Food-Walking

Food-Walking

Let me tell you some memoirs of foodwalking from my wonderful Mumbai days. Here is the first story… “FOODWALKING” – A HEALTHY EXERCISE FOR ALL AGES Ramblings of a “Retired” Navy Veteran By VIKRAM KARVE In my younger days – in school, college and my early days in the Navy – I played active sports for exercise. Later – my exercise comprised less physically strenuous activities like swimming, jogging, brisk walking/hill climbing etc. When I crossed my mid-40’s – and landed up in Mumbai more than 19 years ago – in the early part of the year 2000 – when I was around 45 years of age – I started my “foodwalks”. I had two “foodwalks” every day: 1. The first foodwalk in the morning from 6 AM to 7:30 AM 2. The second foodwalk in the evening from 5 PM to 7 PM (On Sunday mornings I had a super-long “foodwalk ” which started at 6 AM and sometimes extended upto 9 AM or even 10 AM) These “foodwalks” had various stages: 1. First – after a warm up brisk walk – I jogged on Marine Drive for around 3 kms till the end of Chowpatty. 2. This was followed by a brisk walk. On weekday mornings – I would walk back to Stadium Restaurant at Churchgate for a Bun Maska, Bun Omlette or Kheema Pav and Refreshing Irani Chai And – on Sundays – it was a super-long foodwalk to Noor Mohammadi Hotel near Bhendi Bazar for Nalli Nihari – or to Vinay Lunch Home near Thakurdwar in Girgaum for Misal . In the evenings – when I had more time at my disposal – my foodwalks would be more exploratory. I would take new routes every day – and – I would explore new eating places – starting from Colaba and Cuffe Parade in the South – to various places in Central Mumbai like Grant Road, Byculla, Mohd Ali Road, Crawford Market, Girgaum, Kalbadevi, Chowpatty etc – wherever my legs would take me. 3. So – my Food-Walk comprised first a brisk walk – then a “replenishment halt” for food – and – after the “replenishment halt” – it was a leisurely walk back home – fully satiated – and – stomach full and morale high. Retirement is a big comedown – and – my glorious “foodwalks” came to an end. However – I have decided to revive my “foodwalks” again – and this morning I went on a long “foodwalk” – culminating in a “frugal” vegetarian breakfast. During this rather lacklustre foodwalk – I remembered my most memorable foodwalk in Mumbai. So – let me delve into my Foodie Archives – and pull out this “memoir” for you to read… MOUTHWATERING MUMBAI MEMORIES I enjoyed the 6 Best Years of My Life in Mumbai – six glorious years from the years 2000 to 2006. During these six best years of my life, I lived in EMPRESS COURT – my all time favourite home – the best house I have ever lived in during my entire life. I wish I could have had my retirement home in that lovely neighbourhood, or nearby, but then, can an honest naval officer afford a house in South Mumbai? Maybe a Merchant Navy Officer can afford a house in “So Bo” (South Bombay) – but if you have spent your life honestly serving the nation in the “Fauji” Indian Navy – forget about Mumbai – you will not be able to afford a home in the heart of Pune – and you would probably have to settle down in some faraway suburb like Wakad or Baner or Kharadi – or in one of those military veteran “fauji ghettos” like Mundhwa, Kondhwa or Mohammadwadi where most retired service officers have settled down. But in your mind’s eye – you can always hark back – and relive your “good old days” with nostalgia. That is what I did on this lovely morning – during my foodwalk – I reminisced about my glorious Sunday Morning “Food Walks” in Mumbai. Let me tell you about my memorable Sunday mornings in Mumbai. UNFORGETTABLE MUMBAI FOOD WALK NALLI NIHARI at BHENDI BAZAAR Mouthwatering Memories of an Early Morning Food Walk followed by a Sumptuous Nourishing Breakfast by VIKRAM KARVE I love good food. I am a foodie – I am certainly not a snobbish “high-falutin fine-dining foodie” – but I would rather describe myself as a simple Trencherman. As I said, I love good food. And I love walking around searching for good food. So, whenever I get an opportunity, I set off on my frequent “food walks” searching for good food. It was in “maximum city” Mumbai that I enjoyed my best food walks. Let me tell about one of my favourite food walks – a fulfilling early morning food walks culminating in a nourishing breakfast. This is probably my first piece of Foodie Writing. I wrote this in the year 2000 – more than 19 years ago – after returning from one of my food walks. So – Dear Reader – here are some mouthwatering memories of a glorious early morning food-walk in Mumbai culminating in a wholesome breakfast. EARLY MORNING FOOD WALK IN MUMBAI : Mouthwatering Memoir by Vikram Karve I start early – at dawn – from my house near Churchgate. I admire, in the early morning pre-sunrise light, the impressive silhouettes of the magnificent Gothic structures of the High Court and Mumbai University across the Oval. I hear the clock on Rajabai Tower strike 6 AM (0600 Hrs). I walk briskly past Oxford Bookstore, KC College and CCI towards Marine Plaza Hotel. Then I cross the Marine Drive, turn right and start off towards Chowpatty. I greet with a smile the morning joggers and walkers and rinse my lungs with the fresh invigorating sea breeze. I walk briskly on Marine Drive. Soon I am past Marine Lines, Taraporewala Aquarium, Charni Road, Chowpatty, Wilson College – and after the brisk vigorous walk of about 30 minutes I break out into a slight sweat as I reach the northern end of Marine Drive. Here I ponder for a moment. Should I turn left up the Walkeshwar Road to Teen Batti and Banganga…? Or should I turn right towards Babulnath…? Or should I turn back towards Nariman Point…? I experience a sense of true freedom. I can make whatever choice I want and go wherever I desire. That’s freedom…!!! I choose to cross the road, and walk fast, straight up the steep path towards Hanging Gardens on Malabar Hill – trying to exercise my heart and lungs. I take a round of garden atop the water tank near Kamala Nehru Park (is it now called Phirozeshah Mehta Udyan…?) Then I canter down to Kemp’s Corner where I turn right – a U-turn really – past Crossword Bookstore – and I walk down Hughes Road. I turn left past Gamdevi towards Nana Chowk and I cross the railway over-bridge and keep going onto Grant Road past Novelty Cinema. Then I turn right at Delhi Durbar on Falkland Road – reach VP Road – walk past Gol Deval, Alankar cinema – and soon I am at Bhendi Bazar. My destination Noor Mohammadi Hotel is right in front of me across Mohamedali Road. Almost two hours of brisk walking has built up in me a voracious appetite and I am ready to devour a sumptuous breakfast. I am hungry. And I eat only when I am hungry. I enter Noor Mohammadi Hotel, a Spartan no-nonsense eatery, and order a Nalli Nihari and Roti. Nalli Nihari is a pure ghee version of Mutton Nihari cooked with bones filled with marrow. Within a minute a bowl of piping hot gravy, with a generous chunk of succulent meat floating in it, and a fluffy khaboosh roti is placed in front of me. I dip a piece of the soft roti in the spicy rich gravy, let it soak for a while, put it in my mouth and close my eyes to luxuriate in and relish the gastronomic experience in its entirety. I can feel the juicy gravy soaked roti melting on my tongue, releasing its delicious flavours and spicy aroma which permeate into my soul. I am in seventh heaven and keep on attaining higher states of sheer heavenly bliss with every succulent bite of the mouth watering concoction. They say that Nalli Nihari is a mutton bone marrow and wheat gravy – but I don’t delve too much on the contents of a dish. It’s the taste, delicacy, eating experience and ultimate divine feeling of satiation that matters. It is a delectable beginning to a delightful day as the luscious taste of the delicious Nalli Nihari lingers on my tongue indefinitely. Yes, it is epicurean satiation of the highest order – a blissful experience I can never forget. Here is a picture of Nalli Nihari (Today – I click and post foodie pictures using my smartphone – but since this happened more than 19 years ago when there were no smartphones – I will take the liberty of posting a picture of Nalli Nihari – freely available on the internet – from Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository, file url: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nalli_Nihari.JPG ) Nalli Nihari Dear Reader – if you happen to be in Mumbai – and – you are ready for a sumptuous non-vegetarian breakfast – take a brisk stimulating food walk early in the morning – and – begin your day with Nalli Nihari at Noor Mohammadi in Bhendi Bazaar. I assure you that it will be a fortifying and stimulating experience. Don’t forget to tell us how you enjoyed the food-walking experience. But – remember one thing. If you want to truly appreciate this splendid Heritage Gourmet Trencherman’s Breakfast Dish to its fullest – you must build up an appetite for it. Yes – if you really want to enjoy good food – you must build up an appetite for it. And – what better way to build up an appetite than a brisk long walk in fresh air – aka – “Food Walk” Happy Walking. Happy Eating. Happy Food-Walking. Remember – in order to enjoy your food – first build up an appetite – and then satiate it. Yes – remember the “ FOOD-WALK DICTUM ” : First build up an appetite – then satiate it First – “ WALK WALK WALK ” Once more – let me wish you Happy “Food-Walking”. VIKRAM KARVE 1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve 2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post © vikram karve., all rights reserved. Disclaimer: All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental. Copyright Notice: No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright. Copyright © Vikram Karve (All Rights Reserved) © vikram karve., all rights reserved. Revised and Updated Version of the Article Written by me Vikram Karve 19 years ago in the year 2000 and First Posted on my Foodie Blog by me Vikram Karve at url: http://creative.sulekha.com/heritage-cuisine-by-vikram-karve-a-sumptuous-breakfast_146309_blog and http://food.sulekha.com/a-hearty-breakfast-in-the-heart-of-mumbai-id21759-39642-recipe.htm and http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2012/12/mouthwatering-mumbai-memories-food-walk.html and http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2015/05/foodwalking-healthy-exercise-for-all.html Posted by

