Fusion or confusion?

Fusion or confusion?

Manpriya Singh
By all means, if someone wants to give a Punjabi twist to their creamy risotto, they can. However, if in the quest for shaking up cuisines a bit, the chef puts together strange ingredients that have no reason to be together even in an a la carte order.
This was truly highlighted by New Zealand-based Indian chef Sid Sahrawat during his visit to Chandigarh last year. Settled in Sandrigham for the past decade, he had reduced the concept of fusion food to, “It’s all confusion. I don’t believe in fusion food. And fusion is kind of popular in Chandigarh, we saw a lot of dishes like tandoori chicken tacos, I mean what are they trying to do? You end up not doing justice to either of the cuisines.” Of course the debate is open to the floor, but the chefs from the city tell us what they actually think.
Why do it?
Eventually, it’s about doing justice to the cuisines and the ingredients coming together in one dish. “A chef from one country preparing dish of another country is as it fusion enough, why mix up the ingredients further?” laughs Rambagh Rajput, former student, Chandigarh Institute of Hotel Management, who runs his own catering agency.
With that he makes a case for desi greasy Indianised Chinese that has almost become staple meal of several millennials! It’s fusion that has come to be accepted with time and evolution. While Indian Chinese is one thing, paneer pizza quite another! He adds, “And why would anyone put paneer pizza on the menu, when we have the margarita pizza to perfect first?” Adventurous challenge
Agrees Nandita Karan, executive chef, The Lalit Chandigarh, “People who want authentic food, will generally look for (for example) an Italian-owned restaurant, with Italian chefs. They will also look for dishes that you generally find in Italy and that have not been modified too much.” Personally speaking, she likes and prefers authentic food rather than going in for fusion. Since in fusion everyone does mix and match and the results can be good or bad. She adds, “People who love to try new and different food go in for fusion. But then again, it’s an adventurous challenge, as sometimes you don’t know what you are eating.”
Breaks monotony
In the ever-changing, immensely dynamic, food landscape, customising is a given. Which is when Hyatt opened doors for the city to its Italian restaurant; it was named Piccante, meaning spicy in Italian — signifying local palette for spicy food. But not mixing anything up, without rhyme or reason. “There’s a technique behind fusion dishes,” says Chef Vineet Chopra, executive chef and GM, Hotel Park View. If that technique is not followed, it’s fusion gone bad. But fusion takes away the monotony for people who constantly want a change.”
City-based Nita Sukhija, owner of the baking company Uppercrust, feels in desserts, fusion worked well. But that’s not every time. “I am old school; like things traditional and authentic. So if it’s Indian desserts, that’s how they should be and if it is scones, muffins, tarts, they should be like that; no mixing and matching.”
Meanwhile, Falafel parantha anyone? Unlike an aloo parantha, you wouldn’t even know what a perfect one should taste like. So easy for the chef and safe for the connoisseurs!
manpriya@tribuenmail.com

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WEEKLY MENU PLAN (#207)

Yummly WEEKLY MENU PLAN (#207) – A delicious collection of dinner, side dish and dessert recipes to help you plan your weekly menu and make life easier for you! In these menu plans, we will be sharing some of our favorite recipe ideas for you to use as you are planning out your meals for the week. Just click any of the recipe titles or pictures to get the recipe. A little about how we plan our week and our menu plan: Mondays are soup and salad. Tuesdays we are bringing you delicious Mexican cuisine. Wednesdays are a taste of Italy. Thursdays are designed around yummy sandwiches, burgers, and wraps. Fridays are a no cook day around here. Going out with friends and loved ones is something that we think is important. It’s your night off from cooking- enjoy! Saturdays are an exotic food night, it’s a great night to try something new, from cooking with seafood, to trying Indian or Thai dishes. Sundays are a traditional old fashioned all American family dinner- think meat and potatoes. 🙂 There will also always be a couple of delectable desserts to use any day you wish. A new weekly menu plan will be posted every SUNDAY morning so be sure to check back each week! CLICK ON THE LINKED RECIPE TITLES OR PHOTOS TO GET THE FULL RECIPE WEEK #207

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Asian American International Film Festival in NYC Announces 2019 Film Lineup

