From behind the scenes with Shefali Shah to beating the heat with clothes made of aloe – your weekend fix

From behind the scenes with Shefali Shah to beating the heat with clothes made of aloe – your weekend fix

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You have seen her in Satya and Monsoon Wedding . Now, Shefali Shah is hitting the headlines for her powerful performance in Netflix series Delhi Crime , where she plays DCP Vartika Chaturvedi. Based on the real-life Delhi cop Chayya Sharma, who investigated the 2012 Delhi gang-rape case, the series follows Vartika as she leads investigations to capture the six rapists in 72 hours. Shefali believes that with OTT platforms and web series, characters like hers in Delhi Crime have become the centre of the story, getting a rich and layered treatment . What do colours say about physical and mental wellbeing?
On World Health Day, let’s take a look at why keeping an eye on your test results is crucial for good health. Karishma Maini, Vice President – Clinical Business of Strand Life Sciences, talks about test results from the company shown in “colour-coded” graphs and charts . While “green” depicts optimum health, “yellow” shows that caution should be taken and “red” means immediate intervention is required. Where are people going this summer?
Are tourists looking for new destinations? We caught up with Cameron Holland, CEO and Arun Ashok, Country Manager, Luxury Escapes, to find out about the best getaways for the summer . According to them, the Middle East is the trendiest vacation destination of the year, but Cambodia and Croatia are also popular holiday spots for the Indian millennial. It’s time to pack your bags and set off on a summer holiday. This summer, wear your love for nature on your sleeve
Jyoti Sachdev Iyer and Sayesha Sachdev, founders of Core by JSI, believe in a minimalist approach to fashion. They created luxurious everyday wear, using nothing but the most innovative fabrics sourced from across India . What would you choose to wear this season? A jersey woven in cool aloe, a tuxedo made of banana fibre, a blouse spun out of rose petals or a jacket interlaced with eucalyptus? Try the flavours of Australia
Are you planning a trip to Australia? Get ready to enjoy their flavourful food, as the Aussies love to experiment with global cuisines. Serious Australian cooking, especially at stand-alone restaurants, is world class. They know a lot about food, they understand flavour and being of a naturally adventurous disposition, they are unafraid to try out foods from all over the globe . Bon Appetit! Proust with Priyanka Sharma of Uno Más Tapas Bar Kitchen
Having worked in the RPG Group for 11 years after her MBA, Priyanka Sharma started Nessun Dorma Food Ventures with co-founder and chef Pallavi Jayswal. Uno Más Tapas Bar Kitchen is their first venture – already winning leading industry awards in the Food & Nightlife categories, including ‘Best Restaurant’. In her answers to our Proust questionnaire, Priyanka speaks about her greatest loves, heroes and much more .

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Tummala Ready To Bring Her Flavorful Talents To Local Customers