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May 5, South Indian Recipes

SouthIndia Guide South Indian Recipes
South Indian Recipes are very tasty and easy to make. South Indian cuisine is the term generally used to refer the cuisines of the four southern states of India, i.e. Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu. Tamil Nadu Recipes
Though each of these states has their own specific varieties of food, rice is the staple food of this region, and is used commonly, for breakfast, lunch and dinner, in one form or other. The traditional meal is served on banana leaves, and is eaten with right hand. South Indian food has become so popular that you can find at least one South Indian restaurant in almost all major cities.
Find out some of the common cuisines like Breakfast items, Rice, Curry, Deserts etc. South Indian Recipes

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Things to do in the UAE on May 3

Baja fish tacos at Tribeca Cinco de Mayo Image Credit: Supplied ABU DHABI
Mega Sale
Flash sale offering discounts in select stores at Mushrif Mall across selected brands, from 10am until 11pm tomorrow. Select shops will operate through the 24 hour period. An experiential stage show will also take place from 11pm to 3am. mushrifmall.com
Utkarsha 2019
Celebrate Utkal Divas by Odia Samaj Abu Dhabi(OSA – Odia Speaking Families in Abu Dhabi) showcasing in-house talents, performances by guest artists Soma, Bidu and Elina from Odisha (Indian State), Felicitation to Padma Shree recipient Devarapalli Surya Prakash Rao. Free for members of the group at Abu Dhabi Theatre, Near Marina Mall, 10am-5pm. facebook.com/ OdiaSamaj@Konnect
DUBAI
Musical brothers Salim-Sulaiman Live
Bollywood Parks is hosting the Indian musical duo at the Rajmahal Theatre. The duo will entertain guests with a fusion performance along with Rajasthani folk musicians. Playback singers Bhoomi Trivedi, Vipul Mehta and Raj Pandit will also be on stage. Tickets Dh49 for the concert only. Performance is included in the price of the standard ticket to the themepark of Dh99. Buffet dinner will be available at Dh24. dubaiparksandresorts.com
Park Street Brunch
The Dubai group Park Street Band, known for their covers of hit Bengali, as well as English songs, will perform at the Park Street Brunch, celebrating all things Bengali, from music to food inspired by Kolkata’s famed Park Street. At Club Everest, Astoria Hotel, Bur Dubai, 1.30pm. Music artists Rishi Chanda (Parash Pathor, Hip Pocket) and Chiradeep Lahiri (Parash Pathor, Krosswindz) along with Dubai based nightingale star Nishita Charles will also join the party. Food and beverage packages start at Dh49. Call 04-3291772
Zhara Festival 2019
The international music festival, presented by Zhara TV and Berin Iglesias Art, will host Russian, Azerbaijani and Ukrainian artists – Grigory Leps, Emin, Vremya I Steklo, Leonid Agutin, Valeriya, Ivanushki International, Maruv, Artik & Asti, Alexandr Panayotov, Olga Buzova, Albina Janabaeva, Slava, Rodriguezzz, Julianna Karaulova and Elina Chaga. At Azure Beach Dubai. Doors open at 6.30pm, with performances from 8pm. Tickets from Dh400. azure-beach.com
Cinco De Mayo
Celebrate the Mexican festival with true Latin American fervour.
■ At Zoco in Al Habtoor City indulge in a brunch feast while grooving to the tunes of a live Mariachi Duo. Chef Manuel Sanchez will be cooking age-old traditional Mexican creations of his own, while you enjoy traditional beverages from 12.30-4pm. Call 04-4370044.
■ At Muchachas in Holiday Inn Express it’s Mextravaganza with a special edition of the romantic More Amor. Call 04-3275878.
■ Tribeca is draping its walls with Mexican buntings and firing up the tortillas for a limited- edition Cinco de Mayo brunch, from 1-5pm and 7-11pm. At JA Ocean View Hotel, JBR. Dh225 with soft beverages, Dh349 for the house package and Dh399 for the premium package. Call 050-3456067.
■ At Palapa, The Pointe, mark the occasion feasting on a menu of authentic Mexican and seafood bites, dulce treats and free-flowing beverages with the Friday brunch. Get some moves with the salsa instructors coming alive to live music. Dh165 for the soft package and Dh255 for the house package, 12-4pm. Call 04-568 4657
Afrocentric Closing Party
Queen of soulful South African House music Monique Bingham will be closing the season at Pure Sky Lounge, Hilton Dubai The Walk. Resident DJs GB and Cory Centric will be on support playing South African House classics as well as present day hits. Doors open 8pm, free before 10pm, Dh50 thereafter.
Call 058-5080860
Red Party
The signature celebration takes places once a year in every Nikki Beach location in Europe. Guests enjoy a day of poolside indulgence with high-energy beats and global-inspired cuisine. An afternoon of Flamenco-themed fun while resident DJs Mademoiselle Sabah, Alexis Nohra and Mert Yenidunya, weaving track after track from 12-9pm. At Nikki Beach, Pearl Jumeirah. Call 04-3766162.
The Half Hours: 3 Comedy Specials!
To mark Dubomedy’s 11th birthday, they launch a new series celebrating their diverse alumni as they debut 30-minute Stand-up Comedy Specials. The performance will feature brand-new specials by Mish’al Eskander, Sundeep Fernandes and Liz Bains. Co-hosted by Ali Al Sayed and Mina Liccione. At Gate Avenue, DIFC Pop-up, 7.30pm. Ages 13+ . Free, register by emailing rsvp@dubomedy.com with your names and number of guests.
‘Dil Hi To Hai’
Theatrical representation based on the life and works of the renowned Indian poet Mirza Ghalib, showcased through ghazals and fusion kathak infused into theatre. At Emirates International School Auditorium. Ticket from Dh50, doors opn at 6pm, show at 7.30pm. Call 058-5391231. qtickets.com
FootVolley Tournament
Wavebreaker Beach Club will host the team sport that demands excellent balance, ball control, focus and quick reflexes. Open for everyone – children or adults, go alone or take your team. Dh100 participation including beach access, 20 per cent discount on food and beverages, 9.30am to sunset. Call 050-9471898
Russian Music Fest: Rock Legends in Dubai
Masters of Russian rock Kipelov, Nogu Svelo, Chaif, Crossroadz and Zemlyane will perform for the first time in Dubai at the music festival at Jumeirah Beach Hotel. Experience a diverse range of Russian rock music, from heavy metal to classic rock. Tickets start from Dh195. Doors open at 6.30pm, concert at 7.30pm. Call 050-7686418. mpremiere.com
Knockout Night
An adrenaline pumping night bringing together 30 martial arts specialists for 15 bouts of high energy fights and a celebrity audience including YouTube sensation KSI and British professional boxer Amir Iqbal Khan. at Five Palm Jumeirah, 7pm. Tickets start from Dh500. Fights will also be live streamed on Fite TV. knockout.ae
Kickers Anniversary
Celebrate the 4th anniversary of Kickers, Dubai Sports Village. Celebrate for a marathon 14 hours from 12pm until 2am, with beverages starting from Dh10, unlimited food on offer as DJ Trina entertains until 5pm, followed by a live band from 6-9pm, and a closing set by DJ Joe. dsc.ae
RAS AL KHAIMAH
Mayfest 2019
A musical extravaganza featuring a multitude of acts and performances from sundown and beyond. Today, rave to the beats of French DJ and singer Willy William (pictured). Pre-party at the foam party an enjoy mixes, stage shows and a hearty flow of beverages. Concert from 10pm onwards following which guests can head to Club Inferno with DJs Baur and Nejtrino taking over. Tomorrow, theres a pink pool party lined up, followed by a masquerade party. Call 07-2020000
Foot Volley Tournament at Wavebreaker Image Credit: Supplied
Park Streek Band Image Credit: Supplied
Musical Brothers Salim-Sulaiman Image Credit: Supplied
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Mother’s Day Gift Guide: The Finest Private Island Meals For Spoiling Mom

