Food Fusion That You Need To Know In Real World

Food Fusion That You Need To Know In Real World

Food Fusion That You Need To Know In Real World By Christopher Powell Though, the food fusions have suffered lot of turbulent past just because of the applications. In times of fusions could underwhelm, the worse would still be sentimental souvenir at the voyage. The dismissing the mix food in basis to missing the exciting and fresh flavor combinations like the Jamaican and Chinese Fusion NY do. First groups on people were force to be deceived and kidnapped in making journey, though that practices were curbed in somewhat through agreement between Chinese and British authorities at formally supervise would be recruitment processes. Then from on, the family was encouraged into emigrate, though without often being in completely informing the living and working conditions and the contractual obligations. The women start arriving around eighteen sixty on small numbers. The eighteen saw first of thirty six thousands of East Indians which arrive at Jamaica and that the influences spread which that time of that Jamaican cookbook around eighteen ninety three that were the recipes for coconut jelly and curry. The famous ones would become the favored dish around country and then embraced through newly emancipated people whom used the slow cooking in foods at effort in making them palatable and soft while that work in all day plantation. The curry dishes would grace every nearly menu and using the local meats like seafood, chicken and goat. Foods that based in one culture yet the prepared be using flavors and ingredients inherent in another culture that also be considered as fusion cuisine. In instances, the pizza have made with pepper, cheddar, salsa, or another common ingredients of taco often be marketed as the taco pizza. That particular dish would be the fusion of Mexican and Italian dishes. Presentation and plating tools are the simplest ways in upscale the food. It comes in fusion food then it is integral in giving the clear identity. Even in simple things like carrot soup and using with precise tons and garnishing tools in adding thin strips of the carrot at top. Those often are modified at incorporating local product. Another should be developed and novel locally. The popular dishes would include the curry goat, salt fish or cod and fried dumplings. It has adapted by the Chinese, Spanish, French, British, Indian, African and Irish influences. It could be employed in lot of great different reasons. It could be technique that might use through chefs to expand the culinary repertoire that would afar them the dish that truly be distinct from the competitors. The fusion cooking might practice by the cook more than just one cultural heritage and injecting the unique identity to the cuisine. Popularity in food fusion would own lot of mixes. That also be growing on popularity because that allow the chef in creating distinctive from the competitors, the dish could truly call them. Other reason in which the chefs may do stamp in identity on certain style in cuisine as introducing the new concepts in customers in interested ways. The mix might take the existing foods which are fuse and popular together in creating the unexpected flavor. Often featured should be South eastern Asian, south Asian and East Asian alongside dishes another one and offering of dishes which inspired combinations in such cuisines. The cuisine is considered the fusion culture and taking the inspiration from Mexico, France, and Italy then the idea on eastern Asia and then creating of traditional dishes those cultures with the nontraditional materials. That would combines different food in various nations island. About the Author: You can get valuable tips for a fantastic Jamaican and Chinese fusion NY restaurant at http://www.henricasrestaurant.com now.

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Up Your Native-Australian Cooking Game With This Very Accessible New Cookbook – Broadsheet

Art & Design | Entertainment | Fashion & Style | Food & Drink | Things to Do | Travel | The Shop Up Your Native-Australian Cooking Game With This Very Accessible New Cookbook Two of Australia’s most passionate advocates for indigenous food and culture Rebecca Sullivan and Damien Coulthard want to get more native ingredients into your kitchen. Their new cookbook, Warndu Mai, features more than 80 doable recipes, from roo meatballs and lemon-myrtle pasta to strawberry-gum pavlova and emu-egg sponge cake.
Roo bolognese and lemon myrtle pasta 1 / 2
Damien Coulthard and Rebecca Sullivan 1 / 2 Published on 24 April 2019 by Daniela Frangos Share
“Australia’s history can be told through food,” writes Yuin man and Dark Emu author Bruce Pascoe in his foreword to cookbook Warndu Mai . He points to the early settlers’ diet of mutton and potatoes. Then the cuisines of each new wave of migrants: Chinese, Indian, Italian, Greek, Vietnamese, African – food that’s shaped Australia’s culinary landscape while we’ve ignored the bounty of produce right in front of us. Finally, that’s changing.