The 42nd Asian American International Film Festival (AAIFF42) taking place July 25 to August 3 in New York City, announced its full film lineup of 12 narrative features, 9 documentary features, and 67 short films, from 19 countries.
Opening night will feature Yellow Rose directed by Diane Paragas, with Ms. Purple directed by Justin Chon as Centerpiece film, and the festival will close with Happy Cleaners directed by Julian Kim and Peter S. Lee.
OPENING NIGHT: YELLOW ROSEDirected by Diane Paragas – USARose, an undocumented Filipino girl, dreams of one day leaving her small Texas town to pursue her country music dreams. Her world is shattered when her mom suddenly gets picked up by Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Rose, facing this new reality, is forced to flee the scene, leaving behind the only life she knows, and embarks on a journey of self-discovery as she searches for a new home in the honky tonk world of Austin, Texas.
CENTERPIECE: MS. PURPLEDirected by Justin Chon – USAFrom award-winning filmmaker Justin Chon (Gook, 2017), MS. PURPLE is a poignant drama about Asian American sister and brother, Kasie (Tiffany Chu) and Carey (Teddy Lee), who were raised and are now seemingly stuck in Koreatown, Los Angeles. Abandoned by their mother and brought up by their father, the siblings continue to struggle with deep emotional wounds from the difficulty of the parental dynamic. Now, with their father on his deathbed, the estranged Carey comes home to help Kasie care for him. As they reunite over their dying father, Kasie and Carey confront their shared past, attempting to mend their relationship.
Closing Night: HAPPY CLEANERSDirected by Julian Kim & Peter S. Lee – USAHAPPY CLEANERS is about the Choi Family living and surviving in Flushing, Queens. We observe the day-to-day lives of the Choi Family members as they navigate through their respective struggles, cultural clashes, inner angst, all while trying to keep the family dry cleaning business afloat. RETROSPECTIVE & SPECIAL PRESENTATIONS
FRESH KILLDirected by Shu Lea Cheang – USA, TaiwanDescribed by the director as “Eco-Cyber-Noia,” FRESH KILL centers around a non-nuclear family anchored by mothers Claire (Erin McMurtry,) Shareen (Sarita Choudhury) and their daughter Honey (Nelini Stamp.) A wild ride involving corporate conspiracies, pollution and community activism, Shu Lea Cheang’s debut is a must see.
MERATADirected by Hepi Mita – New ZealandA documentary portrait of the pioneering indigenous filmmaker and activist Merata Mita, MERATA is an intimate tribute from a son about his mother that delves into the life of the first woman from an Indigenous Nation to solely direct a film anywhere in the world. Known as the grandmother of Indigenous cinema, Merata’s independent political documentaries of the 70’s and 80’s highlighted injustices for Maori people that often divided the country.
MISSISSIPPI MASALADirected by Mira Nair – USA, UKMississippi Masala is a tale of how prejudice makes victims and instigators of us all. In 1972, Indian Jay (Roshan Seth), a resident of Uganda, is forced by the bigoted Amin regime to take his family and flee the country. He vows to hate and distrust all blacks–at least until he is able to reclaim the real estate stolen from him by the Ugandan government. Flash-forward to 1990: Jay and his family have settled in Mississippi. Seth’s daughter Mina (Sarit Choudhury) makes the acquaintance of African-American Demetrius (Denzel Washington), the prosperous manager of a carpet-cleaning business.
THE SLANTED SCREENDirected by Jeff Adachi – USAHollywood has a long tradition of cultural prejudice, particularly when it comes to depicting Asian peoples. For Asian actors, only limited roles are available, and they are often pigeonholed into depicting ethnic stereotypes. The struggle against these stereotypes, as well as the dilemmas facing actors forced to succumb to them, are explored through interviews with Asian actors and filmmakers and in a series of archival film clips covering a century of American film.
Paired with the short film THE RIDEDirected by Jeff Adachi and Jim ChoiTHE RIDE takes viewers on a personal and intense ride through the underbelly of the criminal injustice system, seen through the eyes of SF Public Defender Jeff Adachi, who is one of the nation’s few elected public defenders. NARRATIVE FEATURES
CITIES OF LAST THINGSDirected by Wing Ding Ho – Taiwan, FranceIn reverse chronology, CITIES OF LAST THINGS tells the story of an ordinary man through three extraordinary nights. Each story, set in the future, present, and past, examines his relationships with women and how they have influenced his life.
DEMOLITION GIRLDirected by Genta Matsugami – JapanA high-school student, living in a small town in Japan, takes on an unusual side job to shoulder the weight of her family’s financial burdens and her university costs. She is forced to face one difficult decision after the next, which eventually culminate in one night of mayhem.
EMPTY BY DESIGNDirected by Andrea A. Walter – Philippines, USAEMPTY BY DESIGN is about the struggle of identity experienced living and growing up in multiple places surrounded by different cultures, and what it means to call a place home. The film takes place in Manila, Philippines and follows Samantha, a recent University Graduate who moves back home after her parents have passed away, and Eric, a Hollywood Stuntman and Body double who comes back to shoot a new film.
GO BACK TO CHINADirected by Emily Ting – China, USAWhen spoiled rich girl Sasha Li blows through half of her trust fund, she is cut off by her father and forced to go back to China and work for the family toy business. What simply begins as a way to regain financial support soon develops into a life-altering journey of self-discovery, as Sasha learns the family business from the ground up, and more importantly, learns to reconnect with her estranged family.
IN A NEW YORK MINUTEDirected by Ximan Li – USAIN A NEW YORK MINUTE follows three strangers as they accidentally discover the solution to their problems lies in a single pregnancy test. Amy is haunted by a past breakup that has manifested into an eating disorder. Angel is caught between a loveless marriage to an American businessman and a passionate affair with a Chinese writer. Nina moonlights as an escort in order to support herself.
K.D.Directed by Madhumita Sundararaman – IndiaKD an 80-year old village overhears his children say they want him dead to claim their inheritance. Realizing he has never lived for himself, KD runs away from home. He encounters an 8-year-old orphan and together they discover the meaning of life and friendship.
LAST SUNRISEDirected by Wen Ren – China, USAA future reliant on solar energy falls into chaos after the sun disappears, forcing a reclusive astronomer and his bubbly neighbor out of the city. As temperature goes subzero, oxygen depletes, the only hope is a miracle at their final destination, District Four. Akin to the orphan planet earth, they gravitate forward in search of light in the perpetual darkness.
LUCKY GRANDMADirected by Sasie Sealy – USASet in New York City’s Chinatown, an ornery, chain-smoking Chinese grandma goes all in at the casino, landing herself on the wrong side of luck – and in the middle of a gang war.
SONG LANGDirected by Leon Le – VietnamSet in 1980s Saigon, Song Lang is a gritty underworld noir hiding a tender, romantic heart. At the film’s core is the unlikely bond that develops between hunky, brooding Dung (Lien Binh Phat), a tough debt collector for a ruthless loan shark, and Linh Phung (popular V-pop singer Isaac), a charismatic young opera singer for a struggling company that performs cai luong, a modern form of traditional Vietnamese folk opera. DOCUMENTARY FEATURES
AMERICAN HASIDirected by Laura Asherman – USA, IndiaAfter losing his day job, comedian Tushar Singh decides to pursue stand-up comedy full-time. Singh maps out a 35-day tour of India, taking part in India’s flourishing stand-up scene and drawing on his unique perspective as the son of conservative Hindu parents in Huntsville, Alabama.
BEI BEIDirected by Marion LipschutzFrom the moment Bei Bei Shuai steps out of jail on the arm of her lawyer Linda Pence, their lives are consumed by an impending murder trial. If they lose, Bei Bei will go to jail for 45 years to life, setting a precedent that will affect all pregnant women who, intentionally or not, terminate their pregnancies. But if they win, it will be a landmark in blocking a long standing stealth movement to end abortion, at any stage of pregnancy.
EATING UP EASTERDirected by Sergio M. Rapu – Chile, USAIn a cinematic letter to his son, native Rapanui (Easter Island) filmmaker Sergio Mata’u Rapu explores the modern dilemma of their people, descendants of the ancient statue builders, as they face the consequences of their rapidly developing home.
JERONIMODirected by Joseph Juhn – USA, CubaBorn in 1926 to Korean indentured servant parents in Cuba, Jeronimo joins the Cuban revolution and crosses paths with Fidel Castro and Che Guevara, before turning to his Korean roots and identity.
LOVE BOAT: TAIWANDirected by Valerie Soe – USA, TaiwanLOVE BOAT: TAIWAN is a coming-of-age film that looks at the Taiwan Love Boat, one of the longest running summer programs in the world, where college-aged Taiwanese Americans get closer to their history, their culture and each other. Throughout its history the Love Boat has served as a political tool for Taiwan’s government, as a means for Taiwanese American parents to ensure the preservation of Taiwanese bloodlines, and as a site for romance for young Taiwanese Americans, reflecting Taiwan’s history as well as the history of the Taiwanese American community.
Paired with the short film SPRING BUDDirected by Candy Chan – China, USAThrough the power of education, one woman’s vision transforms the lives of a thousand girls in China’s rural Shaanxi Province.
RITUALS OF RESISTANCEDirected by Tenzin Phuntsog, Joy Dietrich – TibetRITUALS OF ASSISTANCE looks at the evolving generational responses by pacifist Tibetans under 65 years of Chinese occupation. Through first-hand oral accounts by three Tibetan exiles living in Nepal, the U.S., and India, the film traces the three paths of resistance from the active and the brutal, to the realm of the symbolic and sacrificial.
Paired with the short film THE LITTLE GODDESSNarrative – Directed by Gauri Adelkar – IndiaDurga and her family depend on the ‘Bahurupi’– a dying folk art practiced in rural India – to survive. Every day they transform into mythological characters and perform skits in which Durga is the star performer.
SEADRIFTDirected by Tim TsaiSEADRIFT documents the immigrant and refugee experience in the American South; something that the mainstream media almost never talks about. Focusing on Vietnamese immigrants who moved to the Gulf Coast of Texas after the end of the American conflict in Vietnam, we’re placed in the center of a world of racial tensions and constant violence that eventually ends in death.
Paired with the short film THE TALE OF KIEUNarrative – Directed by Ray Leve – VietnamIn the years following the Fall of Saigon (1975), an exodus occurred in numbers of hundreds of thousands. Life under the Iron Fist was catastrophic – plagued by grave conditions of poverty and oppression. To escape Vietnam was to take to the seas and it was there that many had also perished.
THE UGLY MODELDirected by Doris Yeung – USAFrom the outside, Philly based Korean American adoptee and fitness model Kevin Tae-jin Kreider seems to have it all, Looks, Muscles, Chutzpah, Confidence and Charisma. He has a popular Instagram and vlog and has modeled around the world for the likes of Men’s Health, Gillette and Abercrombie & Fitch. Yet since childhood, he has always felt ugly and second best as an Asian male in America. THE UGLY MODEL examines the paradox of a handsome male model who feels ashamed, ugly and emasculated because of his Asian ethnicity in America.
WHEN WE WALKDirected by Jason DaSilva – USAWHEN WE WALK is a compelling story of one man’s struggle to maintain his relationship with his son while also trying to maintain what’s left of his independence as he lives with a severe form of muscular dystrophy. SHORT FILM PROGRAMS Laugh Through It: Comedy Shorts
In this year’s comedy shorts lineup, we plunge into a twisted exhibition, a panicked seminarian, a daughter’s interrogation, a dramatic dependency, a sensei’s heartbreak, an automated love story and a newfound respect for chicken.
EXTINCTDirected by Veronica Dang – USABlack Mirror meets Odd Couple
MASTERS OF DIVINITYDirected by Eugene Suen – USA. South KoreaAn ex-seminarian and now-struggling filmmaker begins to panic after his wife tells him that God wants her to quit her job
SIGH GONEDirected by Jeannie Nguyen – VietnamWithout the guide of her “lost love”, Thuy is on the verge of death by boredom. Having no agenda, she finds odd ways to entertain herself in the bustling city of Saigon, Vietnam.
FORBIDDEN TIKKA MASALADirected by Rahul Chaturvedi – Canada, IndiaA coming-of-old-age story that follows a devoutly religious vegetarian who finds a new lease on life after mistakenly eating chicken at her retirement party.
THE INTERVIEWDirected by Bobby Yan – China, USAIn order to meet her boyfriend, a young woman must pass a complex and incredulous series of questions from her mother, in what becomes, The Interview.
MR. YOSHI’S TERRIBLE DAYDirected by Ken Lin – USAAfter a humiliating defeat in front of his students, a delusional “chi-energy master” struggles to regain his purpose. Inspired by true events.
A LIFT STORYDirected by Viplav Shinde – IndiaSantosh Kumar, a country boy who has found a job as a house help in Mumbai’s up market residential tower, falls in love with the female automated voice of the elevator believing the voice talks only to him and exists in real. Beyond Queer: LGBTQ+ Shorts
We are more than our gender identity, sexuality or race. These shorts show the beautiful depth of the queer Asian diaspora. From the gorgeous exploration in “Kiss of the Rabbit God,” the hilarity of relationships in “I Think She Likes You,” to the reawakening of love in middle age in “Halwa,” this block showcases that we are all more than our labels.