Jade Mountain Resort’s Anse Chastanet Beach tented dinner at sunset Jade Mountain Resort There’s nothing more classic on Mother’s Day than starting the day’s celebrations with breakfast in bed, but a delicious meal overlooking clear blue seas from one’s very own private island is an upgrade most moms can get behind. Whether it’s breakfast, lunch, or dinner, taking in a meal from the vantage point of a relaxing tropical paradise will undoubtedly delight.
The world’s oceans are full of islands offering a truly exclusive experience where only one group of guests is accepted at a given time, but a majority of “private islands” actually have a small number of villas on them, while still working hard to maintain privacy for every visitor. Of course, renting out entire islands with all their villas is almost always an option, too. Whether guests have every scrap of land to themselves or not, each of these private islands ensures a luxury food experience certain to spoil Mom. A beautiful, locally-sourced meal at Cayo Espanto Cayo Espanto
Cayo Espanto, Belize
Belize’s coastline is a patchwork of private islands, but none are as luxe as Cayo Espanto . It’s only a seven minute boat ride from the tourist hub of San Pedro, but it feels worlds away. Prior to arrival, the resort gathers its guest’s preferences for every meal, including snacks and drinks, so Chef Patrick, a graduate of the California Culinary Academy, can tailor a culinary experience to every visitor. While everything served on Cayo Espanto is locally-sourced, artfully crafted, and beautifully-plated, it’s the dinner setup that will really take mom’s breath away. Delicate lights strung over a candlelit table with a pathway of flowers leading up to it, with butlers on hand to welcome you to the meal is everything a private island meal celebrating mom should be.
Villas range from $1,595 to $3,395 per night, depending on the season.
Jade Mountain, St. Lucia
Families can up the ante for celebrating the mothers in their lives this Mother’s Day with the Ultimate Castaway Dinner at Anse Mamin Beach in St. Lucia. Guests staying at Jade Mountain resort can schedule a surprise three-course dinner on the resort’s private, second beach to treat their wonderful mothers. Just a short stroll down a walkway from the main beach or a quick water taxi ride, families arrive at a candlelit walkway leading to their beautifully decorated tent. For dinner, mothers can expect a fresh gourmet meal made by ingredients hand-picked from the resorts on-site organic farm. Think rainforest herb-seared scallops, Chateaubriand, and giant salt Prawns. Toasting mom from the shores of a remote island beach while taking in the cotton-candy colored sunset is the Mother’s Day dreams are made of.
Villas range from $1,385 – $3,665 per night, depending on the season Dining by the sea on North Island North Island Seychelles
North Island, Seychelles
Give mom the royal treatment at the Seychelles North Island , the private island where Prince William and The Duchess of Cambridge honeymooned. Here the chef meets with each guest individually to create meals tailored to their specific preferences, accompanying meals with wine from an extensive onsite cellar. The North Island’s staff will set up candlelit dinners anywhere on the island as desired, including in the villas and on the beaches, bringing bespoke to the next level — and then some. This resort has mastered the art of luxury indulgence, and it tastes divine.
Rates upon request Four Seasons Voavah from above Four Seasons
Four Seasons Voavah, Maldives
Luxury doesn’t get much more private than this. In the Maldives, Four Seasons has locked down the world’s first exclusive-use UNESCO hideaway, transforming an already stunning, natural beauty into the apex of supreme luxury. The Four Seasons Voavah in the Baa Atoll features villas tucked into unreal greenery encircled by the purest white sand beaches. Dining comes straight from the surrounding sea, offering recipes from Chinese, Japanese, Sri Lankan, Indian, Maldivian, Italian, Lebanese, and Moroccan cuisines. Mom can enjoy these culinary experiences from her Mother’s Day villa, or at a candlelit soiree in the Beach House.
Rates upon request
Orpheus Island, Australia
Nestled in the Great Barrier Reef is Orpheus Island, Australia , a gem within a gem that lucky visitors can visit while indulging in the this resort’s trademark luxury. The island itself is home to a national park home to some of Australia’s most remarkable creatures, with the world’s largest barrier reef right offshore ready to be explored. Australia is a country of great wines, which are complemented by the local fare served up by the onsite chef. The most incredible of their dining experiences is Mother’s Day perfection: an intimate six course dinner for two served on the Island’s starlit pier, with teeming sea life swimming below while the vast sky twinkles with stars above.
Villas costs $2000+ per night, depending on season Dinner at Laucala is always a beautiful event Laucala
Laucala Island, Fiji
25 villas, designed in an upscale Fijian fashion, adorn the remote island of Laucala . Some villas are perched on high while others are tantalizingly close to the water’s edge, creating a variety of private island perspectives depending on what Mom wants. While the island does have restaurants where guests might run into each other, Laucala offers what they call “dining by design”, which means customized menus in private dining locations: amid the jungle, along a jetty, in guests’ villas, whatever the heart desires. Every mom is different, but there will be something here for her no matter her preference.
Rates upon request
Ali Wunderman is a travel writer focusing on what’s good to eat and drink around the world. Follow her adventures on Instagram . Ali Wunderman Contributor Ali Wunderman is a freelance journalist focusing on food and beverage, travel, wildlife and the environment, and outdoor adventure, among a wide range of topics. Her wor… Read More

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Amid poll frenzy, it’s business as usual at Majnu Ka Tilla

Amid poll frenzy, it’s business as usual at Majnu Ka Tilla May 6, 2019 [ultimatesocial count=”true” networks=”facebook,twitter,google,print,mail”]
By Soibam Rocky Singh, Read the original article here.
Only Tibetan refugees born in India between 1959 and June 30, 1987, have the right to vote in the country
With less than a week to go for the Lok Sabha election in Delhi, the Capital is bustling with poll-related activities. But it is business as usual at ‘Majnu Ka Tilla’, a cramped refugee colony located on the west bank of the Yamuna.
An open gate adorned with colourful Buddhist decorations and worn-out posters leads to the intertwined alleys of the colony that are thronged by tourists, college students, shoppers and foodies looking for authentic thukpa (Tibetan noodle soup).
There are shops selling budget fashion and footwear, jewellery and semi-precious stones, Tibetan artefacts, and a string of restaurants offering Tibetan cuisine. When not attending to customers, some of the shopkeepers could be seen watching popular Hindi comedy shows or reality shows on their smartphones.
The mood inside the colony, officially called New Aruna Nagar Colony, is in stark contrast to the rest of Delhi, which has been engulfed in poll frenzy.
Karma Dorjee, president of the colony’s resident welfare association, said: “ Hum party-bazi main itna ruchi nahi rakhte. Hum ko itna fayda to hota nahi hai. [We do not engage in politics as we do not get anything out of it].”
Born in Arunachal Pradesh in 1959, Mr. Dorjee said there were only a handful of residents who are eligible to vote. “I can vote,” he added.
When asked about the lack of poll-related activities in the colony, Mr. Dorjee pointed to a bunch of letters sent by the Election Commission to the colony’s residents. “We do take part in the election process. The EC official comes, checks the documents, and after some inquiry we get the election documents,” he said.
Mr. Dorjee said there are around 375 permanent families settled in the colony, with a total of around 3,500 to 4,000 refugees. He, however, had no clue about the number of residents who have acquired Indian voting rights. A settlement since 1962
Giving a brief history of how the colony was formed, Mr. Dorjee said that in 1959, when the initial exodus from Tibet took place, following the footsteps of the Dalai Lama, many had stayed back at the border towns hoping that things would go back to normal.
But after the 1962 India-China war, those who had stayed back realised that it was going to be a long-drawn process. They were then settled at Majnu Ka Tilla in 1962, said Mr. Dorjee. Who can vote?
Sonam Norbu Dagpo, Secretary of Department of Information and International Relations, the Central Tibetan Administration based in Dharamshala, said that Tibetan refugees born in India between 1959 and June 30, 1987, can acquire Indian citizenship by birth. “As citizens they have all the rights. The remaining refugees are on residential permit [RP] or residential certificate [RC], which have to be renewed periodically,” he said. When asked if there was any official figure on the number of Tibetan-origin Indians who have voting rights, Mr. Dagpo said there are none.
“Also, I do not think the number will be big. Reason being, voting rights are only available to those who are born between 1959 and 1987,” he said. Basic issues
In his mid 60s, Sonam Dorjee, who, along with his wife, runs a small clothing shop in the well-known Monastery Market near Kashmere Gate ISBT, said he was not really interested in politics.
He, however, said that the issues which need highlighting were the usual — electricity, water, development etc.
Mr. Sonam Dorjee said his parents moved to Delhi in 1969, before which they were in Darjeeling. Mr. Dorjee now lives in Dharamshala.
He was particularly joyful that the Indian government has been very keen in preserving and flourishing of the Tibetan culture and tradition. Looking ahead
Asked whether he hopes to return to his country in his lifetime, Mr. Sonam Dorjee exuded hope: “Within the Dalai Lama’s lifetime something will come up for us.” He said the Dalai Lama was their guru and they as followers will continue to follow him wherever he takes them.
Mr. Karma Dorjee said that the residents of Majnu ka Tilla have been offering prayers in the temple inside the colony for the well-being of the Dalai Lama since the news broke in April of him being hospitalised with a chest infection.
“We have been offering prayers every day from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. at the temple. Besides, we have been serving food to the people at the Nigambodh Ghat,” he said, adding that the prayers will continue till May 4.
“Nobody had thought that we would be here for the long haul. Looking at the circumstances today, it [the Tibetan conundrum] is not going to get solved any sooner,” said Mr. Karma Dorjee.
“China toh pagal ho gaya hai [China has gone mad], but we will continue with our struggle,” he quipped. He also pointed out that it has become very difficult for Tibetan refugees to take an NOC (no-objection certificate) to protest in the Capital. “Earlier, we used to even gather at the gate of the Chinese embassy, but then it got restricted to Teen Murti, and then India Gate and now Jantar Mantar. In recent times, we have been blocked here at the colony gate itself,” he said.
“We have to fight for our country. We will not lose hope,” he added. Dwindling population
Overall, there are probably around 1,50,000 Tibetans outside Tibet out of which one lakh are in India, said Mr. Dagpo.
“Many of them now go abroad. There is a resettlement programme in many countries, including Canada,” he added.
“Once our kids are out of college, they need to find jobs and opportunities. So whoever gets the chance to go abroad are going there,” said Mr. Karma Dorjee
“We do not get government job. All that we get is jobs in private companies. We are also paid less by these companies as we are refugees,” he said, adding: “That is not the case with foreign countries. Once you become a citizen, everything is equal. They will even enlist you for jobs”.
“ Magar yaha jab tak piche nahi padenge, koi nahi dega [Here, until you chase it, nobody is going to give you anything],” he said laughing.