Partners Rebecca Sullivan and Damien Coulthard are two of Australia’s most passionate advocates for indigenous food and culture. Together they run Warndu, a native-food label and food-education brand, and they’ve just released their first joint recipe book ( Warndu Mai means “good food” in Coulthard’s Adnyamathanha language).
The “cookbook and compendium” contains more than 80 accessible recipes and a glossary of more than 60 ingredients with information about seasonal availability, flavour profiles and how best to incorporate these foods into your home cooking.
“It’s a very easy way for people to start using native ingredients,” says Sullivan, who wrote a series for Broadsheet dedicated to the stuff . “We feel very strongly that the industry can’t be sustainable unless every person is using it … it can’t just be at a chef level, and I know chefs don’t want it to be just at chef level either. In fact, for chefs to have an easier job of it, it needs to be at an every-person level so the supply is there.
“We believe every pantry should have at the very least some wattleseed in it, some lemon myrtle … [and] that people need to start subbing beef with kangaroo.”
Sullivan has developed delicious, doable recipes with ingredients such as Kakadu plum, Geraldton wax, karkalla (or pigface) and pepperberry. There’s kangaroo meatballs with lemon-myrtle pasta; emu prosciutto; bunya nut pesto; wattleseed brownies; emu-egg sponge cake; strawberry-gum pavlova and more.
“It’s the sort of food we eat,” says Sullivan. “Let’s say [a recipe called] for spinach, I’ve replaced it with warrigal greens. If there’s a call for lime I use finger lime. My favourite recipe in the book is a desert lime and coastal rosemary – which is our native rosemary – olive oil cake, but using macadamia oil instead of olive oil.”
Clare Valley-based Sullivan is a self-taught cook, sustainability advocate and regenerative farmer. She teaches cooking at River Cottage UK, The Agrarian Kitchen in Tasmania and Le Cordon Bleu Australia. Last month she was one of only 15 people worldwide chosen as a Yale World Fellow – a global leadership development program – for her advocacy work.
Most exciting for Sullivan is the book’s distribution to mega-retailers such as Big W, which she says will bring these ingredients to entirely new diners. “This is big for the industry, generally speaking,” she says. “There are so many people who have been grafting away for so much longer than Damien and I … they’re the ones who have made sure this stuff hasn’t died down. Just grafting, grafting, grafting … almost ready to give up and thank God they haven’t because I really hope that some of those rewards start coming their way.
“People like Tumbeela in the Adelaide Hills … who just keep going and going and going and … obviously we have so many amazing chefs in Australia who have championed it and also put in the hard yards … and got the word out there. So that’s all starting to pay off for everyone.”
Sullivan says we’re at a “tipping point” now where native Australian produce is no longer ignored, and, crucially, no longer a “trend”. “People are seeing the value in it not just culturally and socially but environmentally and from a health perspective as well,” she says. “And also I think people are seeing through the local food movement – I mean, how can you be a supporter of the ‘local food movement’ if you don’t eat anything truly local?”
“Here’s me – 15 years in the ‘local food movement’ and I was as big a hypocrite as the next person. It was only when I met Damien that I started eating this stuff.
“So the landscape is definitely changing … I mean look how many bloody gin brands there are out there with native ingredients in them now. And people seeing that it’s easier for them to get their hands on things helps.”
Accessibility is vital, and rather than include a list of stockists in the book, Sullivan and Coulthard are building an online resource guide through the Warndu site. “The industry changes so frequently so [this way] it can constantly be up-to-date,” says Sullivan. “And we’re heavily vetting the people in our resource guide … so if they’re unethical businesses they won’t be in.”
Culture and history is inextricably tied to these ingredients – something Bruce Pascoe is quick to remind those embracing these foods without stopping to consider their connection to country. “Cook your way through this book but remember that you can’t eat our Aboriginal food if you can’t swallow our history.”
Start with the following recipe for roo meatballs and lemon myrtle pasta, an edited extract from the book.
