Garima Arora: Best female chef in Asia is the first Indian woman to receive Michelin star

Garima Arora: Best female chef in Asia is the first Indian woman to receive Michelin star

Share on: Garima Arora: Best female chef in Asia is the first Indian woman to receive Michelin star Garima Arora, an alum of top kitchens including Noma and Gaggan, has been named the best female chef in Asia for her progressive Indian-Thai restaurant Gaa in Bangkok. AFP
A former journalist turned chef and alum of top kitchens including Noma and Gaggan, has been named the best female chef in Asia for her progressive Indian-Thai restaurant Gaa in Bangkok. The title bestowed by the Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants group comes just months after chef Garima Arora became the first Indian woman to earn a Michelin star last winter. Avant-garde Indian cuisine
The concept of Gaa is not unlike Gaggan, an avant-garde restaurant in Bangkok which also serves progressive Indian cuisine with local Thai ingredients and influences. Gaggan is helmed by Indian chef Gaggan Anand and has topped Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants for the last four years in a row.
(Related: Acclaimed chef Gaggan Anand on winning Asia’s 50 Best and what he hopes to achieve next for his restaurant )
At Gaa, diners choose between a 10 or 14-course tasting menu that changes quarterly and relies on classic Indian cooking techniques, notably, the extraction of umami from vegetables, Garima Arora explains in a video interview.
That’s the principle behind her signature dish, flame-grilled jackfruit topped with caramelised onions, served with an assortment of pickles and roti. The result? A vegetarian dish where the lack of meat goes unnoticed.
“What ignites my passion as a chef is eating something new for the very first time,” she said.
“The joy one feels when they take a spoonful of something they never tasted before. That’s the feeling I like to have and that’s the feeling I want my guest to have as well.” Culinary ethos
Along with being adept in the kitchen, Arora is skilled with words, expressing her culinary ethos with ease and clarity, perhaps owing to her background as a former journalist.
Like a journalist, she also asks thoughtful questions in her cooking (Why is that Indian cuisine developed this way and why do we put things together the way we do?) in order to come up with new and different dishes.
For Arora, there was no toiling in small ma and pa restaurants or greasy spoons.
After graduating from Le Cordon Bleu in Paris in 2010, Arora went straight to the top, working at Noma in Copenhagen where she learned to approach cooking as a “cerebral exercise” before moving on to Gaggan.
(Related: Is Bangkok’s first Michelin Guide good or bad for Thailand’s food scene? )
She opened Gaa, a three-story restaurant across the street from Gaggan in 2017. While discussing her decision to open in Bangkok, she described the city as the perfect backdrop for the shared connection between Indian and Thai cultures, people, language, food and mythology.
“It’s so deeply connected.”
She also welcomes the notion of bringing progressive Indian food to the international stage: “Indian food can be the future of modern cuisine.” Photo: Anne Emmanuelle Thion

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‘Driven by its cuisine, Japanese food exports to India jumped 40 per cent in 2018’

‘Driven by its cuisine, Japanese food exports to India jumped 40 per cent in 2018’ Wed, Mar 6 2019 12:10:57 PM
By Vishnu Makhijani
New Delhi, Mar 6 (IANS): Indicative of the growing popularity of Japanese cuisine in India, food exports from the East Asian nation jumped 40 per cent in 2018.
Even as it is working with various entities to further bump this up and has bestowed a government-authenticated tag on 36 fine diners.
“Last year, Japan reached an agreement with India on the sanitary certificate of fishery products exported from Japan to India. Following this, in 2018, the export of Japanese food from Japan to India increased to about 1.3 billion Japanese yen (about Rs 833 million), which translates to a more than 40 per cent increase compared to 900 million Japanese yen (about Rs 580 million) in 2016,” the country’s Ambassador, Kenji Hiramatsu, told IANS in an interview.
The Japanese government is currently working on increasing exports of agricultural products and foods to India and is engaged in discussions with Indian government agencies including the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), Ministry of Agriculture & Farmers Welfare (MoAFW) and Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MoFPI), he said.
“With FSSAI, we signed an MoU on food safety last October at the annual summit meeting, and are currently in discussions on improving the management system of food imports to India. With MoAFW, we are having discussions on exporting Japanese apples and pears to India,” the ambassador said.
For Japanese restaurants, he pointed out, “the availability of Japanese ingredients and drinks from Japan are essential. Therefore, in order to promote Japanese food in India, at the same time, we also need to work on the establishment of an ecosystem where Indian outlets can have easy access to Japanese ingredients and drinks. I will keep working on this important task furthermore”.
He also pointed out that until last year, the number of certified Japanese Food Supporters, a tag granted by the Japan External Trade Organisation to fine diners, was only one in India, but now, the number has dramatically increased and 36 are certified in India, including 16 which were certified in February.
“I hope more Indian people will start visiting these restaurants and enjoy the taste of Japan,” he said.
How would he describe the role of food diplomacy in India-Japan ties?
“I think we can understand each other’s culture more in depth at the ground level by appreciating both Indian and Japanese food. You can also learn something about Japanese sensitivity and sense of beauty through Japanese cuisine.
“Japan is a country with a highly refined food culture, and the Japanese people have traditionally enjoyed a rich variety of food gathered from the mountains as well as the sea. Japan has four distinct seasons, and in each of these four seasons, we can enjoy different kinds of agricultural produce and fresh seafood at their best,” he said, adding that Japanese chefs are fully in tune with the seasons and use the freshest available seasonal ingredients to create Japanese cuisine.
“Enjoying Japanese food also means learning about the Japanese people and their culture. Through cultural exchanges including food between Japan and India, I think we can enrich our lives and gain a better understanding of each other’s country,” the ambassador explained.
How does he see the roadmap for the spread of Japanese cuisine in India?
“Currently, we have some Japanese restaurants operating in major cities of India, such as Delhi, Mumbai, Bengaluru and Chennai, because of the increasing number of Japanese expats and also the growing awareness of Japanese food, especially among young Indians. We would like to reach out more to Indian people in these big cities first,” Hiramatsu said. Top Stories

