Giving Muslim Visitors a Place at Japan’s Tables

Giving Muslim Visitors a Place at Japan’s Tables

Home / World Localities / Giving Muslim Visitors a Place at Japan’s Tables Giving Muslim Visitors a Place at Japan’s Tables World Localities
The Challenge of Eating Out in Japan
With the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics fast approaching, Japan—in both the public and private sectors—is gearing up to welcome a fresh wave of visitors from overseas. Above all else, there is a drive to assure these foreign guests that Japan is a safe and fun country. Of the more than 2.8 million overseas tourists who visited Japan in July 2018, the Japan National Tourism Organization says that more than 2.4 million—a significant majority—were from neighboring countries and regions in Asia , including from Malaysia, where Islam is the official religion, and Indonesia , which has the largest Muslim population in the world. This is heightening awareness in Japan of the need to create a Muslim-friendly environment that ensures an enjoyable experience for these visitors .
Meals are a special matter of concern for Muslims because of their religion’s dietary requirements, such as the Islamic prohibitions against pork and alcoholic drinks. Only halal food and drink, processed according to Islamic dietary law, is permissible.
Halal seals of certification displayed in restaurants, on menus, and on restaurant websites are one way of assuring Muslim visitors that they can eat safely in these places. But while there are as many as 20 institutions authorized to provide halal certification within Japan, the certification is not well known, to the extent that it makes the news when halal certification is awarded to places like Fujita Kankō’s Origami Asakusa , a Japanese restaurant in Tokyo’s popular Asakusa district, or Sōjiin, a Mount Kōya temple that provides lodging and vegetarian cuisine. Fujita Kankō’s Origami Asakusa restaurant offers a halal menu. (Photo courtesy of Fujita Kankō.) Origami Asakusa ’s beef shabu-shabu course. (Photo courtesy of Fujita Kankō.)
Japan is also seeing growth in eateries that may not be halal-certified, but can be categorized as Muslim-friendly just the same. Kobe Misono, the original teppanyaki steak house, makes it clear that it has not obtained official certification . But the restaurant offers halal Kobe beef stored separately from other meats, prepared with special halal cooking utensils, and served on halal dishes, and has staff who have undergone the Japan Halal Association’s training program for Islamically accepted food handling. The original teppanyaki steak house, Kobe Misono. (Photo courtesy of Misono Inc.) A serving of halal Kobe steak. (Photo courtesy of Misono Inc.)
Online and Print Guides for Halal Diners
The Tokyo Convention and Visitors Bureau has published the Tokyo Muslim Travelers’ Guide 2018–2019, listing 93 halal-certified and Muslim-friendly restaurants in the metropolis. Available online as a PDF download, this is a valuable resource for Muslim tourists seeking good places to eat. The Tokyo Muslim Travelers’ Guide 2018–2019 lists 93 halal-certified and Muslim-friendly establishments in Tokyo. (Photo courtesy of Tokyo Convention and Visitors Bureau.)
The concierges at the Nihonbashi Information Center right by the famed bridge in Chūō, Tokyo, will happily print out a computer list providing access information on Muslim-friendly eateries in the nearby Nihonbashi, Hakozaki, Koamichō, Hatchōbori, and Kanda areas, including places serving Malaysian, Arabic, and Indian cuisine.
The Asakusa Culture Tourist Information Center, across the street from the Kaminarimon gate to the temple Sensōji in Taitō, Tokyo—one of the must-see places for foreign tourists—offers a Tokyo Map for Muslims and information and assistance for Muslim tourists. The map provides an easy-to-use guide with photos of the 21 halal-certified restaurants in the Asakusa and Ueno districts. The latest version of the Tokyo Map for Muslims is also available online (see link above).
Naritaya Asakusa , a popular rāmen shop located on Asakusa ’s Nishi Sandō Shopping Street with halal certification from the Japan Islamic Trust, does not use any alcohol-based ingredients, pork, or pork-based soup stock in its food. Naritaya Asakusa . (Photo courtesy of Fellows, Inc.) Naritaya Asakusa ’s halal rāmen. (Photo courtesy of Fellows, Inc.)
On the second floor of Naritaya Asakusa is a prayer space and place for ablutions. On the ceiling is a Qibla arrow indicating the direction of Mecca. This kind of service and attention to Islamic requirements is not surprising—Naritaya Asakusa originated in Malaysia’s Johor Bahru, only to move to Japan later, giving it a natural edge when it comes to accommodating the ne of Muslim customers. Naritaya also has branches in Kyoto’s Gion district and Osaka’s Minami district.
I spoke with some Malaysian tourists enjoying a meal in the rāmen shop. “We have great difficulty finding halal restaurants in Japan,” they said. “We just happened to see this shop’s seal of certification when we passed by here. When we can’t find a halal restaurant , we buy salmon onigiri rice balls in a convenience store .”
In another conversation with some Muslim women from Indonesia taking photos at Sensōji’s Kaminarimon, I was told: “All Japanese food is delicious. We always ask first if a dish is halal and have never had any problems.” Apparently, not all Indonesian Muslims are strict adherents to the Islamic precepts, and while they will not eat pork themselves, do not mind if it is served in a restaurant where they are eating. With this attitude, they do not fret too much about a particular restaurant ’s qualifications, though they will avoid places that obviously specialize in pork dishes, such as shops serving pork-broth rāmen or tonkatsu (pork cutlet) shops. Google News: Trourism Indonesia site-nippon.com