Roo meatballs
Prep time: 1 hour 40 minutes Cooking time: 40 minutes

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Spices for Long Term Storage – 4/23/19

April 16, 2019
This isn’t going to be just another food storage article. For excellent advice on that subject, start by exploring the SurvivalBlog archives and the LDS web site. But there’s a related topic that I felt was worthy of discussion.
It wasn’t that long ago that .22 rimfire ammo disappeared from shelves, and conversations about PMAGs in stock sounded pretty similar to claims about Yeti and the Loch Ness Monster – utterances viewed by most listeners with great skepticism. We live in a ‘just in time’-supplied world, where almost anything can quickly affect the price – or the availability – of many products we’re used to seeing on our store’s shelves.
If you bake, you’ve probably noticed the massive increase in the price of vanilla. Last year, a hurricane in Madagascar so damaged the crop that today’s vanilla prices have nearly doubled. Vanilla, like many other spices we rely on, still come from isolated places on the globe. Any environmental, economic or political disruption could cause them to rapidly disappear from our markets – perhaps for a very long time. More than our recipes would be affected, because some of these things are essential components of food preservation as well. The World of Spices
While we can locally source many things we might use in cooking, here are some thoughts on specific items that come from overseas and that couldn’t easily be replaced. Peppercorns , of any kind, come from the fruit of the Piper Nigrum vine that grows primarily in Asia. (Peppervine, Ampelopsis Arborea, grows throughout much of the US, but it’s an entirely different plant.) Pepper is an essential ingredient in most cooking, as well as a component of many pickling and preserving methods. Don’t forget to stockpile a pepper mill. While some claim that cinnamon can be grown domestically , most of the cinnamon in the world comes from Indonesia, China, Sri Lanka, India, Brazil, and the Caribbean. Cinnamon can be ground easily using a coffee grinder. Cinnamon takes two forms, Cassia and Ceylon. Each has a slightly different flavor, and recipes in the US and Canada are written for Cassia. Ceylon, the dominant form in Europe and Mexico, is more fragile and easier to break. Cassia generally looks like a folded stick of rawhide, while Ceylon has more of a pumice-like structure. Cassia is potentially harmful if consumed in large quantities. What we call ‘Saigon Cinnamon’ is Cassia. Cloves are the dried, immature buds of an evergreen tree that grows in India and Madagascar. Cloves are a powerful spice, serving as an accent in a wide range of foods from Indian cuisine to holiday hams. Cloves are also a necessary part of many pickling recipes . Clove oils are a powerful topical anesthetic, particularly useful for tooth aches. Cloves can also be substituted for tobacco as a smoking product. Cloves can be used whole, grated or ground. Nutmeg is the seed of a tropical evergreen tree. Originating in Indonesia, nutmeg was subsequently cultivated in the West Indies where most of the production still continues today. Nutmeg is actually the interior part of the seed, with the shell being the spice known as mace . Nutmeg is an essential spice for baking, soups and meats and can be used in a wide range of Whole nutmeg is grated rather than ground. Caution, nutmeg is capable of being abused as a hallucinogenic. Although your brain might register chili and Tex-Mex food when you smell it, cumin is actually native to Egypt. While cumin can be grown in the US, the bulk of the product comes from India, North Africa and China. When ground, cumin’s potency begins to fade within a year. Cumin also has a nasty habit of blending in with its neighbors in the spice cabinet. Cumin is particularly useful for Indian and Middle Eastern recipes , and is a great addition to potatoes, root vegetables, beans and lentils. Most vanilla comes from Madagascar, although New Guinea is rapidly rivaling their production. Vanilla is an extraordinarily complicated orchid to grow commercially that requires hand fertilization to mature. I’m told there’s no distinguishable difference in taste between authentic and artificial vanilla when used in recipes. That said, there’s an enormous difference in terms of storage. Real vanilla extract – which usually has an alcohol content of 35 percent – lasts indefinitely. Imitation vanilla is only good for a year. Real vanilla is very expensive at the moment, and there’s a number of ‘buyer beware’ warnings out there