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Top Indian Restaurants in Zurich

Filed in Businesses & Services , Family , Food and Drink , Restaurants , Switzerland , Things To Do by newinzurich on May 5, 2019 • 0 Comments Top Indian Restaurants in Zurich
If you love Indian cuisine and are looking for a great place to have a delicious curry in Zurich take a look at some of the recommendations for Indian Restaurants in Zurich we have collated. If we’ve not got your favourite Indian restaurant listed, please let us know by adding it in the comments below. Top Indian Restaurants in Zurich Tamarind Hill Indian Restaurant
Great curries with a good selection of both meat, vegetarian and fish dishes with attentive and very friendly service. It gets busy, so booking in advance recommended. In addition to the Oerlikon restaurant, they now have a second restaurant in Birmenstdorfstrasse 427, 8055 Zurich.
Address: Schaffhauserstrasse 306, 8050 Zurich
Tel: +41 41435352595
For directions to the Tamarind Hill Restaurant Oerlikon on Google Maps click here. Tandoori BBQ Restaurant
We’ve been going to the Tandoori BBQ Restaurant from the time it used to be located in Stauffacher. Now situated in Seefeld, the restaurant is still a favourite and this time has great outdoor seating too. As the name suggests they offer some fabulous tandoori dishes as well as great kebabs and a good selection of wonderful curries. The weekday lunch buffet is always great value too.
Address: Seefeldstrasse 96, 8008 Zurich, Zurich 8008
Tel: +41 44 202 00 21
For directions to the Tandoori BBQ on Google Maps click here. Tadka
Delicious authentic Indian Food from curries to Tandoori specialities and lots more. As well as indoor seating Tadka also boasts an outdoor beer garden where you can eat outside and enjoy your wonderful curry alfresco. Very friendly service.
Address: Quellenstrasse 49, Zurich 8005
Tel: +41 44 578 06 41
For directions to Tadka on Google Maps click here. Vulkan
A very good selection of North Indian curries and specialities. Lots of choice and friendly service. Also does take away.
Address: Klingenstrasse 33, Zurich, 8005 Switzerland
Tel: 044 273 76 67
For directions to the Vulkan Restaurant on Google Maps click here. Restaurant Malabar
Another Indian restaurant in Oerlikon the Malabar in Oerlikon describes its cooking as “New Indian cuisine”. They specialise in Southern Indian food and offer a good selection of fish, meat and vegetarian and vegan dishes. They serve Thalis and dosas too. The also run Cookery courses at their premises as well.
Address: Wallisellenstrasse 11, Zurich 8050,
Tel: + 41 44 311 31 17
For directions to the Malabar Restaurant on Google Maps click here. Kerala
Also located in Oerlikon, the Kerala also offers great variety of South Indian dishes. As well as fish and meat, there are plenty of vegetarian options too.
Address: Hofwiesenstrasse 188, Zurich 8057
Tel: +41 44 364 45 77
For directions to the Kerala Restaurant on Google Maps click here. Kormasutra
A popular Indian restaurant in the centre of town with a good selection of curries and tandoori dishes. They also do take away service.
Address: Mühlegasse 5, Zurich 8001
Tel: + 41 44 252 48 48
For directions to Kormasutra on Google Maps click here. Hiltl
Hiltl is not really an Indian Restaurant per se, rather a vegetarian restaurant which also offers vegan options and usually a good selection of Indian curries and Indian inspired cuisine.
Address: Sihlstrasse 28, Zurich 8001, Switzerland
Tel: +41 44 227 70 00

