Fun Activities To Do With The Whole Family | Home of the Global Indian | Events | San Jose CA | India Currents

Fun Activities To Do With The Whole Family | Home of the Global Indian | Events | San Jose CA | India Currents

Fun Activities To Do With The Whole Family Share This Page: Sign Up Now
We can bicker about the Bay Area’s changing landscape all day long, but we all agree that our swath of California has so much to offer. From inspiring natural scenery and classic institutions to new traditions and only-in-S.F. events, the Bay Area has something for everyone.
We’ve got you covered with fun activities, whether it’s a cold and rainy day and you’re stuck inside or if the weather warms up and you can shed your winter coat and enjoy the outdoors in all its glory. Onedome
An interactive arts & entertainment venue offering two interactive experiences that merge art, story and technology.
Unreal Garden introduces you to a cool Augmented Reality experience where art comes to life all around you. Featuring the work of artists, and created by a team of technologists, innovators and storytellers, it merges multiple layers of perception of augmented reality, projection mapping, soundscapes, and even the physical space itself all work together to immerse you in a fantastical otherworld.
LMNL features 14 interactive rooms and installations like the “Kinetic Infinity Room,” a visually stunning LED mirrored room that appears to go on forever, while responding to movement with light and sound. The “Fluid Structures” installation allows participants to walk around walls made of digital water, appearing inside of the installation as a water version of themselves — even allowing for digital water fights with other people in the room. The “Funky Forest” is a digital forest ecosystem featuring a digital waterfall that’s path can be moved around the room with logs. Depending on where the water flows, the forest will conjure creatures from the forest and grow trees and flowers. “Prana” is a 12-foot LED sphere connecting humans to technology with one simple breath. With the viewer in the center, the sphere lights up with each inhalation, uniting the piece and the participant.
Open every day. Buy the combo ticket for the best deal: https://onedome.global . 1025 Market St., San Francisco, CA 94103 Bruce Munro at Montalvo: Stories in Light
London-born Bruce Munro is best known for large-scale light-based artworks inspired largely by his continuous study of natural light and his curiosity for shared human experiences. This exhibit features the largest number of works by Bruce Munro ever on public display at a single venue. Inspired by the artist’s readings of C.S. Lewis’s Chronicles of Narnia , the installations range in scale from enormous and immersive to intimate, utilizing hundreds of thousands of bespoke components to construct multi-hued waves, clusters, cascades, flocks, and seas of light.
Some of the stunning exhibits include a sea of “lily pads” created from over 4,000 illuminated stems in an installation entitled Silver Sea – named for Narnia’s flowing freshwater ocean (called “drinkable light” by the character Prince Caspian). A flamboyance of 1,000 flamingos, densely clustered on Montalvo’s Garden Terrace and illuminated in sunset hues, pays tribute to Ramandu’s Table (on which food magically appeared every day to feed a flock of pure white sun-birds), while a metal tree of glowing lights alludes to the Parliament of Owls (the talking birds who met nightly to discuss the affairs of Narnia). Over the grand staircase in Montalvo’s historically landmarked Villa, a 106-year-old stained glass window depicting the three sailing ships of explorer Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo is illuminated in constantly changing multi-prismed waves of color, offering an allusion to Prince Caspian’s galleon, the Dawn Treader, voyaging across mythological seas.
Select evenings through March 17, Montalvo Arts Center, 15400 Montalvo Rd., Saratoga. Tickets must be reserved in advance for specific dates. For tickets ($15-27) and more info: www.montalvoarts.org . The Walt Disney Family Museum
Find animation, innovation, and inspiration and discover this intimate museum as it tells the remarkable life story of Walt Disney. Curated by his daughter, Diane Disney Miller, it has some wonderful interactive galleries with exhibits narrated in Walt’s own voice alongside early drawings, cartoons, films, music, along with a spectacular model of Disneyland.
Walt Disney Family Museum, 104 Montgomery Street in the Presidio , San Francisco, CA 94129
What day trip is complete without some Indian food, which is definitely having a bit of a renaissance here in the Bay Area. Here are some cool new joints that are unique or as they say in Hindi “hatke.”
Viva Goa Indian Cuisine: specializes in Goan cuisine, which features a lot of seafood, coconut, and kokum. 2420 Lombard St., San Francisco
Besharam : chef Heena Patel channels flavors from her native Gujarat, Don’t miss her fish moilee or, at brunch, her handvo.3407, 1275 Minnesota St., San Francisco.
Ritu : started as popular food truck DUM (whose chicken biryani is the stuff of legend), this brick and mortar location has California twists like kale chaat (with yogurt, tamarind, and “Mumbai trail mix”), great kebabs, or a feast-worthy four-course menu for $45 per person.
Splurge worthy are:
Campton Place: Earned a Michelin star for innovative Cal-Indian cuisine. chef Srijith (Sri) Gopinathan blends traditional American and European fine dining with Indian spices and influences: Think black cod with tamarind jaggery and guinea hen two ways, roasted with tomato tokku, kohlrabi and lime yogurt, and slow cooked with root vegetables and kallappam.
ROOH : A very polished setting featuring dishes like pumpkin mulligatawny with parmesan mousse and curry oil, or green pea kulcha with goat cheese and truffle. 333 Brannan St., San Francisco
August 1 Five : a new interpretation of traditional Indian cuisine. Small plates, tandoor, and boozy cocktails. 525 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco.
Mona Shah is a multi-platform storyteller with expertise in digital communications, social media strategy, and content curation for Twitter, Facebook for C-suite executives. A journalist and editor, her experience spans television, cable news and magazines.
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Lunch Box – 4 / Lemon Rice , Paneer Fry

