festival The Asian American International Film Festival (AAIFF), presented by Asian CineVision, is the first and longest running festival in the country devoted to films by and about Asians and Asian Americans. About Asian CineVision Asian CineVision (ACV) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit media arts organization devoted to the development, exhibition, promotion, and preservation of Asian and Asian American film and video. Thank You The 42 nd Asian American International Film Festival is made possible by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, the Academy of Motion Pictures Art and Sciences, Pernod Ricard, Asia Society, Flushing Town Hall, Museum of Chinese in America, and the Friends of ACV. Thus articles 42nd Asian American International Film Festival Announces Full Lineup that is all articles 42nd Asian American International Film Festival Announces Full Lineup This time, hopefully can provide benefits to all of you. Okay, see you in another article posting . 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Jun 26, Fairmont Hotels & Resorts Server Jobs in South Africa

Fairmont Hotels & Resorts Server Jobs in South Africa
Fairmont Hotels & Resorts Server Jobs in South Africa
As a Server with Fairmont Hotels & Resorts, you will be an ambassador for the exceptional service and cuisine that are hallmarks of our dining experience. Your warm, personal attention and knowledge of our outstanding Food & Beverage offerings makes guests of our restaurants and lounges feel unique and valued.
On KwaZulu-Natal’s Dolphin Coast, under an abundant forest canopy, you will find Zimbali – Zulu for “valley of flowers.” A sanctuary unlike any other in South Africa, this charming and unspoiled region is a nature lover’s wonderland. Dappled shadows from the lush vegetation and cool breezes from the Indian Ocean leave their mark on your soul.
Endless beaches and clear skies invite you to relax and dream. Within this subtropical paradise, set within the serene confines of a coastal forest reserve, you will find the highest expression of exclusive hospitality, the Fairmont Zimbali Resort. Responsibilities Consistently offer professional, friendly and engaging service Assist guests regarding menu items in an informative and helpful way Follow outlet policies, procedures and service standards Have full knowledge of beverage lists and promotions Have full knowledge of all menu items, garnishes, contents and preparation methods Follow all safety and sanitation policies when handling food and beverage Other duties as assigned Previous service experience an asset Previous point of sale system experience an asset, but not required Excellent communication and organizational skills Strong interpersonal and problem solving abilities Highly responsible & reliable Ability to work well under pressure in a fast paced environment Ability to work cohesively with fellow colleagues as part of a team Ability to focus attention on guest needs, remaining calm and courteous at all times How to Apply Interested and qualified candidates should apply online by 7th July, 2019

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5 places in the city that Mumbaikars swear by for their love of momos!

Mumbai has warmed up to this Tibetan delicacy and crafty peeps have actually come up with fusion versions of it- not surprising because if we have a Chinjabi cuisine, we can have anything at all.
We’ve chalked out 5 places in Mumbai for the ultimate momos right here so bookmark this article right away! Kepchaki Momos
Seated on the Carter Road stretch and slightly difficult to locate but ask around for Kepchaki Momos and we promise you, it’ll be worth your time! Started by a Nepali hairstylist called Milan Thapa, in a bid to recreate the momos available back home, Kepchaki is sure to leave you craving for more.
Try out their pork and prawn variants to be absolutely pushed into a street-food fiesta on your palate!
Location: 153, Chuim Village, Khar Dan Pada, Khar
Cost: ₹450 for two people (approx.)
Timings: 11:30 am – 3:30 pm and 6:30 pm – 11:30 pm New Sernyaa
New Sernyaa is the place for you if you feel like eating a home-style Tibetan meal and if momos are your weakness, this place hits the nail right on the head. Their chicken momos, roasted pork and pork spare ribs made with Tibetan wine are the real heroes which shine through all moods and we can never get over this place. If you’re a momo lover, your Mumbai visit will be incomplete without dropping by here!
Location: 8, Ashok Enclave, Chincholi Bunder, Link Road, Malad West
Cost: ₹900 for two people (approx.)
Timings: 12noon – 12midnight Bhukkha Sher
If you’re into spicy tandoori momos, this is it! Bhukkha Sher is where momos have been garnering rave reviews amidst Mumbaikars although it isn’t a momo specialty hub. Their chicken oyster chilli gravy momos and makhni gravy momos are worth every penny and it also has grub options for sinful people who aren’t into this delicacy!