such as: Never buy anything with a foreign label, look closely to make sure the product specifically says ‘extract’ as opposed to ‘flavoring’, and that the product contains alcohol as that’s a necessary component of the real thing. Costco vanilla is well regarded and relatively inexpensive ($30), but the internet says that Hawaiian Vanilla Co, and Nielsen-Massey Madagascar Bourbon Vanilla are the best. Cardamom is the seed pod of a leafy tropical plant. Cardamom has a place in recipes from the orient to Scandinavia, and can be used in many different ways. Found in foods and drinks, you’ll notice the flavor when you taste it. There are actually two forms of cardamom, Elettaria and Amomum – commonly ‘green’ and ‘brown.’ Cardamom plants seem to prefer higher altitudes and the leading producers of cardamom are Nepal and Guatemala. Both forms of cardamom can be obtained as a whole seed pod, of which all portions might have a use. Allspice is actually a single spice, not a spice combination. Allspice can be found in many roles and in diverse recipes across the globe. Allspice shows up in sausages, meats, gravies and baked goods. Allspice is often the ‘secret ingredient’ that disappointed consumers notice when it’s left out of the recipe. Allspice is grown in the West Indies and South America. Turmeric While the effectiveness of turmeric as an herbal medicine can be debated, there’s no doubt it’s essential to taste buds across the world – especially in curries. Turmeric root can be found in stores, but I’m suspicious that any attempt to dry and store it whole would fail. Like ginger, I would argue it’s best to buy turmeric already ground. The bulk of commercial turmeric comes from India, Sri Lanka, the East Indies, Fiji, and Australia. Ginger has been used for centuries to spice foods and drinks, and is also claimed to have medicinal properties. Likely native to lower Asia, ginger can thrive in warm and humid environments. Ginseng is not ginger but can be used in many of the same ways. While Ginseng grows in the upper Midwest, it’s a difficult resource to cultivate. Most commercial ginger today is grown in Africa and South America.
There are other spices that are produced closer to home, but that might be seriously impacted by any insult to global trade. Bay Leaves. The Bay Laurel Tree is native to the Mediterranean, but can be grown in the US where there’s a warm climate. Locally, the tree may be called Pepperwood or Myrtlewood. They make lovely indoor trees for many people. Personally, I’ve managed to kill them every time I’ve owned one. While I don’t really understand the necessity of this spice (I’m not sure I can taste it), it’s found in too many recipes to apparently live without. People write that this is one spice where there’s a significant difference between using fresh off the tree versus dried. Mustard Seeds . Many of the mustard seeds used in Indian cooking and pickling spices are the same that you can use to grow mustard greens. When people mention mustard, red blooded Americans probably visualize awaiting hot dog buns, but there’s a lot more you can do with this spice. Caution: When cooking with whole mustard seeds make sure they get hot enough to pop. If they don’t, your meal will probably still taste fine, but you’re in for a bad surprise later. Coriander . Coriander and cilantro aren’t exactly the same thing. In the US, ‘coriander’ refers to the seeds, but we call the stems and leaves cilantro. Elsewhere in the world the entire plant is referred to as coriander. The two spices are not interchangeable in recipes. Coriander’s native range is the Eastern Mediterranean to Pakistan, but it can be grown almost anywhere as an annual. Coriander has a number of medicinal and other useful properties . Both cilantro and coriander taste like soap to a small subset of human beings. Paprika is rendered from parts of bell peppers, but what we use generally comes from overseas. Not surprisingly, a great deal of paprika comes from Hungary and Spain. Paprika can be made at home, but it takes a lot of work. An incredibly useful and adaptable spice, paprika would be hard to live without. Celery seed . Celery seed is a powerful spice used in everything from sauerkraut to Bloody Marys. Celery can be found across the globe, particularly in very moist, nutrient rich soils. While it’s not difficult to grow , I know very few people who actually do, which invites the prospect of scarcity in bad times. Cayenne Pepper originated in South America and is a powerful additive to almost anything that needs heat. It simply wouldn’t be Cajun, Creole, or Mexican cooking without cayenne.
