Grilled Indian Tandoori Chicken

Grilled Indian Tandoori Chicken

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My family loves Indian food ( coconut curry chicken… mmm )! So I’m always looking for new, healthy recipes. Luckily, Indian food is generally healthy. I can also easily tweak it to include the ingredients I prefer to use.
This Indian tandoori chicken recipe is a great example. It is a grain-free recipe that uses spices for flavor. First Tandoori Chicken Dish
So how did this dish get its name? A tandoor is a cylindrical clay oven. It has been a staple of Indian cooking for centuries. While bread and chicken from a tandoor are nothing new, Chef Kundan Lal Gujral (of Pakistan) is responsible for its signature crispy skin and red color.
After the Partition of India, Gujral began cooking at a new restaurant in Dehli called Moti Mahal. This restaurant became popular with celebrities and world leaders in the mid 20th century. Because of this restaurant, Indian cuisine is now an international favorite (and I’m so glad it is!). How to Make Tandoori Chicken
You can quickly throw together a simple tandoori chicken (remember to marinate overnight).
First, marinate the chicken in a yogurt and spice mixture to give it its signature tangy, juicy, and spicy flavor. The acidity of the yogurt helps improve the moisture content of the chicken and also begins breaking down the proteins. The result is tender chicken!
The spice profile includes garam masala (cumin, coriander, cardamom, black pepper, cinnamon, cloves, and nutmeg). It also has turmeric, garlic, and onion. The spiciness of the seasonings contrasts with the tangy coolness of the yogurt for a fantastic flavor.
Marinate the chicken for at least 24 hours. Then, add it to the grill. While the traditional tandoori chicken was in a tandoor, today we broil or grill this recipe. This recipe calls for grilling, but you can use your oven’s broiler too. How to Serve Tandoori Chicken (the Healthy Way)
You typically serve Indian food with rice or Naan. If you’re avoiding carbs or grains, there are other vegetable-based options. Cauliflower rice – While I do eat white rice occasionally , I like to use cauliflower rice when I can. Roasted vegetables – This dish can change based on taste (or what’s in the refrigerator!). This is a great way to add nutrition to a meal. Potatoes or sweet potatoes – Whether you dice and steam or roast, potatoes or sweet potatoes are an excellent carbohydrate for an Indian style meal. Sauteed greens or cabbage – Saucy meat dishes are great over sauteed cabbage or greens. The sauce adds flavor to the vegetables and makes it a cohesive meal.
Because of their antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals, vegetables are a perfect side dish. But, sometimes you need a little bread! If you must have bread with your tandoori chicken, try my grain-free flatbread recipe.

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Nandhana Restaurants best Andhra cuisine restaurants in Bangalore

Nandhana Palace in Bangalore presents amazing Andhra cuisine by complementing the flavors and traditions of Andhra with global ingredients and procedures. We are the celebrated Andhra Style Restaurant in Bangalore renowned for our dedicated service to our dearest customers. Our professional chefs are placing authentic spicy taste across the garden city, Bangalore. Nandhana restaurant serves spicy Andhra food at affordable prices without compromising on the taste and hygiene. Every dish here is made with fresh ingredients which gives a supreme treat for your taste buds. We greet you with the enormous list of appetizing Andhra food menu prepared enthusiastically by our expert chefs. We serve wide varieties of Andhra style of both Vegetarian and Non – vegetarian food. Nandhana restaurant is established with a zeal to supply everyone the authentic scrumptious Andhra style food in Bangalore. Stretched our wings in 14 top locations of Bangalore. We provide the fastest Food Home Delivery where our customers can enjoy eating hot food served on plates. Place an order at us to experience the best Andhra food ever. Nandhana restaurant bring to you a variety of delicious veg and non veg dishes that you must eat at least once in your lifetime. Enjoy the original flavors of South Indian cuisine at Nandhana palace Restaurant.