Tummala Ready To Bring Her Flavorful Talents To Local Customers 07, 2019 Michael Torelli/Cheshire Herald Submitted photo – Ladoo are sphere-shaped sweets made from flour, butter/oil, and sugar. They can include raisins, nuts and other ingredients.
Sheela Tummala started cooking when she was 8 years old.
Growing up, Tummala would experiment in her parents’ kitchen whenever possible, crafting her own recipes and using some passed down from her grandparents and other relatives.
“These recipes have been passed on for generations—I don’t know how many years, but definitely a long time,” admitted Tummala.
Now some of Tummala’s family-recipe Indian sweets and savory dishes will be available to the public for special events. Tummala, a dentist, is currently working toward registering her business, which she will share with her aunt. The two recently acquired the necessary food and beverage licenses and approvals from the state in October, when Tummala truly began considering making sweets for her friends, family, and Temple members to enjoy. Submitted photo – Sheela Tummala.
“Step by step,” Tummala said, of the process. “It took some time because even the Department of Consumer Protection doesn’t know our products.”
Tummala did not consider cooking as a source of income when she moved to the United States, nor did she consider taking it on as a side job. Rather, she was focused on schooling, her profession, and raising her family.
“I didn’t take it seriously until this point because I was busy with my career,” she said. “It takes a lot of effort, energy, and time when you come from a different country and start to establish a career here.”
Some of Tummala’s dishes for sale are ladoo—a sphere-shaped dessert made with lentils, sugar, nuts, and spices—and kovakajjikaya (kova), which is a sweet consisting of boiled milk and sugars.
“(Ladoo) is the most popular Indian sweet,” explained Tummala. “Everybody makes this dish as kind of like a tradition for festivals, weddings—any big occasions that take place in the family or in the community.”
The process of making 60 to 70 ladoos takes about one hour, according to Tummala. A lentil batter is mixed with water to create pellets. Once the batter is the right consistency, Tummala mixes the batter with sugar syrup and the balls are formed.
“It cannot be liquidy,” explained Tummala. “We put all that into the sugar syrup and we make a ball with it.” Tummala’s recipe includes cashews, raisins, and she uses ghee—a clarified butter used in Indian cuisine—for boiling.
“Ghee is really delicious, and it adds a nice aroma,” she said. “ … It’s kind of like a rich flavor, and very healthy, too.” Tummala’s favorite dish to make is kova, which takes about two hours from start to finish. She begins by boiling milk into a solid, which is then shaped into a patty.
“The patty comes from the boiled milk. Once you make the kova itself, it comes out in a solid, soft texture,” Tummala said. Submitted photo – Kova is a traditional Indian sweet made from dried or heated milk.
Pieces of coconut and jaggery—concentrated cane juice—are placed on the patty, which is then rolled up into its final product. Tummala is looking forward to sharing her foods with others. She said some of the sweets, such as kova, are not available for purchase in Connecticut, making it challenging for Temple leaders, friends, and family to easily find them.
“For them, they don’t have to feel guilty and they can just order and buy it from me for them to enjoy for weddings and things like that,” Tummala said. “They do not have to go to India to get these sweets. They can get them here.”
Tummala is also eager to receive feedback about her products.
“I’m looking forward to seeing how the community reacts to this and welcomes this,” she said.

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Munch: Two new Caribbean food options in Pittsburgh