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Leaves, stems and flowers

Leaf, Stem and Flower Vegetables
Leafy vegetables is the name often given to plants where the part eaten is the leaf, the leaf stem and in the case of the Globe Artichoke, the flower bud or as in cauliflower and broccoli, the flower bud and stem, these are eaten when the parts are young and tender. Most have a short growing time and were available through most of the growing season although hot dry weather can make the plants tough and bitter and causes them to bolt, (produce flowers and seed) since many are annuals.
Sometimes types of leaf vegetables are called greens or pot herbs, these are most often ones where the leaf and stem are steamed or boiled and are often cooked with a piece of cured pork for flavoring and often served with pepper sauce and/or vinegar. Often refers to turnip tops, beet tops, mustard leaf as well as similar type plants, as well as a large variety of wild plants, which will not be covered here.
Most domesticated plants used as greens are quick growing cool weather species that are frost resistant, these qualities alone helped make them important vegetables in the past, due to the fact they can be planted early in the spring to help with the lack of Vitamin C caused by winter, some in milder climates will winter over and produce a quick crop during winter warm spells and right after sprint thaw, for someone suffering from scurvy this could be a life saver.
Many of these greens can be found in the produce section of large grocery stores and in local farmers markets and can also easily be grown in home gardens.
Asparagus Family/ Asparagaceae
Asparagus: Asparagus officinalis
Asparagus is a perennial spring vegetable in which the young shoots of the plant are eaten. It was once considered a part of the Lily Family but it and its near relatives are classified in their own family Asparagaceae, the asparagus being the only member of the family cultivated for food. The wild asparagus has its origins most likely in the coastal regions of the Mediterranean; it was know to ancient Egyptians, as well as the Greeks and the Romans all which held it in high esteem. The asparagus does well in the wild in any area it is introduced to, so tracking its exact origins down is difficult.
It is not known exactly when it was brought to America, but Thomas Jefferson was fond of it and had a large area for the growing of it at Monticello. It is most likely that it came with most of our other common vegetables with the early settlers.
Asparagus comes in three colors, the common green, purple and white. The purple is a mutant strain popular in Italy although it is sometimes seen in the United States. White asparagus is the common green type that has had the shoots kept from the sun by piling a loose layer of dirt over the stalks while they are growing, this cause the plant shoot to stay white because with out sunlight the chlorophyll needed for photosynthesis does not form, causing a more tender and delicately flavored shoot. The extra labor involved makes white asparagus more costly.
Amaranth Family/Amaranthaceae)
The plants in this family are cold tolerant and can be planted in early spring and will produce through out the summer and late into the fall.
Common Beets:Beta vulgaris subspecies vulgaris
Beets in our modern world are often not thought of as anything but a root vegetable, but the young leaves and stems make my favorite of the greens. The seed of the beet in fact is not a seed at all, but a fruiting body containing one or more seeds, these will often sprout up 2-4 plants together. When they reach a size big enough to make greens, thin by carefully pulling the excess plants and cook them with the small beet root attached.
Chard/Beta vulgaris subspecies cicla
Chard, also known as Swiss Chard or sometimes referred to as Leaf Beet in old referances, it is the same species as the common garden beet it is just a slightly different sub-species, both are descended from a wild beet called a Sea Beet that grows along the shores in the Mediterranean Sea. Popular on the European continent, it was not grown or used much in the United States till after the Civil War. Chard has green leaves but the stem which is also eaten can range from white, to yellow to red and makes a colorful pot herb, often putting it both now and in the past on tables where other type greens would not be seen.
Both of the above types of Beta vulgaris are biennials, although if planted early in the spring they sometimes have a tendency to bolt (flower and produce seed) in hot weather if planted early in the spring.
Spinach/Spinacia oleracea
Spinach is an annual that has it’s origins in the Middle East and is thought to have reached Italy in the 9th century and traveled to Spain and then the rest of Europe, reaching England in the 14th century, it made it to America through the early settlers from England and other countries.
Today it is probably safe to say that spinach is the most popular pot herb in the United States, this has not always been the case, and a 1911 Grocers Guide says it is “increasing in popularity.” Two factors contribute to the increase; one is the increase in immigrants from Italy and Sicily where the cuisine uses far more than a boiled or steamed vegetable side dish. The other is selective plant breeding, the older varieties were very quick to bolt in hot weather the newer types are more heat resistant, making it an easier crop to grow in both commercial applications and the home garden. Of course there were pretty much three generations (Starting as a comic strip in 1929) that grew up on Popeye cartoons which has been debated many times as to if it has had anything to do with the increase in spinach sales, one has to think it has at least a minor factor in it. One other use for spinach is the juice, in the time period depicted here, it is the juice from cooking spinach, often used as a green food color, and today in a world where some folks are moving away from artificially made products this use is coming back.
Spinach like most greens is very cold resistant and can be planted very early in the spring and can also be planted in late summer and the fall and in an area with a mild winter will slowly produce all winter long in some case. In most cases it at least will survive the winter and can be a very early spring harvest till they bolt when the weather gets hot.
There are also greens sold as seed and as finished greens that go by the names of New Zealand Spinach and Chinese Spinach, these are not true spinach and any popularity they have gained is in the 20th century later, beyond the scope here.
Cabbage Family/Brassicaceae
The plants in this family are very cold tolerant, and can be planted in the spring and due well being planted in late summer, often producing after light frosts. Some of the most well know are actually sub-species of the same species, Brassica oleracea, which is a wild cabbage that grows in Southern and Western Europe along the coasts. The wild cabbage can be used for food, the leaves resemble turnip leaves.
This wild cabbage was among the early vegetable crops grown in Europe, although exact date is unknown, some of the primitive forms of the cultivars were around in at least the 7th or 8th century BC, thanks to careful selection of the mutations of the wild cabbage.
Some cultivars of this group contain pigments called anthocyanin type, these give the plant red, purple or blue colors, depending on the Ph of the soil, these are the same pigments seen in blueberries and other fruits, Neutral Ph gives a purple cast, alkaline a red and acidic a blue.
Plants of this family also can be fermented with Lactobacillales also known as lactic acid bacteria, these bacteria are what sours milk and sourdough, they convert some of the simple sugars in the plants to lactic acid. The acid formed as well as the salt normally added to such foods preserves it from spoilage from other microbes, two common examples are sauerkraut and Kim Chee.
Broccoli/Brassica oleracea subspecies Italica
Broccoli is a very close relative of Cauliflower, developed in Italy by at least the 6th century BC, both the unopened flower head and the flower stems are the part most often eaten. Broccoli’s cultivation and use in America is a bit murky, most sources say it’s origins in the United States dates to the 1920’s and the mass influx of Italian immigrants. Yet is does show up in a few 19th century cook books although often the recipe calls for either broccoli or cauliflower. Also Thomas Jefferson records that he grew broccoli.
The answer may be in reference books from the era:
The Market Assistant, Containing a Brief Description of Every Article of Human Food Sold in the Public Markets of the Cities of New York, Boston, Philadelphia, and Brooklyn.
By Thomas Farrington De Voe
New York: Hurd and Houghton, 1867.
“Broccoli.–This excellent plant is a variety of the cauliflower, but considered not quite so delicate in flavor, the head or flower of which being somewhat of a purple cast, while that of the cauliflower is of a creamy white. However, the qualities and varieties of both broccoli and cauliflower have become, by cultivation, so nearly alike–especially of the white varieties–that it requires the botanist to distinguish between them. Broccoli is in season from September to November, and may be kept longer if hung up by the roots in a cool place.”
GROCER’S ENCYCLOPEDIA
ARTEMAS WARD
1911
“BROCCOLI: a variety of the common cabbage produced by cultivation. It is very similar to the Cauliflower, but more highly colored. It is not grown as much as formerly, as Cauliflower is now in the market nearly all the year.”
So is broccoli period or not, an interesting question, notice the description of the color in the first one, that may be referencing to one of the cultivars of cauliflower containing pigments of the anthocyanin type. This pretty much explains the first reference, but makes the second confusing, why did he say it was a similar to cauliflower, a cauliflower with the anthocyanin pigments are not hard to mistake, they are just colored cauliflower, and to be truthful it is hard to say broccoli resembles cauliflower and vice-versa. But there is another little known sub-species of Brassica oleracea, often called Romanesco Broccoli or Brassica oleracea sub-species Romanesco a plant that has green (or sometimes colored) heads with a look more like but not exactly, like cauliflower. This is making a slight comeback today and is sometimes touted as a new cross between broccoli as we commonly know it and cauliflower; it may be this, but dates back a lot longer, perhaps over 2000 years.
I will admit, this problem with broccoli has me thinking the above statements are right, but I must admit I’m not 100% sure, I am not saying broccoli should not be used in the historical camp, but I will say I would have a hard time justifying it based on the evidence I’ve seen.
Brussels Sprouts/Brassica oleracea subspecies Gemmifera
Brussels Sprouts are very close relative to the common head cabbage, Brussels Sprouts it form small heads 1-1 ½ inches in diameter at the base of the leaf stem. Most likely a mutant of the common cabbage, and popular in Belgium, it may have originated there, the name hints it was, thought to be one of the newer of this species it does not show up in written accounts till around the 13th to 15th century.
Most likely brought to America by the French, it is one of many plants mentioned by Thomas Jefferson that were grown in his gardens. It was not a popular vegetable in the United States till into the 20th century when it became an important commercial crop in California. Seed catalogs offered it, but few mentions of it are found in cook books of the time period.
Cabbage/Brassica oleracea subspecies apitata
Cabbage was one of the most important vegetables in the 19th century diet, it was easy to grow and harvest, it produced a lot of crop per acre, it kept well in a cellar or similar cool storage, also when changed into sauerkraut through a fermentation process involving lactic bacteria it is preserved very well and can be kept a year or more in a wooden barrel. This fermented cabbage retained a lot of the vitamin C in the cabbage, making it an important scurvy preventive.