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Weekend Planner: July 12th

You’ve worked hard all week, and now Friday’s here again! It’s time to start planning your weekend! Welcome to Weekend Planner, your weekend update on fun.
Every Friday we put together a list of the weekend events we think look most interesting and provide them here. Keep in mind there is always a lot more going on, and all it takes is a little digging to find something that will be the perfect activity for you.
Click on any of the event titles for a link to the event.
Friday, July 12th
Oakland First Friday (Yes, on the 2nd Friday!) Telegraph Ave, Oakland
5 PM, All Ages
Free
Oakland First Fridays is an immersive art and community experience on the first Friday of each month from 5-9p. for five huge blocks on Telegraph Avenue from West Grand to 27th Street.
Oakland’s KONO district (Koreatown/Northgate) springs to life with for this event, with galleries, artist collectives, street artists, local culinary artisans, performers, musicians, dancers, DJs, and poets gathering for Oakland First Friday events.
Oakland First Fridays Every First Friday | 5-9pm
Telegraph Ave from West Grand to 27th St., Oakland
FREE
Closest BART – 19th Street Rain sometimes cancels – They typically make an announcement by Wednesday – Check Facebook for updates Thousands of people come from across the Bay Area and beyond to see and experience art, be inspired, eat great food, enjoy live music, and stroll through the amazing, eclectic city of Oakland. An economic impact report shows that the Oakland First Fridays has a major, positive economic impact on the KONO community.
What else is going on? How About Art Murmur! Taking place at the same time is the Oakland Art Murmur , a collection of galleries and mixed-use venues many of which are open First Friday evenings. The range of artistic exhibitions is inspiring.
Most of the venues are open from 6–9 pm. Many of the galleries are adjacent to the Telegraph Avenue site of Oakland First Fridays on 23rd, 24th, 25th and 26th Streets going east toward the hills.
Festival FAQ Is there an entrance fee?
Oakland First Fridays is free and open to the public! But we rely on community support to keep our festival alive! You can make a donation online here , or at our festival entrance on West Grand & Telegraph Avenue.
When does the street festival start / end?
Oakland First Fridays Street festival happens on the first friday of each month, from 5pm – 9:00pm. If the event becomes cancelled due to rain, an announcement will be made Wednesday the week of the event. Check back on our website or facebook page for updates.
Where is Oakland First Fridays located?
Our festival entrance is located at the intersection of West Grand and Telegraph Avenue, and spans 5 blocks down to 27th Street in Oakland’s KONO District. View the location on google maps here .
Accessibility Info:
Our festival is wheelchair accessible and family friendly. People of all ages are welcome to attend. If bringing a dog, it must remain on a leash at all times. Our events bring over 30,000 attendees, so expect large crowds, and amplified sound from our multiple stage and performance areas. There are Porta Potties available on 23rd St, 24th St, 25th St and 26th St. For exact locations, check out our festival map here .
Public Transportation:
We recommend taking public transportation to Oakland First Fridays. The closest Bart Station is the 19th Street stop, which is only a few blocks away. The 12 (Grand Ave. & MacArthur Blvd.), 51A (Broadway), and 6 ( Telegraph Ave. ) AC Transit buses also come right to the KONO District. On weekdays and weekend evenings, the free Broadway shuttle runs every 12-15 minutes up and down Broadway from 26th to Jack London.
Parking:
Oakland First Fridays’ pick up and drop off location is located on Valley and 23rd street. Limited Metered parking is available on side streets near Telegraph Avenue, so make sure to bring quarters! If you chose to park on the street, we advise you to not leave any valuable items inside your car. If you’d rather park in a garage, here is a list of garages close by .
Alcohol Policy:
Alcoholic beverages are served exclusively within our Sake Garden, located in front of Gogi Time at 23rd St and Telegraph Avenue. Otherwise, no alcohol is allowed at the street festival. We do not tolerate the consumption of alcohol in our festival streets. If you’re interested in drinking alcohol, we advise for you to visit our Sake Garden or one of the many bars and restaurants in the KONO district. Drink Responsibly.
How do I become a volunteer?
Volunteering is a great opportunity for you to connect with your community, work as a member of a team, meet new people, and gain references for future employment or academic advancement. You’ll also get free food and a t-shirt for volunteering. We have in-office and day-of-event volunteer positions. For more information, visit: http://oaklandfirstfridays.org/volunteer/ or check out our volunteer orientation video!
What to do after the Festival?
Oakland First Fridays street festival ends at 9:00 pm, but nightlife within the KONO district still goes on! Visit one of the many bars, nightclubs or restaurants in the neighborhood. For a list of locations and events, check out the Koreatown-Northgate Business Directory: http://www.koreatownnorthgate.org/shop-dine/
Updated 6/26/19 – Event info last checked via website
Friday, July 12, 2019
“Oakland First Fridays” Street Festival For July 2019, “First Fridays” will be moved from July 5 to July 12 due to the Fourth of July holiday. Join us July 12th on Telegraph Avenue between West Grand and 27th Streets from 5:00 pm – 9:00 pm to celebrate our community.
Sundown Cinema Outdoor Movie Series Kickoff Dolores Park, San Francisco
6 PM, All Ages
Free
Film Night in the Park and Sundown Cinema have combined forces to create a brand new summer outdoor movie series at parks all over SF.
Expect food, drinks, music, neighborhood fun, and film selections that both cinephiles and casual moviegoers will love. Sundown Cinema will not only celebrate the unique character and beauty of San Francisco’s parks , but will also help preserve and sustain these community spaces by donating a portion of the proceeds to SF Parks Alliance.
– July-August events start at 6pm
– Sept-Oct events start at 5pm
– Films begin around sunset
Learn More: Facebook | DoTheBay | SF Neighborhood Theater Foundation Want Reserved Seating? Donate to the SF Parks Alliance or Enter to Win on Funcheap or DoTheBay 2019 Schedule: Star Wars (1977) , Friday, July 12, Dolores Park – Star Wars-themed performance by SF Conservatory of Music Hook (1991) , Thursday, July 25, Alamo Square Park – Robin Williams Birthday Spiderman: Into the Spiderverse (2018), Fri, Aug. 23, Union Square Bohemian Rhapsody (2018) Fri., Sept. 6, Jerry Garcia Amphitheater – Sing-Along Space Jam (1996) Friday, Sept. 27, India Basin Shoreline Park Mean Girls (2004) , Thursday., Oct. 3, Marina Green – National Mean Girls Day People’s Choice (Halloween-themed) , Fri., Oct. 18, Dolores Park
Saturday, July 13th
Skate San Francisco NOW Hunter’s Point, San Francisco
11 AM, All Ages
Free
Join us for a full day of roller skating, music, food and community fun! We’ll have several DJs playing music for new and seasoned skaters alike. Bring your own skates or lace up with the skates we will provide onsite.
Presented by the Church of 8 Wheels , Skate San Francisco embraces and showcase the 40 year history of skating in San Francisco. Saturday, July 13th at NOW Hunters Point is a part of the weekend long celebration that will honor the original members of the Golden Gate Park Skate Patrol which was the group responsible for keeping roller skating from being banned in the park in 1979. We will also honor other skate advocates from around the world in recognition of their work to spread rolligion where they live and beyond.