Read More…

Must-visit food experiences in NYC

Hi,
My wife and I are massive foodies from the UK travelling to NYC for a few days next week. We live close to a large city in the UK so a lot of food trends popular here we’ve already tried (obviously we’re saturated with high street Chinese and Indian restaurants (North and South), Italian, Thai, and recently Vietnamese pho / banh mi type places have become popular) and also poorly done Mexican (probably more Tex-Mex).
I’m just looking for recommendations please for places which are must visit food experiences focusing on the type of thing we won’t get in your typical large UK city. The places where we would be kicking ourselves if we later found out they existed and we missed them.
We’re trying to fit in a sit down restaurant at some point for something a bit more special, plus lots of street food day-to-day.
Not against regional cuisines from the placers I mentioned above (China/India/Thailand/Vietnam) if they’re unique to NYC food scene and hard to find in the UK – e.g. we saw some places on YouTube doing hand-torn Chinese noodles that looked really good, and Halal food carts serving really tasty looking (presumably Indian in origin?) food.
Would really appreciate some recommendations please!
Thanks.

Read More…

Hospitality at its best

I stayed in Anuraga palace for a small duration of 2-3 days the last weekend i.e 19th-21st Jan’19. On our arrival, we were welcomed very graciously. The whole staff is very friendly and helpful. We loved the location of the property and the infrastructure is up to the mark with all the important facilities yet gives a feel of a traditional Rajasthani royal life with beautiful haveli style structure and feel. In the restaurant staff pay’s special attention to each and every guest. The food is delicious with traditional authentic taste in the Indian & Rajasthani cuisine. You can also book safaris from the reception. I would highly recommend this place if you are going to Ranthambore.