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EATZ: Diya

Diya By Debby Critchley So many of you are afraid of Indian food. It’s too hot, it’s too spicy. Come to Diya and fall in love with the cuisine. Indian and Nepalese food ranges from gently flavored to fiery hot and many degrees in between. Diya understands and provides a range of flavors certain to make everyone, including pepper heads, happy. Biryani The dining room is light and airy, white tablecloths with red accents and golden napkins, and lit by beautiful crystal chandeliers. Make yourself comfortable on a banquette while your server attends to your needs. The wine list covers a wide variety of wines and there is an extensive list of beers. Mixed drinks are also available. Not in the mood for alcohol? Have a mango lassi and luxuriate in the richness of the mangoes or warm yourself with a milky chai. Momo There are lots of choices to begin your meal. There are delicious samosas filled with gently spiced potatoes and green peas. Try the Samosa Chat. Diya takes a crispy crusted samosa and crushes it. They top it with chana masala, a chickpea curry cooked with an assortment of warming Indian spices. Then add chopped onions, tomatoes, and scallions and drizzle with a yogurt cream. It’s a cross between a crispy taco and loaded potato with all the flavors of India. All is flavored with chaat masala – expect spice and a bit of heat but easily handled. Another go-to starter is the Nepalese Chicken Momo. These tender steamed dumplings are made with a flour dough filled with ground chicken marinated with fresh garlic and spices. So yummy. For a bit of heat, dip the momos in the tomato chutney thoughtfully provided in a separate ramekin. Chaat Samosa Breads are an integral part of any Indian meal and the chefs deliver! There are a variety of rotis, naans, parathas, and kulcha. Order the bread basket which gives you a delightful assortment of the tandoor baked naan, the garlic naan topped with garlic and cilantro, and the onion kulcha loaded with onions and also cooked in the tandoor oven. The breads are nicely browned and have a chewy texture. Each is flavorful in its own right and makes the perfect accompaniment everything you may order. I could make a meal out of the bread. I dip it into any of the vegetables or use it to wrap up a piece of chicken or lamb from the tandoor – it makes the best little Indian sandwiches. Naan There are so many veggie choices. You can’t go wrong with any of them. It’s hard to pick a favorite because they are all so good. The Palak Paneer is the perfect combination of spinach and homemade paneer cheese flavored with fresh herbs and spices. The spinach is so smooth and creamy and the chunks of firm cheese are just the right counterpoint. Talk about the perfect dip for that naan! The bowl was empty and the spoon licked as the dish was declared utterly perfect. The Aloo Gobi is a blend of fresh cauliflower and potatoes simmered in a blend of herbs and spices. Could the cauliflower be any more tender? Could the spices be more flawless? Next time, I want to try the Baingan Bharta, a baked and mashed eggplant cooked with onions, tomatoes, and herbs and the Daal Makhani, slow simmered black lentils sautéed with a butter sauce. Cauliflower Entrees offer an array of chicken, seafood, lamb, goat, and tandoori specialties. We barely scratched the surface. The menu offers several rice dishes known as Biryanis. We had the Veggie Biryani. It is a combination of a variety of vegetables cooked with basmati rice, toasted herbs, and spices. Be warned, it comes with heat. The biryani is the perfect example of how Indian spices blend with heat to create a delicious dish. Then there’s the Shrimp and Scallops, a beautiful combination of seafood cooked with onion, tomato, coconut milk, curry leaves, mustard seeds, wine, and garlic sauce. There were lots of shrimp and calico scallops in a sauce that was so, so good. Once we finished the seafood, we devoured the sauce over the perfectly cooked basmati rice. Salmon On to the Tandoori specialties. These kinds of ovens are used throughout the Middle East, India, Pakistan, and parts of Central Asia and China. All tandoor ovens operate on essentially the same principle. The ovens are cylindrical and often curve inward toward the top like a beehive or jug to concentrate the heat. A fire in the bottom heats both the walls of the oven and the air inside to upwards of 900°. Before cooking, the fire is allowed to die down to coals so that the temperature remains consistent while food is cooked. Flatbreads like naan get slapped against the sides of the oven where they adhere to the super-heated surface and cook very quickly. Meats are usually cooked on long skewers that are either inserted directly into the oven or cooked over the mouth of the oven. The easiest way to try the beauty of Diya’s marinated meats cooked in the tandoor oven is with the Tandoori Platter. The flavors range from mild to medium and are served on a bed of browned onions that soak up the juices. The Tandoori Chicken was marinated in yogurt, lemon juice, and mild spices. The chicken leg and thigh were tender, juicy, and flavorful. The thigh being my favorite. There was the Lamb Chop marinated in yogurt and spices. I can only say the lamb chop was a winner – finished with great relish The Chicken Tikka is a boneless chicken breast marinated in a house blend of spices, yogurt, lemon juice, ginger, garlic paste. Each bite was amazingly. The Lamb Boti is made with chunks of lamb marinated with the same ingredients as the Chicken Tikka. I won’t say we came to fisticuffs over the lamb but it was the hands down favorite on the platter. To top off the tandoori was the salmon. Seasoned with a similar yogurt marinade, it was another taste sensation. The fish was beautifully glazed and the flavor of the spice melded with the salmon to create a remarkable bite. Tandoori Indian desserts show a sweet tooth. The Gulab Jamun, milk balls in rose flavored sugar syrup with a touch of cardamom. These are little fried donut type doughballs in this sweet syrup. Sweet yet delightful. Less sweet is the Kheer, a rice pudding made with basmati rice boiled in milk with a touch of cardamom and sugar. It’s a large serving, easily shared by two, and a great palate cleanser. The surprise dessert was not on the menu. Ask if there is Kulfi available. Kulfi is not whipped, resulting in a solid, dense frozen dessert. It is denser and creamier than ice cream. Served like a popsicle drizzled with a fruit syrup, it is a frozen guilty pleasure. The version here is flavored with coconut.
Kulfi f Diya is a great addition to the family of restaurants in Old Town. Try it for lunch when they feature a bountiful buffet from 11 am to 3 pm on weekdays. Go for dinner with a group to explore a variety of dishes to share. Hot, spicy, warm, and rewarding, Diya is your next favorite. Spinach Would you like your restaurant reviewed? Contact the Zebra at editor@thezebrapress.com TAGS