**This event is FREE for residents of the 94124 area code. If you live outside this area code, purchase a ticket and read more about the celebrations here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/skate-san-francisco-celebrating-40-years-of-roller-skating-in-san-francisco-tickets-56624118262
Bastille Day Celebration
Embarcadero Plaza, San Francisco
11 AM, All Ages
Free
The very first San Francisco Bastille Day celebration took place in 1880, so come and be a part of a grand Bastille Day celebration and discover French cuisine, wines and crafts at this Kermesse (outdoor festival) .
The free admission event is open to all to enjoy a wine, pastis and beer garden , a vintage Citroën car show , games of “Pétanque,”a kid’s garden, tours of the SF’s French Quarter, French musicians and all kinds of fun for the entire family.
Plus don’t miss the “Course de Garçons de Café,”or Waiters’ Race , the first of its kind in San Francisco .
2019 Entertainment & Schedule
11:00a Opening Bastille Day San Francisco 2019 11:30a Moorea Swing Boys Tahitian Dance Group 12:00p & Friends (On The Terrace) 12:00p To 4:30Pm Petanque Tournament 12:30p Fashion Show By Ricochet (On The Stage) 1:00p French Connection Chansons FrançAises (On The Terrace) 1:30p Moorea Swing Boys Tahitian Dance Group 2:00p Bistrot Moustache (On The Terrace) 2:30p Moorea Swing Boys Tahitian Dance Group 3:00p & Friends (On The Terrace) 3:00p To 4:00p Waiters’ Race 4:30p National Anthems (On The Stage) 4:35p Speech Of M. Emmanuel Lebrun-Damiens, General Consul Of France At San Francisco 4:45p Rue ’66 (On The Stage) – San Francisco’s only authentic 60s French “yé yé” band 5:45p French Oak – Gypsy Musette (On The Stage) – French jazz gipsy band 6:30p Music Ends 7:00p After Party By L’Apero – 111 Mina Street A Waiters’ Race , or “Course de Serveuses et Garçons de Café,” is a race that tests the speed at which a waiter can carry a loaded tray without tipping any of its contents. This race has been going on in France since the 1930s.
Pétanque is a French game similar to lawn bowling or bocce ball. Pétanque is a form of boules where the goal is to toss or roll hollow steel balls as close as possible to a small wooden ball called a “cochonnet” or jack, while standing inside a circle with both feet on the ground. Join in from 10 am to 4 pm to learn the game and partake in tournaments organized by the SF Club.
The Children’s Playground , located next to the pétanque courts, will feature several games to delight children of all ages.
Sunday, July 14th
Presidio Picnic: Easter Sunday Main Post Lawn, San Francisco
11 AM, All Ages
Free
San Francisco’s favorite family picnic is back for 2019. Presidio Picnic brings together the best of the Bay Area food scene with the beauty of this national park site and views of the bay and the Golden Gate Bridge.
Held on the seven acre Main Parade Ground lawn, this weekly community event features food and drink from more than 30+ international mobile food creators representing the best of San Francisco ’s multicultural food scene curated by Off the Grid .
But it’s not just about the grub; visitors can enjoy an ever-changing array of free activities including yoga classes, lawn games, a Presidio photo booth , free kids bike-riding lessons from the Presidio YMCA, and nature-based arts and crafts for kids in the Presidio Adventure Zone tent.
Grab a blanket and head to your national park for Presidio Picnic. This great family event takes place on the Presidio’s beautiful Main Parade Ground, a seven-acre lawn with views of the park, the city, and the San Francisco Bay.
Presidio Picnic
Every Sunday | March 31-October 20, 2019 | 11 am to 4 pm
Main Parade Ground, The Presidio, SF
FREE
A rotating lineup of 30+ international mobile food creators representing the best of San Francisco’s multicultural food scene curated by Off the Grid Free Yoga class from LubbDubb every Sunday from 11 am to 12 noon Free Presidio Y Bike learn-to-ride lessons for kids every 1st Sunday of the month. Bicycles and helmets provided Cultural Dance Performance every 3rd Sunday of the month at noon to 2 pm. Food Trucks & Pop-Ups The rotating lineup of 30 of the Bay Area’s best mobile food concepts at this year’s Presidio Picnic includes:
(New to Presidio Picnic this year are Off the Grid mobile food creators)
Beans N Barbells: mobile pop café serving specialty coffee beverages
Bowl’d Acai : made-to-order juices, smoothies and acai bowls
Estas Manos: just-launched artisan coffee roaster proudly based in San Francisco
Fruity Moto: organic, all-natural, fruit-centric craft beverages
Gio Gelati: traditional Italian gelato made with impeccable California ingredients
Horn Barbecue: much-lauded authentic Texas barbecue with a cult following
The Base Co: LA-based natural sweetener company serving guilty-free, plant-based beverages in refillable “happiness jars” that feature designs by local artists
La Santa Torta: Tacos, tortas, elotes and more that showcase the gastronomy of the Jalisco region of Mexico
Lobsterdamus: Southern-California shellfish favorite serving up Maine lobsters on a mesquite grill
Mi Morena: La Cocina entrepreneur offering fresh Tacos de Guisado on housemade tortillas
Milk & Waffles: authentic Liège waffles topped with imported pearl sugar
MOMO Noodle: high octane sauces and toppings on traditional Asian noodles
On a Roll – Calcutta Style: Indian kathi rolls fusing traditional and modern flavors
Pye: savory meat and veggie pies made in small batches with honest ingredients
Spunbyss: classic, made-from-scratch sliders, fries and sides with vegetarian options that include a plant-based burger patty from Impossible Foods
Turontastic: crunchy and irresistible Filipino desserts with inventive fillings like ube mochi, and strawberry-Nutella
Participating alums from Off the Grid’s 24-month mobile food incubator in partnership with Google, Instrucktional, include:
Bollocks: Globe-spanning spherical delights from meatball master Greg Spangler.
Manjé: Haitian Caribbean cuisine from entrepreneur Dimitri Lilavois.
The Great Mac n’ Cheese Melt Off
SPARK Social SF, San Francisco
11 AM, All Ages
$5
The biggest Fête du Fromage in the Bay Area returns on National Mac ‘n Cheese Day at SPARK Social SF. Find your gouda time at this havarti party, where fifteen of the best food trucks and pop-up shops will be mixing up mouthwatering mac ‘n cheese specials all day long.
Who will be the mac ‘n cheesiest? Cast your vote for the Chancellor of Cheese, the Monarch of Mac, the King of Queso at this National Mac ‘n Cheese Day melt-off. In addition to insane mac ‘n cheese creations, enjoy live music, lawn games, and a photobooth.
This event is all ages and will happen rain or shine. Please note, there’s no dogs on the Festival Lawn (though they’re always welcome on the SPARK pavement).
Mac ‘n Cheese Vendors
Saturday, July 13th
– The American Grilled Cheese Kitchen
– The GrilledCheezGuy
– Jackrabbit Kitchen
– Little Red Riding Truck
– Nombe
– Batter Up
– Chef’s Truck
– Gyros on Wheels
– Firetrail Pizza
– The Sarap Shop
– Nuncha Empanada
– Gyros on Wheels
– Kokio Republic
– Doughp Cookie Dough
Sunday, July 14th
– The American Grilled Cheese Kitchen
– The GrilledCheezGuy
– Moonraker Mobile
– Little Red Riding Truck
– Nombe
– Batter Up
– Chef’s Truck
– Gyros on Wheels
– Firetrail Pizza
– The Sarap Shop
– Nuncha Empanada
– Gyros on Wheels
– Kokio Republic
– Lobos Ice Cream