Location: Society 86, D6, Near Janki Devi School, Mhada, Andheri West Lokandwala, 4 Bungalows
Cost: ₹500 for two people (approx.)
Timings: 12noon – 4pm and 7:30pm – 4am The Appetite Momos
The Appetite Momos’ menu features momos which are made of Indian bases like chicken achari momos and mutton nawabi momos to name a few amidst the lot! Their inexpensive prices and hearty quantity always pulls us in and their dips are always perfectly seasoned and served. This is our go-to spot during monsoons specially because the rain coupled with the steams of hot soup along with momos is the best feeling ever!
Location: Gala 5 A, Saraogi Estate, Opposite Mahavir Trinkets, LBS Marg, Kanjurmarg, Bhandup
Cost: ₹200 for two people (approx.)
Timings: 9am – 11pmMutton Momos, Cheesy Chicken Momo Moktu
A prominent name in the momo lover’s circuit in the city, Moktu keeps their momos fairly simple which makes ’em super addictive! They serve their absolutely mouth-watering momos in a traditional bamboo container and when confused about what to order, go for the mutton momos, cheesy chicken momo and don’t leave without trying out the jhol momos too!
Location: Food Court, Infiniti Mall 2, Link Road, Malad West
Cost: ₹250 for two people (approx.)
Timings: 11am – 11pm
Seeing such fusions and varieties of momos around the city, we now truly believe that love comes in all sorts of shapes and tastes! Visit any of these places for the best momos in Mumbai and satiate your cravings with endless servings of this treasured Tibetan delight!

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(ARE-Dubai) Supervisor, Cigar Room

Fairmont Supervisor, Cigar Room in Dubai , United Arab Emirates Primary Location ** Supervisor, Cigar Room At Fairmont Hotels & Resorts, exceptional service and flavours are the hallmarks of every dining experience. As Outlet Supervisor, your passion for guest service and the pride you take in our menu offerings will ensure your Outlet is a preferred dining destination and workplace!
Hotel Overview: Fairmont The Palm is a luxury, world-class resort located on the iconic Palm Jumeirah Island in Dubai. The hotel features 381 guest rooms and suites with dedicated Fairmont Gold rooms and lounge. A total ofeleven food and beverage outlets on property including 24-hour in-room dining—offer a mix of culinary and entertainment options that mirror Dubai’s cosmopolitan air includinga Mediterranean, Indian, and Modern Asian cuisine and a Brazilian churrasco experience. Fairmont The Palm also features an expansive pool and beach area with a health club, Willow Stream Spa and the Fairmont Falcons Juniors’ Club.
Summary of Responsibilities:
Reporting to the Assistant Banquet Manager, responsibilities and essential job functions include but are not limited to the following: * * Consistently offer professional, friendly and engaging service Supervise the F&B Outlet team in all aspects of the department and ensure service standards are followed Maximize revenues by upselling and following budget guidelines Handle guest concerns, reacting quickly and professionally Balance operational and Colleague needs Have full knowledge of all menus and promotions Ensure Colleagues have full knowledge of all menu items, garnishes, contents and preparation methods being served in the Food & Beverage Outlet Follow outlet policies, procedures and service standards Follow all safety and sanitation policies when handling food and beverage Other duties as assigned Previous Food and Beverage leadership experience preferred Previous Point of Sale system experience required Computer literate in Microsoft Window applications required University/College degree in a related discipline preferred Excellent communication and organizational skills Strong interpersonal and problem solving abilities Highly responsible & reliable Ability to work well under pressure in a fast paced environment Ability to work cohesively as part of a team Ability to focus attention on guest needs, remaining calm and courteous at all times
*Physical Aspects of Position (include but are not limited to): * Constant standing and walking throughout shift Frequent lifting and carrying up to 25 lbs Frequent kneeling, pushing, pulling, lifting Occasional ascending or descending ladders, stairs and ramps
*Visa Requirements: * Please note that you must be eligible to live and work in Dubai. We will assist successful applicants with the visa process and provide flights and accommodation.
APPLY TODAY : Whether you’re launching your career or seeking meaningful employment, we invite you to visit http://www.fairmontcareers.com/ to learn more about Fairmont Hotels & Resorts—and the extraordinary opportunities that exist!