Steffi’s Recipes Easy Cooking Recipes for healthy and Tasty Food This recipe blog is a collection of both vegetarian and non-vegetarian recipes, featuring recipes from the Indian Cuisine, Chicken Recipes, Mutton Recipes, Chettinad Recipes, Kerala Style Recipes, Biryani Recipes, Authentic Indian Recipes, Traditional recipes, North Indian and South Indian Recipes, Indian Sweets and Desserts. These simple recipes are quite easy and can easily be made at home by beginners and amateur cooks. Steffi’s Recipes Spread the Joy of Cooking !!! ≡ Navigation Written By Angela Steffi on Tuesday, March 5, 2019 | 9:15:00 PM Posted by Angela Steffi on 9:15:00 PM This is the Fourth lunch box in our lunch box series and today we will look at the recipe to make Lemon rice and spicy Paneer roast . Ingredients for making Lemon Rice 3 cup Ingredients for Spicy Paneer Roast 2 tbsp Pomegranate Cooking Method Step 1) Heat oil in a pan and roast the peanuts for few minutes, set is aside and then temper with – mustard , channa dal and urad dal, cashew nuts roast it for few more minutes until it changes to golden brown. Step 2) Add dry red chilies ,green chilies and curry leaves. Give it a stir and add turmeric powder and a pinch of Asafoetida. Switch off the stove immediately. Step 3) Once it is cooled slightly add the lemon juice, salt and mix well. Step 4) Add the cooked rice and mix well. You can adjust or reduce the sourness of lemon by adding extra cooked rice. For Spicy Paneer: Step 1) Cube the paneer and season with chili powder, turmeric powder , Pepper, Garam masala, Pepper, salt and some lemon juice. Step 2) Heat oil and roast the panner on medium heat until well done. That’s it our delicious colorful lunch box is ready to be enjoyed.Happy Cooking !!! SHARE SHARE About Angela Steffi I am an avid food blogger with a great passion for food. I am always eager to try new recipes and modify recipes and experiment with them. I have two cooking channels on Youtube CLASSIC MASALA HUT (for english recipes) and MADRAS SAMAYAL (for Tamil recipes). RELATED POSTS

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Marketing Microwave Ovens to a New Market Segment Essay