SPINSTERHOODDirected by Jhanvi Motla – USA, IndiaSara Chatterjee is forced to come out to her family when her girlfriend Spencer discovers she secretly goes on dates with men to appease her parents.
SAFE AMONG STARSDirected by Jess X. Snow – USAA queer Chinese-American woman struggles to tell her immigrant mother why she left school. She teleports into her own galaxy where no violence can touch her.
KISS OF THE RABBIT GODDirected by Andrew Thomas Huang – USAA repressed Chinese restaurant worker falls in love with an 18th century Qing dynasty god who leads him on a journey of sexual awakening and self discovery.
HALWADirected by Gayatri Bajpai & Nirav Bhakta – USAAn Indian Immigrant woman decides to rekindle her relationship with her childhood companion through facebook messages until her abusive husband finds out.
ABLUTIONDirected by Omar Al Dakheel – USAThe bond between a disabled Muslim father and his son is tested when love is pitted against religion.
PEPPERDirected by Jayil Pak – South Korea, USAWhen the Korean Goddess of Birth ushers one boy’s soul to grant a couple their son, an unforeseen ghost alters her plan.
LIONHOODDirected by Jason Karman – CanadaA portrait of two teenaged hockey players which explores the intensity of adolescence – a time of unrestrained physicality and surging hormones, resulting in unchecked impulses and unseen emotions.
I THINK SHE LIKES YOUDirected by Bridey Elliott – USAWhen Justine and Julia pick Jake up at a bar, it’s not quite the threesome he was expecting. Thicker than Water: Shorts
In this eclectic, intimate selection of shorts, familial and national bonds are stretched to a breaking point. The siblings, cousins and neighbors of nail-biters like BESIEGED, and OUR HOME HERE are barely afloat in a sea of confusion, mistrust and isolation. Many are traveling or have arrived at a new place, like the Filipino immigrant family at the center of KAAWAY, and have only the other person as an anchor. Will they find a safe shore, or go under together?
MAUKA TO MAKADirected by Jonah Okano & Alika Maikau – USASet in Kaneohe on the island of Oahu, two cousins grapple with their own internal struggles while trying to sell drugs to make a living.
KAAWAY (ENEMY)Directed by Wester Demandante – USAIn 1996, a Filipino boy is stuck behind enemy lines after a brawl at school.
HEDIEHDirected by Sahar Sotoodeh – IranHedieh is a 14 year old girl who escapes from the school service in Iran. Her friend is now forced to explain Hedieh’s whereabouts in this tense classroom drama.
OUR HOME HEREDirected by Angela Chen – USAParallel stories of broken relationships between parents and their children striving for the American Dream all revolving around one explosive night at a fast food joint.
BESIEGEDDirected by Mengchen Niu – ChinaA jealous actor begins to sabotage his musically gifted brother after he realizes they are auditioning for the same film role. The Phone or the Pen?: Art and Technology Stories
In OUROBOROS, A DAY OF THE ARTIST, BUFFALO NICKEL, BEAST, HAVE A NICE DAY, and FIREBIRD we see how people struggle to find themselves in the modern world. Often, technology can keep you hemmed in and distanced from loved ones, but art and passion can set you free. In these films, we see art and tech interwoven into various lives, which help hold onto or further distance people from their families, both blood and chosen.
OUROBOROSDirected by Trevor Choi – Hong KonThis is a story about a struggling stage director Choi trying to adapt Susan Or’s web fiction.
A DAY OF THE ARTISTDirected by Byung Hoon Lee – KoreaA day of film composer on the deadline.
BUFFALO NICKELDirected by Youthana Yuos – USAA bored and lonely Indian American woman unwittingly calls upon the powers of a Social Media Influencer who offers her a chance to change.
BEAST – DANCE MOVIEDirected by Johnson Cheng – USACarson, California is home to the reigning Krump champions of the world. They call themselves the “Beast Fam”— a crew made up of suburban Filipino and Mexican American youth who found both family and salvation through the electric street dance of Krump.
HAVE A NICE DAYDirected by Lau Kok Roi – Hong KongBabar, a Pakistani immigrant left with nothing, finds as he comes out of jail that his wife, Hina, and son, Ali, had left their home. Reluctantly, he seeks help from his good friend Numan, and learns that Hina wants to divorce him.
FIREBIRDDirected by Mimi Lee – USAAn Asian-American artist loses her identity as she navigates her way through a social-media driven world. Otherly Worlds: Genre Short Films
Things aren’t always what they seem. What begins as everyday, quickly becomes an exploration of legends, beasts, future technologies, alter-egos, and the supernatural. Join us as we experience a twist on stories of triumph, friendship, deception, and self-discovery.
ALTERNATE EGODirected by David Chai – USAThis film explores the possible dangers of social media and how the profile we see on our friend page could just be an alternate ego.
THE LIE GAMEDirected by Jyothi Kalyan Sura – USA, IndiaAfter losing her boyfriend to depression, a computer scientist creates and anti-depression AI application and looks for funding to complete it. Following a string of failed interviews, she enters her final interview which turns into a bizarre challenge of lie detection.
QUANTUMDirected by Ryan Willard – USA, PhilippinesWhen a boy battling a brain tumor is ready to give up, his little sister helps him discover a message of hope.
THE VISITDirected by Roxy Shih = Taiwan, USAA pregnant woman and her husband visit her lonely, aging grandmother in the rural mountains of Taiwan only to witness the older woman’s mysterious disappearance.
DISAPPEARDirected by Namroc Doan – USAA daughter gets manipulated by her mother to pull off a heist and struggles with the fallout of the crime.
BALIKODirected by Chris Chung – UKMara, a once renowned photographer, journeys deep into the mountains in search of a mystical beast never photographed before. But while searching for a mythical beast, the beast she truly discovers is inside herself. Off the Beaten Path Shorts
In this collection of short films, we find ourselves in surreal spaces, odd predicaments, and obscure inner worlds, where bizarre and whimsy collide and we discover places we could never have imagined.
ALBATROSS SOUPDirected by Winnie Cheung – USA, Japan, Hong KongAlbatross Soup is an animated short hybrid documentary film based on an entertaining yet disturbing lateral thinking puzzle. Over 50 people have been recorded trying to guess this riddle using only “yes” or “no” questions.
BRUNCH WARSDirected by Kamran Khan – USAThree best friends meet every month for a cook off where they each prepare a dish and try and outdo one another. But this time, revenge is on the menu when unresolved issues from their past bubble to the surface.
BUNNY MANDirected by Athena Han – CanadaA group of Taiwanese friends enjoy their meal in a Chinese restaurant while discussing the differences between FOB (fresh off the boat) and CBC (Canadian born Chinese). Then a mysterious Bunny mascot enters and disturbs the night.
CHEATDirected by Yeo Joon Han and Boris Kalaidjiev – ChinaA woman tries to help a man overcome his suicidal thoughts by telling him her grandmother story.
IN FULL BLOOMDirected by Maegan Houang – USAIn Full Bloom is a surrealist short film about overcoming the loss of a partner within the parameters of living as a female Vietnamese immigrant.
WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT THE WATER AND THE MOONDirected by Layla Jian Luo – China, USADuring an attempted abortion, a girl gives birth to a live jellyfish.
HOW TO LIVE YOUR LIFE CORRECTLYDirected by Xindi Lou – USAA troubled, neurotic teenager pins all hope for an existential breakthrough on winning the love of her rebellious hospital roommate. Made in NY Shorts
New York City is where we started and where we continue to champion storytellers. We’re thrilled to present a diverse slate of shorts created by NY based filmmakers.
AN AMERICAN FAMILYDirected by Kieu-Anh Truong – USAThree people. One kitchen. A family
END OF SUMMERDirected by Serena Kuo – USAA teenager’s college move-in day takes an unexpected turn when her father is struck by a heart attack in the middle of the desert.
DUEDirected by Anna Mikami – USAAfter assaulting a police officer to save his undocumented friend, a man chooses to live his last night of freedom in pursuit of the American dream with his pregnant girlfriend.
SECRET LIVES OF ASIANSWhat does the “model minority” do after dark? (A screwball noir in 5 languages.)
24 HR WORKDAYDirected by Zishun Ning – USAIn New York State, many home attendants–mostly immigrants and women–are forced to work grueling 24-hour shifts taking care of seriously-ill patients, with only half of the pay.
GHOSTDirected by SJ Son & Woody Fu – USAAn Asian man learns he has more in common with a ghost than he thought. Identities: Documentary Shorts
What does it mean to be Asian, to be a part of the Asian diaspora? There’s no singular answer and the following shorts dive into various aspects of what makes up our identities. From what we cook for others to how we compete, these documentary shorts give us a glimpse of other lives.
KOPITIAMDirected by Sancheev Ravichandran – USAKopitiam follows the life of a coffee shop owner, Kyo Pang, and explores the daily struggles that she goes through in order to overcome her past while creating an unusual and perhaps unknown type of food in the area.
MEDirected by Derek Kwan – CanadaTwo generations of moms create a new dish for the family restaurant carrying on their legacy through Vietnamese cuisine.
NIGHTCALLERDirected by Alexander Humilde – Philippines, CanadaWelcome to the call centre capital of the world.
DONUTS FOR DOLLARSDirected by Daniel Luu – USA“Donut for Dollars” is about Cambodian donut shops, one of the most extraordinary ethnic economic niches in Los Angeles and all of Southern California. This video is part of the UCLA Center for Neighborhood’s goal to communicate scholarly empirical urban research to a broader audience, to use visual narratives to capture the lived experience of people and communities.
FLY TO THE DREAMDirected by Takahisa Shiraishi – Japan“At the beginning of 2018, four of Japanese Wheelchair junior players traveled to Los Angeles, California, for an international friendly match where American and Canadian top players were waiting for them. Their mission is not only playing tennis but also traveling abroad without their parents and creating friendship with players from other people by speaking English.”
UNSPOKENDirected by Patrick G. Lee – USAThrough letter-writing, a community discussion, and a drag performance, six queer and trans Asian Americans grapple with their queerness and consider what family acceptance might look like.
PASSAGE TO WOMANHOODDirected by Inaya Yusuf – MalaysiaA group of Muslim trans women stand their ground against social marginalization in secular Malaysia. Redefining femininity in Islam they are painting painting their own portrayal of womanhood.
PERIOD GIRLDirected by Jalena Keane-Lee – USAPERIOD GIRL is a short documentary that follows Nadya Okamoto, a 20 year-old Harvard sophomore who started the non-profit PERIOD Org, as she opens up about some of the personal trauma that helps fuel her work. Generations Shorts
Whether it be biological or chosen, family is powerful. These shorts explore how generations come together; clash and grow, for better or for worse.
MOONWALK WITH MEDirected by Erin Lau -USAA story about a Korean American girl named Juno who is haunted by her father’s disappearance. Upon his return, Juno must decide to keep her drifting father grounded or to let him go.
THE MOON AND THE NIGHTDirected by Erin Lau – USAIn rural Hawaii, a teenage girl must confront her father after he enters her beloved pet in a dog fight.
STAYDirected by Foroud Avazpour – IranAn old man suffer from amnesia and his children take him to the past if to find the present.
THE DISTANCE BETWEEN USDirected by Jeffrey Wu – USA, ChinaWhile visiting his grandmother in Beijing, a grandson explores how Alzheimer’s is changing his family and what it means to reconcile intergenerational relationships through language and culture in the face of irreversible memory loss.
AH GONGDirected by Clifford Miu – TaiwanEleven year old Chris arrives at the hospital only to realize that his mother and uncles have decided to pull the plug on his beloved grandfather.
PLEASE TRANSLATEDirected by Kelsy Lua – USAPlease Translate explores how language can act both as a barrier and an effective tool to help bridge the relationship between a Chinese immigrant mother, and her American-born daughter.
LIFELIKEDirected by Haruna Tanaka – JapanKamehachi, a jobless carver of Buddhist statues, earns his living by making lifelike figures for freak shows. A member of a local well-to-do family requests Kamehachi to make a doll of his fatally ill daughter Tsubaki to copy her mortal beauty as is. For Youth by Youth Shorts
Featuring filmmakers under the age of 21, we celebrate the next generation of Asian diaspora storytellers in this shorts block.
TUNDRADirected by Carol Nguyen – CanadaA mother dreams and hallucinates about her daughter, trying to cope with her loss.
MR ORANGE & BABY SNOTDirected by Kana Rosemarie Hutchens – USAMr. Orange lives a lonely life but finds companionship one day in the strangest place.
FOR HERE OR TO GODirected by Ryan Nguyen – USAA Vietnamese family discusses working in their restaurant as a way of preserving their culture and how they cope with the passing of its founder, a loving husband and father of four children.
LUNCHBOXDirected by Tisya Sharma, Tian Yi (Amy) Shi, Annabelle Richens – AustraliaSunny is having a tough time at school when her friends make fun what she has for lunch. Her mum helps her embrace her culture through food.
DEAD HORSE BAYDirected by Sophia Wang – CanadaAn abandoned beach in New York City draws artists in with it’s history infused trash.
DEPENDENTDirected by Drake Presto – USAFilipino daughters open up about their home lives and family experiences living with military fathers.
AMERICAN BORN CONFUSED DESIDirected by Anvita Gurung – USAAn insider’s look at the challenging world of expectations and stereotypes surrounding second generation Indian American youth. Tags