ABOUT FAIRMONT HOTELS & RESORTS
At Fairmont Hotels & Resorts we offer our guests the finest hospitality experience in each of our destinations. And we know that, to offer our guests the best, we first need to offer our employees the best. That’s why you’ll find exceptional work opportunities—throughout North America and the Caribbean, Europe and Africa, the Middle East and Asia Pacific—as well as industry-leading training, career development, recognition and rewards. Fairmont Hotels & Resorts is a celebrated collection of hotels that includes landmark locations like London’s The Savoy, New York’s The Plaza, and Shanghai’s Fairmont Peace Hotel. Our teams are guided by values of Respect, Integrity, Teamwork and Empowerment; we employ the highest ethical and quality standards, treating all colleagues with fairness and dignity. A community and environmental leader, Fairmont is also regarded for its responsible tourism practices and award-winning Green Partnership program. An exciting future awaits!
Primary Location: United Arab Emirates-Dubai-Fairmont The Palm, Dubai
Employee Status: Regular

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Popular Tourist Places to Visit in Madurai

Referred to as the cultural capital of Tamil Nadu, the city is known for the Madurai Meenakshi Temple and is considered as the Athens of the East and the Temple Town.
Madurai is also known for its food, cuisine, architecture, shopping and endearing people. Madurai has been selected as one of the hundred Indian cities to be developed as a smart city under Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s flagship Smart Cities Mission.
Here are Some Wonderful Tourist Places to Visit in Madurai: Sri Meenakshi Sundareswarar Temple
Also referred to as the Meenakshi Amman Temple, the Meenakshi Temple is an old historic Hindu temple situated on the banks of the Vagai River .
Dedicated to Meenakshi Devi and Shiva, it is a major landmark in Madurai and one of the top places to visit in Madurai. With Musical Pillars outside the thousand pillar hall, each pillar produces a different musical note when struck .
Meenakshi Tirukalyanam festival is a ten day annual festival celebrated during April and May which allures a huge number of devotees.
Gandhi Museum
Gandhi Museum is a memorial museum for Gandhi located in Madurai and was inaugurated by Jawaharlal Nehru in 1959.
Earlier, it was the palace of Rani Mangammal of the Nayak dynasty and later it was converted into the Gandhi Museum by the Gandhi Memorial Trust after the assassination of Mahatma Gandhi in 1948. It is one of the five great Gandhi Museums in the country which depict the life of the Father of the nation.
The museum houses a blood stained dhoti that he was wearing at the time of his assassination along with photographs of his lifetime. A new wing has been constructed on the northern side which includes a library and open-air theater.
Thirupparankundram Temple
Thirupparankunram Murugan Temple is a Hindu temple dedicated to Lord Murugan.
Also known as Thirupparankunram Murugan Kovil, it is one of the six abodes of Murugan and considered the first and foremost temple of Lord Muruga .
It is a cave temple and the entrance is built with 48 Nayaka period pillars with artistic carvings. There is a belief that people who get married here get special blessings from Lord Muruga. Also, this rock cut temple has separate shrines for Lord Ganapathy, Shiva, Durgai, Vishnu and other deities.
Thirumalai Nayak Mahal
Thirumalai Nayak Mahal is a beautiful palace in Madurai built by Thirumalai Nayak in 1636.
Divided into Swargavilasa and Rangavilasa, it is one of the important tourist places to visit in Madurai. The Darbar hall (courtyard) and the Natakasala (dancing hall) carry the original glory and are the prime attractions for tourists.
Also, there is a large museum that houses a wonderful collection of paintings, utensils, photographs of the palace showing its full glory and several sculptures. The major and most remarkable part of this palace is the dome of Swarga Vilasa which lies beyond a huge courtyard.
Koodal Alagar Temple
Dedicated to Lord Vishnu, Koodal Alagar Temple is one of the most ancient temples and most popular places to visit in Madurai. Also known as Arulmigu Koodalazhagar Thirukoil, the temple is one of the 108 Divyadesams (Vaishnavite Shrines) of the holy abodes of Vishnu.
The temple tower followed by the main shrine has a large rangamandapa and sanctum. A unique feature of this temple remains the three different postures of the same God. With beautifully carved ornamental windows, the temple attracts large number of devotees.