Read More…

One of the most influential and powerful endorsements for plant-based diets by the Lancelot Medical Journal to save the planet and feed the earth’s population. Yes, we’re on the right track!
Seven dietary changes to protect your health – and the planet
Consider a diet that can prolong your life and, at the same time, feed a growing global population without causing further damage to the environment.
That’s just what 37 scientists from 16 countries (the EAT-Lancet Commission) did for two years. Their findings resulted in recommendations for a healthy diet that can feed the world’s population from sustainable food systems and were published on Thursday in the medical journal The Lancet.
They recognize that food production needs to nourish human health and support environmental sustainability; currently, our food systems are threatening both. Strong evidence indicates that livestock farming is one of the biggest drivers of climate change, biodiversity loss, land degradation, water use and chemical pollution.
The “planetary-health diet,” largely plant-based and low in red meat and sugar, is estimated to feed 10 billion people by 2050 from sustainable food systems. The researchers also believe it will prevent 11 million premature deaths a year caused by an unhealthy diet.
WHAT’S IN THE DIET?
Daily protein comes mostly from plants including beans, lentils, soy and nuts. Whole grains, not refined, are included, and fruits and vegetables fill half of your plate at meals.
The recommended 2,500-calorie diet doesn’t completely eliminate animal foods. It can include, each day, one half-ounce of red meat, one ounce each of fish and poultry and one cup of milk or yogurt. One to five eggs can be eaten a week.
Plant-based oils are substituted for animal fats and added sugars are limited to 31 g a day, in line with the WHO recommendation for sweeteners.
IS IT FEASIBLE?
The planetary-health diet is a huge shift from the way we eat. But eating this way isn’t completely foreign.
The traditional Mediterranean diet of the early 1960s was largely plant-based and contained only 35 g of red meat and poultry combined each day. Many traditional diets (e.g., West Africa, India, Mexico and parts of Asia) contain lots of plant protein and little meat or dairy.
Some people, though, feel that achieving this global diet isn’t feasible.
Not today; that’s for sure. Reaching these dietary targets by 2050, the EAT-Lancet Commission points out, will require policies that encourage healthier food choices, agriculture sustainability, stricter rules around governing of land and oceans and reducing food waste.
TRANSITIONING TO A SUSTAINABLE DIET AT HOME
In the meantime, there are small steps you can take on an individual level to move toward the planetary-health diet.
Replace meat with pulses. Substitute cooked brown or green lentils for half of the ground meat in meatloaf, meatballs, burgers, shepherd’s pie, stuffed peppers and marinara sauces.
Replace some of the meat in tacos and burritos with black beans or pinto beans. Reduce the amount of meat in chili and add extra kidney beans or chickpeas. Eventually, replace all of the meat with beans or lentils.
Replace cheese in sandwiches with hummus.
Use nuts to replace meat. Add almonds or cashews to a vegetable stir-fry instead of beef or chicken. For lunch, have a nut-butter sandwich instead of ham or turkey.
Boost plant protein at meals by tossing toasted nuts or pumpkins seeds into greens salads.
Set a target. Determine how many meatless meals you’ll eat each week and then build on that. Vegetarian chili, tofu stir-fry, salad with edamame, bean burgers, chickpea curry and lentil soup are protein- and nutrient-packed lunches and dinners.
Include plant-based breakfasts, too. Try a smoothie made with fruit, greens and soy or pea milk, whole grain toast with almond butter, oatmeal topped with nuts and berries, quinoa or millet porridge or scrambled tofu.
Pack in produce. Eat a mix of fruits and vegetables, at least five servings a day (one serving is one-half cup of cooked or raw vegetables, a half-cup of berries or one medium fruit). One-half of each meal should consist of these foods.
Consider your snacks. Making snacks 100-per-cent plant-based is an easy step to take. Choose fruit and nuts, homemade trail mix, vegetables and hummus, whole grain crackers with nut butter, soy/pea milk smoothies or soy lattes.
Rethink restaurants. You’ll find a variety of plant-based options at restaurants that specialize in ethnic cuisines such as Indian, Middle Eastern, Mexican, Japanese and Chinese.
Or, pick a plant-based restaurant near you and when travelling.
Reduce food waste. Shop for, store and repurpose foods to minimize waste at home. Avoid buying in bulk; purchase only what you need whenever possible.
Buy “ugly produce,” misshapen fruits and vegetables often thrown away by farmers and grocery stores. Use vegetable scraps to make soup stock.
Store leftovers at the front of the fridge so you don’t forget them; eat within three or four days.
sauce https://www.theglobeandmail.com/life…_Ppz3dDaAe3buE F*ck Cancer
Eat your veggies