The true cabbage as we know it with the tight heads established itself as a type 1000-1500 years ago and had spread beyond the coastal areas into the interior of Europe and became one of the most important crops, it grew well in the cooler climate of Europe caused by the climatic change known as the Little Ice Age. Cabbage was one of the first crops brought to America by the settlers; it has remained a popular crop for truck farmers even today. In this modern world though in the United States, the majority of cabbage eaten, is eaten raw in the form of coleslaw, sauerkraut, even though not needed as a preserved item, still accounts for second place for cabbage use in the United States, most sauerkraut today is actually canned, making storage a lot easier.
Our common head cabbage comes in 3 distinct types; white/green, red and Savoy, with the white being the most popular:
White cabbage (Brassica oleracea subspecies capitata type alba) is the most used variety of cabbage. There are many cultivators suitable for different climates and growing conditions. The heads range from dark green to almost white, fairly flat to round and loose leafed to tight. These are the least expensive types to buy in the grocery store and are suited to most dishes.
Red Cabbage: (Brassica oleracea subspecies capita type rubra) is simply a type white cabbage that showed signs of pigments of the anthocyanin type and were bred to increase the content, a common occurrence in other cole crops. These were bred for the color they add to dishes and are often used as color in coleslaw. Red cabbage was often pickled in brine and vinegar in the past. This pigment is also an antioxidant and red cabbage does keep longer is storage.
Savoy Cabbage: (Brassica oleracea subspecies sabauda) is a type of cabbage with a wrinkled leaf, thought to originate in the Savoy region in the border of region of France, Italy and Switzerland, this type, most likely dates to the early 16th century, there is mention of it in 19th century references as being available in this country; the texture this type is more tender and it is milder flavored.
Cauliflower/Brassica oleracea subspecies Botrytis
Cauliflower is like broccoli in that the flower buds and stems are the part eaten as a vegetable. Another relative of the cabbage, it was developed in the northeastern Mediterranean region and dates to at least 600 BC. It appeared in America in the late 18th or early 19th century, accounts from the period indicate in the markets of this country it was a rather expensive vegetable. Mark Twain said, “Cauliflower is nothing but a cabbage with a college education.”
Cauliflower was most often boiled, steamed, used in soups and was a popular vegetable to pickle, often with small onions and cut up bell peppers. Several references do mention different types of battered and fried recipes very late in the 19th and the very early 20th Century, dish that remains popular today
Collards and Kale/Brassica oleracea subspecies Acephala
Collards and kale are different varieties of the same species, generally speaking if it has a smooth leaf it is a collard and if is has a curly, ruffled leaf it is kale, plus kale tends to have a greyer leaf although other colors such as red and purple are often seen.
These are simply a slightly improved version of the true wild cabbage. The collard and kale were important food plants in the gardens of the Middle Ages, they thrive well with minimal work and cultivation, the can be sewn broadcast and harrowed in and will tend to choke out the weeds, a plus for the primitive agriculture practiced in this era. It does not keep well fresh, but like other members of the family it can be fermented and preserved that way.
These plants had made there way to the United States by the 17th Century. Collards are often associated with the cuisine of the south eastern United States, in fact in many regions of the south they can be planted in the early fall and harvested in the early winter, collards are very tolerant of very cool weather and frost, of course the same is true about kale.
Kale used to be known as borecole and collards as colewort, shortening and a slight changing of the way they are pronounced gives us today’s common names. Although collards remained popular as a pot herb in the Southeast United States, kale had slipped to the point that for many years it was used as a garnish, plus some ornamental versions were developed. (Edible but often bitter) In recent years it is seeing a big comeback and is being used again as a pot herb.
Kohlrabi/Brassica oleracea subspecies Gongylodes
Kohlrabi is another close relative of the cabbage; it is a bit unusual in that it is raised for its edible stem which swells up and is 2-3 inches in diameter when ready to harvest and use. Sometimes in the past it was called a Dutch Turnip or Cabbage turnip. In fact kohl is German for cabbage and rabi is a variant of turnip in German.
The exact origins of the kohlrabi are not known but it was known in 16th century Europe and came to America by at least the early 19th Century. Kohlrabi has never had the popularity in America that it has had in central Europe, it has remained mostly a crop of home gardeners and small local produce farmers. Seldom seen in most produce sections of stores, if one does not raise their own, small local farmers markets are the best bet to find it in season. It can be and is used in about any recipe that cabbage or turnips are used in, although it tends to be milder than either of them.
Mustard/Brassica juncea
One of several species of mustards, this one often used for pot herbs is called Brown Mustard, Indian Mustard, Chinese Mustard or Leaf Mustard. All species of mustards are closely related to radish and turnips. The wild versions grow through out Asia and were introduced to Europe via the trade routes and to American through the early settlers; mustard has escaped cultivation and in many places grows wild as a weed.
Mustard for greens does best in cooler damper weather and is not very tolerant of hot dry weather as far as harvesting tender greens. It will start to produce greens in 3-4 weeks after planting in most cases and is best planted in the early spring and the fall.
Radish/Raphanus sativus
Radish can be and was utilized in the past for greens, seldom used for that in the United States today, there cold tolerance and some of the varieties quick growth meant in the past they could be grown quickly and fresh greens could be picked in about 2 weeks making them perhaps the fastest growning green, important in the past to help cure cases of scurvy.
Turnip Greens/Brassica rapa subspecies rapa
Turnips are another root crop that the tops can be used for greens when young and tender. Like most pot herbs they are best in cool damp weather and get tough and bitter in hot dry weather. Although there are cultivators of turnips that do not produce large edible roots, most home gardeners plant turnips in the early spring and late summer, then thin the stands using the plants removed for greens and giving the ones left room to produce nice roots.
Parsley Family:Apiaceae
This family has several plants that are used for food, both greens and roots, also a lot of spices and herbs are in the family such as cumin, parsley, dill and many others. Also it contains some that are deadly poison such as hemlock.
Daucus carota subsp. sativus
Not often done today, carrot tops make fine greens/pot herbs, there are unfounded rumors that these are poison, but totally untrue, although the tops of the similar parsnip should never be eaten or handled more than needed, they can cause skin irritation and worse to the throat and esophagus if eaten.
Celery/Apium graveolens subspecies dulce
This is a crop that has it’s origins in the Mediterranean region and was well known to the Greeks and Romans, the stalks we know today were not often eaten because with out careful cultivation they are tough and bitter. The leaves and seeds were used for both medicine and as flavoring. And still are today, making it a food as well as a spice and herb.
It is thought that around the 16th century Italians developed less bitter types and learned to blanch it while it was growing. This consists of protecting the stalks from sun light with dirt, boards or other methods. This makes the whiter milder tasting celery that is so popular. Today there are self blanching types for the home gardener, but the quality is not up to commercial standards.
Celery made its way to America most likely some time in the late 18th century or early 19th century, but it was not a popular crop till after the Civil War. In fact The Market Assistant by Thomas De Voe from 1867 does not even mention it. There are recipes that date to even before the Civil War that do have it in the ingredients but they use only a stick or two for flavoring. Originally a spring vegetable, new cultivars that were more heat restraint plus it being a vegetable that stores and ships well, as well as it being productive in green houses made this a vegetable that could often be obtained most of the year by the end of the century.
The real start of the popularity of this vegetable dates to the 1870’s and some Dutch settlers near Kalamazoo Michigan who started growing it and marketing it. By the turn of the century celery had became a popular vegetable, and was grown in many places besides Michigan, Artemas Ward in his 1911 Grocer’s Encyclopedia Mentions it was grown in New York, Michigan, Ohio, Florida, California and Bermuda assuring a supply being in season all year long.
Sunflower Family: Asteraceae
Artichoke/Cynara cardunclus subspecies scolymus
The true Artichoke or Globe Artichoke ( Not to be confused with the Jerusalem Artichoke a root vegetable.) is a plant in the thistle family, the unopened flower bud it the part eaten. Both the leaves of the bud and the core, known as the heart are eaten. The modern artichoke is an improved cultivated variety of another member of the thistle family known as the Cardoon which is native to the western and central Mediterranean regions.
Not a popular vegetable in the past in either the United States or England, it was most likely brought to American by the Spanish and French settlers, it does show up in a few 19th century American recipe books, grocery lists and seed catalogs. It gained more popularity in this country in the early 1900’s, when it became an important commercial crop in California, partly because of the influx of immigrants from Italy.
Lettuce/Lactuca salitva
Lettuce is cold tolerant and the season can run from early spring to late fall, it has a tendency to bolt in hot dry conditions. Lettuce was most likely developed from the wild or Prickly Lettuce /Latctuca serriola, a plant native to Eurasia and North Africa and now naturalized in North America, up to perhaps 6,000 years ago somewhere in the Mediterranean region. Lettuce was said to have first been brought to North America by Christopher Columbus on his second voyage and was most likely brought by every group of settlers who came to colonize America because of how fast it grows from planting to harvest.
Today when most people think about lettuce, they think of the tight heads of lettuce you see most times in any produce section of any store. This is not the lettuce of the 19th century, today this type is called iceberg but was originally called crisphead, the iceberg name came along when it got to be common to ship this type in ice packed rail cars in the 1920. This type of lettuce became popular because it was easy to ship and kept better than the loose leaf types. The seed for this type came on the market in the mid-1890’s and could have been seen in a few home gardens.
The loose leaf lettuce was the common type of the era although some cultivators such as the Romaine do form loose heads and was a common variety grown. Because these types did not ship well with the methods of the time, it was one of the first crops to be grown commercially in greenhouses in or near large cities, although the cost made it to expensive for the working classes. Thomas Farrington De Voe
mentions this practice in his 1867 book, “The Marketing Assistant.”
Today we most often think of eating lettuce raw as a salad or a garnish on a sandwich, but in the past it was often also added to soups. For the historic cook that is buying produce, the Romaine that is fairly common in most any produce section is very period correct and is often easier to find and better quality than some of the loose leaf type you see and the Romaine will travel and keep better in camp.