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It looks like rice in my bed. not sure about the amount of mustard on it. the classic “theres no food in warmers is disgusting and insulting to Indian cuisine.

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Enjoy the heartening combo of Tapri-style chai-pakodas this monsoon season now at Mumbai International Airport

Enjoy the heartening combo of Tapri-style chai-pakodas this monsoon season now at Mumbai International Airport 29/06/2019 Mumbai, (Date) : Travel Food Services (TFS), India’s leading Travel Food and Retail Company, presents the age-old but nostalgic tradition of enjoying a cup of tantalizing chai with crunchy pakodas at their leading travel hubs. With the onset of monsoons, TFS offers the heart-warming combo for travellers to enjoy the bliss of the rains. Indian monsoons are marked by the smell of wet soil, cold breezes and most importantly a cup of piping hot chai and a plate of scrumptious pakodas to complete the experience. TFS brings this unique experience to the airport and offers an array of special chai and pakodas like Potato Bhajji, Onion Bhajji and Palak Bhajji among others. This perfect pair will be offered to travellers from across the country and present them with an authentic monsoon experience Give your journey a special homely twist with the heartwarming combination of chai and pakodas only at the Mumbai International Airport. Time: Open 24×7 Date: Till 22 nd July 2019 Venue: Mumbai Se & Tiffin Centre, Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport Related Posts Monsoon Treats At Taiki Amp up your evening with the best of music this World Music Day at Hard Rock Cafe Chimichurri brings signature cuisine for Mumbaikars