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Record-breaking, 1,140-meter-long waterslide to open in Malaysia

The downside to waterslides? The effort usually always exceeds the reward, at least where time’s concerned.
You climb dozens of steps to reach the slide’s entry point, huffing and puffing your way to the top, only to find yourself floundering about in the exit pool mere seconds later.
This won’t be the case with a new waterslide being built in Malaysia right now.
Stretching a whopping 1,140 meters (3,740 feet) long, the ride is now under construction at Penang’s ESCAPE theme park and looks set to smash the record for “world’s longest waterslide.”
Due for completion at the end of July, it will open to the public sometime in mid-August, staff tell CNN Travel .
A four-minute jungle ride
The current holder of the Guinness World Records longest waterslide certificate is in Action Park, a theme park in Vernon, New Jersey. It measures 601 meters in length.
But unlike the New Jersey version, which is inflatable, ESCAPE’s new slide is made of fiber-reinforced polymer and will be a permanent structure attached to steel poles.
“Breaking the world record was never our intention,” said Sim Choo Kheng, CEO of ESCAPE operator Sim Leisure Group, in a statement. “I’m always baffled by how rides are made so short and quick. I wanted to build rides that last a good few minutes.”
Once open, the slide will offer a four-minute ride that snakes its way down a 70-meter slope, passing through jungle scenery.
Huffing and puffing won’t be part of the experience either. Visitors will access the slide via a cable car chairlift.
Bringing the global spotlight to Penang
The island of Penang, off the western coast of Malaysia, is more famous for culture and cuisine than thrills.
George Town, the island’s main city, is its top draw thanks to a colorful mix of cultures that includes Hindu and Buddhist temples, street art, Islamic mosques, British colonial architecture and ornate Chinese manor houses.
Penang is also considered one of the world’s top food destinations, thanks to the presence of delicious Malay, Chinese and Indian cuisine that includes dishes like Hokkien mee (fried prawn noodles) and Penang laksa.
ESCAPE is about 30 minutes from George Town and offers a variety of adventure activities including waterslides, ziplines and obstacle courses. The-CNN-Wire™ & © 2019 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved. Lifestyle Headlines

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Sweet Exile in Cancale-ville

At the corner of Armitage Avenue and the Kennedy expressway, some only see a Volvo dealership and a neo-Georgian red brick office building, a bland dereliction of architectural duty. Though it has long been demolished, I instead see myself at 3 a.m. sitting in the corner booth at Marie’s Riptide lounge where minutes ago I’ve dropped a dime and conjured Patsy. The gifts of Willie Nelson and my bourbon-addled brain are en fuego as Cline does her glissando slide amidst a honky-tonk piano tinkle into the opening line… CRA-zeee ! Shots roll from the bottle, proffered by THE Marie (Wuczynski), the bar’s snowy-bouffant-crowned namesake. Though she is geriatric, she is always game. She pours one for me, and one for her. I am, whether I like it or not, and oh, God do I, paying for both.
I have often felt that I live in two Chicagos. The Chicago of now, and the city embedded in my memory, that no longer physically exists. It’s not particularly different anywhere else, I guess. Live somewhere long enough, things are gonna go. The Riptide has. Marie did. And so too, shall you.
But, then again, New York still has the Village Vanguard and Café Wha? (we’ll get to this). Rome has the Coliseum. Paris still has the Café Deux Magots.
And yeah, the Green Mill still stands, for now. But Chicago, amongst all the great metropolises, has never been particularly sentimental when deploying the wrecking ball. Maxwell Street was demolished in favor of whatever University Village is, and A. Finkl & Sons steel is now rubble awaiting the future suburban delights of Lincoln Yards.
On second thought, I actually live in three Chicagos. There’s also the Chicago in my mind, that I never knew, the Chicago, whether it was ever real or not, that I’ve mythologized. I am a native Detroiter, but the idea of the stockyards, the broad shoulders of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill’s Sears Tower (it will always be), was to me like the torch of the Statue of Liberty calling to a Dubliner, a beckoning.
Like Bob Dylan making the pilgrimage to the Village, strapping on the six string at Café Wha? in search of Woody Guthrie, I came to Chicago looking for MY heroes, Roger Ebert of Old Town, Ernest Hemingway of Oak Park, and Nelson Algren of Ukrainian Village.