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Top 10 Things to See and Do in Hyderabad, India

May 4, 2019 0
Along the Musi River in the southern Indian state of Telangana is the historic city of Hyderabad . With a rich history that dates back to 1591 and includes eras of rule by the Qutb Shahi Dynasty, the Mughals, the Nizams of Hyderabad, and the British Raj, the city is a gold mine for history lovers. Combine its heritage with its world-famous cuisine and cultural attractions and you’ll find there are dozens of things to see and do in Hyderabad.
While this is a city that has a lot to offer curious travelers, it’s also so large that it can be easy to get overwhelmed by all of the options. That’s why we have compiled a list of sites to visit, restaurants to eat at, and things to do for all types of travelers, whether you’re a foodie, a history enthusiast, a culture lover, or all three. These are the top 10 things to see and do in Hyderabad, India. Charminar
No trip to Hyderabad is complete without a trip to the historic city’s Old Town. There, you’ll find Charminar , a monument and mosque that was built in 1591. The historic building is a beautiful example of Indo-Islamic architecture and is known for its four magnificent arches and four fluted minarets. It is listed as an archaeological and architectural treasure by the Archaeological Survey of India.
It costs 300 rupees for foreigners to visit Charminar, which is ten times the entry fee for locals. Once you climb the narrow, winding staircases and emerge onto a balcony overlooking the city, the price is more than worth it. The balcony offers a spectacular view of much the city, including the four gates that mark the entrances to the old city.
From the balcony, you can admire the incredible architecture and even spot writing from the Quran on the walls of the central atrium. If you love history, visiting Charminar is without question, one of the top things to see and do in Hyderabad! Have Biscuits and Irani Chai at Nimrah Café and Bakery
You’re bound to burn quite a few calories as you explore Hyderabad’s Old Town on foot. Luckily, there’s a fantastic spot between Charminar and Makkah Masjid that’s sure satisfy your taste buds if you need a snack: Nimrah Café and Bakery . This amazing establishment has been offering tasty treats to Hyderabadi visitors and citizens since it opened in 1993.
Nimrah Café and Bakery is famous for their cookies, which are called biscuits in Hyderabad. There are dozens of varieties on the menu. Of them all, their buttery Osmania biscuit seems to be the most popular, but I also highly recommend the rich and sweet coconut with cherry biscuit and the flaky and crumby chocolate-cashew biscuit.
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Order some of Nimrah Café and Bakery’s milky, frothy, and flavorful Irani chai and dip your biscuits into it for an unforgettable flavor combination. This tea is unlike any I’ve ever had and is bursting with notes of cinnamon and ginger. It’s no wonder coming here is one of the best things to see and do in Hyderabad! Try the Biggest Dosa in Hyderabad at Chutneys Restaurant
If you’re traveling through Hyderabad with family or several friends, or if you just like tackling massive foods like I do, don’t miss out on trying the biggest dosa in the city. A two-and-a-half-foot-long rice and black gram Indian pancake can be found at Chutneys Restaurant in the Jubilee Hills neighborhood. It’s so big, it’s actually made for five to six people to share!
As with most types of dosa, it was served with a nutty and earthy sambar, which is a tasty vegetable-based broth, but there are other dipping options as well. I highly recommend the phenomenal peanut chutney and the sweet and refreshing coconut chutney. They’re both out of this world.
The green chili and ginger chutney packs a real gingery punch, while the red chili with ginger was had a thick, tomato base with ginger flavor throughout. It’s the ultimate Indian veg feast! If you’ve had this monster dosa before, let me know how much you managed to eat! Visit Necklace Road and the Buddha Statue of Hyderabad
One place all visitors to Hyderabad should carve out some time to explore is Necklace Road , which is named after a road of the same name in Mumbai’s Marine Drive. The area is loaded with restaurants, recreational facilities, and plazas, and there are several parks nearby as well.
But the area’s most stunning attraction is the enormous Buddha Statue of Hyderabad , which stands on Gibraltar Rock in the middle of the lake.
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The statue stands 58 feet tall and is the world’s largest monolith of Gautama Buddha. The Buddha came to rest on Gibraltar Rock two years after an accident during its transportation, which resulted in the statue falling over and killing ten people.
Today, visitors can pay 20 rupees to ride a ferry to the island and admire it up close. This massive Buddha statue is absolutely gorgeous and has lots of intricate carvings around its base. Viewing this statue up close is easily one of the best things to see and do in Hyderabad.
After you return from the Buddha Statue of Hyderabad, I suggest checking out the food stalls around Necklace Road. There is a stall there that sells a phenomenal papdi chaat and an equally delicious samosa chaat, both of which contained chickpeas, onions, and mint and tamarind chutneys that had my mouth watering. Trying them is a great way to end your Necklace Road adventure! Eat Dosas at Ram Ki Bandi
Early risers visiting Hyderabad would be remiss if they didn’t take advantage of their pre-sunset start to the day and have breakfast at Ram Ki Bandi . This legendary street food stall at Nampally opens at 3 a.m. and is only open until 8 a.m., but despite the early hours, it’s a very popular stop among locals and tourists alike. Once you try the food they serve, it’s not hard to understand why people go wild for their unique dosas!
If you only try one thing at Ram Ki Bandi, make it their pizza dosa. Unlike most dosas, which are often served with sambar and a potato mash, this Italian-inspired dosa contains traditional pizza toppings and comes dripping with hot, melted cheese. It is a magnificent, spicy way to start your day, and the wonderful coconut chutney it is served with helps calm down the heat.
If you still have room in your belly afterward, try the Chinese-inspired Szechwan cream dosa, which is sweeter and spicy and contains onion, cilantro, and other mouthwatering ingredients.
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Finally, round out your dosa breakfast with the amazing Palak Paneer dosa, or go for one of their varieties of idli, which is a soft, nutty, and savory rice cake that also contains black lentils. Try the loaded variety with herbs, spices, cheese, and paneer, as well as the more traditional version with Ram Ki Bandi’s outstanding coconut chutney.
Each dish there is a can’t-miss and makes breakfast at Ram Ki Bandi one of the top things to see and do in Hyderabad! Visit a Flower Market
One of the best things you can do in Hyderabad is visit one of the city’s flower markets. I had the pleasure of visiting the city in November, which is in the middle of festival season. Diwali was being celebrated at the time, and because of that, I was able to watch locals purchase lots of different types of flowers in preparation for their celebrations. The entire market was packed!
As with most markets in India, be prepared for a wild flurry of activity around you when you visit a flower market, especially during Diwali. As you slowly make my way down the crowded, narrow alleys of the market, check out vendors preparing beautiful flowers, delicious-looking vegetables, and much more for their customers.
It might be hard to pay attention to one thing at a time due to all of the activity around you! It’s an assault on the senses for sure, but is also an experience you won’t soon forget! Visit Golconda Fort
History buffs visiting Hyderabad will have a blast visiting Golconda Fort , which had humble beginnings as a mud fort around 1143. According to legend, a shepherd boy found an idol in the area in that year.
The king of the Kakatiya Dynasty ordered a mud fort to be built around the site when he heard about this, and the fort grew larger and became more complex over the centuries that followed.
Golconda Fort is actually a complex that is made up of four smaller forts and boasts a 10-kilometer-long outer wall and 87 bastions. The fort is noted for once housing the Koh-i-Noor Diamond and the world-famous Hope Diamond within its enormous walls. Both diamonds, as well as the Nessak Diamond, were found in the region around the fort.
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Take some time to visit the fort’s main gate and stables, which used to house animals like elephants. Then make the hike up the 360 steps to get to the very top, where you’ll find the Sri Mahakali Temple.
There you’ll also find a terrific lookout point where you can see all of Hyderabad spread out below you. Don’t overlook the boulders in the temple area, which are covered in beautiful and intricate paintings of Hindu deities. If you’re a history lover like me, this is one spot in Hyderabad you can’t afford to miss out on! Eat Exotic Southern Indian Food at Uluvacharu Restaurant
As a foodie who has eaten spectacular dishes all over the world, when I heard about the exotic Southern Indian offerings at Uluvacharu Restaurant , I didn’t hesitate to go there and check it out for myself. I’m glad I did, because if I hadn’t, I would have missed out on one of my favorite food experiences during my time in the city.
This popular restaurant operates with the goal of reinventing long-forgotten recipes. At the same time, they aim to bring authentic, unique, and original dishes together under one roof. They also want to keep ancient dishes that were prepared by their ancestors alive for current and future generations.
They do this by serving incredible dishes like their smoky Korameenu Tandoori Fish, which contains masala and other spices and is served with a mint chutney. Their crunchy and peppery Bangla Kodi, which is potato-wrapped chicken masala nuggets, is also wonderful.
There is also a spicy chicken dish called Kona Seema Kodi Vepudu, a tangy and flavorful vegetable kebab known as Pandu Marayapaka, and four outstanding pulaos. One of them, the Matka Mamsam Pulao, contained the most buttery and tender lamb I’ve ever eaten in my life.
Two of my favorite items on the menu at Uluvacharu Restaurant were the Royyala Vepudu, which are spicy river prawns with masala, cilantro, and green chilies; and the mind-blowing bamboo chicken, which consists of pieces of raw chicken that are cooked inside bamboo shoots with masala spices.
The bamboo flavor permeates the chicken and had my palate craving more! Trust me, if you’re heading to Hyderabad, you need to take one night to have dinner at Uluvacharu. There’s no doubt in my mind that it’s one of the things you must see and do in Hyderabad. Every dish is a home run! Eat Authentic Hyderabadi Biryani at Paradise Restaurant
The city of Hyderabad is practically synonymous with biryani, a layered basmati rice dish that is extremely popular throughout the Indian subcontinent. One of the best places in the city to try authentic Hyderabadi biryani is Paradise Restaurant in HITEC City.
I had the pleasure of trying four different types of biryani at Paradise Restaurant and each one was an explosion of mind-blowing flavors and sensational textures in my mouth.
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The mix of rice in their mutton biryani was wonderful, and the mutton itself was juicy and tender. The mutton bones were filled with delicious marrow that added an unexpected new layer of flavor to the dish that ultimately made it one of the most spectacular biryanis I’ve ever had in my life!
Their chicken biryani is also incredibly tender and perfectly cooked and had a delightful roasted flavor that I couldn’t get enough of. Paradise Restaurant also serves a stunning egg biryani containing a poached egg, which went really well with the rice and Indian spices.
But my favorite biryani, and the one I recommend the most, is the veg biryani. This biryani contains beans, peas, and a flavorful non-melting Indian cottage cheese called paneer. The mix of the paneer with the rice, yellow curry, vegetables, and spices was next level. This is a dish that must be eaten to truly understand how heavenly it is. If you only order one thing at Paradise Restaurant, this is the one you should get. It alone makes dinner at Paradise Restaurant one of the top things to see and do in Hyderabad! Have a Southern Indian Breakfast at Minerva Coffee Shop
There are lots of incredible spots to get veg dishes in Hyderabad, but few of them compare to the southern Indian fare that is offered at Minerva Coffee Shop . This popular restaurant has been serving flavorful and well-made southern Indian cuisine since 1987, and after I had breakfast there, I quickly realized why so many people recommended it to me.
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There’s no way to truly go wrong with any item on their menu, but I highly recommend ordering the vada, a type of savory, fried doughnut. This flaky and crispy creation has a soft interior and is served with coconut chutney, sambar, and a spicy ginger chutney. You also must try the polenta-like upma and the giant puris with various vegetable curries.
Another star on the menu is the uttapam, a savory pancake that contains curry leaves, onions, cashews, and carrot. Dip it into the curries and chutneys provided and watch your taste buds sing! Don’t miss out on this fabulous breakfast. It’s definitely one of the best things to see and do in Hyderabad! BONUS: Eat a Southern Indian Thali
When traveling through India, I highly recommend trying a thali in every city you visit. A thali is a large platter that contains lots of different Indian dishes, as well as rice, a variety of bread, or both, depending on which part of the country you’re in. When you go to Hyderabad, the best place to try an authentic southern Indian thali is Taj Mahal Restaurant .
Southern Indian thalis are mostly rice-based and you eat them with your hands, so be prepared to get your hands messy. I had never eaten rice with my hands before, but after having done it several times since then, I truly believe eating with your hands makes your food taste even better, so dig in!
It is staggering how phenomenal this thali is. From mixing the dal and rice together with my fingers, to trying the fried onion and the puris with a mixture of spinach, cabbage, and nuts, every experience was more delicious than the last. This thali came with a wonderful tomato rasam, which is unreal when it is eaten with a thin, crispy flatbread called papad.
One of my favorite elements of this thali was a curry that contained green beans, carrots, and peppers, which was easily one of the best curries I’d ever hand. Another highlight was the vada that was soaked in a watered-down curd. I usually don’t like curd, but this one was exceptional! You have to try when you come to Hyderabad!
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There’s a reason why the southern Indian city of Hyderabad is such a popular tourist destination. With a rich history that can be explored in its monuments and a delicious cuisine that is both traditional and innovative, there is so much to see and do in this amazing city. Book a trip to Hyderabad now to experience it for yourself!
NOTE: Whenever you travel, I suggest you purchase travel insurance to protect yourself in case any emergency situations come up. In my opinion, AXA Travel Insurance is the very best because it covers a wide array of issues. Buy your AXA Travel Insurance protection plan here ! Related