Munch: Two new Caribbean food options in Pittsburgh
This item is about 8 months old, but the restaurants featured here are still going strong in Pittsburgh [thanks, Peter Jordens]. Am I just hungry right now? Dan Gigler ( Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ) writes about Caribbean cuisine option in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He underlines the irony of not finding Caribbean food in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic and returning home to find two great spots specializing in the food he craved. Here are excerpts.
[. . .] The all-inclusive resort at which we stayed had lovely lodging, a little casino, a sports bar where we watched the Penguins, and four full-service restaurants. There was a French restaurant. Mexican. Italian. And, a Japanese Teppanyaki-style steak and seafood spot. And they were all just fine.
Wait for it … wait for it …
But.
One offering was conspicuously absent at a resort that’s smack between the 18th and 19th parallels, which catered to Americans, Canadians and Europeans, and was staffed almost entirely by native Dominicans and Haitians: a single morsel of Caribbean food.
Of course, the Caribbean is a collection of thousands of individual islands, a dozen sovereign nations and another 13 territories, all with their own cultures, nuances, cuisine, flavors, influences and history.
But jeez-o-man, pad thai isn’t exactly native to the DR, and we could easily get that. Something — anything — pan-Caribbean would’ve sufficed. Alas, there was no mofongo, no chicharron, no lechon, not one single blessed fried plantain, and no jerk anything (except for the relentless staffer in the lobby trying to hard sell us a time share). So, it was with some amusement that we returned to Pittsburgh to learn that two new independent Caribbean-flavored restaurants had opened, thereby making it easier to find said fare in the Paris of Appalachia than it was at a resort on the actual island of Hispaniola. Go figure.
Musa Caribbean / Cajun Fare
West Indian by way of eastern Texas is the culinary lineage behind Musa (which is the genus from which banana and plantain trees come), a Caribbean and Cajun fusion restaurant that opened in May in Beechview. Proprietor Kenrick Cheong is a native of Galveston, and his parents come from Trinidad and Barbados. He came to here to attend the bygone Pennsylvania Culinary Institute, and he never left after meeting his wife, Amy, a Pittsburgher of Polish stock (he notes that they had curried pierogies at their wedding), and starting a family.
This cheery spot on Broadway Avenue was converted from a drab old neighborhood bar. A chalkboard reads “Welcome to the Don’t Hurry,” Caribbean travel posters adorn the colorful walls, and patrons have flocked to an outdoor deck to sip on dozens of rum drinks whipped up by a quick-witted bar staff.
There are curries and jerk pork to go with shrimp po’ boys and a particularly good and rich seafood gumbo with andouille sausage and crawfish ($13). The Peppa Pot Steak ($20) was excellent: perfectly cooked sirloin with grilled vegetables in a lightly sweet sauce and served with a side of bone marrow and grilled bread.
The menu is modest for now, but Mr. Cheong said he intends to grow it slowly, adding more traditional dishes as well as cross-cultural mashups.
2318 Broadway Ave.; 412-207-2733; https://musa-restaurant.business.site .
Pauline’s Caribbean Soul Cuisine
This spartan family-run spot, opened in late April on Federal Street on the central North Side with an all-Jamaican staff, is bare bones, and that’s OK because the spices bring all the color and flavor one could hope for. They do the classics here like oxtail, curried goat and jerk chicken that are usually ready to go, as well as made-to-order seafood specialties. But like a good barbecue spot, when the food is gone for the day, it’s gone till tomorrow.
Jerk is among my favorite seasonings because unlike many hot sauces that punch you right in the face, it often has a pleasing, fragrant and inviting nose. It’s only after a few minutes that you realize you’re sweating from a creeping internal heat, like the boiling frog.
This was roughly the experience with the very good jerk chicken combo at Pauline’s ($12). The crispy skin had a slight char, but the meat popped with juicy flavor. A side order of baked mac and cheese was excellent, with the addition of piquant bell pepper in the cheese sauce.
Pauline’s is a fine addition to a little half-block stretch that, with excellent hot dog, pizza and burrito shops, might have the best street food in the city — at least on a pound-for-pound basis.
1204 Federal St., North Side; 412-231-2000; facebook.com/PCSCPittsburgh [. . .]
For full article, see https://www.post-gazette.com/life/munch/2018/08/02/Munch-finds-Caribbean-food-in-Pittsburgh/stories/201808020018

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Israel’s tourism triumph relies on its air bridge