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food exports: Driven by its cuisine, Japanese food exports to India jumped 40 per cent in 2018,

Indicative of the growing popularity of Japanese cuisine in India , food exports from the East Asian nation jumped 40 per cent in 2018.
Even as it is working with various entities to further bump this up and has bestowed a government-authenticated tag on 36 fine diners.
“Last year, Japan reached an agreement with India on the sanitary certificate of fishery products exported from Japan to India. Following this, in 2018, the export of Japanese food from Japan to India increased to about 1.3 billion Japanese yen (about Rs 833 million), which translates to a more than 40 per cent increase compared to 900 million Japanese yen (about Rs 580 million) in 2016,” the country’s Ambassador, Kenji Hiramatsu, told IANS in an interview.
The Japanese government is currently working on increasing exports of agricultural products and foods to India and is engaged in discussions with Indian government agencies including the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), Ministry of Agriculture & Farmers Welfare (MoAFW) and Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MoFPI), he said.
“With FSSAI, we signed an MoU on food safety last October at the annual summit meeting, and are currently in discussions on improving the management system of food imports to India. With MoAFW, we are having discussions on exporting Japanese apples and pears to India,” the ambassador said.

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7 Reasons Why You Should Stay at Renaissance Lucknow Hotel

airplanemode_active India • March 6, 2019 • Written by Jeremy Khalil 7 Reasons Why You Should Stay at Renaissance Lucknow Hotel Renaissance Lucknow Hotel is a three-year old, five-star lifestyle deluxe hotel, strategically located in Lucknow, the capital of Uttar Pradesh in India. Authentic and does not feel touristy, Lucknow is also known as the city of Nawabs (titular native governors who led lavish lifestyle during the time when the Moguls ruled India beginning late 16 th century up until early 18 th century; then endured until the British seized control of Lucknow in the middle of 19 th century). So, why should you stay at Renaissance Lucknow Hotel, you might ask? Read on to find out… Bright, sharp, posh, efficient and homely, Renaissance Lucknow Hotel offers excellent Indian hospitality that revolves around the central idea that the guest is God, hence should be treated accordingly. Deluxe Room The hotel’s interiors are bright , courtesy of the large floor-to-ceiling glass panels that permit generous amounts of natural light. It seems like one of the hotel’s defining design principles is to let in as much daylight as possible to its public spaces and guestrooms to enliven its interiors and uplift guests’ mood. Renaissance Lucknow Hotel’s lobby. Renaissance Lucknow Hotel dishes out sumptuous food and beverage options via the smart-looking all-day dining restaurant called L14, and the elegant dinner-only restaurant named Sepia, which features Awadhi cuisine (Mughal cooking techniques with Northern Indian cooking pattern), known to have existed since the times of the Sultanate of Delhi (early 13 th until 16 th century) prior to Mughal rule. Sepia’s flattering dishes such as Nalli Nihari (flavourful lamb-based dish slowly cooked overnight in lamb stock) and Murg Korma (chicken cooked in rich Mughlai gravy) lets guests dine opulently like the Nawabs . L-14 All-day Dining Nalli Nihari, a flavourful lamb-based dish served at Sepia. Guests should head to the fabulously cosy Sky Bar on 16 th floor for pre- or post-prandial drinks. This bar is fast becoming the city’s watering hole for people to unwind indoors or al fresco from evening until night, especially when the weather is cooler and drier from October until March. Be sure to try out Sky Bar’s refreshing cocktails and mocktails served up by experienced bartenders while taking in the memorable bird’s-eye view of Lucknow. Sky Bar can hold up to 200 persons, ideal for intimate gatherings and parties. Renaissance Lucknow Hotel has the one and only infinity pool in the city , which opens from 6:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m., located on the same level as Sky Bar, affording guests with panoramic view of Lucknow while swimming. Infinity pool at Renaissance Lucknow Hotel. With a 22,000-foot squared Ren Garden , the hotel can convert the space into a spectacular venue for weddings or large-scale events for up to 1,500 people. Ren Garden being set up for reception. Guests can appreciate Lucknow at a deeper level by utilising the hotel’s dedicated lifestyle concierges called Navigators who are experts in unearthing the city’s gems. It is recommended that guests ask the Navigators to take them to the following unique places: Hazratganj – this shopping area is filled with the city’s hidden gems like the almost 160-year old perfume shop called Sugandhco ; Royal Cafe that sells scrumptious popular snack called basket chaat ; Ada Designer Chikan studio that showcases exquisite handmade embroidered fabrics called chikankari ; and popular street food like the souffle-like malai makan and the satisfyingly sweet kulfi and ras gula because the city is a street food haven. Bara Imambara – this complex comprises ornate arches, ramparts, mosque and hall with excellent acoustics built to commemorate the fallen grandson of Prophet Muhammad, Hussein. It was completed in 1797 A.D. under the patronage of Nawab Asaf-ud-Daula, the Governor who moved the capital of Awadh region from Faizabad to Lucknow in 1775. Architecture and heritage enthusiasts will be awed by the complex’s grandeur, ingenuity and timelessness, including the imposing gateway that can be seen in the distance called Rumi Darwaza. To enter this site, guests need to wear modestly with full length clothes (no sleeveless tops, shorts or revealing attires are allowed). La Martiniere College ( http://www.lamartinierelucknow.org/ ) – this institution was founded by General Claude Martin, a Lyon-born French adventurer who amassed great wealth while serving under Nawab Shuja-ud-Daulah and his son Nawab Asaf-ud-Daula. Travellers can pay homage to this much revered figure by visiting his grave at the basement of a neo-classical palace called Constantia, which is part of La Martiniere College. General Martin is hailed until today as one of the influential figures who helped turn Lucknow into an important city, especially after Nawab Asaf-ud-Daula moved the capital of Awadh to Lucknow from Faizabad. Cappucino Blast ( https://www.facebook.com/cappuccinoblastlucknow/ ) – this ornate, boldly decorated and whimsical café is the oldest in town and has been attracting the well and good since its inception 19 years ago, serving satiating western-inspired dishes like tacos and pizzas, definitely recommended for lunch and dinner. Shopping for perfumes at Sugandhco. Basket chaat, popular Lucknow snack. Exquisite traditional embroidery called chikankari. Part of Bara Imambara complex viewed from the top of Imambara main hall. Bold interior of Cappuccino Blast. Share:

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Apache Junction, AZ Fusion Indian Wedding by Erika Greene Photography