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Guide to The Victoria Public Market

Guide to The Victoria Public Market Guide to The Victoria Public Market
The Victoria Public Market is Victoria’s year-round market, home to a vibrant community of artisans and local businesses operating in the iconic Hudson Building located right downtown. Feel like a local as you find some of the freshest and tastiest food offerings and explore this bustling hub where you’ll often discover live music, a wide array of events and workshops, day-vendors and a community kitchen!
Bonus: They recently installed a mural wall that’s the perfect spot for an iconic snap to document your travels in Victoria. La Pasta
Be transported to the streets of Italy with made from scratch noodles and fresh sauces from La Pasta . During the week, each day has its own unique pasta of the day like pasta primavera on Monday or capellini on Thursday. On weekends kids eat free with the purchase of any pasta bowl. Insider Tip: Create your own dream bowl by opting for the ‘pick your pasta’ on the menu and choose from a variety of noodles, in-season local vegetables and homemade sauces! Image by La Pasta Wafflebeast
Whether you’re looking for a beast of a waffle, waffle pops or a bite-sized treat, Wafflebeast is the place to be! While guaranteed to cure your sweet cravings, if you’re looking for something move savoury they also serve fresh donairs with sizzling beef, chicken or pork and a delicious tangy sauce.
Image by @victoriapublicmarket Roast
Fuel up for the day with a meal that’s anything but ordinary! Opt for one of Roast’s mouth-watering sandwiches where you’ll watch juicy roast beef and Porchetta carved right before your eyes, or build your own superfood salad box with practically any topping you can think of. Shatterbox Coffee Co.
Enjoy a locally roasted brew and some fine vegan menu options at this European inspired coffee bar. It’s also the perfect spot to enjoy fresh flavours in their ‘soups of the minute’ which are always changing. Insider Tip: For the perfect afternoon pick-me-up we recommend trying a Shatterbox original like the Lumberjack Latte or Love Potion. Silk Road Tea
Stop by Silk Road Tea for a full tea experience; explore the selection of hand-blended teas at their unique tasting bar before picking out a favourite. You can never go wrong with bestsellers like Angelwater (a blend of peppermint and rose petals) or Sour Cherry Green Tea. Taco Stand Al Pastor
Inspired by the taco stands of Tijuana, Guadalajara and the Baja Peninsula, Taco Stand Al Pastor is sure to satisfy your Mexican food craving. From their famous fish tacos to breakfast burritos to loaded gringo fries, your taste buds will be singing after your visit. Image by @tacostandvic The Very Good Butchers
If you’re looking for a wide range of vegan options, look no further. On the menu at The Very Good Butchers , you’ll find everything from bean-based smokin’ burgers to barbecue-pulled jackfruit, and other options that will delight vegans and non-vegans alike. Sutra
Enjoy a selection of Indian cuisine with favourites like butter chicken or kale and navy bean curry paired with fresh naan bread. If you’re looking for something to cook at home, purchase one of their delicious and convenient boil-in-a-bag curries for an easy crowd pleaser. The Westcoast Pantry
The perfect one-stop shop, acting as a grocery store and coffee bar all in one specializing in local, organic and health-conscious products. With a great selection of bulk products and a coffee and smoothie bar, The West Coast Pantry is the perfect spot to load up on healthy snack supplies. Whisk
If you’re looking for colourful and cute kitchenware you’ve come to the right place. Whisk has a wide selection of kitchen gadgets that are perfect for that hard-to-buy gift or to add a personal touch in your kitchen; think quirky aprons, brussel sprout dish towels and owl mugs. Victoria Pie Co
From chicken pot pie to apple, and Italian vegetarian to key lime, whether you’re looking for sweet or savoury, you will be delighted by the pies at Victoria Pie Co. Plus they’re always playing with new flavour concoctions so you’re sure to find something you like on the ever-growing menu.
Image by @victoriapublicmarket VicExpress
VicExpress is the perfect spot for a grab and go lunch, with a wide selection of teriyaki rice dishes, noodle bowls and fresh sushi. VicExpress also has a selection of Japanese groceries if you’re after something unique that you might never have tried before. Stay In Touch Get Email Updates Download Victoria’s

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7 Eateries in Kailash Colony that you Must Visit

Kailash Colony market in Delhi has got some awesome yet underrated eateries where you can order food without getting too weary of the prices. With a forever hungry tummy, I was astounded to see the number of economical eateries it poses and listed down some of the best out of all. So, the next time you find yourself in this famous market, head to any of these places without a second thought.
Cafe 27
They run an amazing 99 menu from 12 pm to 5 pm which includes drinks, hookah, veg and non-veg snacks, cocktails and more – all at INR 99! Yes, you read it right. Apart from this amazing deal, they have an amazing ambience that will give you the vibe of shack life. Do not miss their Non-Veg Kebab Platter , Chicken Malai Tikka , Black Bean Sauce and Dahi Ke Kebab .
Nikke Tikke
Nikke Tikke, a small outlet, serves mouth-watering platters, gravy combos and biryani. They claim their curry menu ( isn’t the most elaborate one though ) to be their speciality and to my surprise, they manage well on the quality. If you love Mughlai food, then go for Roomali Roll or a Warqi ; you can customize it according to your preference and taste.
The Big Chill Café
The Big Chill opened their first and foremost outlet in Kailash Colony and is now 18 years old. One of Delhi’s most iconic food chains with quirky interiors and drool-worthy desserts will keep you coming back for more. Look no further and head here when you are craving authentic Italian feast.
Juggernaut
Unlike most dosa joints, this restaurant is massive. Spread across 3 levels, Juggernaut has a dining hall on one floor, a terrace on another and a lobby aka store on yet another from where you can buy goodies. There is a new entrant in their menu – ‘Anar Dosa’ which is a stack of cone-shaped dosas (16 pieces) with a variety of sumptuous fillings like Aloo Masala, Spinach Corn, Paneer and others. Even if you are not a South Indian cuisine fan, this dish should be on your checklist because there is no harm in trying something new. Right?
Uncultured Café & Bar
Being one of the best resto-pubs and lounges in the city, Uncultured Cafe & Bar offers a premium multi-cuisine menu with the finest cocktails for everyone. It also offers a relaxing and awesome ambience with a spectacular view when you are in a mood to chill with your friends and have a round of pegs and shots.
Anupama Sweets
Are you craving street food or chaat? I would recommend this place when you are in a mood to eat flavoursome Golgappa , Aloo Chaat or Pav Bhaaji . This place will not burn a hole in your pocket and this iconic spot has not trembled in its uniformity for serving quality food.
Sanjha Chulha
Sanjha Chulha is heaven for Mughlai and North Indian lovers with flavoursome delicacies that will satisfy your hungry soul. Vegetarians should try the Paneer Masala Tikka Roll , Malai Chaap , Paneer Malai Tikka and if you are a non-vegetarian, go for the boneless Butter Chicken with Roomali Roti , Chicken Tandoori and Chicken Kalmi.
So, now that you are aware of all the gastronomic experiences that Kailash Colony offer, won’t you head to these recommended places and treat your taste buds?