Read More…

New Indian restaurant opening in Moscow

New Indian restaurant opening in Moscow Karma in Eastside Marketplace offers a family-friendly scene, authentic cuisine By Anthony Kuipers Daily News staff writer Feb 11, 2019
Kai Eiselein/Daily NewsDeepika Dhawan stands in the foyer of Moscow’s newest eatery, Karma, located in the Eastside Marketplace. Kai Eiselein/Daily News
Deepika Dhawan stands in the kitchen of Moscow’s newest eatery, Karma, located in the Eastside Marketplace. Kai Eiselein/Daily News
Deepika Dhawan stands in the foyer of Moscow’s newest eatery, Karma, located in the Eastside Marketplace. Kai Eiselein/Daily News Save
A new Indian restaurant has made its way to Moscow and the owners hope to be welcomed by the Palouse community.
Karma will hold its grand opening and ribbon cutting at the Eastside Marketplace at 10:30 a.m. today with members of the Moscow Chamber of Commerce. The restaurant is in the space once occupied by La Madrid.
Co-owner Deepika Dhawan spent Saturday putting the finishing touches on preparations for opening day. This is not her first go-around when it comes to opening a restaurant.
She and her husband, Manoj Kumar, own restaurants in Bainbridge Island and Wenatchee, and have opened Karma in Moscow to be closer to their daughters. Dhawan admitted she was initially hesitant about moving away from western Washington, but said her husband insisted on staying close to family.
“That’s why we are here,” she said laughing.
She said they have also been encouraged by locals who have eaten at the family’s other restaurants to expand their business to the Palouse.
Dhawan is the head chef, and while she did not want to give away too many secrets about her recipes, she said the restaurant will offer family-friendly, authentic Indian cuisine.
She said her father encouraged her to cook when she was 13-years-old and 10 years ago she brought her skills to the states when she moved from India.
Dhawan said she hopes people will be open to trying Indian menu items they may have not had before. She said some people can be intimidated by the plethora of spices used in Indian cuisine.
But Dhawan said expanding one’s palate can bring joy to a food lover’s experience. When she moved to the country, she was afraid to try food she was not familiar with, such as Mexican and Chinese items. Her husband encouraged her to be more open to new things to make the transition into American life easier.
“Now, I love Mexican food,” she said. “Now, I love Chinese food.”
She also loves the location of her new restaurant. She said the building has a positive energy and the large parking lot will be convenient for customers, whom she hopes will be impressed. “Hopefully, they will give us their blessing,” she said.
Anthony Kuipers can be reached at (208) 883-4640, or by email to .

Read More…

A look at 10 of the best independent restaurants to visit in Lancashire

A look at 10 of the best independent restaurants to visit in Lancashire From Italian to Indian these eateries are serving up some amazing food Share The Olive Tree Brasserie in Blackburn (Image: The Olive Tree Brasserie/ Trip Advisor)
We’ve all been there.
Your monthly wage packet burning a hole in your bank account and the prospect of a good evening of food ahead – and your mates suggest a night an Nandos.
It’s not bad but it’s not exactly thrilling – so next time why not suggest going to these independent treasures in Lancashire for the same price? The Butcher and Tonic, Lancaster
Meat and gin. What more could you need?
In an age where thing seem quite complicated, The Butcher and Tonic in Church Street, Lancaster, makes things very simple.
Enjoy sumptuous steaks, gorgeous wine pairings and choose from more than 100 assorted gins. Come to the Butcher and Tonic for your steak and gin (Image: Trip Advisor/ The Butcher and Tonic) The Loom Makers Bistro, Burnley
With a combination of continental and British cuisine, this eatery is the perfect place to go for good food that doesn’t break the bank.
Situated in the town’s Bank Parade, the bistro is just as likely to smash out a beautiful pizza, cannelloni or surf and turf.
It is renowned for having a quiet and relaxed atmosphere whilst delivering fantastic service with a high standard of food and a cracking bar to boot. A nice spread at the Loom Makers Bistro in Burnley (Image: The Loom Makers/ Trip Advisor) The Sultan of Lancaster
The term Sultan was used to denote leaders of Arabic nations but this the only example of a Sultan from Lancaster.
Based in a converted church in the centre of the city, The Sultan may not be in the business of prayers but its food is certainly holy.
More than one customer have claimed The Sultan as purveyors of the best curry ever, so it’s certainly not one to miss. Read More Lorenzo’s, Preston
Everyone loves authentic Italian food and Lorenzo’s doesn’t fail to bring those classic flavours to Preston.
From traditional pizzas to carbonara and chicken livers plus an extensive wine list, this place has it all and at a decent price.
Whilst chain restaurants are churning out so-called “Italian” food why not go to an independent place that prides itself in cooking the real thing? Get a traditional taste of Italian at Lorenzo’s Carnivoro, Burnley
Another Burnley gem, Carnivoro is the place for meat lovers.
No one quite does meat like Brazil and this South-American restaurant proves that beyond any reasonable doubt.
Choose from a menu of chicken, beef and lamb steaks or simply come and pay a set price so that you can select from 15 different meats in their Full Rodizio.
It’s like a huge meat buffet. Read More Ambrosini’s, Blackpool
You can never eat too much Italian food so we have no problem adding a second one to this list.
Located in Squires Gate Lane, this hole-in-the-wall eatery is famed for delivering top-notch pizzas and unreal calzones with a long list of classic Italian wines.
It’s also known for putting together some decent deserts as well. Michael Wan’s Wok Inn, Blackpool
Nothing can beat authentic Chinese food.
Built around a street-style food menu Michael Wwan’s Wok Inn is located in a beautiful seafront building on Blackpool’s prom, opposite the North Pier.
If you’re keen to experience your decent, home-cooked favourites in an urban-looking restaurant then this is the perfect place. Come to the Wok Inn for your best Chinese food (Image: Michael Wan’s Wok Inn/ Trip Advisor) Calypso Caribbean Restaurant, Blackburn
Calypso was a sea nymph in Greek mythology, famously imprisoning the king Oydsseus.
We haven’t heard of this restaurant taking any prisoners or appearing in Greek epics but it does serve some amazing Caribbean cuisine.
Come along if you want some authentic jerk chicken, quality reggae music and an atmosphere akin to a Barbados beach. Read More