Executive Summary tweed Appliances is an international confederation that specializes in manufacturing and intellectual nourishment commercialiseing appliances glob everyy. The company is hygienic spotn for their line of micro- alters. Whereas or so of their crops atomic number 18 manufactured in the U.S and while most of the appliances are exported to the U.S and the European merchandise, ashen Appliances likewise market places several eminent up-end models in India where they face some issues in trying to penetrate the market. Moreover, the demand for zap ovens has gradually increased in the past couple of years. Subsequently light Appliances had to come to a endeavor that in growth to the market of their high-end models, they must introduce refreshing micro-cook ovens at all impairment levels in order to stone pit the wide amount of kinfolks in India. By evaluating the problems such as the culture differences in the midst of the west and the east or wh ether it is the consumers limited knowledge towards the ho use uphold appliance, we determined the contrastive strategies and alternatives to tackle such issues.Statement of the ProblemThe depicted object study focuses on the challenges of the Indian kitchen appliancesmarket for microwaves. Before the liberalization of the Indian economy, only a few local companies were the study players in the kitchen appliances market. But, aft(prenominal) opening the market for foreign competitors also global players like e.g. Samsung or LG push into the market. The kitchen appliances market seems to be real lustrous as abundant growth in the next years is predicted. Nevertheless this emerging market in India focuses several challenges. At first the Indian market for microwaves is precise different from the Ameri chamberpot market where the market share holding companies are very victorful.There are several cultural specifies to consider. The Indian fodder for example differs a lot from the Ameri put up. While Indian diet has a high significance for the populate, is elegant complex and time consuming to cook the Americans emphasize an easy and simple way of readying. Indians prefer cooking with odoriferous ingredients, a great variety of spices and herbs and hand their own list of cooking techniques and equipments that are deprivationed for the recipe. Contrary, the Americans prefer their food grilled or signal or else than steamed cooked over dry heat. But, there are non only crosscultural differences concerning the food, there are also differences between the geographic areas of India itself as the Indian cuisine varies between the Southern and Northern fictitious character of the country.3Further, there are evidentiary variations in the cultural characteristics. Indian hatful mostly live in big families with close alliances. In contrast, in the American society live a lot of single quite a picayune. As really individualistic culture, the families ties were non that tight as in India. atomic number 53 of the biggest challenges, that gather up to be faced, is the flattening knowledge of the consumers. Mostly Indian people do not know how to use the microwave properly. Most of the (potential) consumers do not expect that all of the Indian dishes can even be prepared in the microwave, not only heated up. So they miss the big advantages like timesaving at cooking, that nobody has to keep an eye on the food constantly while all vitamins and nutrients retain in the food and further to a greater extent than the simplification of cleaning afterwards.Another problem that goes hand in hand with the missing knowledge of the consumers is the price discussion of the microwaves. Forthe traditional silly Indian middle class, the very expensive first introduced microwave models were unattractive. to boot the models were not adequate for the Indian market as the big Indian vessels did not fit in. Even though most manufacturers reacted by conniving the microwaves concord to the special Indian needs and a price cut, the sales glitz did not increase notably. This leads to the chicken egg question for the company- the prices leave alone not come down easily until volumes up, while volume depends on prices.Additionally, the kitchen appliances market is nowadays predominated by some brands what betrays it more complicate for freshly companies to get more market share. On the other hand, there yet is a lot of potential to penetrate this relatively new market. especially the recent development like revolt living al-Qaidaards and wages and also the fact that household applications like washing machines are no highlife good any more, eases a market entry and increase of market share. Better access to consumer ken and the big advantages that microwave cooking could lick to consumers also strengthens the possibilities of a dust coat Appliances.4Situation AnalysisTo be successful in enter the Indian kitchen application market White Appliances need to identify controllable and uncontrollable elements of the markets. This can best be shown in a Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-and-Threats-Analysis (SWOT).StrengthWeaknessesMicrowaves are easy to use and high school price for the customersunderstandable for almost everybodyMicrowaves arent common in India accessible and efficient way of The presence of microwaves atcookingIndian markets is rather weakTime SavingLongtime use of appliancesChicken-egg problem (price vs. racy technology- ideally for thevolume)technically affine Indian peopleWide ingathering range from high-end tobasic models with different categoriesOpportunitiesThreatsNew, diverse target companys in IndiaTrends in society (Healthavailable (men in the kitchen in world-wide, bachelors, students, youngin food industry, doubts ofwomen etc.)consciousness, slow movement trendmicrowave radiation)New form of lifestyles and rising assorted cultural background than inliving standar dsHigh affair in insane asylums andIndian society versus individualistictechnology of Indian people could beother markets (e.g. collectivisticAmericans) apply stronger by White AppliancesDifferent eating habits (Western vs.Indian food, fresh vs. convenientsales in the future dayProposed bright future for microwavefood, different eating habits) sole(prenominal) little market penetration byConsumers knowledge nearly the usecompetitorsof microwaves is little, difficult toProposed increase of retail storesconvince themEnvironment of competition tightensas the market is promising5Objectives and GoalsTo make the market entry in the Indian market successfully, it is important to set objectives and intermediate objectives. A goal is to find a suitable strategy to enter the market with longterm success. White appliance would like to establish itself on the market and to prevail a net incomest the major competitor. They want to increase their market share to profit from the proposed marke t development. Its important that they communicate their services and predict on the market. The people need getting to know quickly and effectively the microwaves from the White appliance. To increase the consciousness and the sale of microwave oven and especially of the microwaves from white appliance it is necessary to come on the knowledge of microwave cooking in India. People need to know how to use a microwave with all its functions. White appliance should have special product cracks to make the buying of a microwave more attractive. They have to offer different price ranges of the product and it can be useful to corporate with experienced partner for scattering.Strategy and EvaluationsFor entering a new market, a lot of decisions have to be made and a consistent strategy has to be implemented. In the following, a recommended strategy for the White Appliances Company exiting be introduced by focusing on product, price, distri barelyion and conversation, the marketing co re elementsof all products.(1) harvestingIn response to entering a new market and being confronted with new cultural and companionable behavior and habits, the adaption of the product to the Indian culture and cuisine is essential. To meet the critical needs of the new market, the investment in Research & Development as wholesome as in product innovation is a significant first step in developing a successful and sustainable marketing strategy. Especially value added features like user-friendly one-touch program buttons, an cypher saver mode or a microwave size that suits to Indian families and cooking habits need to be reconsidered in the product innovation process. and so every microwave model for the Indian market comes with high volume space, as this is essential to the Indian family sizes. Based on this, different microwave models will be implemented, which inhabit their special functions and features fitted to different target groups. The product range of White Appliance s should include at the beginning cardinal different models, one basic model in a lower price range to hand a high market penetration and present moment a 6 console model, for a target group, searching for a more favorable way of cooking with microwaves.The basic model aims to reach the advancing lower-middle class, which can be seen as the most prosperous target group. The microwave comes with a basic interface to set power and time. A manual guide will be provided to inform the customer how to make the best out of the different setting options. This microwave type will be manufactured in Asia, whereas low employment and import be can be reached, to establish a low product price. The comfort model comes with different program-buttons in addition, which eases handling and leads to a more pleasant cooking experience. This model targets the status-oriented middle-class, which aims to have a functional but comfortable cooking experience. The comfort model will be produced in the U.S., as the target group will be more timberconscious too. If these two microwave types are established successfully in the market, a high-price combimodel will be launched in a long-term strategy.It can already be seen, that combination-oven (convection and microwave) gain more and more importance, especially in a high-middle class, but as the production is way more costly, it is connected with a higher lay on the line as ROI has to be gained through high product prices. As higher the consumers investment, as more factors will be considered, whereas already animated brand conscious(predicate)ness in the market would be maintenanceive, what speaks as well for a product launch in a second phase. regardless of whether the customer decides to buy a basic, comfort, or premium microwave model, the invention of an excellent after-sales-service could be helpful in creating an USP (unique selling proposition) for White Appliances and to stand out from their competitors in the mark et. The implementation of a service-hotline, a customer-care website providing information according to the handling of the product and answering frequently asked questions as well as video-tutorials via YouTube, the offering of a repair service or warranties are tho some examples that could be considered in creating an excellent customer service. (2)PriceThe two respectively three different models will be established indoors their own price segment. The basic model will be sell in a cheap price range round round Rs. 5000. The cheap price has to be absorbed by a high volume. This is a run a risky step as a high sales rate is premise, but it is the only way to dissolve the chicken-egg-problem of low prices can only be reached through high volume. Further it gains a high penetration in the market and can raise brand sentience fast. The comfort model will be sold for round more or less Rs. 10.000. This establishes our brand, as a microwave seller for affordable models, but quali ty and more 7functional features will speak for the higher price.Besides, the offering of a coupled two years warrantee could increase the consumers attraction to this model. The premium model, which will be launched in the second phase, will be rolled-out to the market with a price of Rs. 15.000. To cut costs of production, a long-term goal could be to promote the basic microwave innovation in local manufacturing and only to continue importing the premium models. To support sales, a combination package with microwave glass-bowls and cooking equipment could be offered, in an each similar price range, which will be especially evoke to microwave starters. It can be assumed that a high dowry of the main target group buys a microwave forthe first time.(3) statistical distributionThe distribution will be best and easiest implemented through existing kitchen equipment retailers. This gives the opportunities to sell the own product in combination with special kitchen forward motion pack ages and fits to the existing consumer purchase habits.(4) CommunicationThe communication strategy can be divided into two parts. The first part aims to raise knowledge about microwaves and its functionality in general, whereas the second part pushes brand and product awareness of the White Appliance company. Consumers buy products not because of the product itself, but of its potential to solve an existing need. As Indian people are mainly new to the product microwave and its functions, most consumers wont be aware about the need to possess a microwave in their workaday life. Therefore one part of the communication strategy aims to raise general product awareness via sociable media and TVshow cooperation.For TV-show cooperation, existing, successful cooking shows could be used to present microwaves and their functionality for daily cooking. Of course the TV-studio would be equipped with microwaves from White Appliance, but in the communication the product usefulness is primer. In parts of social media marketing, a Facebook fan-page is imaginable, where microwave recipes and tips will be promoted. The social media site, shall be named more focused on its purpose and should not be included in the companys fan-page. Rather a powered by addition should make up the connection to the company. This naming makes sure, that it is findable for those, who want to know more about microwaves and its usefulness, further the site-name is promising for its purpose.8Besides an increased awareness about microwave and its functionality in general, the popularity of the own brand has to be pushed. This can be done sustainably via the following communication channelsTV-CommercialPromotion circumference (microwave party in style of Tupperware parties, food tasting on the street, in supermarkets etc.)Point-of-Sale specials as e.g. free microwave cook books, when buying an oven fracture special services to the client (video-tutorials on YouTube FAQ on website hotline)As well the c ommunication via an own App would be reasonable, but as the development of an app is pretty costly, a launch is recommended in the second phase, when the investment can be defrayed by the gained sales.As every strategy has its advantages and disadvantages, those will be presented in the following, to show the strengths of the strategy, but as well where weaknesses have to be eyed.(1) ProductTo enter the market with a basic model to reach the promising low-middle class target group seems pretty prosperous. Further he more comfort-oriented middle-class will be reached with a second model, so that the market entering strategy is based on a brought target group and the brand awareness will be raised by a penetration strategy. The risk of that strategy lies therein, that competitors might plan the same and the market will be overflowed by pricy microwaves.(2) PriceAs the production for the basic model takes place in the region, this leads to low production and logistic costs. In combinat ion with a high volume, themarket can be entered with a low price to reach the low-middle class. Although this sounds pretty promising, the strategy is not without any risk, as the success is depending on the sales volume, which has to be very high.(3) DistributionThe distribution via existing retailers leads to lower investments and the company doesnt need to care about the legal environment. Further an already existing and proof distribution system is used. Nevertheless the distribution via retailers performer a accepted loss of control, as 9those retailers have their own demands. The offer of a trade discount to all retail partners for the first year could be helpful to diminish this risk and to create an initial demand.(4) CommunicationThe communication strategy does not only focus on the product itself but rather on the general benefit of the usage of the product, which is the start of a sustainable product communication where the brand communication can be build on. But the penetration of the different channels as introduced means a big investment to the company.Recommendations and ContingenciesFor a sustainable and successful market approach, the whole strategy must be implemented in once, because all parts product, price, distribution, and communication depend on each other. Further it is important, that decent attention will be given to every single part of the strategy. When it was sensible, an implementation in two phases short-term and long-term is suggested, to decrease risk and base higher investments on the by then hopefully already existing success and high sales.The marketing strategy needs to be implemented carefully, avoiding to offend the socialcultural behavior and habits of the Indian community. Therefore the strategy has to be controlled and reconsidered all time while implementing, to detect further weaknesses and optimization potential. Only by paying attention to market behavior and key figures, the success of the running strat egy can be proofed and in shell adjusted.