Other neighborhoods that blazed deepest in my consciousness were Wicker Park and Bucktown, lair of Liz Phair, Tony Fitzpatrick, and, yes, I’m sorry, the great pumpkin, Billy Corgan.
Because this is Chicago, and no one remembers shit, for a while they called that confluence of North, Milwaukee and Damen, “the six corners”, even though that moniker had been claimed long ago by the intersection of Milwaukee, Irving Park, and Cicero. Today they call it the crotch.
For most of my twenties I executed a self-imposed exile in crotchville, soaking up the spirits that once haunted, in hopes of my own naturalization, on the curbside patio at Pontiac Café, in a dark corner of the Artful Dodger, and over fried chickpeas at Del Toro.
Against all odds, one place that remains from that time is the godforsaken burrito emporium Flash Taco. Given anything that could go, that Flash Taco’s griddle-steamed carne asada still exists is some kind of immaculate persistence. There were much better Mexican-inspired establishments on this strip that died first, including Chino Taco, which provided a free chili-spiced pickled salsa so corrosive, I am positive that they are responsible for the old man stomach pains I endure far too frequently. I’d have thought the glorious packets of charred pork belly from the Pontiac’s replacement, Big Star, would have put the Flash out of biz, but nope. It’s like they knocked down the Empire State Building, but somehow left behind the municipal parking meter that stood in front.
But, if in vino veritas, then, in beer and booze, bad choices. I am as guilty as anyone for supporting the Flash. I remember one night, procuring a Sprite and a foil wrapped steak bomb and walking past another defunct neighborhood relic, Big Chief. A screaming guitar solo thundered as folks filched fags on the sidewalks. I stopped, placed my spoils on the trunk of a white Datsun so I could listen to the music. Distracted, I turned to see my burrito hightailing it off in the distance, sour cream and meat juice dripping from the trunk like Hansel and Gretel’s breadcrumbs, as my hangover helper left me in a lurch.
That of course is a metaphor. But the reality is, Bucktown and its environs have been dismantling forever. Del Toro, for example, which before was Mod, and a bunch of other things before that, had this incredible Antoni Gaudi-eseque mosaic designed by Suhail (he too an artist many have already forgotten), filled with thousands of painstakingly hand inlaid glass tiles, that was demolished.
If you didn’t feel the slow burn, maybe you saw the explosion a month or so ago, when they laid blowtorches to the iconic neon marquee, the Double Door Liquors sign, which was banished to secure a permit for the construction of the Yeti-brand boutique of bro coolers.
Progress can be good of course. Big Star’s patio is filled with better brown liquor and way killer comestibles than the Pontiac ever had. The intricate stone wall of Del Toro may be gone, but in its place, sits one of the best cocktail bars in America, The Violet Hour. Del Toro’s chefs also blew up. Andrew Zimmerman opened the magnificent Proxi and has been a great steward of the menu at Sepia, while Rob Levitt became Chicago’s premier butcher at Butcher & Larder, and now Publican Quality meats (PQM).
This brings me to PQM’s new sister restaurant, a new division of One Off Hospitality (Big Star, The Publican, Pacific Standard Time, Dove’s, Avec, etc.), Café Cancale, which sits, apologies, smack dab inside the sweaty nethers of the crotch.
One Off and Cancale’s principal chef partner is Paul Kahan, who in many ways, as much as Algren or Phair, is also one of my heroes. I lived in Cleveland for a short time after graduating from college. Living on my own for the first time, without a dormitory steam table to sustain me, I was faced with a lifetime of eating Hot Pockets or learning how to cook. Despite my continued fondness for the occasional pocket, and Totino’s party pizzas, I chose the latter.
Obsessed with learning to cook, I ate everywhere I could. I dialed for reservations to The French Laundry like I was trying for Nirvana tickets at Ticketmaster (Stubhub didn’t exist back then). I devoured Food Network (when they actually cooked) and the cookbook canon, working my way up from salsa to soufflé, cooking alongside the Charlie Trotter books, Paul Prudhomme’s Louisiana Kitchen , Madhur Jaffrey’s An Invitation to Indian Cooking , and the Chez Panisse series.