Read More…

British Dal Festival 2019: BYOB Vegan Dal Buffet Feast – Bosh Supper Club – Bristol | Wriggle – exclusive food & drinks deals near you

About the {{offerTypeLabel(offer)}} This {{offerTypeLabel(offer)}} is on {{getFormattedLabel(occurrence)}}
Bristol’s best BYOB supper club is back with a bang, and this time, Bosh joins forces with British Dal Festival 2019 – a week long celebration of dal – for a lentil-filled feast like no other.
For this fabulously informal buffet-style feast, the lovely Juliet is drawing on her travels throughout India and Sri Lanka to bring you a trio of delicious dals to fire up your February!
So, what’s on the menu? Black dal makhani (Goa) Red dal (Sri Lanka) Coconut, tomato and tamarind dal (Sri Lanka)
This tasty trio will be served with Indian bread and a selection of sambals – fiery hot sauces and pastes. The whole savoury menu is vegan, and as if that wasn’t enough, you can enjoy a famous Bosh salted caramel brownie to finish – trust us when we say these are bloody fantastic! (Vegan cake available on request.) For this supper club, the Bosh team will be serving dals and sides buffet-style, and you can drop in anytime between 7 and 9.30pm for your feast. Seating will be relaxed and informal, just grab a bowl and then chat and mingle with other dal lovers and Juliet herself. An absolute bargain at just £12.50 a ticket and BYO drinks.0 IMPORTANT: Please email hello@boshbristol.com with any dietary requirements, and if you’d like vegan cake for dessert. About Bosh Supper Club Chef Juliet is the host and chef at Bosh Supper Club. Each Supper Club provides a set-menu themed around her travels, where ingredients are fresh, seasonal and, where possible, grown in the Bosh kitchen garden. For Juliet, it’s all about cooking food that brings a smile to people’s faces. It’s also BYOB – so a top-quality opportunity to enjoy restaurant-quality cuisine and a few drinks at an unbeatable price. How to claim Once you’ve bagged your Wriggle, head down to Bosh at the Elephant House for 7.30pm. When you arrive just tell Juliet that Wriggle sent you, show her the code and indulge in your delicious meal! How to get there {{getFormattedLabel(occurrence)}} {{ offerTypeLabel(offer, true) }} live now: {{occurrence.countdown().top}}{{occurrence.countdown().bottom}} Available to buy from: {{occurrence.getPurchaseWindowStart() | moment: ‘MMM Do’}} at {{occurrence.getPurchaseWindowStart() | moment: ‘HH:mm’}} Available from: {{getFormattedLabel(occurrence)}} {{ offerTypeLabel(offer, true)}} over Fear not, there are other dates available. {{ offerTypeLabel(offer, true) }} sold out Fear not, there are other dates available. Date & time