Apache Junction, AZ Fusion Indian Wedding by Erika Greene Photography Here it comes, a new featured love celebration! This time, we ride the love plane and land in the rocky mountains of Arizona for Jenna & Tushar’s lovely Indian Fusion wedding. Our beautiful Maharani rocked a traditional but unique wine and gold lengha for the Hindu rituals. She was looking absolutely beautiful for her big day! The bride was assisted by Casey Brough and Summer Abdeh for her hair and makeup respectively. The duo made sure she was looking flawless the entire time and they sure nailed it. Henna by Purvi created the beautiful henna art Maharani Jenna and the bridesmaids had. Amazing indeed! The lucky groom, Tushar, wore a beige and wine traditional sherwani for the Hindu ceremony. They were both looking amazing and I was particularly amazed by the color palette chosen. It was traditional yet modern. The earthly vibes of Arizona were all over the place for this celebration! The ceremony was held at The Paseo and what a beautiful time that was! The crew from Your Jubilee was all things busy with the planning and design of the event and as you will see, it was a true success. So, join us one more time for another featured gallery , thanks to Erika Greene Photography , and get yourself your daily dose of glam! How did you meet your Groom and when did you know he was “the one”? We met on March 15, 2015, at a coffee shop in Portland, Oregon. (initially, we met on match.com and after chatting for a week or so we decided to meet up). I think I knew he was “the one” after our first meeting. I went home and sat on my bed and thought “I could see us growing old together” Share the scoop on your Proposal Story! Tushar proposed at chokhi dhani resort in Jaipur…days before our actual engagement ceremony ;). Tell us how you went about planning your wedding, and your overall experience with the Venues, Hair & Makeup, Outfits, Decor Theme, and all of the other important details. We hired YourJubilee wedding planners as we were planning the wedding in Arizona from Houston Texas where we live. They were amazing and took care of all the details. The venue “The Paseo” was amazing, Hair was done by my best friend Casey Brough, Makeup was Summer Abdeh, Mehendi was “henna by Purvi”. Outfits were from Gaurav Gupta online (India), Manavar (Houston), and Ventura’s Bridal (Houston). The theme I was going for was just colorful, I let the planner design and take care of the rest from there. We were out in the desert, so I wanted it to be a desert fusion wedding atmosphere. We had a local burro (donkey) come dressed in our wedding colors who delivered beer and soda to the guests (this is a local southwestern tradition). The DJ (DJ Adhi) played the dhol, we had both Indian and American cuisine (India Palace and Atlasta Catering). How did you select your bridal lengha or wedding dress? Did you have a favorite color in mind? Bridal Lengha was actually picked by my co-worker. lol. I couldn’t decide between 3 lenghas so I showed them all to her and she picked! The fusion outfit was a version of a Gaurav Gupta dress that I had seen online, and the traditional wedding gown was made to look very simple and elegant in contrast to the other two dresses. What was the most enjoyable part of the planning process, and why? Dress shopping was my favorite part of the planning process. My mother was supposed to fly into Houston to dress shop with me but a close friend unexpectedly passed away and she had to stay back home. So instead, my husband came to all of the dress shops with me and created a WhatsApp group for all of my friends who were deciding at each store which were the favorite dresses. It was a really fun day! What did your guests particularly love about your Wedding? The guests loved the venue as we were out in the Desert with mountains and cactus and beautiful sunsets/weather. They also loved the wedding burro (donkey). We also received a lot of compliments on the great music! Was there a really special moment in your wedding that constantly replays in your mind? The moment we said “I Do” and kissed for the first time as a married couple! For events other than your ceremony, please tell us as much as you would like about the decor, style, dances, and all the special details. This was a fusion wedding so we did things a bit differently than a typical Indian Wedding and different from a typical American Wedding. We had a bridal shower at my best friends house with physic who did tarot card readings! We had a Mehndi night that was very low-key but all of our American friends loved getting a henna tattoo! We did two pre-wedding photoshoots to take the pressure off of all the photos on the wedding day. We went out to the desert near the venue and took photos which was really great! The main theme we tried to focus on for our wedding was for everyone to have a good time. The planners did an amazing job executing all of the small details so the day went perfect and everyone had a great time. I love paper/letters so we spent a great deal with the wedding paper designer who designed custom work for all of our invites, menus, food labels, etc. Everything turned out beautiful! Do you have any words of wisdom for Brides-To-Be? Try to relax and soak in all the moments as much as possible. The time will go by very quickly, so remember to have fun and enjoy yourselves. See you in a bit for more, Maharanis! STYLE

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Impossible Foods Continues Asian Expansion in Singapore