Cooking out of the Trotter books produced a trail of tears, but I did ok with the others, save the occasional burn incurred from Prudhomme’s “Cajun napalm” technique for making roux. It was the Panisse books that made the most sense to me. Though I was living in a world of artificially-ripened tomatoes and having a hard time procuring goat cheese, a simple beet salad, and the adherence to seasonality, rung me like a bell.
So it did, too, for an applied math student and eventual computer programmer Kahan, who (for reals), hopped a freight train and hitchhiked to California with a buddy. While living in California, he ate a tomato salad at Chez Panisse that changed the course of his life.
By the time I’d heard of him, Kahan had launched Blackbird. I’d maneuvered a job change from Cleveland to Chicago in no small part because I’d exhausted all of (future Iron Chef) Michael Symon’s spots in Cleveland, and I wanted to live in the city of Charlie Trotter, Blackbird, and Frontera Grill.
I’ll save the Trotter’s experience for another essay, but, the short version is it didn’t quite meet my expectations. Against everywhere else I’d eaten, though, Blackbird was Sid Vicious smashing guitars over the heads of the well-heeled at a country club banquet.
I’d always been obsessed with the clean lines of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Ray and Charles Eames, and George Nelson. Blackbird’s stark white, black, and silver dining room was the future home I wanted but could never afford (because I was blowing all of my disposable income dining out). The tables at Blackbird were so close. Elbow to elbow with your fellow diners, sometimes you could grab a bite from the plate of a complete stranger. I felt like I’d found the dining equivalent of moshing at The Metro. Rock and roll on the house speakers, I destroyed sweetbreads that tasted like molasses candy coins, and mowed through sweet corn crepes bursting with ricotta, nestled in a wild mushroom broth, wondering if maybe I should give up my carnivorous ways for the vegetarian lifestyle.
Like an itinerant jam band groupie I’d follow Kahan from restaurant to new restaurant, desirous of his newest set list of dishes, hoping for an improvisation I’d never seen before. Kahan’s restaurant group which had once been 4K, aka Four Knuckleheads, became One Off Hospitality. And they stayed true to that name, until they opened Publican Anker, basically Publican 2, electric bugaloo, in bar form. Unlike Blackbird, it was an annoying noisy jostle. Communal tables were a little too communal, with servers accidentally delivering dishes you ordered to the people sitting next to you. Tears rolled down my heart as I watched some sleeve-tattooed lady crib my pork collar one night.
But, Paul Kahan, thankfully, is a man of many life-changing experiences. On his fiftieth birthday, he forewent the hobo life, and hopped aboard a transatlantic flight to France. He descended on the sleepy coast of Brittany and a town called Cancale, one of the premiere oyster spots of Europe. He ate and cooked until he was possessed to deep six Anker in favor of a new concept, Café Cancale.
Stand on the corner of Milwaukee and Damen and gaze upon Cancale’s majesty (which is a very brave thing to do in these ridesharing electric scooter times). The restaurant will summon you with its blue and white sailor striped-awning capped with a rosy paint strip. You can almost smell the Gauloises.
The dinge of Anker has been banished in favor of a pleasant buttercream yellow paint scheme, a zinc-like bar top capped by a light fixture which looks a giant set of old-fashioned bloomers, and button-tufted blue banquettes.
You will be greeted jovially by general manager Felipe Ospina wearing a Cubs hat, jeans, and bespoke-looking sportcoat so perfectly sewn to his lithe torso, that it feels like a single oyster bite will pop a button.
This is also a good time to mention that Ospina recognized me, and as such, my service experience, which included a gratis éclair and a cordial of pineau de charentes, may or may not mirror yours.
Ospina, like his boss, Kahan’s long time managing partner, Donnie Madia, is classy and cool. This is frankly the overall theme which extends to the food executed by chef de cuisine A.J. Walker, which is to say, Cancale is inspired as much by The Clash as it is by the classic bistro.
You may think it’s coy to compare a seemingly sedate seafood restaurant to a punk rock, but in 2019 you gotta have major couilles (if you don’t know what those are, check urban dictionary Paris edition) to serve up walleye quenelle, a centuries old Escoffier wet dream, which is basically a steamed fish mousse donut. In Walker’s hands however, it is a cloud-like seafood soufflé swimming in a lake of cognac and lobster essence capped off with a verdant mound of pea shoots that tastes like soil and fresh spring air.