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My Wife and I Shed a Combined 100 Pounds After Going Plant-Based

My Wife and I Shed a Combined 100 Pounds After Going Plant-Based
By Siddharth Bansal, print / save article
Together since high school, Siddharth and Nidhi grew up eating rich foods. But by the time Siddharth was 25, he weighed 375 pounds and had dangerously high cholesterol. Together, they decided to try a plant-based diet for weight loss.
My wife, Nidhi, and I met in high school, dated through college, and got married in 2001. We’re both “foodies,” and I have been heavy all my life. Shortly after we got married, I was at my heaviest—375 pounds—and had an incident with acid reflux. My doctor told me that my cholesterol levels were dangerously high and, at 25, I was a “walking time bomb.” I started following a low-carb diet . I dropped 100 pounds, with the support of Nidhi, who followed the same diet. But I ended up gaining it back.
After many similar periods of unsustained weight loss throughout the years, our physician introduced us to Forks Over Knives and the recipes on the website. In 2017, we watched the documentary. Our eyes opened. We decided not to treat this as a diet but to make it our lifestyle. Adapting to Plant-Based Living
It was tough giving up some things we loved, such as eggs and chicken. I faced challenges while traveling for work. I had to plan ahead and locate restaurants online that offered vegan options, and I further customized my meals to make them WFPB compliant. But the main challenge was Indian food. There is a myth in Indian culture that food cannot taste good without oil, ghee, and heavy cream. We had to adapt old recipes to our new way of eating. After trial and error, Nidhi mastered the art of cooking Indian food with the principles of a WFPB diet. Now we try to connect with other Indians to inform them of alternatives for better health.
Our friends and family are shocked by our transformation and admire our commitment. We are eating more and still enjoying the cuisines we love. We love the Forks Over Knives app and gather other WFPB recipes we come across. We have joined a gym to help with toning. It takes time for your body to recover from decades of being overweight, and I want to do it the right way and not rush into it.
Since January 2018, I have lost about 70 pounds and Nidhi has lost 25 pounds, and we feel amazing about our journey.
Ready to get started? Check out Forks Meal Planner , FOK’s easy weekly meal-planning tool to keep you on a healthy plant-based path. tags:

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I have to say, vegetarian Indian food is the one cuisine where I like everything. Everything. The spices make my heart happy.

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The First State Gets Its First Food Hall