Israel’s tourism triumph relies on its air bridge Arrivals stream in from everywhere.edwin Tourism Director Jerusalem Development Authority Ilanit Melchior. (photo credit: SIVAN FARAG)
The virulently anti-Israel movement known as Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions – BDS – is roiling through campuses, overflowing into city councils, encroaching into corporate boardrooms, and now chomping at the essence of Israel’s special niche in the world: its travel and tourism industry. Everywhere, the boycotters have been asking to isolate Israel. BDS even convinced Airbnb to stop listing Jewish locations in Judea and Samaria– also known as the West Bank (a term invented after Jordan invaded in 1948, when the UN’s partition suggestion failed to create two states). In Ireland, a bill advancing through Parliament may criminalize visiting the Old City and even purchasing lunch or a keepsake.Whereas similar boycotts against other countries have inflicted withering effects on national economies, in Israel – it simply hasn’t worked. The opposite is true. Yes, boycotters are busy demonizing Israel. Yet despite this, Israel’s tourism industry has rocketed to a singular triumph and now employs tens of thousands. Flights are packed and new non-stops are being added across the globe. Even though new luxury hotels are going up as fast as the Mideast sun will dry concrete, rooms remain in high demand and, thus, are scarce and expensive. Israel has become world famous for creative cuisine and trendy eateries; so if you want to get a table at the most popular restaurants, you’ll need to book weeks in advance. Travel and tourism to Israel has dramatically changed. It’s not just synagogue sisterhoods and Jewish organizations. Swelling up from Israel’s “Start-up Nation,” world famous top chef culture, and hard-won penetration of markets beyond America and West Europe, as well as its sophisticated travel industry burnishing, Israel is now a destination for the entire world. Traditional Jewish-American travelers from Miami to Seattle must now compete with Silicon Valley techies, Chinese students, Indian tourists, East European Christian pilgrims and diverse businessmen from across the planet. The numbers are multiplying.IN 2016, 2.9 million total worldwide visitors visited Israel. By the close of 2018, that number had boomed to 4.1 million—and the totals keep climbing. Within the coming decade, Israel expects to employ 98,000 people in its tourism sector.When Israeli tourism prospers, so does the Palestinian community. Christian pilgrims make a beeline for Bethlehem. Thus, tourism breeds economic interdependence and strengthens co-existence.Arrivals stream in from everywhere.Today, most North American travelers to Israel are not Jewish; they are Christian, often seeking Biblical discovery. From North America, Jews comprise about 40% to 45% of the travelers, while Christians generally hover at about 60% year to year, according to official estimates. While the Jewish-Christian percentages remain the same, the growth spurt for North America has seen the overall numbers increase by 42% since 2016.In 2009, only 20,000 Indians visited Israel, reports Israel’s tourism office in New Delhi. Some years ago, Israel hosted Indian travel agents, knowing that in India, such agents book most of the travel. Reciprocal travel programs tapped such markets as India’s Kerala Christians. Dramatically improved diplomatic relations between New Delhi and Jerusalem combined with thrice-weekly direct Air India Boeing 787 Dreamliner service – which was granted special Saudi flyover permission, saving more than two hours – has created a steady flow of Indian visitors. This year, Israel expects more than 80,000 Indian arrivals, with travel officials working to achieve a further 65% increase. That may happen if, as planned, the Israeli film industry entices Bollywood producers to use Israeli locations.In 2015, only 30,000 tourists visited Israel from China. But when direct flights between Ben Gurion airport and numerous Chinese cities were added, the number more than trebled to 100,000-plus annually. Today, China is Israel’s greatest growth market. Celebrity Chinese chefs are now flown in, and Chinese-speaking guides are easily found. AIR CONNECTIONS are the lifeblood of Israel’s tourism as well as its international viability. Nowadays you can fly nonstop to Israel from numerous North American cities. From New York’s JFK, Delta is launching a twice-daily nonstop. From Newark’s Liberty, United also flies nonstop twice daily. From Washington, DC’s Dulles, United will soon inaugurate thrice-weekly nonstop service. From Toronto, Air Canada offers daily nonstops. From Montreal, Air Canada will fly twice weekly during the summer. From San Francisco, United flies daily, primarily for the surging nexus to Silicon Valley.North American carriers all compete with El Al, which is by far the dominant carrier linking the continent with Israel, boasting 45 nonstop flights weekly that carry more than 50,000 passengers per month. For many Israel-bound travelers, El Al is the one and only carrier – and it has vastly improved. With the exception of the Jewish sabbath and holidays, Israel’s star-emblazoned national carrier flies day or night, rain or shine, good news or bad news, rockets or not. Its unique extra security, where young security staffers at the airport ask invasive personal questions to evaluate risk, are sometimes viewed as a mix between reassurance, ritual, and a Jewish guilt trip. “You’re coming to Israel? Why now?” Or the classic: “Who do you know in Israel?” Answer: “Everyone.”El Al has conquered labor problems, onboard religious tiffs and more to expand and enhance its daily service to and from multiple US cities. Not only can you fly El Al nonstop direct from New York, Newark, and Miami, but now also from Boston, Los Angeles, Toronto, and this summer, from Las Vegas and San Francisco. In spring 2020, Chicago service starts. Most of all, El Al predominantly offers Dreamliner service. On its 747 and 777 fleet, El Al still offers Economy Seat PLUS, relatively affordable, spacious, and comfortable, especially in the bulkhead row. For many traveling to Israel, El Al’s Economy Seat PLUS is now the go-to booking. What’s more, you can purchase business class check-in at either JFK or Newark for $35 to $45 and your travel experience will be delightful. The lounge is restful and stocked with good food and beverages, allowing you await departure in luxury.Israel’s tourism triumph would not have been possible without an airline triumph as well. That triumph in the skies has finally happened. The writer is the author of IBM and the Holocaust and a syndicated columnist who travels extensively, frequently reviewing the hotels he stays in. He personally and independently paid for all aspects of travel mentioned in this article. He can be found at www.edwinblack.com.