Impossible Foods is launching its plant-based meat Thursday, 7 March, with a variety of dishes available at eight restaurants throughout Singapore — one of the world’s most vibrant and discerning culinary hotspots.
This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20190305006036/en/
Empress highlights Impossible meat in three dishes: Black Pepper Impossible Meatball Skewers, Pan Fried Impossible Gyoza, and Impossible Crispy Pancakes with Chinese Chives. (Photo: Business Wire)
Home to some of the world’s most fanatical food critics and gourmets, Singapore is considered one of the greatest food destinations worldwide . It’s the first Asian city to host The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards (called the “ Oscars of the global restaurant industry ”). Influenced by its geography and rich history – a cross-section of Malay, Chinese, Indonesian, Indian, Middle Eastern and European cultures – Singapore is famous for its abundance of Michelin-starred establishments and its bustling “hawker” street-food culture.
Tonight, 6 March from 6 to 10 pm, Impossible Foods will host the first public preview of its plant-based meat for the first 500 people who come to the world-famous Lau Pa Sat Festival Market. Dishes will be served at Lai Heng Fried Kway Teow and Sunny Viet Vietnamese Cuisine. In addition, one of the stalls will be transformed into an Impossible pop-up for one evening only, featuring the Impossible Burger by Chef Andrei Soen of Park Bench Deli and the Impossible Crispy Pancake with Chinese Chives by Chef Ricky Leung of Empress.
Starting 7 March, Impossible Foods’ flagship product will go on the menu at Singapore’s leading restaurants, including Park Bench Deli, Three Buns Quayside, Potato Head Singapore, Privé Orchard, Empress, and Marina Bay Sands’ Bread Street Kitchen by Gordon Ramsay, CUT by Wolfgang Puck and Adrift by David Myers. The restaurants will serve a wide variety of Impossible selections from Western and Asian gastronomy.
“Singaporeans are blessed with and obsessed with great food. They’re among the world’s most demanding gourmets — and I’m sure the region’s chefs will rise to the occasion and create the world’s most imaginative Impossible dishes yet,” said Pat Brown, CEO and Founder of Impossible Foods.
Impossible: Better in Every Way
The Impossible Burger debuted in 2016 at Momofuku Nishi, the New York City restaurant of Chef David Chang. More than 5,000 restaurants in the United States now serve the Impossible Burger — from award-winning restaurants to family-owned diners, and the nation’s original fast-food chain, White Castle. Last year, Impossible Foods launched in Asia and is now served in nearly 150 restaurants in Hong Kong and Macau.
Impossible Burger can be used in any ground meat dish and is easy to cook on the BBQ, charbroiler, flat top grill, high speed oven, steamer or sauté pan. The product contains no gluten, animal hormones or antibiotics. It’s kosher- and halal-certified.
A quarter-pound Impossible Burger has 0 mg cholesterol, 14 grams of total fat and 240 calories, and as much bioavailable iron and protein as a comparable serving of ground beef from cows. (A quarter-pound, conventional “80/20” patty from cows has 80 mg cholesterol, 23 grams of total fat and 290 calories.)
Impossible Every Which Way in Singapore
The island city-state of Singapore covers about 700 square kilometers and is home to more than 7,600 restaurants — including those helmed by some of the world’s best known chefs. Starting 7 March, the following award-winning establishments will begin serving Impossible’s flagship product:
Park Bench Deli serves sandwiches with a strong focus on high-quality ingredients. Chef Andrei Soen will feature the Impossible Patty Melt , ($22) which will replace their existing Patty Melt made with ground beef from cows.
Potato Head Singapore and Three Buns Quayside by Potato Head serve innovative burgers, sides, and desserts designed by Group Executive Chef Adam Penney. Both locations will offer brand-new burgers, including The Impossible Dream ($27) and Impossible Chedda ($23).