The First State Gets Its First Food Hall 0 0
From beer gardens to shopping mall food courts, people have always been enamored with venues that offer a variety of food and drink options and since everything old is new again, it’s no wonder why the food halls of yesteryear are making a roaring comeback.
But what exactly is a food hall?
Typically, a food hall is a spacious location that contains restaurants, specialty purveyors, producers, and artisans selling from kiosks or small stalls. Sometimes both raw ingredients and prepared foods can be found under the same roof, giving off a bit of a farmers’ market air. The modern food hall concept has ancient roots and can be traced all the way back to Emperor Trajan of Rome and the world-renown Grand Bazaar in Istanbul with its narrow, hawking stalls is the longest, continually operating permanent market of its kind. In the early 18th and 19th centuries, a burgeoning department store scene in London helped usher in the era of the food hall—Harrod’s being among the most famous. American society saw its own culinary landscape changing during the same time period and food shops like Quincy Market in Boston (1825), Reading Terminal Market in Philadelphia (1893), and everyone’s favorite fish-tossing destination Pike’s Place in Seattle (1907) were born and forever altered the way people ate. Dining, once confined only to one’s home, became a public and communal activity. A game-changer, indeed.
Food halls are usually reserved for bustling metropolises (like The Bourse in Philadelphia), but the city of Wilmington was ripe for a concept of this sort and diminutive DE.CO (a portmanteau for Delaware Collective) delivers. A collaborative effort between local developer Buccini/Pollin and Seawall Development, DE.CO bills itself as a launchpad for chefs and a haven for eaters and is located in art deco-styled DuPont Building in the heart of downtown’s business district. The spacious venue is home to 8 stalls (7 permanent residents and a pop-up that plans to host a rotating roster of in-residence chefs and their teams), a test kitchen, a chic atrium bar, and a lounging area that occasionally doubles as an entertainment and art space.
DE.CO, in true food hall tradition, offers diners a range of cuisines whose dishes would please both the pickiest and most adventurous of palates. Take a look: Pizzeria Bardea – Since its opening, the rustic Italian gem consistently lands on both foodies’ and critics’ best-of lists. The DE.CO menu shies away from the hearty plates of its main restaurant and focuses on Neopolitan-inspired artisanal pizzas and salads which anyone knows is quite possibly the best meal on earth. Don’t expect to find run-of-the-mill pies; instead opt for the Upside Down, a formaggio-centric mash-up of mozzarella, grana padano, and ricotta topped with garlic oil and tomato drizzle. Pair it with one of Bardea’s lighter salads, an authentic panzanella (bread salad), and that’s amore. Connie’s – An outpost of the Baltimore favorite, the soul food-inspired restaurant capitalizes on the chicken and waffles craze. Crispy, seasoned chicken tenders are perched atop a pillowy, hot-off-the-iron buttermilk waffle on which diners can drizzle maple syrup or dot some fiery hot sauce, but serious foodies opt for fried shrimp and a red velvet or cereal-infused waffle. If poultry and the pancake’s cousin isn’t your thing, order a Maryland legend: the Baltimore chicken box (fried chicken and French fries). Round out your meal with a cup of the homemade sweet tea. Phubs – The pho and banh mi-slinging crew behind the counter at this restaurant make you feel like you’re at one of the busy food stalls in Vietnam. The atmosphere is fast-paced, raucous, and fun—you might be treated to a bit of banter while you wait for your food. The pho, a traditional noodle soup, is studded with slices of jalapenos, a sprinkle of cilantro, and a couple of lime wedges; shrimp or flank steak can be added. A variety of banh mi (think of it as a Vietnamese sub), rice bowls, and bubble tea complete the spot-on menu. Verandah – If variety is the spice of life, this Baltimore outpost is thriving. An array of traditional street foods like samosas, kebabs, chaat, and paratha (flatbread) are served alongside heartier dishes like tikka masala. The offerings are creative and go a long way to prove that Indian cuisine is more than curry. Stripp’d – Healthy eating doesn’t have to be synonymous with boring or tasteless. Drink to your health with a smoothie or fresh, cold-pressed juice. If you’re looking to fill up without overloading on calories, açai bowls and steel-cut oatmeal are a good bet. A rotating menu of sandwiches and salads packed with nutritious ingredients make for the ultimate feel-good meal. Al Chu’s Sushi – Chances are, if you’re a sushi lover, you know Al Chu’s name. For years, he was the chef at downtown’s popular Mikimoto’s and was responsible for many of menu’s most well-known sushi rolls. Now he’s calling the shots at his own place and, judging from the queue of hungry diners sidling up to the adjacent sushi bar, it’s a hit. Chu brings his culinary expertise to his menu of sashimi, sushi rolls, and Hawaiian poke bowls. Spark’d – Hotel duPont, Wilmington’s swankiest landmark, has one of the best pastry programs in the area. In a genius move, the powers that be decided to create a confection haven for its popular desserts. Patrons can nosh on pastry chef Leah Steinberger’s sweet-and-tart lemon bars, cookies, and a seemingly endless array of baked goods—her artisanal confection work is almost too good to eat. Almost. Locale Post BBQ – It’s a pretty safe bet to assume the regular customers of one of the city’s most popular barbecue joints were thanking the grill gods that Locale’s team opened a second location. The main restaurant on Lincoln Street consistently sells out of racks of ribs and pulled pork often before noon and, as the occupant of DE.CO’s pop-up stall, plenty of hungry folks are hoping the residency becomes a permanent one. Though the full menu is not available, you can get your fill of barbecue sandwiches and sides.
DE.CO has proven to be a welcomed addition to downtown Wilmington’s growing food landscape and fits in nicely with the city’s sophisticated revitalization efforts. With each opening of a new restaurant, palates and horizons are expanding. A delicious endeavor, indeed.
* DE.CO is open seven days a week for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.
This article is a part of my food series for the Greater Wilmington Convention and Visitors Bureau. Read all my posts here . share post to: Author Food + travel writer | Author of Food Lovers’ Guide to Philadelphia, Main Squeeze: Juicing Recipes for Your Healthiest Self, and Philly Eats: The Best Bites in the City (coming soon) Leave A Comment Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed . Copyright 2019 The Palate Princess | Full Plate Media, LLC All Rights Reserved.