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Things To Expect When In PARIS

Paris, the French capital drawing visitors for centuries around the world. Starting with historic monuments to the exceptional cuisines, Paris has it all. Wandering on the streets of the romantic city, posing in front of the Eiffel, shopping on the fashion street, eating the French desserts, walking in the beautiful gardens and going in and out of cafes -just defines the perfect day. You will be amazed to see the beauty, culture, fashion and history everywhere.
Hey Guys,
2019, first travel was Paris and I will never forget how amazing it was. I wasn’t worried about the rain or cold. All I know is that I loved it. I couldn’t take my eyes off the marvellous buildings and monuments. I know you will get a lot of information starting from ‘How to go there’ to ‘places to visit’. But I found some things that you must know before you go to Paris.
Here I present you ‘Things To Expect When In Paris’.
Language & Currency
French is the most spoken language in Paris while some people may know English or other European languages. Euro is the currency throughout France and other European countries. Most of the Cafes and restaurants accept cards. But I would advise you to have some cash for the local vendors / small retailers.
TRAVEL TIP
Cafes or restaurants or shops near the main attractions like the Eiffel tower are more expensive. Walk a few blocks more to find more authentic and less expensive places.
Safety Measures Paris is the most touristic place and hence it’s quite naughty and mischief too. Starting from you landing there, travelling, till you leave, you need to be really careful about your important things. A lot of pickpockets and other sorts of mischief is quite usual there. So, be VERY careful with your wallet, bags, luxury items etc. You do not wanna end up without a passport( travel documents), cash or luggage. I am not scaring you guys but just giving a heads up.
TRAVEL TIP
Be careful with your belongings Don’t talk to strangers. They will try to lure you into the conversation just to get into the pockets. If you want help, there are Information Desks everywhere and security. Just don’t take help if someone randomly offers you from nowhere. It’s not a MIRACLE. Keep your docs and wallet safe and not in one place.
Travelling Around A fair amount of hotel and hostels according to your budget are available. You can Airbnb too. So no worries. Just make sure about the area that you want to live in. Public transport in Paris is very good and an inexpensive way to travel around. Connectivity between places is great. hop on and off metro and buses are available from place to place. If you wanna go somewhere far, you can always grab a taxi or Uber. However, the best way to explore the city is by walking
TRAVEL TIP
You can buy metro/train tickets beforehand. You can buy up to 1-2 booklet of the ticket. One booklet has 10 tickets. This would save you time. You can take the hop on and off bus tickets. Make sure the area is safe where you choose to live in.
Food & Cuisines Food will be least of your worry. As there are tonnes of Cafes, Restaurants and bars. You can enjoy all sort of cuisines. Must try the French desserts Macaroons , Croissants, Crepes, Tulipes , Crème Brûlée , Apple Tarte, Eclair and so many. If your Vegetarian or Vegan, it will be a little hard for you. Vegetarian dishes are very less on the menu or sometimes there are none. But Good news is Indian restaurants are almost everywhere.
TRAVEL TIP
Take the hotel which is near cafes, restaurant and supermarket. It will be easier for your meals for the day. Carry some snacks on the go. Find the restaurants based on the cuisine you want to have. Spending Time Paris needs time. it’s a big city with a lot of history, culture and beauty. Don’t plan Paris just for the weekend. Make a trip of at least 3 to five days. Don’t rush to visit every place, take your time and Get to know about the history of the place. Walk around and spend time and fall in love with the city. Every corner has its own aura of beauty. I hope I have helped you a bit about what to expect when in Paris. If You have been to Paris, Tell me about your
experience and your favourite place in Paris 💖 .