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Impossible Foods Continues Asian Expansion in Singapore | Malvern Daily Record

Impossible Foods is launching its plant-based meat Thursday, 7 March, with a variety of dishes available at eight restaurants throughout Singapore — one of the world’s most vibrant and discerning culinary hotspots.
This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20190305006036/en/
Empress highlights Impossible meat in three dishes: Black Pepper Impossible Meatball Skewers, Pan Fried Impossible Gyoza, and Impossible Crispy Pancakes with Chinese Chives. (Photo: Business Wire)
Home to some of the world’s most fanatical food critics and gourmets, Singapore is considered one of the greatest food destinations worldwide . It’s the first Asian city to host The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards (called the “ Oscars of the global restaurant industry ”). Influenced by its geography and rich history – a cross-section of Malay, Chinese, Indonesian, Indian, Middle Eastern and European cultures – Singapore is famous for its abundance of Michelin-starred establishments and its bustling “hawker” street-food culture.
Tonight, 6 March from 6 to 10 pm, Impossible Foods will host the first public preview of its plant-based meat for the first 500 people who come to the world-famous Lau Pa Sat Festival Market. Dishes will be served at Lai Heng Fried Kway Teow and Sunny Viet Vietnamese Cuisine. In addition, one of the stalls will be transformed into an Impossible pop-up for one evening only, featuring the Impossible Burger by Chef Andrei Soen of Park Bench Deli and the Impossible Crispy Pancake with Chinese Chives by Chef Ricky Leung of Empress.
Starting 7 March, Impossible Foods’ flagship product will go on the menu at Singapore’s leading restaurants, including Park Bench Deli, Three Buns Quayside, Potato Head Singapore, Privé Orchard, Empress, and Marina Bay Sands’ Bread Street Kitchen by Gordon Ramsay, CUT by Wolfgang Puck and Adrift by David Myers. The restaurants will serve a wide variety of Impossible selections from Western and Asian gastronomy.
“Singaporeans are blessed with and obsessed with great food. They’re among the world’s most demanding gourmets — and I’m sure the region’s chefs will rise to the occasion and create the world’s most imaginative Impossible dishes yet,” said Pat Brown, CEO and Founder of Impossible Foods.
Impossible: Better in Every Way
The Impossible Burger debuted in 2016 at Momofuku Nishi, the New York City restaurant of Chef David Chang. More than 5,000 restaurants in the United States now serve the Impossible Burger — from award-winning restaurants to family-owned diners, and the nation’s original fast-food chain, White Castle. Last year, Impossible Foods launched in Asia and is now served in nearly 150 restaurants in Hong Kong and Macau.
Impossible Burger can be used in any ground meat dish and is easy to cook on the BBQ, charbroiler, flat top grill, high speed oven, steamer or sauté pan. The product contains no gluten, animal hormones or antibiotics. It’s kosher- and halal-certified.
A quarter-pound Impossible Burger has 0 mg cholesterol, 14 grams of total fat and 240 calories, and as much bioavailable iron and protein as a comparable serving of ground beef from cows. (A quarter-pound, conventional “80/20” patty from cows has 80 mg cholesterol, 23 grams of total fat and 290 calories.)
Impossible Every Which Way in Singapore
The island city-state of Singapore covers about 700 square kilometers and is home to more than 7,600 restaurants — including those helmed by some of the world’s best known chefs. Starting 7 March, the following award-winning establishments will begin serving Impossible’s flagship product:
Park Bench Deli serves sandwiches with a strong focus on high-quality ingredients. Chef Andrei Soen will feature the Impossible Patty Melt , ($22) which will replace their existing Patty Melt made with ground beef from cows.
Potato Head Singapore and Three Buns Quayside by Potato Head serve innovative burgers, sides, and desserts designed by Group Executive Chef Adam Penney. Both locations will offer brand-new burgers, including The Impossible Dream ($27) and Impossible Chedda ($23).
Privé Orchard ’s Group Executive Chef Robin Ho serves Juicy Lucy Impossible Meatball Spaghetti ($19) and Impossible Satay Sliders ($15), as well as the Nothing is Impossible Beef Cheeseburger , part of a kids set meal at $12.
Empress at the Asian Civilisations Museum offers traditional Chinese cuisine, and Executive Head Chef Ricky Leung will feature appetizers: Impossible Crispy Pancakes with Chinese Chives ($6.80), Pan-fried Impossible Gyoza ($6.80), Black Pepper Impossible Meatball Skewers ($8.80) and mains: Sichuan Mapo Tofu with Impossible Meat ($18) and Dragon’s Breath Fried Kuay Teow with Impossible Meatballs ($18).
Bread Street Kitchen by Gordon Ramsay showcases casual British European fare and is helmed by Executive Chef Sabrina Stillhart. The restaurant is offering The Impossible™ Flatbread ($24), The Impossible™ BSK Burger ($25), and The Impossible™ Wellington ($39), a creative spin on Bread Street Kitchen’s iconic Beef Wellington.
CUT by Wolfgang Puck is the first Asian outpost of the award-winning steak restaurant; Executive Chef Joshua Brown has created The Impossible™ Slider , a remake of its signature mini Kobe beef sliders, priced at $18 for three.
Adrift by David Myers boasts a creative California izakaya menu, inspired by David Myers’ sojourns across Asia and Europe. Executive Chef Wayne Brown serves The Impossible™ Sausage Roll , a juicy plant-based sausage ($14).
Impossible will be available to restaurants in Singapore on a limited and exclusive basis through Classic Fine Foods – Asia’s leading importer and distributor of fine foods. The group specialises in sourcing, importation, storage, marketing and distribution, and has been operating throughout Asia and Europe since 2001.
Big Taste, Small Footprint
Earlier this year, Impossible Foods launched its first product upgrade at the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES), where “Impossible Burger 2.0” took home the show’s highest honors, including the “ Most Unexpected Product ,” “ Best Product Launch ,” and “ Triumph of Food Engineering .”
Based in Redwood City, Calif., Impossible Foods uses modern science and technology to create wholesome and nutritious food, help restore natural ecosystems, and feed a growing population sustainably. The company makes meat from plants – with a much smaller environmental footprint than meat from animals.
To satisfy the global demand for meat at a fraction of the environmental impact, Impossible Foods developed a far more sustainable, scalable and affordable way to make meat, without the catastrophic environmental impact of livestock .
Shortly after its founding in 2011, Impossible Foods’ scientists discovered that one molecule — “ heme ” — is uniquely responsible for the explosion of flavors that result when meat is cooked. Impossible Foods’ scientists genetically engineer and ferment yeast to produce a heme protein naturally found in plants, called soy leghemoglobin.
The heme in Impossible Burger is identical to the essential heme humans have been consuming for hundreds of thousands of years in meat — and while the Impossible Burger delivers all the craveable depth of beef, it uses far fewer resources because it’s made from plants, not animals.
About Impossible Foods:
Based in California’s Silicon Valley, Impossible Foods makes delicious, nutritious meat and dairy products from plants — with a much smaller environmental footprint than meat from animals. The privately held company was founded in 2011 by Patrick O. Brown, M.D., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry at Stanford University, and a former Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. Investors include Khosla Ventures, Bill Gates, Google Ventures, Horizons Ventures, UBS, Viking Global Investors, Temasek, Sailing Capital, and Open Philanthropy Project.
More information:
impossiblefoods.com
www.twitter.com/impossiblefoods
www.facebook.com/impossiblefoods
www.instagram.com/impossible_foods
Press Kit:
www.impossiblefoods.com/media