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6 Things that happen to your body when you eat Turmeric every day

Turmeric has been used for over 4,000 years to treat a variety of conditions.
Studies show that turmeric may help fight infections and some cancers, reduce inflammation, and treat digestive problems. – University of Maryland Medical Center
Native to southwest India, turmeric is a herbaceous plant of the ginger family.
It is most commonly used as a spice in various foods, including Bangladeshi cuisine, Indian cuisine, and Pakistani cuisine and curries.
Turmeric is also one of the world’s ancient herbal medicines, having been used in Asia for thousands of years.
Today, medical professionals and herbal practitioners in various fields note turmeric’s ability to treat and/or alleviate a number of different health conditions.
HERE ARE 6 BENEFITS OF TURMERIC IF CONSUMED REGULARLY:
1. REDUCES INFLAMMATION
Turmeric is believed to be a powerful anti-inflammatory. In fact, the abundant spice contains over two dozen anti-inflammatory compounds. Curcumin, one of turmeric’s most abundant compounds, has been noted in various studies for its excellent anti-inflammatory properties.
Of the many studies that have been conducted, one of the most prominent was published in the October 2007 issue of Alternative and Complementary Therapies.
Dr. James Duke, a well-respected ethnobotanist summarized his findings in the July 2008 issue of the American Botanical Council.
After reviewing over 700 studies, Duke concluded that turmeric effectively outperformed many pharmaceutical drugs prescribed for a variety of chronic, debilitative conditions, with no significant side effects.
2. REDUCES CANCER RISK
While studies noting turmeric’s effectiveness against cancer are in the early stages, various lab and animal studies have yielded promising results.
Researchers at the American Cancer Society note that curcumin, a prevalent compound in turmeric: “interferes with several important molecular pathways involved in cancer development, growth and spread.”
In another study published by the US National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health, researchers again note curcumin’s cancer-fighting properties.
The study further details various “pathways” that curcumin counteracts to achieve such properties.
In their summation, researchers of the study emphasized the cancer-fighting properties of curcumin in a resounding fashion:
“The activity of curcumin reported against leukemia and lymphoma, gastrointestinal cancers, genitourinary cancers, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, lung cancer, melanoma, neurological cancers, and sarcoma reflects its ability to affect multiple targets. Thus, an “old-age” disease such as cancer requires an “age-old” treatment.
3. AIDS DIGESTION AND RELIEVES DIGESTIVE-RELATED DISORDERS
Partially since turmeric is such a powerful anti-inflammatory, the substance is also effective at improving digestion and reducing some symptoms of digestive disorders.
A study performed at the University of Maryland Medical Center notes a variety of different conditions in which turmeric may be helpful, including indigestion and ulcerative colitis.
Here are some of the study’s key findings:
– Curcumin, a component of turmeric, stimulates bile production in the gallbladder, which is believed to help improve digestion.
– Turmeric serves as a potential safeguard against remission in those with ulcerative colitis, a chronic disease of the digestive tract with intermittent symptoms.
One noteworthy exception to the above benefits of turmeric is stomach ulcers.
The researchers did not find any evidence of alleviation to this condition.
In fact, turmeric is advised against for the condition, since it may increase the production of stomach acid.
4. PROMOTES BRAIN HEALTH
Among turmeric’s most powerful health benefits are its positive effects on our cognition.
According to researchers, curcumin aids by enhancing our ability to learn and process in different environments.
Further, curcumin may assist with warding off neurodegenerative conditions – dementia disorders and Alzheimer’s among them.
Scientists sought to gain further insight into curcumin’s brain benefits by conducting a study, which was subsequently published in the Public Library of Science.
Utilizing a curcumin-fortified diet, scientists tested the behavioral performance in rats after a 6-week and 12-week time period.
At the study’s conclusion, researchers noted enhanced spatial and non-spatial memory and a possible link between curcumin treatment and enhanced cognition and neurogenesis.
In other words (this is exciting): turmeric may aid in neuroplasticity – the development of new brain connections…incredible.
5. PROMOTES HEART HEALTH
Curcumin in turmeric also aids with ensuring a healthy heart.
In the same study by the University of Maryland, scientists came to this conclusion by observing curcumin’s effective plaque-removal properties.
Plaque buildup in the arteries can lead to a heart attack or stroke – a condition known as atherosclerosis.
Curcumin is also effective in reducing bad cholesterol known as LDL and preventing blood clots.
One important note to the latter, turmeric may interact with certain blood-clot medications – make sure to seek a doctor’s advice before supplementing turmeric in this case.
6. ALLEVIATES ARTHRITIS SYMPTOMS
Because of turmeric’s anti-inflammatory properties, it is believed to be effective at alleviating arthritis symptoms.
Many health professionals subscribe to the notion that turmeric is more potently anti-inflammatory than many – if not most – other pharmaceutical and over-the-counter alternatives.
In a study published in the US National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health, rheumatoid arthritis patients who supplemented curcumin into their diets experienced a “reduction in tenderness” and a reduction in “Disease Activity” in numbers far-greater in proportion to those who did not.
Source : Kingdemic