Privé Orchard ’s Group Executive Chef Robin Ho serves Juicy Lucy Impossible Meatball Spaghetti ($19) and Impossible Satay Sliders ($15), as well as the Nothing is Impossible Beef Cheeseburger , part of a kids set meal at $12.
Empress at the Asian Civilisations Museum offers traditional Chinese cuisine, and Executive Head Chef Ricky Leung will feature appetizers: Impossible Crispy Pancakes with Chinese Chives ($6.80), Pan-fried Impossible Gyoza ($6.80), Black Pepper Impossible Meatball Skewers ($8.80) and mains: Sichuan Mapo Tofu with Impossible Meat ($18) and Dragon’s Breath Fried Kuay Teow with Impossible Meatballs ($18).
Bread Street Kitchen by Gordon Ramsay showcases casual British European fare and is helmed by Executive Chef Sabrina Stillhart. The restaurant is offering The Impossible™ Flatbread ($24), The Impossible™ BSK Burger ($25), and The Impossible™ Wellington ($39), a creative spin on Bread Street Kitchen’s iconic Beef Wellington.
CUT by Wolfgang Puck is the first Asian outpost of the award-winning steak restaurant; Executive Chef Joshua Brown has created The Impossible™ Slider , a remake of its signature mini Kobe beef sliders, priced at $18 for three.
Adrift by David Myers boasts a creative California izakaya menu, inspired by David Myers’ sojourns across Asia and Europe. Executive Chef Wayne Brown serves The Impossible™ Sausage Roll , a juicy plant-based sausage ($14).
Impossible will be available to restaurants in Singapore on a limited and exclusive basis through Classic Fine Foods – Asia’s leading importer and distributor of fine foods. The group specialises in sourcing, importation, storage, marketing and distribution, and has been operating throughout Asia and Europe since 2001.
Big Taste, Small Footprint
Earlier this year, Impossible Foods launched its first product upgrade at the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES), where “Impossible Burger 2.0” took home the show’s highest honors, including the “ Most Unexpected Product ,” “ Best Product Launch ,” and “ Triumph of Food Engineering .”
Based in Redwood City, Calif., Impossible Foods uses modern science and technology to create wholesome and nutritious food, help restore natural ecosystems, and feed a growing population sustainably. The company makes meat from plants – with a much smaller environmental footprint than meat from animals.
To satisfy the global demand for meat at a fraction of the environmental impact, Impossible Foods developed a far more sustainable, scalable and affordable way to make meat, without the catastrophic environmental impact of livestock .
Shortly after its founding in 2011, Impossible Foods’ scientists discovered that one molecule — “ heme ” — is uniquely responsible for the explosion of flavors that result when meat is cooked. Impossible Foods’ scientists genetically engineer and ferment yeast to produce a heme protein naturally found in plants, called soy leghemoglobin.
The heme in Impossible Burger is identical to the essential heme humans have been consuming for hundreds of thousands of years in meat — and while the Impossible Burger delivers all the craveable depth of beef, it uses far fewer resources because it’s made from plants, not animals.
About Impossible Foods:
Based in California’s Silicon Valley, Impossible Foods makes delicious, nutritious meat and dairy products from plants — with a much smaller environmental footprint than meat from animals. The privately held company was founded in 2011 by Patrick O. Brown, M.D., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry at Stanford University, and a former Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. Investors include Khosla Ventures, Bill Gates, Google Ventures, Horizons Ventures, UBS, Viking Global Investors, Temasek, Sailing Capital, and Open Philanthropy Project.
More information:
impossiblefoods.com
www.twitter.com/impossiblefoods
www.facebook.com/impossiblefoods
www.instagram.com/impossible_foods
Press Kit:
www.impossiblefoods.com/media
//www.businesswire.com/news/home/20190305006036/en/
Contacts:
Rachel Soeharto: rachel.soeharto@impossiblefoods.com +1 310 490 1938
Andrea Seifert: andrea@aka-asia.com +65 8612 9224
Jia En Chan: jiaen@aka-asia.com +65 9389 4813
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รีวิวอาหารอินเดีย (Indian food review)