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Kochi Grand Hyatt Bolgatty’s chef wants ‘Thai food to be popular among Malayalis’ – The New Indian Express

Home Lifestyle Food Kochi Grand Hyatt Bolgatty’s chef wants ‘Thai food to be popular among Malayalis’
The chef’s garden at home provides lemongrass, basil, ginger, galangal, eggplant, papaya, and butter peas needed for her Thai dishes. Share Via Email Published: 30th June 2019 05:00 AM | Last Updated: 30th June 2019 12:58 PM | A+ A A- Chef Supattra Boonsrang (Photo | EPS) By Shevlin Sebastian Express News Service Supattra Boonsrang, Chef de Cuisine of the Thai Soul restaurant at the Grand Hyatt Bolgatty in Kochi, is at home in her herb garden that she set up a year-and-a-half ago. It provides the lemongrass, basil, ginger, galangal, eggplant, papaya, and butter peas needed for her dishes. (Photo | EPS)
Supattra says, “The climate in Kochi is similar to Thailand—hot summers, rains, not-very-cold winters and high humidity. I used to have such a garden back in my home country.”
The pesticide-free garden uses an unusual type of manure. “We put chicken and fish bones in the oven and roast it. Then, we put it in the grinder and make a powder. It is good for the soil,” she says.
She is making a crab meat salad. The meat is put in a charcoal oven and has been smoked.
Supattra puts the meat, now cut into small pieces, into a bowl, and adds a mix of lemongrass, laksa leaves (Vietnamese mint), coriander, shallots, chillies and fish sauce and thinly-diced mango.
Next it a Tom Yum Koong, a spicy prawn soup with kaffir lime, lemongrass and galangal (forest ginger), and a green curry called Kaeng Khiao Wan Gai, which has coconut, eggplant, and green chillies. This is to be eaten along with the long-grained Jasmine rice, imported from Thailand.
Dessert is the cool Tab Tim Kromb—water chestnuts, dipped in coconut milk and crushed ice. To give it a touch of Kerala, she placed a slice of jackfruit on top. “Most people these days chop vegetables, meat and fish by machine, I do it by hand. I still use the mortar and pestle. I feel that is the only way to give the food a human touch,” she says.
Her culinary journey began in Yasoton town in northern Thailand. Her father Payad used to cook in a small restaurant as a chef. Supattra started her career cutting vegetables for him.
She feels diners are no longer enjoying the slow rhythm of a multi-course meal.
She says, “People want food that is made fast without much garnish. They also want all the courses to be served at one go. Thai food is steamed, so it is healthy and light on the stomach. My own mother, at 88, is so fit she walks faster than me.”As for her aim today, Supattra says, “I want to make Thai food popular among Malayalis.” Stay up to date on all the latest Food news with The New Indian Express App. Download now (Get the news that matters from New Indian Express on WhatsApp. Click this link and hit ‘Click to Subscribe’ . Follow the instructions after that.) TAGS

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Denver Itinerary – A weekend in the Mile High City