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Amari Pattaya reopens

The redevelopment programme of Amari Pattaya is complete, with the unveiling of the new accommodation in two distinct buildings – Amari Tower and Amari Suites. The property also features extensive free-form swimming pools with a treehouse-themed slide and aqua waterpark, kids’ club with animation team, restaurants, ballrooms, meeting facilities, fitness centre and spa..
Amari Pattaya, on the northern end of Pattaya Bay, has 297 refurbished guest rooms and suites, including the 19th floor executive lounge in Amari Tower, just steps away from the beach. The Amari Suites, tucked away in their own building, offers a collection of 49 one- and two-bedroom suites.
Designed to evoke the charm of traditional Thai homes with contemporary luxury, each suite aims to provide a getaway home. Guests only have to take a few steps to get to the newly built waterpark and swimming pools. All suites offer ocean views and a dedicated living area with dining space as well as furnished balconies.
New dining experiences offer multiple cuisine options including Thai, Asian, Indian, Italian, Chinese, among international fare are on offer at Amaya Food Gallery. Aqua Eatery & Bar is another new dining venue for guests to enjoy poolside cocktails and snacks.
Amari Pattaya new flexible venue offerings include the newly built pillar-free ballroom, four additional meeting rooms in Amari Tower, and the Beach Lawn.
These have made Amari Pattaya a potential venue for meetings, conferences, incentives, weddings and team-building activities for 10 to 1,000 people.
Completely new in offer and build, the extensive free-form pools feature the Aqua waterpark, Treehouse Kids Club, playgrounds, and a family restaurant.
The pool area, created specifically to enhance the destination, has new sun-loungers, umbrellas and day beds.
Amari Pattaya is located at the northern end of Pattaya Beach, less than 90 minutes by car from Bangkok Suvarnabhumi Airport.

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For Cunard, a triumphant return to Alaska Weekly

Jul 11, 2019 | Queen Elizabeth passengers gaze at the Mendenhall Glacier from the glacier’s visitor center in Juneau. Photo Credit: TW photo by Eric Moya For my first trip to Alaska, four years ago, I packed several jackets, though I’m quite certain that none had lapels.
So whereas packing for that trip was all about being prepared for the weather conditions I expected to encounter during a late spring in the 49th state, for my recent return at roughly the same time of year, I also made sure to pack a sport coat, suit and tux — as one does for a sailing with Cunard Line.
This year marked a return to Alaska for the cruise line and the inaugural Alaska season for its 2,081-passenger Queen Elizabeth, which launched in 2010 and aboard which I made the journey from June 10 to 20. Next year the line is planning a full Alaska season, building upon lessons learned during this abbreviated season and, as always, striving to balance a sense of place with Cunard’s signature White Star Service.
In terms of onboard entertainment, that means Cunard standbys such as music-and-dance productions in the ship’s 830-seat Royal Court Theatre, which offered some of the best sightlines and sound I’ve ever experienced, on land or sea. Exploring Alaska with Cunard After a decades-long absence, Cunard Line returned to Alaska this year. The cruise line hosted destinations editor Eric Moya during its penultimate Alaska sailing this season aboard the Queen Elizabeth. Pictured, the ship in port in Sitka. Photo Credit: TW photo by Eric Moya After a decades-long absence, Cunard Line returned to Alaska this year. The cruise line hosted destinations editor Eric Moya during its penultimate Alaska sailing this season aboard the Queen Elizabeth. Pictured, the ship in port in Sitka. Photo Credit: TW photo by Eric Moya Eos Strings performs in the Brittania restaurant during the 10-day sailing’s first of two gala evenings. Photo Credit: TW photo by Eric Moya Performers at the Great Alaskan Lumberjack Show in Ketchikan. A variety of show packages offer guests meals, an ax-throwing challenge and more. Photo Credit: TW photo by Eric Moya A humpback sighting in Stephens Passage during a shore excursion in Juneau. Photo Credit: TW photo by Eric Moya Queen Elizabeth passengers gaze at the Mendenhall Glacier from the glacier’s visitor center in Tongass National Forest, Juneau. Photo Credit: TW photo by Eric Moya A train along the White Pass & Yukon Route Railroad makes its way back to Skagway. The rail line was built in 1898 during the Klondike Gold Rush and today uses restored circa-1950s trains. Photo Credit: TW photo by Eric Moya Bald eagles spotted at Icy Strait Point, an Alaska Native-owned cruise destination near the town of Hoonah. Photo Credit: TW photo by Eric Moya The 75-mile-long Hubbard Glacier seen from Deck 2 during a day at sea. Photo Credit: TW photo by Eric Moya St. Michael’s Orthodox Cathedral in Sitka, built in 1848. Photo Credit: TW photo by Eric Moya Passengers dancing in the ship’s Queens Room. Photo Credit: TW photo by Eric Moya Baked Alaskas in hand, Queen Elizabeth chefs prepare for the chefs’ parade in the Brittania dining room on the sailing’s second gala night. Photo Credit: TW photo by Eric Moya Harbor seals get some sun on a buoy in Stephens Passage. Photo Credit: TW photo by Eric Moya Previous Next
During my sailing, I particularly enjoyed the Palladium Nights revue, with the production’s talented dancers and singers evoking swinging ’60s London and beyond. A duet on Dusty Springfield’s “Son of a Preacher Man” showed off the range of the production’s female singers, who seemed to relish the opportunity to let loose with some soulful vocal runs; a Tom Jones medley did the same for the two male singers, and “It’s Not Unusual” in particular offered a fun approximation of the Jones experience, complete with pelvic thrusts aimed at the ladies in the front row.
Earning a standing ovation a few nights later was the Russian duo Aura, whose wordless interpretive dance told a tale of a romance from courtship to infidelity to happiness rekindled, all with Cirque-style acrobatic feats that drew gasps from the crowd.
Entertainment with a more regional flair was on offer throughout the journey, as well. Folk duo Cassie and Maggie from Nova Scotia regularly entertained guests in the Garden Lounge on Deck 9 and took the headlining gig one night at the Royal Court Theatre. The Alaska String Band boarded in Juneau to offer guests a taste of its rootsy bluegrass sound. Cassie and Maggie, a folk duo from Nova Scotia, performing in the ship’s Garden Lounge. Photo Credit: TW photo by Eric Moya
By day, programming in the theater generally took on a more educational bent. Lecturers such as William Lokey offered historical context for the ports we’d visit; for one of his lectures, for instance, Lokey gave an overview of the 1896 Klondike Gold Rush and its enduring impact on the U.S.
Rachel Cartwright, the sailing’s onboard naturalist, gave several presentations on the wildlife we’d encounter over the course of our trip. She also made herself available for informal chats in the Garden Lounge.
“Our lectures take a lot of time and resourcing, and you can tell by the attendance that guests really want it,” said Paul O’Loughlin, entertainment manager. “The guests want knowledge; they don’t just want to see, they want to understand.
“We want to really put Alaska at the forefront of the daytime programming,” O’Loughlin said.
Likewise for executive chef Mark Oldroyd, putting Alaska at the forefront of the ship’s culinary offerings while continuing to feature Cunard classics was the goal for this season’s sailings. An antipasto course at La Piazza; the Italian menu was one of several cuisines served on a rotating basis in the Queen Elizabeth’s alternative-dining venue. Photo Credit: TW photo by Eric Moya
So while the first of two black-tie nights offered quintessentially British dishes such as beef Wellington and sticky toffee pudding, barbecue salmon was also on the menu; other evenings likewise showcased regional items such as reindeer. An afternoon seafood buffet brought throngs to the Deck 9 Lido deck with the allure of mountains of king crab legs, several salmon dishes (varying in both species and preparation) and more.
“We all know what Alaska’s famous for: salmon and crab and seafood and freshness,” Oldroyd said. “We want to make that a key feature: Come and taste Alaska.”
On more laid-back evenings, I sampled other dining options. One big highlight was dinner at the Golden Lion Pub, which poured familiar U.K. brews such as London Pride but also stocked a selection of bottled beers from the Alaskan Brewing Co. (as did most bars and restaurants onboard). One appetizer, the sesame-crusted Norfolk duckling, was one of the best versions of Peking duck I’ve ever had, and that’s coming from a former China expat.
The Steakhouse at the Verandah, one of two additional-charge venues, served classic steakhouse fare, from ribeyes to creamed spinach to cheesecake. The other additional-charge venue offered a menu that rotated between Asian fusion (Bamboo), Indian (Coriander) and Italian (La Piazza) themes; on one of the La Piazza nights, I enjoyed a seafood pasta prepared tableside with a beyond-generous portion of scallops and shrimp.
All of these onboard offerings, of course, are in service to the main attraction . An orca spotted in Stephens Passage during a shore excursion in Juneau. Photo Credit: TW photo by Eric Moya
“Alaska is quite port-intensive; it’s a lot busier than the Caribbean,” said food and beverage manager Glenn Milway as we watched the 75-mile-long Hubbard Glacier come closer into view during a day at sea. “Here there’s a lot more to do: the glaciers, whale-watching, fishing, hiking, you can go on the trains.”
Milway anticipates that next year’s Alaska season will see some tweaks based on the line’s experience this year — he is especially eager to take greater advantage of the salmon-fishing season to maximize guests’ access to fresh seafood. But otherwise, he said, for Cunard’s return to Alaska after a decades-long absence, “To be honest … we’ve got a lot right.”