by รีวิวอาหารอินเดีย (Indian food review)
Bawarchi is Bangkok most well-known and prestigious Chain of fine & casual dining Indian restaurants. Established in 1998 in Bangkok, Bawarchi is an ambitious venture of group holding company Incapital Ventures with interests in F&B, wellness, tourism and Technology.The Award-winning Indian Restaurant offers truly authentic Indian cuisine coupled with stunning ambience and service. An innovative menu features original recipes that have been reconstructed to be both visually and texturally appealing. ร้านอาหารอินเดียไหนดี (Which Indian restaurant is good?)

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[www.keralites.net] Indian Spices

Funny Gallerys Why Indian food is so delicious: Scientists say our love of curry is down to a lack of overlapping flavours :- Scientists studied the chemical compounds in 2,00 0 Indian dishes They found ingredients were teamed together that had no similarityThis is in contrast to many Western dishes that tend to pair flavoursOut of the 381 cooking ingredients in the world, Indian food uses 200Out of the 381 cooking ingredients in the world, the research team from that Indian food used 200 in their cuisine. ‘Each of the spices is uniquely placed in its recipe to shape the flavor sharing pattern with rest of the ingredients,’ the researchers said’Each of the spices is uniquely placed in its recipe to shape the flavor sharing pattern with rest of the ingredients,’ the researchers said COULD CURRY BE USED TO BANISH BAD MEMORIES? A spice commonly used in curry could help erase bad memories, according to a study. Curcumin, a bright-yellow compound found in the root of the Indian spice turmeric, prevented new fear memories being stored in the brain, and also removed pre-existing fear memories, researchers found. It is hoped that the findings will help develop treatments for people suffering with psychological disorders. ‘Each of the spices is uniquely placed in its recipe to shape the flavour sharing pattern with rest of the ingredients,’ the researchers said. Previous research has found curry could actually be good for you, easing arthritis and even protecting people from Alzheimer’s. Most curries contain turmeric, cumin, allspice, cardamon, ginger, garlic and capsicum – spices with strong anti-bacterial properties. This is largely why they’re found in dishes from hot countries, where meat needs to be preserved. Separate studies have found that garlic, cinnamon and cumin can destroy up to 80 per cent of meat-borne bacteria, while ginger can slow bacterial growth by 25 per cent. Whatsapp Group+91 98450 81888 HOME REMEDY IN INDIA Hands that serve are Holier than Lips that Pray __._,_.___ Posted by: =?UTF-8?Q?=E2=99=A3_=E2=99=A3_=E2=99=A3M=2ED=2E_?= =?UTF-8?Q?HEGDE=E2=99=A3_=E2=99=A3_=E2=99=A3?=

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Taste the Flavours of the Sun at Cafe Mediterranean