Denver Itinerary – A perfect weekend in the Mile High City Where to stay in Denver – The Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel
The Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel
Downtown is the perfect place to base yourself for discovering Denver. We stayed at the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel . It’s a great location for visiting the museums, RiNo, Larimer Square and, of course, downtown. Some of the best things to do in Denver are just a short stroll away.
The Sheraton is a modern hotel and one of Denver’s largest. There’s a cool bar, a choice of restaurants, cafes and a heated rooftop pool with fabulous views.
Check rates and availability at the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel Denver Weekender – Friday
I’m assuming you’ll arrive late Friday afternoon for your weekend. However, this Denver itinerary could work for any two-day trip midweek or weekend. Dinner and bar hopping at Larimer Square
Larimer Square, Denver
Head to elegant Larimer Square for shops, people watching and dinner. Larimer Square is the city’s oldest and most historic part of town where the first gold prospectors from the Old West era staked their claim. There’s a relaxed vibe and it’s the perfect part of town to chill into your weekend in Denver. You’ll find hip coffee bars, urban boutiques and exclusive stores and maybe some street performers.
See if you can spot the cute little cat statues which peer at you from the top of buildings, street lights and window sills. In the evenings the street, which is strung with lights, is bathed in a soft glow against the Victorian brick buildings.
For dinner, take your pick from a great range of chef-led restaurants or one of the many different cuisines available. There’s loads to choose from and every taste is covered. Finish your evening with cocktails at Green Russell, Larimer Lounge or one of many other bars and clubs. Denver Weekend Getaway – Saturday
Your first full day in the city is going to be packed with some of the best things to do in Denver so you’ll need to fuel up big time. We’re heading to LoDo (Lower Downtown) for breakfast and a peek at Union Station, a Mile High must-see. Union Station
Union Station, Denver
The 1914 vintage train terminal in LoDo has had a makeover and morphed into a hip gathering spot for dining, shopping and entertainment. It’s still big on transportation and this where you’ll arrive if you take the direct train from Denver International Airport.
The beautiful terminal Grand Hall is filled with long wooden benches, library-style desks and big squashy sofas. The leather armchairs are just aching to be curled up on for spot of people watching. It’s known as Denver’s Living Room for a reason. There’s a Denver tourist office in the station so head there and pick up any information you need for your visit.
Head for one of restaurants, coffee shops or prop up the Terminal Bar of an evening. But we’re here for breakfast… Breakfast at Mercantile inside Union Station
Mercantile Dining and Provision is a restaurant and mini market serving seasonally-inspired dishes in a casual atmosphere. We were there on Mother’s Day and it was packed and nicely buzzing. I checked out the open kitchen, watched the barista at work and was tempted by shelves of artisan goods from chocolate to charcuterie and spices to pastrami.
Breakfast was oh so good. I devoured Avocado Quinoa Toast with smoked mackerel, sprouted lentil vinaigrette and poached farmhouse egg which was just the right side of runny. The way I like my eggs. We all dipped into shared plates of pancakes, oats and crisp bacon. A flight of coffee
Breakfast was accompanied by juice and a flight of coffee. Yes, coffee lovers, you heard that right. A flight of coffee! I chose the ‘method’ flight – a single origin (Ethiopian) presented three different ways; Espresso, Americano and Cortado. Believe me when I say that any hint of jetlag was wiped out after that caffeine trio.
After breakfast drop by some nearby LoDo institutions like the independent Tattered Cover Bookstore at 1701 Wynkoop Street, a Colorado landmark.
Rockmount Ranch Wear is a family run company located in an historic building dating from 1909. If you’re looking for the right gear to wear during your Old West trip this is the place. You know you want that cowboy shirt and if Rockmount was good enough for Elvis… Explore Denver by e-Tuk
Electric Tuk-Tuk
One of the coolest things to do in Denver awaits. The ultimate urban Denver city tour by eTuk . Your guide will pick you up from outside Union Station and take you on an incredible 2.5 hour tour of Denver. They say it’s ‘the most fun you can have on three wheels’ and they’d be right. The 100% electric tuk-tuks are built locally in Denver by eTuk USA so they’re eco-friendly and help support the local community.
Our entertaining (total understatement – they were hilarious) guides knew everything there is to know about Denver; the hot spots, historical points of interest and hidden gems. The tour was a fast, fun and a fabulous way to discover Denver. If you don’t have a lot of time and want to get around the Mile High hotspots then an eTuk tour will be perfect for you.
At most attractions we got out of the Tuk-Tuk to get a closer look. We stopped at the gorgeous Brown Palace Hotel where they were playing live jazz in the art deco hotel lounge. The hotel still uses an underground spring beneath the hotel to supply water to all the taps. If you’re passing during your visit to Denver definitely drop in for afternoon tea or even book a stay there.
Brown Palace Hotel, Denver
We stopped by (didn’t go in) the Molly Brown House Museum, Victorian home of the ‘unsinkable’ Molly Brown, philanthropist and Titanic survivor.
The City and County Building Public Art in Denver
We saw loads of public art during our tuk-tuk tour. I loved the Big Blue Bear aka ‘I See What You Mean’. The 40-foot blue bear was created by the late Denver-based artist Lawrence Argent and peeks into the Colorado Convention Center. For every construction project valued at over $1 million in Denver 1% must be donated to public art. This means that art projects can be found all around the city. I spotted a few; Big Sweep – a giant dustpan and brush, the Big Blue Bear at the Convention Centre and Little Horse Big Chair outside the Public Library. It seems Denver likes to do cool public art on a big scale.
We also stopped at Larimer Square, the City County building, LoDo abd LoHi neighbourhoods, Civic Center Park and the downtown core. Our whirlwind tuk tuk ride ended in RiNo at Central Market. The perfect place for lunch… Lunch in Central Market
At the end of our fabulous eTuk tour we were dropped in RiNo (River North) a former industrial neighbourhood. If you arrive on foot it’s just a ten minute walk from LoDo (lower downtown). RiNo Art District has morphed from an old industrial area into a creative district which is packed with vibrant street art, galleries, restaurants and microbreweries. RiNo is a hotbed of hip.
We lunched in the Central Market, a gourmet marketplace and food hall located in a beautifully restored 1920s building. You’ll find a wide choice from pizza, sandwiches and salads to coffee, chocolate and ice cream. There’s also a bar serving beer, wine and cocktails. I can recommend the delicious vegan curry from Green Seed which I enjoyed sat in the sunshine outside with a healthy fruit shake. Discover the Street Art in RiNo
The River North Art District started out as a clutch of galleries in reclaimed warehouses. It’s now one of Denver’s most vibrant neighbourhoods packed full of stunning street art, creative spaces and performance venues. Wineries and craft breweries are two a penny.
Epic street art in RiNo adorns the sides of buildings, walls and lock-ups. It’s even on the roads. Just head out from Central Market and follow your feet down the streets and alleyways. You won’t have to look far.
Check the alley at the back of Denver Central Market for cool street art
Look closely and you’ll see these are four different murals
You could easily spend a whole day seeking out Denver’s street art. Travel blogger Julianna from ‘The Discoveries Of’, was also on our trip and has written an excellent guide to Denver’s murals with a self-guided walking map which is worth checking out. Stop for a craft beer
Mural hunting is thirsty work so I suggest well-deserved beer or glass of wine at one of RiNo’s many craft breweries. Craft beer is big in Denver with over 100 brewpubs, breweries and taprooms. Our Mutual Friend is just a couple of doors away from Central Market and offers craft beers brewed using 100% Colorado ingredients. Check out Denver Beer Trail for details of all Denver’s craft breweries and brewpubs. Dinner and sunset views at El Five
Tonight head out to LoHi (Lower Highlands) for dinner and views at El Five Denver’s newest urban hotspot. Take the lift up to the fifth floor (L5 – the clue’s in the name) for fabulous city views and sunsets paired with tapas, mezzes, wine and cocktails. The atmosphere is lively and the décor dark, edgy with a vintage cinematic theme. Definitely one to book as it’s one of Denver’s most popular restaurants.
Food is a delicious fusion of Mediterranean, Gibraltar and Lebanese dishes. Think Middle Eastern mezze platters, traditional Mediterranean tapas and new school tapas. I loved the crispy cauliflower yukfa, flatbreads and dips and spicy vegetarian paella with lentils, quinoa and vegetables.
The restaurant has an outside terrace overlooking Denver’s downtown city skyline which gradually lights up and sparkles as dusk falls. On the west side of the restaurant you’ll watch the sun set in a glorious show of colour. After dinner join the queue downstairs for the perfect gelato at Little Man Ice Cream Parlor . A Weekend in Denver Itinerary – Sunday
Take a lazy breakfast in your hotel or, better still, in your hotel room. If you’re staying in the Sheraton you could take a dip in the heated rooftop pool before heading out to discover Denver’s museums.
Check rates and availability at Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel Mooch around Denver’s Museums and Art Galleries
There’re loads of museums in Denver so you’ve got plenty of choice. Here are some top picks which are all within a few minute’s walk of each other. Denver Art Museum
Denver Art Museum Credit Stevie Crecelius
You can’t fail to spot Denver Art Museum in the Civic Center area of Denver aka the Golden Triangle. It’s an architectural work of art in its own right, all angles and triangles inspired by the light and the geology of the Rockies. The building is covered in 9,000 titanium panels that reflect the Colorado sunshine. Inside is a fascinating collection of Native American art and hands-on exhibitions. The Clyfford Still Museum
The Clyfford Still Museum showcases the work of the artist of Abstract Expressionist artist Clyfford Still. The museum houses the late artist’s work which had been kept from the public since 1980. History Colorado Center
I dropped by the History Colorado Center and learnt about the state’s history of gold mining, skiing and native American Indians. I also learnt that Crocs were invented in Denver. Who knew? If you’re into history The ‘Written on the Land’ exhibition about Colorado’s indigenous Ute tribes is fascinating with Ute beaded clothing, photography and sound recordings. Colorado State Capitol Building
We also stopped by the nearby Colorado State Capitol Building with its gleaming bell-shaped dome. If you go look out for the thirteenth step. It’s exactly 5,280 feet about sea level and inscribed ‘One Mile Above Sea Level’. It’s why Denver’s known as the Mile High City. Free tours of the building are offered Mon-Fri from 10am-3pm and last around 45 minutes. Worth doing for the panoramic views at the top. Lunch at 16 th Street Mall (Downtown)
16th Street Mall is a mile-long pedestrian promenade packed with eateries, cafes and shops. Choose from one of 42 open-air cafes for lunch and check out the shops. Use the free shuttle bus that runs the length of the street and stops at all the intersections which will help make the most of your time. More cool things to do in Denver
Depending how much time you have or how long you spend exploring Denver’s museums you’ll likely want to pack in a bit more sight-seeing before you head off on the rest of your trip. Here are a couple more top picks for more things to do in Denver which I’d have loved to have done if we’d had the time. Cheer on a local Denver sports team
Coors Field, Denver. Credit: Visit Denver
Sports fans will love that Denver is home to no less than six professional sports teams. The Colorado Rockies play baseball at the Coors Stadium and the Denver Broncos NFL team kick off at Bronco’s Stadium at Mile High. There’re also hockey, soccer and rugby teams. Many of the stadiums offer tours and Colorado Sports Hall of Fame is a free museum showcasing Colorado’s sports legends. Check the teams’ websites for game schedules. Visit Red Rocks Stadium
See a concert or just pay a visit this world-famous Red Rocks outdoor amphitheatre located 15 miles west of Denver (a 20 minute drive). You’ll need a car so you might want to drop by at the start of your Colorado road trip. The open-air venue is the only naturally formed, acoustically perfect amphitheatre in the world. It’s surrounded by Colorado’s red rocks right in the middle of nature. It’s worth heading to the top of the steps for magnificent views of the surrounding area. The venue is open to the public at no cost when there are no concerts on. There’s a visitor centre, documentaries on the geology of the venue and its musical history as well as a performers’ Hall of Fame and a restaurant. Nearby are excellent hiking and biking trails.
Red Rocks Amphitheatre, Denver. Credit: Visit Denver
If this is the end of your road trip you might want to chill a bit before heading to the airport. Head for Denver’s Botanic Gardens – an oasis of calm in the middle of the city. There are 45 different gardens to explore and one of the country’s top 10 conservatories. Garden. Denver Travel Tips
Denver sits exactly one mile above sea level and enjoys 300 days of sunshine under the bluest of skies. It’s nearer to the sun so the skies really are bluer and it’s hotter. Because of this, you’ll need to use sunscreen and drink loads of water to help avoid altitude sickness. I suffered with it slightly in the first couple of days and I can tell you it’s best avoided. Getting around Denver
You can explore The Mile High City easily on foot and public transport. Free shuttle buses, known as the MallRide cruise 16 th Street Mall and stop at each corner so you can cover a lot of ground fairly quickly and hop on and off as you please. The official Denver Tourist Information Centre is located just off 16 th Street at 1575 California Street. Denver’s light rail service makes getting around the city easy. A single ride costs $2.60 or you could use Uber or Lyft. Getting from Denver International Airport to the City
Getting into the city centre is easy using the direct rail service from Denver International Airport to Denver Union Station. The 37-minute trip costs $10.50 each way.
There you have my 2-day Denver itinerary plus a few things that I didn’t have time for which I’d go back for in a heartbeat. So what are my overall feelings for Denver? I think the shot above pretty much sums it up…
Have you been? Did I miss anything? Drop a comment. More Colorado articles on this site Pin it for later
I visited Denve, Colorado on a trip hosted by Visit Colorado . As always, all views and opinions are entirely my own and I retain full editorial rights. I was not paid to write this article.
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Love affair with the curry: London opening up to India’s diverse cuisines – The Economic Times