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May 6, 2019 – Who is Ajit Jain, the possible successor to Warren Buffett?

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Can AI Nudge Us to Make Better Choices?
The behavioral revolution in economics was triggered by a simple, haunting question: what if people don’t act rationally? This same question now vexes the technology field. In the online world, once expected to be a place of ready information and easy collaboration, lies and hate can spread faster than truth and kindness. Corporate systems, too, elicit irrational behavior. For example, when predicting sales, employees often hide bad deals and selectively report the good ones. AI stands at the crossroads of the behavioral question, with the potential to make matters worse or to elicit better outcomes from us. The key to better outcomes is to boost AI’s emotional quotient – its EQ. How? By training algorithms to mimic the way people behave in constructive relationships.
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Ramadan 2019 Iftar Review: Mint Leaf of London Dubai

Ramadan 2019 Iftar Review: Mint Leaf of London Dubai Ramadan 2019 Iftar Review: Mint Leaf of London Dubai By Monday, 06 May 2019 Digging deep into the streets of India, adding a bit of Middle Eastern touch, the unique mix and match of ingredients, Chef Pradeep Khullar’s menu is lip-smacking while remaining true to the spirit of the month Mint Leaf of London, Dubai
There is a twist here. A bit of a turn there. A few expert moves and some huge surprises – in a nutshell that’s how one can describe Chef Pradeep Khullar’s Ramadan menu at Mint Leaf of London Dubai. While last year, the restaurant had gone the British-India route, tracing its past through its cuisine, this time Khullar explores the streets of India and beyond. Street food for an Iftar menu? We were as surprised as you were – but herein lies the catch and the ingenuity. Digging deep into the streets of Delhi and elsewhere, adding a bit of Middle Eastern touch, the unique mix and match of ingredients and the sheer balance of flavours has resulted in a menu that is lip-smacking while remaining true to the spirit of the month.
The nine-course meticulously crafted menu is a melange of flavours, served with a lot of flair. It begins with a pre-starter, the Kataifi samosa – the name itself an ode to this region. This ‘samosa with a difference’ comprises potato mixture wrapped in Kaitaifi pastry (instead of the usual maida) and served with the most delicious and fresh mint yogurt chutney. Pop one in the mouth and you can’t wait for another one. But wait, there is a lot of distance to cover so on to the next course!
Followed by a cold starter, the Palak Patta chaat immediately brings back memories of home. The spinach leaf is crunchy and you can taste the faint hint of carom seeds. But what adds to the flavour are the chutneys and the bed of balsamic strawberries (yes! Perhaps it should be called a strawberry chaat then!) on which it is served. The sweet-tangy-crunchy essence blows your mind away!
During the course of our conversation, Chef Khullar explained how the starters and the small bits were perhaps more difficult to craft than the main course. And once you taste the starters, it’s easy to see why. The portions might be small but each pack in massive flavours. The choice is vast but we will break it down for you. Do not miss the achari paneer tikka stuffed in thin roomali roti or you will regret it for life. The paneer tikka is probably the most overused item on an Indian menu. You may have had it a zillion times before but there is something about this particular concoction grilled to perfection. This one stays true to the roots without any experimentation but it’s balance of the spices that take it to another level. If you have always loved paneer tikka, you will fall for it harder. If you are bored of it, then try this version to rediscover your love for it.
A small portion of Makkai ki khichdi is a good take on the traditional rice dish albeit it wouldn’t rank extremely high on the overall menu. What makes it a winner still is the kakhra chips that decorate its rim. Tribute to Gujarat, checked.
Makkai ki Khichi
And then comes the pièce de résistance – beef seekh kabab. Yes, Kebab is an important part of Ramadan menu but who could have thought it could taste this good? This is seekh kebab at its most sublime – juicy, delicious and flavorful without being too heavy on the palate. We seriously doubt if we had tasted anything better. 10 on 10. If you have space after all this, try the mains that boast of the more familiar chicken and lamb curries (for meat and poultry lovers) and the usual mushroom for veggies. Once again, the sides win hands down. Our ultimate favourite being the anda paratha. One hopes this makes its way to the main menu for it’s that perfect. Taking you back to the egg kiosks on the streets of Delhi, but served with the flourish of Dubai, this is a paratha that ticks every box in the cookbook.
The pics don’t do justice to this incredible seekh kebab
But how can any meal be over without dessert? Our vote goes to the Dodha pudding – a traditional Punjabi sweet – which is essentially steamed pudding made of wheat, milk and sugar though this one was topped with homemade coconut, milk and vanilla essence. It’s a meal that you would not want to end; after a day of fasting, if you are looking for a feast that will not just take you down memory lane but also leave an impression for a long time, you know where to where to head this month. Newsletter
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