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4 Fuego Tapas Hot Spots in Atlanta

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If you have been keeping up with my articles (thank you, loyal fans) you know that I recently came back from an incredible trip to Spain , during which I ate my body weight in local cuisine. Now that I’m back at school, I have realized that the ATL foodie scene has its own trendy lil taste of España. Here are 4 must-try Atlanta tapas hot spots to check out when you are feeling ~spicy~ . #1. Barcelona Wine Bar
If you couldn’t tell from the name, Barcelona Wine Bar has two specialties: wine and food inspired by Barcelona. What’s not to like? Their menu is entirely tapas, including fun charcuterie boards and big plates to share, like tasty paellas. The Inman Park location is moody, swanky, and every aesthetic moment you need to feel fabulous while you’re sipping your glass of vino.
Must-Try Dish: Manchego & Jamón Croquetas #2. Gypsy Kitchen
Located in a mad bougie shopping district in Buckhead, when you step off the glass elevator into Gypsy Kitchen , you feel like you’ve been transported. This trendy Spanish-Moroccan-Indian tapas restaurant is both beautiful and absolutely delicious. With unique seasoning (cocoa-dusted scallops!) and creative takes on traditional dishes, you will be unable to stop ordering more plates.
Must-Try Dishes: Patatas Bravas, Gypsy Fried Chicken #3. The Iberian Pig
Inspired by delicious Spanish jamón (check out their Jamón Happy Hour), The Iberian Pig specializes in the most popular tapas plates straight from the homeland with a focus on, of course, the pig! Sausage, pork, bacon, you name it– the meat is the thing to eat at The Iberian Pig. Get ready to pig out!
Must-Try Dish: Pork Cheek Tacos #4. Whiskey Bird
Whiskey Bird brings a hot new spin on tapas, bringing Asian fusion dishes to the Spanish tradition. Located on Highland Ave, this upbeat spot is perfect for a dinner with friends– you’ll be fighting over who gets the last bite of every plate.
Must-Try Dishes: Yakitori Skewers, Crispy Brussel Sprouts
Next time it’s GNO or you’re just celebrating the fact that it’s Friday, gather a group that’s ready to sample and share. Check out any of these trendy Atlanta tapas spots for a great food-stagram , an exceptional meal, and a fuego taste of Spanish flair.

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Architect Nao Saito writes a travel diary about exploring recipes, homes and kitchens throughout South India