Read More…

Oldbury balti house owner admits food offences after shock peanut find

Oldbury balti house owner admits food offences after shock peanut find A former Oldbury balti house owner pleaded guilty to food offences at Birmingham Magistrates Court. 0 comment A BALTI house’s former owner was ‘playing with human life’ by falsely advertising a dish as peanut-free, a court heard.
Reza Ul-Islam – the former director of B68 Indian Cuisine Ltd, trading as B68 Indian Cuisine and Takeaway – pleaded guilty to food offences at Birmingham Magistrates Court on February 7.
Tests had discovered the outlet’s lamb korma and rice dish – advertised as peanut-free – contained enough of a trace of peanuts to give someone with an allergy an anaphylactic reaction.
Ul-Islam, 26, from Birmingham, was sentenced to a 12-month community order with supervision and 150 hours of unpaid work.
He was also ordered to pay the prosecution costs of £1,995 plus a victim surcharge of £85.
In passing sentence, magistrates said they were taking the matter very seriously because Ul-Islam had been “playing with human life”.
They added it was his “lucky day” that custody was not the sentence as he had pleaded guilty and had no other offences.
Sandwell Council’s trading standards team uncovered the potentially fatal situation at the takeaway on Hagley Road West in December 2017.
Officers were testing food served in takeaways and restaurants to check bosses were complying with strict rules on food allergens and food labelling.
Tests discovered the lamb korma and rice dish which was sold as being peanut-free actually contained over 40g per kg of peanuts.
Experts said this would easily be enough to cause an anaphylactic reaction – which can result in death – in someone allergic to peanuts.
Officers said it was not known how the meal became contaminated with peanut as Ul-Islam had failed to co-operate with trading standards during the investigation.
Forty premises were visited across Sandwell between September and December 2017 and three sold meals that contained dangerous levels of peanuts.
A further two meals tested contained trace levels of peanut but not at a high enough level to cause a reaction.
Businesses are legally required to warn customers about any allergens in food.
Sandwell Council’s cabinet member for public health and protection Councillor Elaine Costigan said: “It’s shocking to think of a business serving food to members of the public putting someone’s life at risk in this way.
“We’ve all heard of the tragic but thankfully rare circumstances of people who have died or become seriously ill after they’ve eaten something without knowing it contains a substance they are allergic to.
“Our trading standards team does vital work in keeping us all safe when we’re eating out and I want to congratulate them for bringing this prosecution.
“I dread to think of the consequences had someone with a peanut allergy eaten this dish.”

Read More…

Amazing stay

We had an amazing stay of 7 days with citymax,bur dubai. Rooms are same as shown in websites and so the services. The staff of the citymax is very well trained and very polite.. Specially Mr sayed n Mr Bilal Hafeez at help desk,helped us a lot in getting our courier from Amazon. The restaurant Indian cuisine restaurant serving amazing food.. In short a well budget hotel for a long stay.. 5 star from our side undoubtedly..

Read More…

Fatburger Continues India Expansion

Fatburger Continues India Expansion by Gunjan Bagla
In February 2019, Beverly Hills, CA-based FAT Brands announced plans to continue its expansion into the Indian fast-food market. Recognizing continued growth in India, the company plans to co-brand two of its American cuisine giants, Fatburger and Buffalo’s Express , and build sixty more restaurants throughout India over the next ten years.
Opening its first restaurant in Gurgaon in 2014, Fatburger features authentic American cuisine of burgers, fries, and milkshakes. It has become a family favorite with menu items featuring chicken and lamb burgers, onion rings, as well as vegetarian options, all mixed with traditional Indian spices. Buffalo’s Express adds to the variety by offering its well-known chicken wings and specialty sauces. Fat Brands’ Franchises
FAT Brands will work with Franglobal Advisors Partners Limited , a franchise firm based in Faridabad, Haryana, to develop its new co-branded restaurants. Andy Wiederhorn , chief executive of FAT Brands, echoed the excitement of expansion in his statement, “We have found the perfect partner in Franglobal Advisors Private Ltd. and are thrilled to continue development in India for years to come.” 14th,

Read More…