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‘Driven by its cuisine, Japanese food exports to India jumped 40 per cent in 2018’

‘Driven by its cuisine, Japanese food exports to India jumped 40 per cent in 2018’ New Delhi, March 6 (IANS) Indicative of the growing popularity of Japanese cuisine in India, food exports from the East Asian nation jumped 40 per cent in 2018. Even as it is working with various entities to further bump this up and has bestowed a government-authenticated tag on 36 fine diners. “Last year, Japan reached an agreement with India on the sanitary certificate of fishery products exported from Japan to India. Following this, in 2018, the export of Japanese food from Japan to India increased to about 1.3 billion Japanese yen (about Rs 833 million), which translates to a more than 40 per cent increase compared to 900 million Japanese yen (about Rs 580 million) in 2016,” the country’s Ambassador, Kenji Hiramatsu, told IANS in an interview. The Japanese government is currently working on increasing exports of agricultural products and foods to India and is engaged in discussions with Indian government agencies including the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), Ministry of Agriculture & Farmers Welfare (MoAFW) and Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MoFPI), he said. ALSO READ: Starc, Hazlewood doubtful for India tour “With FSSAI, we signed an MoU on food safety last October at the annual summit meeting, and are currently in discussions on improving the management system of food imports to India. With MoAFW, we are having discussions on exporting Japanese apples and pears to India,” the ambassador said. For Japanese restaurants, he pointed out, “the availability of Japanese ingredients and drinks from Japan are essential. Therefore, in order to promote Japanese food in India, at the same time, we also need to work on the establishment of an ecosystem where Indian outlets can have easy access to Japanese ingredients and drinks. I will keep working on this important task furthermore”. He also pointed out that until last year, the number of certified Japanese Food Supporters, a tag granted by the Japan External Trade Organisation to fine diners, was only one in India, but now, the number has dramatically increased and 36 are certified in India, including 16 which were certified in February. “I hope more Indian people will start visiting these restaurants and enjoy the taste of Japan,” he said. How would he describe the role of food diplomacy in India-Japan ties? “I think we can understand each other’s culture more in depth at the ground level by appreciating both Indian and Japanese food. You can also learn something about Japanese sensitivity and sense of beauty through Japanese cuisine. “Japan is a country with a highly refined food culture, and the Japanese people have traditionally enjoyed a rich variety of food gathered from the mountains as well as the sea. Japan has four distinct seasons, and in each of these four seasons, we can enjoy different kinds of agricultural produce and fresh seafood at their best,” he said, adding that Japanese chefs are fully in tune with the seasons and use the freshest available seasonal ingredients to create Japanese cuisine. ALSO READ: PNB scam: DRT summons to Nirav Modi; Union Bank also a party (IANS Exclusive) “Enjoying Japanese food also means learning about the Japanese people and their culture. Through cultural exchanges including food between Japan and India, I think we can enrich our lives and gain a better understanding of each other’s country,” the ambassador explained. How does he see the roadmap for the spread of Japanese cuisine in India? “Currently, we have some Japanese restaurants operating in major cities of India, such as Delhi, Mumbai, Bengaluru and Chennai, because of the increasing number of Japanese expats and also the growing awareness of Japanese food, especially among young Indians. We would like to reach out more to Indian people in these big cities first,” Hiramatsu said. (Vishnu Makhijani can be contacted at [email protected] ) –IANS

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Yes about 15-20 mins to walk from the hotel. There’s a variety of cuisines available along the strip. I also like Lekanto , it’s an international menu but they do a lot of Cypriot specialities and the food and service is good. Andria and Seriani opposite are similar although I find Andria a bit overpriced. There is also Samisen for Japanese Teppanyaki which is good. There’s Sala Thai and Gold Temple (which does both Chinese and Indian). La Vigna is Italian (don’t rate it personally). Not been to Coral King but I know it is popular. At the top of the strip round the corner is Phidias Tavern (also popular) and Ocean Basket for great seafood. There is also SiDaYes for more fine dining. So there’s lots to choose from 🙂
Have a look on here to see what’s about and ask any questions you may have: https://www.facebook.com/OutandAboutCoralBay/