Architect Nao Saito writes a travel diary about exploring recipes, homes and kitchens throughout South India By 0
“I am a Japanese woman from Tokyo, and an architect by profession. I like designing on a small scale, particularly furniture or interiors.” And so begins the book, Travels Through South Indian Kitchens by Nao Saito.
The author’s interest in the every-day life connection between people, their environment and culture morphed into a research project that resulted in a book. It began with an invitation from the publisher of Tara Books* offering a three-month residency at the publishing house in Chennai (formerly Madras), the capital of the state of Tamil Nadu in India. Saito’s architectural tenet and design philosophy, anchored by her belief that “a space is not just a fixed physical structure – it is also fluid, shaped by the way in which people use it” lead her to focus on a venture related to kitchens – the metaphoric “heart” within a home and a primary key to a broad and deep understanding of people and their cultures.
Through visits to diverse homes in various South Indian communities, interacting with the cooks in their kitchens, sharing food and friendly, intimate chats, writing and sketching her observations, Saito produced a travel diary enhanced with floor plans, photos, conversations with and recipes from the Indian women she met.
Her kitchen explorations result in a broadened understanding of not only the physical structure of kitchens, but its psychological significance. One of her first revelations was her realization that “the kitchen need not be a single room. It can expand to other spaces inside and even outside… beyond what I could have imagined.”
Saito’s illustrative sketches, simple and unadorned (charming, somewhat child-like – but a precocious one), mirror her writing style: accessible, conversational. A tête-à-tête between friends. She has an eye for detail which she shares as she examines the kitchens visited, the food eaten, the people met and the lifestyles lived.
Tamil cuisine, called Chettinad, is often cited as the most renowned cuisine of Tamil Nadu, recognized for its use of fresh ground masalas (spice mixes and blends), sun-dried meats and salted vegetables. The Chettiars were once traditionally vegetarians, but through trade influences, they have also adopted non-vegetarian habits. The recipes in Saito’s book, nearly two dozen in all, are family dishes from the women who cook in the kitchens she visited – wives, mothers, grandmothers, aunties. They include a varied range of vegetarian and non-vegetarian dishes, such as Verkadalai Chutney (peanut chutney), Kathirikai Kootu (stew with eggplant and dal), Puttu (steamed rice and coconut rolls), Shrimp Curry (tamarind stew), and Kuzhi Paniyaram (fried dumplings).
The book, unique in its subject matter, universal in its recounting, is a pleasurable read. For those seeking a respite from the ordinary, a worthy diversion, or a thought-provoking work, Travels Through south Indian Kitchens fits the bill.
*Tara Books is an independent publishing house identified by its website as “a team informed by feminism and other movements for social justice”, and whose guiding principle is embodied in its opening quote:“Pushing the boundaries of the book form in an age that is busy writing its obituary.”

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Goa Holiday Tour Destination To Explore Tourist Places

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Tourism in Goa is one of the most famous in Indian and foreign tourists. The Goa which is a part of the Indian Territory after getting liberated from Portuguese in 1961, and since then India has made it a great tourist destination. Goa is a place which still has the authentic food practices from different places and culture and the Portuguese, French and Continental food along with the beverages which includes the drinks such as Feni has put it at one of the best places to enjoy cuisine and drinks of the best in terms. Now, if the food is so good so is the place although a relatively small state but still with great heritage and with beaches which cover about 125 kilometres of its coastline with various names and with different topographies.
The city is divided into the city limits and beach with the Christianity being the main religion and Church to be found at every other corners with Basilica of Bom Jesus and the historical heritage with fort of Aguada along with River Mandovi protecting the topography with temples also being a greater part of the territory and is connected by Indian Railways through Vasco Da Gama railway station along with Airport which is Panjim International Airport. If the city is to be left and a person moves towards the lake and backwater then the river cruise at the Mandovi River over the Santa Monica Boat Jetty and Panaji Jetty is one of the most favored thing to be done in Goa.
With the Dudhsagar Waterfalls which is at a distance of 71 Km from Panjim Kadamba bus stand the waterfall is the highest and largest fall of Goa. It is a four tiered waterfall located on the Mandovi river in Goa and if we talk about the historical and heritage forts then the Chapora fort is situated in North Goa which is one of the massive fort constructed by the King of Bijapur, Adil Shah. Also, as above one has talked about the Hindu Pilgrimage then the Shri Shantidurga Temple is one of the best found at foothill of Kavlem village in Ponda Taluka. The Shri Mangueshi temple is one of the largest, wealthiest and the most popular Hindu shrines in Goa and the other temple is Shri Mahalaxmi temple.
Now, talking about the prominent beaches of Goa are Baga Beach along with Anjuna beach and the most famous to be known among the tourist is Candolim beach, Calangute beach and Colva beach. The more of the famous beach are the Vagator beach and the Morjim beach which is found to be buzz with activities throughout the year and people love to indulge in various sports such as Snorkelling, Scuba diving and also the rides such as Paragliding with the various tour packages Goa making it to be a memorable trip for every one who feels like exploring Goa for the fortnight or maybe a week although Goa is a state which could be enjoyed for a long period of time and one could get much out of their enjoyment by spending a better part of their life in Goa.
Delhi tour travel is a well plan to explore India capital territory which has three UNESCO world heritage site and many more attractions such as India Gate, war memorial, national museum, Signature bridge etc.
Europe tour travel is a well plan to visit European countries which has lots of historical landmarks such as Roman Empire monuments, beautiful beaches, snow land Switzerland, British Empire main land UK etc. Views: 4