It’s a midsummer day in London — bright, warm, with a nip in the air. We have had an elaborate meal at the Indian Accent restaurant in Mayfair: badam pasande, khoya mattar, nargisi kofte, yam tahiri, potatoes with lotus seeds and chironjee, shammi kebab and fake ones made with black gram. It’s the food of the community that I was born into —Kayasth, scribes to Mughal emperors, who had a composite culture focused on food, music and Scotch whisky.
My family’s recipes have been cooked by chef Manish Mehrotra in his inimitable style. Many of the movers and shakers in the London food scene are sampling this heritage cuisine that is making a debut in the city where restaurants, popups and food writers have all been lately focusing on a nuanced approach to Indian gastronomy. This is effecting a change in the perception of Londoners who are recognising a complexity and diversity in Indian cuisines that go beyond a goopy curry mess.
Throughout our meal, liberally laced with whisky cocktails in the middle of a working day, passionate discussions have broken out at various tables about this changing image and whether we are in the midst of a definitive “India moment” that has the potential to catapult Indian food to its rightful stature as a great and complex cuisine of the world.
At my table are Camellia and Namita Panjabi, owners of the Masala World restaurant group, groundbreakers of Indian gastronomy in London with their acclaimed restaurants; chef Sriram Aylur, the highly respected head chef of the one-star Michelin restaurant Quilon (the only one in London to serve detailed coastal Indian food), chef and cookbook writer Manju Malhi , a specialist in Anglo-Indian food; and Sameer Taneja, former head chef of Tallie Joe and Benares who is now consultant at Kanishka, chef Atul Kochhar’s new restaurant focusing on food from the northeastern states. They are all deliberating and debating the evolution of Indian food in London in the last three-four years: Whether it is beginning to get the respect it deserves.
The Beginning
The UK’s love affair with the curry goes back to the Victorian times when, apparently, Queen Victoria ordered it to be cooked for her dinner every day. Taking cue, the upper classes made it fashionable to have at least one generic “hot” dish at their social dinners, which were thought to be incomplete if they did not serve at least one curry. For the past two-three years, however, this love affair has been on the wane. Curry houses, mostly Bangladeshi run, have been in a crisis, shutting steadily, with The Guardian reporting in 2017 that two-three are closing every week across the UK.
Yawar Khan, chairman of the Asian Catering Federation (a body that represents 35,000 ethnic restaurants and takeaways in London), was also Quote: d in the press as saying that half of London’s curry houses will disappear in the next decade.
Many reasons have been put forth for this crisis, including a shortage of subcontinental chefs, who are finding it difficult to get work visas since 2006, when the clampdown on work permits began. Changing customer preferences is also a big reason for the curry’s exit from the UK’s national imagination.
“More and more people from the UK are travelling to India and are more knowledgeable about the finer points of Indian cuisines. Earlier, people assumed that the whole of India ate one kind of food, which was curry. Now, restaurants are catering not just to Brits but also to Indians who are travelling to London and who research online on the kind of Indian restaurants they would like to go to when they are in London,” says Malhi, who grew up in the UK and has observed this transition in the last three-four years.
Chef Manish Mehrotra, however, cautions that even now “Indian restaurants that do not put cliched dishes like chicken tikka masala, butter chicken or vindaloo in whatever form on their menu have to struggle to get audience recognition in London because customers have a strong curry image of the cuisine”. (Indian Accent London does not have butter chicken on its menu.) Even during the pop-up, a common refrain was “but this does not taste like Indian food”, pointing to the problem of dominant perception.
However, a shift may just be evident with younger consumers. “The millennials are adventurous. They are curious about the provenance of ingredients, specific spices beyond chilli, and are not afraid to try these,” says Aylur.
In fact, from the conversations that I had, it emerged that the demand for “authenticity” is gaining so much currency that even curry house owners are travelling to India to pick up regional recipes.
At a restaurant such as the spectacular The Veeraswamy — established in 1926, it is London’s oldest Indian restaurant and is now owned by the Masala World group — the emphasis on sourcing ingredients has always been paramount. It is evident in dishes such as the rogan josh, which is unlike the bastardised curry in most restaurants even in India. At The Veeraswamy, it is a dish that chef Heston Blumenthal comes to eat. It is splendid in its subtlety with mild Kashmiri red chillies and pran (a particular type of shallots), all sourced from the Kashmir Valley. “In fact, we import all our spices from India to maintain the correct taste of classical Indian recipes,” says Camellia.
This kind of detailing that is necessary to produce nuanced Indian food is still an exception. However, it may be the need of the hour as people look for “authenticity”. Marks & Spencer, for instance, caused a social media outrage last year when it introduced Bengali Turmeric Curry, with customers and critics crying foul about supermarkets’ peddling “fake foreign food” and cultural appropriation.
Rise of Regions
Supermarket chain Waitrose tipped Indian street food to be the next big thing in the UK. It may well be. Tesco is selling bhel. The feted celebrity chef Vineet Bhatia has opened a deli counter called Kama at Harrods where he recreates the food of his Mumbai childhood. Interest in regional Indian food is at an all-time high, because unlike curry’s “heavy” image, regional Indian and street food are seen as light, nutritious and flavourful. This is turning the stodgy image of Indian food on its head.
Camellia Panjabi was arguably the first to introduce street food and regional dishes in her restaurants in London. “When I quit the Taj in 2001 and opened Masala Zone, I conceptualised it as a thali and street food restaurant, offering light and flavourful dishes from different regions, with an emphasis on vegetarian food that I also wanted to highlight,” says Camellia. “However, there was resistance. People in London, used to eating chunky meat dishes, started telling me that ‘you are cutting down on our protein’, so I gave an interview talking about how Indian regional meals were balanced diets and that caught attention,” she recalls. It has taken almost 20 years for perceptions to change.
Instead of the heavy and meat-centric food of the north-west frontier that set the tone for so much of London’s Indian fixation, the accent these days is firmly on regional traditions.
The latest entrant is Kanishka that serves food from the seven states of the Northeast. In the last two years, many others have popped up — from Asma Khan’s Darjeeling Express (where home cooks often host dinners) and Kahani, inspired by Tamil food, to the family-run Gunpowder that does dishes such as uthapam with pulled duck, and Roti-Chai, a modern casual diner with small plates and food inspired by street hawkers and roadside restaurants from different regions in India.
Dishoom, the high-street chain, is now expanding to Manchester. Tooting — London mayor Sadiq Khan’s neighbourhood, where three years ago my highlight meal was at a Pakistani dhaba, Lahori Karahi — is now apparently a dosa paradise.
“Thanks to social media, customers have become more knowledgeable and it is not as if you can serve them food that is inauthentic or low on quality even if they are paying £20,” says chef Taneja.
As the epicentre of the discerning gourmet world, London matters. Changing stereotypes here may just mean that a tipping point has been reached and that Indian cuisines, in all their diversity and complexity, may now be ready to find a wider recognition all over the world.
(The writer looks at restaurant trends, food history and culinary cultures)
House Party? Try These Simple And Delicious Cocktail Recipes of 4 Next Prev Play Slideshow Cheers! 24 Sep, 2018 Red, white or sparkling, wine in every form is to be loved. Those with a taste for wine know just how delightful the beverage is. From the flavour to the effect, one simply can’t stop at a glass of this delight. However, there is always room for improvement; you can play with the flavours, add a few ingredients and prepare a wine cocktail. All you need is wine and a few ingredients to whip up a cocktail good enough to blow your mind. (Recipes courtesy: Grover Zampa) The Star Gazer 24 Sep, 2018 IngredientsGrover Art Collection Sauvignon Blanc: 90 mlDark rum: 30 mlVanilla extract: 10 mlPineapple juice: 10 mlMethod- Add all ingredients in a cocktail shaker and mix for 10 seconds- Take a highball glass and fill it with ice- Strain the drink over ice- Squeeze a lime over it and empty cocktail in the glass The Refresher 24 Sep, 2018 IngredientsGrover Art Collection Chenin Blanc: 60 mlZampa Soirée Brut: 60 mlLemon juice: 10 mlVodka: 30 mlSugar syrupGrapes for garnishMethod- Mix all ingredients- Set aside for an hour- Garnish with grapes- Serve chilled Beauty Elixir 24 Sep, 2018 IngredientsGrover Art Collection Rosé: 90mlGin: 30 mlStrawberry pureeLime juice and syrupMethod- Mix all the ingredients in a shaker- Serve in highball glass Next
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