No one in their right mind tries to reinvent the perfection that is the jiggly runny yolk, the hunky lardons, and the vinaigrette-kissed greens of a salade Lyonnaise. But Walker, flips you a righteous bird, by also throwing in crisp scrims of mandoline-shaved fried potato wisps and smoked nuggets of eel, to take things to the next level.
I should back up a second. I have often joked that my life loves, in order, are Detroit Red Wings hockey, food, and family. But, maybe, that is not quite right. Rather, if I’m being honest, it is probably, raw or lightly cooked seafood, pizza, and sexual healing.
Foie gras and steak are fine, but I’ll take abalone and Kusshi and Royal Reds all day long. On this count, Cancale, in the form of Fiddler’s Cove oysters, that taste inherently like brine and butter, delivers like Domino’s.
There is also an impeccably “dressed” lobster, featuring salty, creamy cool chopped claw and tail meat dusted with black lime (Joe Strummer would approve) tossed with crunchy commas of celery. It does take a while for this dish to arrive. My wife is so hungry, she suggests that she’d be fine eating it naked. The good news is our server warns us of these minor pacing delays, so we’re not left wondering if we’ve been forgotten.
Cocktails at Cancale feel like they’ve been named after unpublished Edith Wharton novels. There’s the “Cotillion”, the “Pablo in Paris, and “Lilacs of Spring”. I especially dig “Mirth in the Afternoon” a brew of licorice and lemon made with Pineau des Charentes, Pernod, Absinthe, sparkling wine, and lemon peel. Many of the drinks, like the ultra-luxe “Superb Last Word” are served with sidecars sitting in ice-filled hammered-copper sleeves, so that each sip of gin, lime, and chartreuse, is frigidly delicious.
Ribbons of toothsome pappardelle, covered in a snow of pecorino pepato, wrap themselves around winey-flavored pistachios and steak-like morels.
The only real mis-step of the night is an ammonia-tinged plank of trout featuring a giant fat globule. But, even then, the fish’s skin is crispier than George Hamilton’s face, and the truffled and pickled peach olive and radish slivers encrusting the top are taste bud firecrackers.
Dessert from Erika Chang, including a sweet and salty mountain of strawberry sundae featuring chocolate ribbons and an orange-scented cookie crumb bottom is redemptive.
The One Off Hospitality team is populated by stellar butchers, bakers and Cancale-makers, none more accomplished than Publican Quality Bread head, Greg Wade, his kouign-amman oozing butter and sticky caramel alongside a dollop of Chang’s silky maple ice cream.
If I have any criticism of Cancale, it’s that it’s slightly a victim of its restaurant group’s own standards. Whether it’s the crazy garden wall at Nico Osteria or the Viking-chic of the original Publican, diners now expect to be completely transported and inspired by the rooms in which they eat. The elbow-shaped space of Cancale, it’s peaceful dining room cut off from the boisterous bar area, is still a tad awkward. If you sit in the bar room corner like I did, you’re shoehorned in next to a fairly unattractive wine cooler, and a plastic silverware tub. It’s not a huge deal, though. The staff has to make efficient use of what is a fairly tiny restaurant space.
What is undeniable is that in the spectrum of progress and the transformation of Wicker Park, Cancale is the kind of Chicago of now I can get behind. However, Cancale will also soon be surrounded by the new tenant of the adjacent former-Double Door space, a Yeti cooler concession. That a super expensive plastic insulated box concern has displaced one of city’s holiest cathedrals of music is an unabideable stink to those of us with the memory of what once was. The good news is that through breaking Wade’s artisan bread, guzzling down crisp Muscadet, and gorging on killer crustaceans at Cancale, all of that unpleasantness will, I believe, be driven away by the imagined perfume of briny North Atlantic breezes and the anise waft of Pernod. Advertisements

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Opinion | On the Antarctic Ice With Anthony Bourdain

In February 2017, I was nearing the end of four months at a remote outpost in Antarctica, gathering data for my Ph.D. thesis. Donald Trump had been inaugurated a month earlier and already the words “climate change” had been purged from the White House website. The mood among the scientists at the bottom of the world had changed drastically. We had been the forefront of studying climate change and suddenly we were being shunted aside.