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Indian Spiced Shepherd’s Pie: Whole30 Approved Recipe

Posted in Recipes • Entrees Let’s chat about #Whole30
I had seen so many people do this 30 day meal plan now and was always quite skeptical about these meal plans that makes you stop eating certain food groups. Until I realized it was an elimination meal plan that helped you identify what triggered your digestive issues. You know I love anything that helps me understand my capacity a bit better and so I started reading up on it. Since early December, I had been dealing with some severe gastritis issue that seemed to never go away. I had been told that these digestive triggers will stick around for a bit, but I couldn’t manage to shake it at all. I really was lacking energy, efficiency and feeling bad about how my body was doing as it continued to breakdown. So after reading up on it and trying to figure out what my meals would consist of I realized that it was definitely going to be a sacrifice, but something I can most definitely do with a bit of planning. So here we are just under 2 weeks in and about to hit the middle mark! I’m not going to deep dive into Whole30 and all things Whole30 approved just yet, but I did want to share a recipe I’ve whipped up that is Whole30 approved.
This recipe celebrates spice, fat, flavor and punch. One thing I realized is that the simplest replacements or additions to a recipe can truly enhance the nutritional landscape of a dish. I took a British classic (and pub favorite) and decided to put my Indian spin on it. It’s the most indulgent Whole30 approved recipe I’ve made to date and I’m quite excited about adding it to my regular repertoire.
I’ve been reading a lot about how we should be eating and what triggers most people. For me, I loved good quality food, but I’m also someone who seeks simplicity. There have been diets who wants you to avoid carbs and dairy, diets with only protein, and so on. The reality is that we should just be eating what was created for us to eat. These are whole foods. Food that have never been frozen, preserved, or genetically modified at any point. The food we should be eating should have fat and acid and be naturally spiced and herbed. Indian food has been my rebound during Whole30 as lots of the cuisine can easily be made Whole30 approved with just a few substations. There is no compromise to flavor and no compromise to the indulgence I was hoping for from a comforting plate! 4 Servings

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Dubious said: ↑ I think you seriously need to either change your company of friends or broaden your circle….
Everyone I know has first asked me the difference between Pakistani and indian food…And even after taking them to an indian restaurant followed by feeding them home cooked Pakistani food…BELIEVE ME, they were less confused and NEVER made a mistake of confused labeling! Then again my circle of friends include people in university [working and students] …so maybe they needed to prove they are not ignorant and have high observation skills….but I have never faced what you claim…
Sure, I myself sometimes call our food desi but they always called it Pakistani coz I took them to indian restaurant and they noticed the difference AND remember it/ kept it in mind…
My American neighbours ALWAYS differentiated the 2 from the start coz they had experienced both types in California as they had friends from both groups…So, I guess it really depends on what kind of “people” you are surrounded with… Click to expand… Until and unless, they interact with overseas-Pakistanis or visit Pakistan, they do not get to know about the differences in Indian and Pakistani cuisines but once they have done it, they do not make this mistake. However, it depends on their Pakistani friends as well that how much they explain to them.
Pakistani food contains a lot more meat though even Indians restaurants use meat as well for marketing but the taste and quantity of meat based recipes is much higher in Pakistani cuisine. Furthermore, our spices are different even the garam masala taste different… by Shaan, National, Laziza or any other Pakistani brand vs any Indian brand…the taste, texture and smell are different. And then simply there are a lot recipes which are exclusive like dam-pukht, chapali kebab, takatak, bakra mussalalam.. Lahore Naan, chikkar cholay, siri payeee in Pakistani cuisine while dhokla, dossa etc. And generally, Indians use stronger spices especially more chilli.

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