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Comfort Khana

Yes, we know you’re thinking of Mask at TST. And Comfort Khana By Editor’s Desk, July 12, 2019, Categories: Entertainment , Featured , Reviews , Slider , Wine & Dine There is a quaint place I stumbled upon and thought I made a big discovery! But apparently, people are well-aware of the little eatery ‘Sharmaji’ in Hung Hom. The reason I write about it because almost everything here took me by surprise – location, food, service and guests!
Quietly tucked in the corner of a Hung Hom lane, Sharmaji Indian Veggie Restaurant is easily missable if you don’t have exact directions. Their unpretentious and rather modest entrance may even make you rethink your decision to eat here. Funny thing that caught my eye was ‘paw bhaji’ at a pure vegetarian restaurant! But misspellings aside, the food is worth sinking your paws into.
The small restaurant is packed with clean, basic tables and chairs. There is no seating plan. If you’re looking for décor and ambience, don’t look for it here. Just grab a seat and order.
The family-run place has soft-spoken and polite staff who will already know you from your second visit onwards. The greeting is brief and service, quick.
I prefer going here with a friend – one, because its less awkward when you’re seated across a stranger; two, because you can order more and share! In absolute contrast to the size of the place, the menu is more elaborate than you’d expect. Almost everything you’d crave from Indian cuisine is on their list – including aloo-tikki burger! (I haven’t craved it so not tried it).
Their North Indian meals and South Indian dishes are everything you’d expect. The meal plans are absolute value for money. A distinct dry masala on their South Indian food adds a signature taste to it.
I am a ‘chai & chaat’ person. Their chai sure takes the championship cup! But I wouldn’t put bets on the chaat, especially if you’re used to the authentic Indian street savories.
This summer, I’d reckon a tall glass of sinful lassi with your meal. Only if you have the luxury of squeezing in a nap after. Their paneer bhurji also has the same effect on me.
What you will like here is the food and the friendly service. Its impressive how a place that looks so modest is so popular. You’ll find as many Indians as non-Indians coming to eat here. For their benefit, images of the menu items are printed and pinned on the walls – end to end.
For me, their chai is reason enough to keep going. But if it’s the homemade meal feel you’re craving, then Sharmaji is the place. Clean, simple, affordable Indian food with a complete ‘no-frills’ experience. This is the closest you can get to ghar ka khana in a Hong Kong restaurant.
Address: Shop A, G/F, Block 2, Hung Hom Garden, 3 Tsing Chau Street, Hung Hom Facebook Comments

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