March 6, 2019 Taste the Flavours of the Sun at Cafe Mediterranean And so, I have heard (or read from somewhere) that the Mediterranean is still one of the healthiest, happiest, cleanest, and nicest places to live on Earth, thanks to thousands of years of culture and history being handed down from generation to generation as regards to diet and a balanced lifestyle, not to mention exceptional climate and natural beauty of this region. The Mediterranean remains one of the most pristine though heavily-populated areas in the world. It’s one reason the region got so popular with tourists in the first place. Filling your lungs with clean salty air, enjoying the cool breezes and letting the sun shine on your face are some of life’s simplest pleasures. I’m, still hopeful that I get to visit one day.One of the things that make the Mediterranean so great is the food. This region offers such a broad variety of fresh and healthy eats that are well loved and equally familiar to almost every palate. Think about wine, olive oil, seafood, cheese etc. This probably why the many people are now adopting the Mediterranean style of diet. Mediterranean diet includes foods that ae commonly eaten in countries that border the Mediterranean Sea. These meals may provide several health benefits which includes losing or maintain weight, decreasing blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol levels. It may also help protect against certain health conditions such as heart disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. The Mediterranean lifestyle is all about enjoying life to the fullest – through fresh, healthy meals with family and friends, finding a balance between work, relaxation, and experiencing the pleasures of an active life. Sharing meals with friends and family, pausing to taste, smell and enjoy, rather than simply refuel, is one of the most valued foundations of traditional Mediterranean culture and is exemplified in every dish that Café Mediterranean has to offer, a restaurant that I’ve visited one too many times starting back in my college days and up to this day. In 1994, two siblings, Gonzalo and Giovanna Mabanta, along with Gonzalo’s then sister-in-law Marla Moran, put their heart, their soul, and their passion for good food and cooking into a restaurant idea that, in those heady days of the 1990s, was still unknown in Manila: a kitchen dedicated to the distinctive cuisines of the sunny Mediterranean. Taking the name, The Cafe Mediterranean from a long defunct early 1960’s beatnik hangout in Berkeley California, they opened their doors to their first restaurant in Greenbelt Mall, within the Makati CBD. It was an instant hit amongst the corporate crowd with its emphasis on fresh, light, yet flavorful, slightly unusual menu offerings. The traditional cooking of the 14 or so countries located within the Mediterranean allowed the team tremendous flexibility in terms of developing an interesting menu, while at the same time keeping certain key ingredients – olive oil, garlic, and tomato – as unifying elements. I got to visit one of their newest branches in BGC at One Bonifacio High Street with my foodie friends last week and I was able to savor the flavors of the Mediterranean once more. Shish Taouk with Biryani – is a traditional Turkish shish kebab which can be found in Syrian and Lebanese cuisine. This was served with your choice of rice and veggies or regular pita breads. The meat was tender and spiced right. Chicken Kebab Pizza – one of Café Med’s best-selling dish. It’s with grilled chicken, house made pickled chilies and topped with garlic yogurt sauce. I love how Smokey and tasty this pizza is. Also, the bread isn’t that thick and had the right density to it that we all enjoyed. Chicken Kebab with Buttered Rice – fresh and tender chicken pieces spiced and grilled to perfection served with buttered rice, tabbouleh salad and grilled onions and tomatoes. These chicken skewers are moist, tender and flavorsome and perfect with the salty and creamy buttered rice. I hope this comes with couscous too. Hummus with Mushroom & Caramelized Onions – the classic chickpea & sesame dip from the Middle East. This is considered a complete meal. Before getting to try hummus, I thought I wouldn’t like it, but after, it has become one of my favorite things to eat whenever I have the chance to go and grab it. I simply love the combo of hummus and mushrooms. Hummus in itself is already a tasty dish and adding smoky and earthy mushrooms rendered a truly flavorful experience. I just love it with freshly baked and warm pita. Fudge Cake – rich, dense and decadent chocolate cake. This cake is coated with thick chocolate layer but on the spongier side rather than moist. Either way it’s a perfect ending to any great meal at Café Med. Mango Lassi – a popular Indian drink! This is a delicious blend of mangoes and yogurt with a touch of cardamom. I love the combination of sweet mango with tangy yogurt. This is so refreshing and full of zest. Totally enjoyed every dish as Mediterranean food is the top 2 (next to Japanese) among my favorite cuisines. Café Med still serves that good and homey flavors that represents the sea surrounded by southern Europe, North Africa, and Western Asia. Although the benefits of the Mediterranean diet are greatest when eaten as a part of a total lifestyle, you don’t need to move to Greece or Italy to profit from it. You can adopt the diet and/or visit any nearest Café Mediterranean near you. CAFE MEDITERRANEAN Third Floor, One Bonifacio High Street, 28th Street Corner 5th Ave., Bonifacio Global City, Taguig City Contact Nos: 02 7441831

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