Individually, the loss of one or more of these spices might not seem like much, but without them we couldn’t make many of our favorite spice combinations. Simply consider these recipes: Garam Masala , Curry Powder , Chili Powder , BBQ Spice/Rub , Pickling Spice , DIY Old Bay Seasoning , DIY Lawrey’s Seasoning , Poultry Seasoning , Adobo Seasoning , Jamaican Jerk Seasoning , Taco Seasoning , Apple Pie Spice or Pumpkin Pie Spice . It is cheap and good insurance to lay in a stock of spices now.
How to Store Spices
Whole spices don’t spoil , but they do begin to lose their flavor after four years. Ground spices fade in less than half that time.
The same wisdom applies to storing spices as to most things: Store your spices in a cool dark place and in a sealed container. Oxidation is the greatest enemy of spices. I haven’t been able to find any authoritative research on the relative advantages of keeping spices in the freezer. One school of thought says that any advantages will be offset by the exposure to moisture when the container is taken out of the freezer and opened. Others, of course, claim this is an excellent practice.
Glass containers protect the contents but make sure they also have strong air tight lids . To guard against cross contamination of odors and flavors, avoid putting bags of different spices in the same sealed container. Some people even take the trouble to vacuum seal spices in mason jars, which makes good sense when maintaining a large reservoir, then refilling smaller containers for the pantry. Anyone who’s cooked knows the magical properties of those small glass spice jars, seemingly capable of bouncing off tile floors without breaking. The weak point is too often the plastic lid. In any event, better to routinely handle a small quantity rather than risk the larger container.
Instinct teaches to buy in bulk, but with spices there’s a caution: A s tudy in the Kansas City area in 2014 found that 4 out of 10 packages of bulk spices were contaminated by heavy metals, toxins or bacteria. These included some nasty bacteria such as Enterobacter, Klebsiella, and Pseudomonas. The Food and Drug Administration found that 12 percent of all imported spices were contaminated in some way. Black pepper, thyme, oregano and turmeric were most associated with salmonella contamination, sawdust was frequently added to turmeric, paprika and ginger, and lead chromate was occasionally added to turmeric as well. Generally, they found that cinnamon is fine. Where to Buy Spices
All that said, this really isn’t news. There have been stories like this at least since 1941, and for good or ill, the FDA continues to engage in testing for the sake of food safety. While cooking the spices in food to 160 degrees will kill any native bacteria, most of us have the habit of adding spices after the cooking is done which would reintroduce any bacteria back into the food. It is best to buy from reputable vendors.
One of the best known vendors is Penzey’s Spices, but I don’t buy from them. My personal choice, as otherwise Penzey’s has a great reputation for quality, but I’m partial to The Spice House . Though the owners of both businesses are related, the owners of The Spice House have made it a point to leave the politics behind. Costco products are also excellent, as well as Spice Islands which can usually be found in most grocery stores. If you’re buying from a bulk supplier online, it might be wise to consider one that supplies restaurants. They’ve got a lot riding on food safety. How Much to Store
While there are many food calculators on the web that help you estimate your long term storage needs, far less bandwidth is dedicated to the things that will make your beans, rice and tuna fish palatable. Relying on popular wisdom would leave you with salt, sugar, honey and very little else.
The historical spice trade drove the world economy from the 15 th century to modern times, altering the economic shape of the entire planet . Then, pepper was the greatest bulk commodity, followed by cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. Generally speaking, Americans consume approximately 3.7 pounds of spices each year , but it’s difficult to break that down any further. In the world of chefs, the ratio of salt to pepper used in the kitchen is around 3-to-6 parts salt to one part pepper.
Most calculators suggest storing about 6 pounds of salt per person, per year. All things considered, one pound of pepper would seem about right. From that point on its mostly personal preferences and guesswork, but my two cents are that a shift to food storage staples would benefit from more spices. With that in mind, consider storing – per person/per year – one pound of cumin, cinnamon, and paprika; 8 ounces of vanilla, ginger, allspice, mustard seeds and turmeric; 4 ounces of nutmeg (about 20 nuts), cloves, cardamom, coriander, bay leaves, celery seed and cayenne pepper.