Around the last week of our expedition to Lake Hoare, a barren, Martian-like region of the continent, the National Science Foundation, our sponsor, told us that Anthony Bourdain would be arriving to interview us at our field camp for his CNN show “Parts Unknown.” A lot of us knew Mr. Bourdain as a chef and foodie, but Antarctica isn’t known for its local cuisine. There are no Michelin-starred restaurants there (or any restaurants for that matter) and so amid the excitement, there was also a bit of confusion about his visit.
After a long, painfully cold day of sampling glacial meltwater to analyze its biological and chemical components, we all huddled around a laptop to prep for his arrival. We watched a clip of his earlier show “No Reservations” in which Mr. Bourdain eats a still-beating cobra heart.
“I hope he doesn’t want to try the penguin,” said Rae Spain, the field camp manager. She is known across the continent for her ability to take frozen chicken from 2012 and canned vegetables from an undetermined year and make it into a five-star Indian dish. She would be in charge of the food we would share with Mr. Bourdain and his crew.
There was plenty of worry that a celebrity like him would have a hard time in Antarctica. It is, after all, the coldest, driest, windiest place on earth. Would he be O.K. sleeping in a tent? Could he endure the food? Water was so scarce at our field camp that we showered only once a week. Would he be cool with that?
After binge-watching more episodes of his show, we put our fears to rest. This man had floated down the Congo River while trying to kill and cook a chicken in the dark. He and his crew had been trapped in a hotel in Lebanon in 2006 during fighting between Israel and Hezbollah. He’d gratefully accepted and consumed uncooked warthog anus in Namibia. He’d be perfectly fine in Antarctica.
Mr. Bourdain, who died a year ago this month, arrived with a calming smile. “Hi, I’m Tony,” he said, reaching out for introductions. Most of the initial attempts to socialize on our side involved chats about food. We asked him about eating eyeballs and his best and worst meals. “I can tell you the worst dish by far has been the McNugget,” he said. He was easy to talk to. He was curious about us .
Rae Spain made an exceptional dinner that night. Mr. Bourdain discovered how she managed to make ridiculously tasty stuff out of very limited ingredients (her secret: an extensive personal collection of spices) but he was more interested in her story. What kept her going down to the ice for 34 years?
Mr. Bourdain told us he would not be focusing on the behavioral quirks of penguins. Instead he wanted to know about the projects we were working on and why scientists pursue research in such a forbidding place. He was well aware that science and climate research were under threat from the new Trump administration.
“The beginning of the 20th century, when scientists and explorers were national heroes, there was a hunger for knowledge and discovery.” Mr. Bourdain told us, then added: “Not a good climate for facts, though, we live in today. It’s a world that is increasingly hostile to basically everything you’re all about.”
During the day, we ran around a polar desert recording information on warming, glacial melt and flooding to add to a 25-year collection of data that helps us identify trend lines. At night, we heard reports via email of colleagues frantically working to save their data because they feared it would be deleted from government websites. And there at our foldable camp table was Anthony Bourdain, giving us a platform to discuss our research on a highly rated television program. He turned his spotlight on our efforts to collect and analyze data critical to understanding the changing climate.
“This is sort of the last place on Earth where science seems to be celebrated at every level of society. Where people are making great personal sacrifices in pursuit of knowledge. That sounds quaint where I come from. It’s quite wonderful,” Mr. Bourdain said to us. “All you need is better press.”
His show would give us that. Watching “Parts Unknown: Antarctica” was a very hopeful moment for all of us because our painstaking work was being celebrated at a time when climate research was under assault in Washington (and, where, unfortunately, it continues to be).
At the end of dinner, we convinced Mr. Bourdain to join us out for a walk to a frozen lake and its sandy beach for a game of Frisbee. We handed him a pair of crampons to put over his shoes. “These would be great for getting out of bars,” he said as we stumbled our way across the ice. We all sat together on the beach watching the midnight sun go behind a mountain and talking about science and our travels.
By the end of his weekend visit to our camp, we had offered to hire him as part of the biology sampling team. He replied that he was sure he’d be fired “for sampling too much of the bacon.”
He hadn’t come to Antarctica for the food. When you look back on his shows, you see that he rarely went anywhere just for the food. Food was a common ground. It was a means to conversation. The conversation that weekend was about science, and Anthony Bourdain, who would have turned 63 on Tuesday, was our champion, as he was for so many others.
Angela Zoumplis is a polar biologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego.
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