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Hawker Street, Gurgaon – 10 Places To Eat and Drink, Gathering Some of India’s Best Restaurants At Ambience Mall

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[Gurgaon, India] If you look at the big picture, Hawker Street is nothing more than an open-air food court.
However, it comes with a selection of some unique and new outlets in addition to an ambience that works wonderfully with Delhi winters.
Hawker Street is the place to be for a quick, relatively cheap, and tasty bite of food.
All the outlets at Hawker Street are in ship containers, giving it an exclusive appeal. It is similar to a line-up of food-trucks, only immobile.
Situated outside Gate No. 5 of the Ambience Mall, the atmosphere at Hawker Street is very much picnic like with the evenings giving out a semi-romantic vibe thanks to twinkling lights hanging all around.
There is a separate covered area for rainy days. Outdoor heaters are placed at regular intervals to keep diners warm. It’s perfect for a college date or a night out with the family.
With around 20 stalls in total, including some makeshift ones, depending on the time and day you visit, some are closed for business.
Nevertheless, these following 10 restaurants provide a nice variety of food that is sure to satisfy the most ardent of food lovers.
Game of Grills The owners of the Malayali-Arabian food selling Game of Grills must be real fans of Game of Thrones to name their business after it.
There are Funko Pop figurines from the show at the cash register to welcome guests, and the restaurant boasts that their chicken, fish, mutton and seafood are fresh, anti-biotic, organic and halal.
Although there is a nice selection of Arabian and South Indian dishes on offer, I went ahead with the classic Chicken Shawarma Roll (Rs 199, SGD3.75). The bread, warmed over a coal grill, was soft, and the shawarma had a lovely cook on it from being on the rotisserie.
Delicious and a good quantity of filling make this a must eat.
Live Wok A lot is going on at Live Wok that serves Pan-Asian cuisine through its shutters. There’s sushi, soups, dim sums, and a wide variety of starters and main course dishes ranging from noodles to Thai curries.
I do believe that they can get away with cutting down quite a few items off their menu. How they handle all this from such a small kitchen is beyond me.
Having said that, the Tofu Mix Veg (Rs 395, SGD7.50) was tasty. Although, a few more tofu chunks would have made it better.
Kathi Nation I’ve grown eating kathi rolls. Often a part of school lunches, a good kathi can bring back some beautiful memories.
Kathi Nation captures nostalgia with their Paneer Tikka Roomali Roll (Rs 129, SGD2.45) that has large chunks of well-marinated paneer in it.
For the adventurous eaters, they also have noodles and pizza rolls. But I’m old-school and would personally avoid those.
The Salad Story The biggest revelation for me at Hawker Street was The Salad Story.
I do enjoy a good salad, but would I go to a speciality salad shop for dinner? I will, from now onwards.
The Salad Story serves a range of healthy vegetarian and non-vegetarian salads, wraps, and meals. The ingredients are quite diverse and feature quinoa, beetroot, noodles, and a few comfort additions like bacon and cheese.
Now, their Asian Vegetable Salad (Rs 275, SGD5.25) might sound ordinary but came with a delightful array of well-cooked vegetables and crispy rice noodles. Lots of texture and a nice zing to it all.
Best of all, even though there is a very casual laid-back aura to Hawker Street, the food was presented nicely, on non-plastic plates.
Frozen Bottle The craze for milkshakes is at an all-time high in the country. The famous Keventers brought about the trend of takeaway glass bottles, now being followed by other brands.
Frozen Bottle is the same, offering a mix of unique flavours bottled up to drink at your leisure. In addition to this, they also have waffles and ice-cream jars.
The Kesar Badam Shake (Rs 132, SGD2.50) at Frozen Bottle was spot-on in terms of flavours, but the Nutella Kit Kat Fashion waffle was nothing to write home about.
Moets Curry Leaf Moets has a culinary legacy in Delhi that is hard to replicate.
Their outlet at Hawker Street captures the essence of the legendary restaurant and serves up some delicious North Indian food.
The Non-vegetarian Kebab Sampler (Rs 395, SGD7.50) has fish tikka, chicken tikka, and mutton seekh along with dal makhani and naan.
I don’t have any qualms in saying that this is the ultimate comfort food done perfectly.
The Belgian Fries Co. Surprisingly, it was the burgers from The Belgian Fries Co. that impressed me more than their fires.
Consisting of a variety of burgers, waffles, dips, and loaded fries, the menu plays around with different tastes but keeps the essential ingredients the same.
The staff is amicable and helped me with menu selection based on my preferences.
The Veggie Delight Burger (Rs 89, SGD1.70) turned out to be enjoyable with a nice crunch from the single patty. Customers can opt for an extra patty at an added price.
The fries though were run-of-the-mill, but maybe one of their specials like the loaded Bacon and Cheese fries would be more indulging?
Wow! Momo No Delhi winter is complete without a few rounds of momos, even if they are not part of your regular diet.
Wow! Momo has a variety of options consisting of unique offerings like the tandoori and sizzler momos.
In a slightly adventurous mood, I went ahead with their latest experiment, the Butter Chicken Tandoori Momo (Rs 255, SGD4.85).
I don’t believe fusion food can get any weirder than this, but surprisingly the gravy was rich and creamy and quite impressive, as was the texture of the momos in it.
Kaffa Cerrado Artisanal coffee is the latest trend not just in India, but across the world. Sadly, Kaffa Cerrado failed to impress.
To begin with, their font is so confusing that it took me a while to figure out their name.
Then, after all the fuss created around the type of coffees they offer and the blends, their Cold Kaffacino (Rs 210, SGD4.00) was fairly basic.
I do acknowledge that it is supposed to be a “traditional cold coffee”, but I also expect it to be better than what I can make at home.
Chai Point A meal, out in the open, during the highpoint of Delhi’s winter must end with a hot cup of tea. It is as simple as that.
Chai Point is among the many “tea shops” that have sprung up lately, each one looking similar to some extent.
The outlet at Hawker Street serves some basic eats like Maggi and poha to accompany the chai, but in the end, it is the tea itself that comforts the soul.
Chai Point’s garma-garam (hot) Classic Milk Tea (Rs 55, SGD1.05) was faultless.
Simple execution, done right.
In the end, that is all I need to leave Hawker Street with a smile on my face.
Hawker Street, Gurgaon Ambience Mall, Ground Floor, Near Gate No. 5 Opening Hours: 12:00pm – 11:30pm (Mon – Sun)
Click HERE for other Indian Food Entries
* Written by DFD’s India Correspondent @tickereatstheworld . Raghav is a travel and food writer who enjoys the thrill of discovering new places and writing about them. When he is not working, he can be found driving around his two kids from one birthday party to another. Gurgaon Hawker Street India Recommended Posts