[ JWR Adds: If you over-estimate the quantity of spices that you need, then just consider yourself well-stocked for barter or charity.] Final Thoughts
Food should be a centerpiece of emergency planning. In fact, it’s the only prep that can be mastered by anyone: young or old, the robust or infirm. Done right, it not only provides peace of mind, but the practice of food rotation and buying in bulk probably saves time and money in the long run too. While the rated shelf life of dried legumes might be several years, better to rotate them into regular meal planning. Americans don’t eat many beans and our bodies might not appreciate a quick conversion to a ‘legume heavy’ diet. One way to rotate these ingredients into your current consumption might be to try some traditional Indian recipes. Indian food is heavily based on long term storage staples, and the flavor combinations are fascinating. If Indian cooking is in your wheelhouse, you might want to add fenugreek, asafetida and curry leaves to your storage inventory.
Unless you can meat, then banking proteins for long term food storage takes planning. Legumes, combined with rice or a grain, form a complete protein and are inexpensive and easy to store. A pressure cooker is your friend when it comes to preparing dried beans. The electronic idiot proof ones — like The Instant Pot – are a great introduction to pressure cooking, as well as a time saver. Think of it as a cross between a pressure cooker designed for middle school age children and a slow cooker.
“Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint.”– Mark Twain

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Delicious Authentic South indian Food | Nilgirispice | Edinburgh

Delicious Authentic South indian Food | Nilgirispice | Edinburgh Toggle navigation
City : 14-14a Brougham Street, Tollcross,
County : United Kingdom Description Delicious Authentic South indian Food | Nilgirispice | Edinburgh – 14-14a Brougham Street, Tollcross,, United Kingdom, United Kingdom
Want to make your family gatherings more memorable! then their is no better place other than Nilgiri Spice. Nilgiri Spice delivers a contemporary taste of South Indian cuisine, and an extensive wine list that focuses on emerging regions from all over the world. You can’t afford to miss the authentic aroma and taste of spices picked right from the Nilgiri mountains itself. Book your seats now!
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Charles Chipengule, Chef and Owner of Jaa Dijo Dom

is Charles Chipengule, the chef and owner of Jaa Dijo Dom , pictured here (left) with his employee, Abdul (right). Originally from Botswana, Africa, Charles says that he grew up always being interested in food but due to gender stereotypes in his country, he never really got a chance to work in the kitchen. Instead he trained as a mechanical engineer and although he didn’t enjoy the work, he continued to do it professionally because it allowed him to excel financially. After years of working as an engineer, Charles decided to ignore the naysayers and take his shot . A nd when no one else would give him a chance to cook, he decided to give himself the opportunity and used his own money to open up a breakfast food stall. However, he ended up closing down his food stall after a year because he wasn’t making money; and because he had always heard that the U.S. is the land of opportunity, he decided to leave Botswana and pursue his dream. After moving to New York and working in a variety of restaurants for many years, Charles began wondering why there were so many different cuisines available but African food wasn’t being represented. He began doing research into the accessible options and found that the few African restaurants that were open only showcased food from a specific country and catered to the idea of African food that people in the U.S. already had. So he decided to open up his own operation to teach customers about the different types of African food, to introduce them to something new and get them talking about it’s unique and rich flavors, and to get them to recognize the food that he grew up eating.
Charles says that gender roles in Botswana are very rigid so being a man working in the kitchen is shamed and looked down upon because it’s seen as a woman’s place. Even when he opened his breakfast stall, he was only able to cook there for a few months before he had to hire women to work for him because people wouldn’t buy from him since a man was cooking. He continued to oversee operations but since he had his own full-time job working as an engineer, he couldn’t spend much time at the stall and the women working for him couldn’t manage it properly. They were giving out food to friends, which caused him to lose a lot of inventory and money and eventually he had to close the stall altogether. He tried to open another food stall at his father’s compound (his father was also an engineer for a big company in Botswana) but his father didn’t allow him to because he didn’t like the idea of his son working in the kitchen. Realizing that it would be tough to continue working towards being a chef in Botswana, Charles decided to leave Africa and emigrate to the U.S. He says that many people in his country are leaving or trying to leave because the economy is bad, there’s a lot of corruption in the government and the lower class people are not being taken care of. But in order to come to the U.S., you need to have enough money for the process itself and to support yourself once you get there. So h e spent the next year working as an engineer and buying as little as he could in order to save money to buy his plane ticket to New York. He applied for a business visa, waited for a month to hear back, went for an interview and then waited for another couple of weeks before being notified that his visa had been approved. After receiving his visa, Charles spent another full year working, eventually selling his house and his car in order to be able to afford his plane ticket. During that year, he says he held onto the visa and dreamed about his future. And every time he felt disappointed, he would look at the visa and know he had already achieved something that many people in Botswana never can.