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Garima Arora is Elit Vodka Asia’s Best Female Chef 2019

March 6, 2019
Bangkok (Thailand) – March 5, 2019 – ( travelindex.com ) – Garima Arora, executive chef and founder of Gaa in Bangkok, has won the title of elit Vodka Asia’s Best Female Chef 2019. Arora will be presented with her award at a ceremony sponsored by S.Pellegrino & Acqua Panna, on Tuesday 26th March 2019 in Macao.
In partnership with elit Vodka, the 50 Best organization is committed to celebrating role models who demonstrate a progressive vision for gastronomy. William Drew says: “This award recognizes female chefs whose passion, innovation and entrepreneurial spirit serve to inspire the next generation of cooks. Garima Arora has had a huge impact on the dining scene in Asia in a short period with her brilliant blend of Indian traditions and Thai ingredients.”
Arora worked briefly as a journalist before pursuing her interest in the culinary arts. After graduating from Le Cordon Bleu Paris in 2010, she worked at Noma in Copenhagen, learning alongside legendary chef René Redzepi. Recalling her two-plus years at Noma, she says the experience forever changed her approach to cooking. “I learned how to think about food more intelligently. I started looking at cooking more like a cerebral exercise, thinking about what you do, why you do it and understanding your place in a community.”
Returning to Asia in 2016, Arora was appointed sous chef at Gaggan, the award-winning Bangkok restaurant that has held the No.1 position on Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants list for four consecutive years. In April 2017, the chef opened Gaa, a three-story restaurant located opposite Gaggan that celebrates a modern tasting menu using traditional Indian techniques. Showcasing her creativity and culinary inspirations, each dish is made from locally sourced ingredients and explores the connections between Thai and Indian food, from fruits and curries to sauces and spices. The menu is a reflection of Arora’s cultural heritage as well as the community that surrounds her.
Diners choose between a 10- or 14-course tasting menu, which changes quarterly to reflect seasonal specialties. The result is a dining experience that is innovative, modern, playful and unpredictable. In November 2018, Gaa earned its first Michelin star, making Arora the first Indian woman to win such an accolade.
Accepting the prestigious Best Female Chef title, Arora said: “This award is a validation of our team’s hard work and commitment to excellence. I am honored that chefs and respected industry peer voting on this award recognize and appreciate our efforts.” Frances Gaillard, International Marketing Director for Stoli Group, overseeing elite Vodka, adds:
“Garima has accomplished so much in such a short time – a true testament to her diligence and to her distinctive fusion of cuisines learned in some of the finest kitchens in Europe and Asia. We are pleased to be the latest to recognize this rising star in the gastronomy world.”elite Vodka Best Female Chef Award The elit Vodka Best Female Chef Award.
Previous holders of Asia’s Best Female Chef title include Duangporn ‘Bo’ Songvisava from Thailand (2013), Lanshu Chen from Taiwan (2014), Hong Kong’s Vicky Lau (2015), Margarita Forés of the Philippines (2016), May Chow from Hong Kong (2017) and Bongkoch ‘Bee’ Satongun from Thailand (2018)
Winners of The World’s Best Female Chef Award include Ana Roš, Dominique Crenn, Hélène Darroze, Elena Arzak, Anne-Sophie Pic, and Clare Smyth.
In Latin America, the title has been held by chefs Pía León, Leonor Espinosa, Kamilla Seidler, Roberta Sudbrack, Elena Reygadas, and Helena Rizzo.
Restaurant Gaa of Chef Garima Arora in Bangkok is highly rated at Top25Restaurants.com by Travelindex and the trusted Restaurant Rating Index for the best restaurants in Asia.

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Tim Anderson's new cookbook is a love letter to Japan's capital city

Tim Anderson’s new cookbook is a love letter to Japan’s capital city
It includes recipes like pork wontons and Sichuan ramen The latest lifestyle, fashion and travel trends ES Lifestyle newsletter The latest lifestyle, fashion and travel trends Enter your email address Continue Please enter an email address Email address is invalid Fill out this field Email address is invalid You already have an account. Please log in .
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“You should go to Tokyo ! Everyone should go to Tokyo!” says Tim Anderson , 2011 MasterChef winner, owner of cult Japanese fusion restaurant Nanban in Brixton and enthusiastic cheerleader for Japan ’s capital city.
His new cookbook, Tokyo Stories , is “a love letter” to the metropolis, packed with mouthwatering recipes, each accompanied by postcard-style snapshots of the city taken by photographer Nassima Rothacker. Each recipe features “where to find” instructions: a little note directing the reader to the precise nook or cranny in Tokyo where they can find the dish in question. “Most cookbooks, you just want people to enjoy the recipes,” says Anderson. “That’s true of this, but what I really want is for people to go.”
So, there are tempting instructions for Nair-style curry rice, named after the oldest Indian curry house in Japan, printed beside the peeping Senso-Ji temple rooftop; little choux creams shaped like the Studio Ghibli character Totoro served with Tokyo street graffiti depicting the cuddly wood spirit; and steamed crab and pork wontons plated up alongside a picture of a soaring neon-clad office block.
Now is a good time to book a flight. Tokyo is the host of next year’s Olympic Games and this year’s Rugby World Cup. Not to mention the fact that it’s the city with the highest number of restaurants per capita in the world. East is best: fukujin pickles (Tim Anderson/Tokyo Stories)
“It’s almost impossible to be disappointed by it,” says Anderson. “Even an unremarkable ramen shop in Tokyo is better than most you’ll get here. I hear a lot of people saying that they never liked sushi until they went to Japan. The standard there is a cut above.”
Tokyo Stories breaks down the city by storey, from afternoon milk teas found in station subway kiosks at basement level, to pickled-plum martinis served from Tokyo roof gardens bars. “I wanted to get across that Tokyo is a really vertical city,” says Anderson, “along with the sense that you’re going to go up and down physically, but wherever you’ll go you’ll find something good to eat. It’s a rare city — Japan is like this generally — where the food is of a good standard almost no matter where you get it, whether you’re at a restaurant, depachika convenience store, food stand or vending machine.” Chef Tim Anderson (Tim Anderson/Tokyo Stories)
Anderson’s fascination with Japanese food was sparked in his teens, watching Anthony Bourdain’s A Cook’s Tour and the Fuji Television show Iron Chef. “Iron Chef blew my mind. The cooking was just amazing. Each episode was on a different key ingredient — from mishima beef to matsuke mushrooms sold for up to ¥100,000 a kilo — so that was a crash course in the kind of obsessive culture they have for produce in Japan.”
He visited the country for the first time after college, and later taught English in Kyushu, where he met an Englishwoman, Laura, his future wife, on the last train home (they now have a 13-month-old daughter, Tig). At Laura’s urging he applied to take part in MasterChef and created a Japanese-y bento box as his audition piece. In part due to a souped-up ramen with porcini-infused pork broth and lobster gyoza with black truffle, he won the title in 2011. Anderson debunks the myth that the biggest barrier to Londoners trying Japanese home cooking is the scarcity of ingredients. “Look, you really can buy anything in this city,” he says. “Or you can order online. In my previous cookbooks, like Japaneasy, I’ve done the Ocado test with recipes. If you can’t order an ingredient on the internet, it doesn’t go in the book.”
Not that he’s wholly faithful to Japanese traditional cooking. “Japanese food is always changing, evolving and drawing on influences from other cultures and other places. You wouldn’t have tempura if it wasn’t for the Portuguese visiting. You wouldn’t have Japanese curry without the British. I want people to know is Japanese food is diverse.”
His restaurant Nanban has been open for four years now, offering a cultural composite of dishes such as kumamoto ramen, with its burnt garlic and tea-pickled egg, and more jaunty inventions like carbonara made with cod’s roe sauce and onsen egg, and a sasebo burger with gochujang sauce and tea egg mayo served with crinkle fries. Creative, sure. But it’s Tokyo that fires his imagination. Japanese restaurants to try now By Phoebe Luckhurst
Dinings SW3
A hybrid of Japanese and Cornish cuisine (ish), Dinings SW3 has a superlative sushi menu that changes with the seasonal fare available from fishing boats off the Cornwall coast. Lennox Gardens Mews, SW3, dinings.co.uk
Engawa
Engawa, which is in the oasis of the Ham Yard development on the fringes of frenzied Piccadilly, specialises in Kobe beef done every which succulent way.
2 Ham Yard, W1, engawa.uk
Inko Nito
Go for the ichigo negroni — gin, plum sake, strawberry and Campari — and stay for the delicacies cooked over the traditional robata grill.
55 Broadwick Street, W1, inkonitorestaurant.com
Jidori
Jidori does a mixture of small plates and yakitori skewers. It does a vegan à la carte menu but the hero dish is undeniably its katsu curry scotch egg.
89 Kingsland High Street, E8, jidori.co.uk
Jugemu
Jugemu is tiny, keeps unpredictable opening hours, and has barely any internet footprint — in other words, it has the makings of a status restaurant. Expect sushi, seaweed and sashimi.
3 Winnett Street, W1

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Minerva Has Mastered The Art Of Creating Outstanding Indian Cuisine

Minerva Has Mastered The Art Of Creating Outstanding Indian Cuisine March 6, 2019 by Gary Nager
WHEN I FIRST MET Venkat Reddy, the owner of Minerva Indian Restaurant (located in the Publix-anchored New Tampa Center plaza on Bruce B. Downs Blvd.), I told him up front that Minerva was probably never going to make my list of favorite restaurants in New Tampa because I really wasn’t a big fan of Indian food or even most types of curry.
I also told him, however, that I’ve always been at least a little adventurous when it comes to food and that I would keep coming back to Minerva to sample as many of his (and his customers’) favorite dishes as possible. Nearly three years later, I’ve sampled not only Minerva’s extensive and very reasonably priced buffet but also many of the specialties I probably would never have considered sampling when I was younger.
So, today, whether it’s because my taste buds have “grown up” or because Minerva’s authentic cuisine from every region of India is just that good, I really do enjoy visiting there — and not just because I also enjoy cutting the spice of the food with the truly delicious beers of India, including Taj Mahal, Hunter and others (Minerva also serves some good and popularly priced wines).
I always include an order of naan bread when I visit Minerva and my favorite had been the garlic naan, but on my most recent visit, I loved the savory butter naan (below, left) even more.
As for starters, I really enjoy the vegetable, lamb and chicken varieties of Minerva’s samosas, which are fried, well-spiced triangular-shaped appetizers.
But, my favorite appetizers are the vegetable spring rolls served with mint and tamarind dipping sauces, and the Minerva Special Soup, which is sort of a blend of traditional New York-style Chinese egg drop soup and my mom’s homemade chicken soup. It’s loaded with white meat chicken and a variety of fresh veggies.
Going Off-Buffet
Venkat agrees that most people who like Indian food go for the butter chicken, Masala or Tikka Masala dishes and biryani (rice) dishes (all of which are Specialties of the House at Minerva), but my favorite entrée at Minerva is still the Tandoori lamb shish kabab (above), which is actually ground lamb served with a crispy edge outside and tender inside on a sizzling fajita-style dish, only with better onions and peppers than at any Mexican restaurant. And, even though the lunch buffet is an amazing deal at just $9.95 Mon.-Fri. and $12.95 Sat.-Sun., full orders of the entrées I’ve mentioned all cost just $14.95 or less.
I also really enjoyed the Minerva Special Chicken, which features delicious veggies with boneless chicken pieces in a sweet red curry tomato and basil sauce that has no bite at all. Another new favorite of mine is the goat curry, which is tender goat on the bone, again with a light curry sauce that was excellent when paired with the vegetable biryani (basmati rice) from the buffet.
And yes, for you vegetarians out there, Minerva offers nearly two dozen veggie entrées, plus hand-made dosas (crepes), a South Indian favorite served with sambar, coconut and ginger chutney and a variety of veggie-based fillings. I still haven’t sampled any of the dosas, but Venkat says they are definitely among his most popular dishes.
I’ve also never sampled any of Minerva’s desserts, but they are very popular, too, especially the rice kheer (pudding) and the gulab jamun (milk-based balls in a sugar syrup).
Be adventurous…visit Minerva…and please tell Venkat I sent you!
Minerva Indian Restaurant (19050 BBD Blvd.) is open for lunch every day from 11 a.m.-3 p.m., and for dinner from 5 p.m.-10 p.m. For more info, call (813) 978-8586 or visit MinervaTampa.com .

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