Once Charles arrived in the U.S., he was planning to fall back on his career as an engineer in order to establish himself. But since he was coming from a different country, his experience in the field wasn’t taken into consideration and he would’ve had to get his GED and start all over again in order to be certified to work as an engineer in the U.S. Because he needed to support himself, he decided to take a job that a friend got him at an Indian restaurant and began washing dishes there. After the Indian restaurant, Charles hopped around, working at different restaurants in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens, usually spending a year at each place before moving onto the next one. Once he started working in restaurants, he got even more interested in the industry and wanted to further improve his skills. He enrolled in some general education classes in a free adult program in Brooklyn as well as some small cooking courses, which he paid for. He began learning the basics of cooking, as well as how to use certain utensils and machinery that he didn’t have in Africa (most food prep there was done by hand) and food plating. Because foods aren’t labeled with restrictions in Africa, he also had to learn about dietary restrictions (he didn’t know about much other than the major food allergies) and understand what each one meant so that he could classify the dishes that he created. Working in many restaurants allowed Charles to get familiar with a lot of different cuisines but it also alerted him to the need for African food. He wanted to give people in New York something different to try and make it more accessible to them. He reached out to many people to get them on board with his idea and invest in his plan but no one wanted to take the risk so he decided to take a shot and try it himself. He started Jaa Dijo Dom (meaning “a place to eat”) in June 2017.
Charles started Jaa Dijo Dom as a catering business because he knew it would be too tough to succeed as a restaurant just starting out. He decided to make the menu a mix of all African cuisine to give customers the full African experience with the foods that they eat on a daily basis. He was also inspired by his grandmother, who worked as a cook in South Africa, and always incorporated new foods from the country into their cooking and influenced his desire to create a mix of cuisine in his business. He wanted his food to appeal not only to Americans but also to other African people who only know food from their country and aren’t familiar with dishes from other regions. Most of his cooking skills and South African recipes he learned from his mother and grandmother. But in order to learn the recipes from the North, West and East, he had to buy books to learn the recipes and cooked them again and again until he got them right. He got some African people that he knew from different countries to taste test each dish so that he could make sure that they were authentic and tried different recipes until he was able to do it properly. After launching Jaa Dijo Dom, he did recipe testing, menu creation and ingredient sourcing for the first five months to make sure that each dish was right, not taking any orders until November 2017. He made sure that all of the items on his menu were traditional, inexpensive dishes that people in Africa can afford and that a customer would see if they visited the country.
Charles admits that the first year of business was horrible. It was just him doing all of the prep work, cooking and deliveries and there were times he thought about closing it down and going back to work in a restaurant because he wasn’t making any money. But he kept going because he could see that there were people who were interested in the food; people starting giving him good reviews and customers started coming back. Little by little things started picking up and now, almost two years later, he has five employees that work for him as well as some hourly employees that he hires when he’s really busy. He still cooks almost everything himself and spends most of his days working in their commissary kitchen (he generally works 3AM to 5PM) but now he has two employees that he’s been training and teaching his recipes to so that he can relax a little bit and not have the business rely solely on him. However, Charles does still have to deal with issues in the kitchen, since the space they work out of is over 30 years old and houses six different companies with only one oven and one stove to share. Some weeks he can’t take as many orders as he would like to because the kitchen space is booked up, which is frustrating because he ends up losing business. The companies that work there try to communicate and work around each other’s schedules but it makes it hard to prepare food, especially when he has big deliveries. This commissary kitchen is where most small food businesses start out because the rent is cheap but Charles hopes that in a few years, he can own his own place and have the space and the ability to take on many more orders. He’ll really feel the business is doing well when he’s able to make that move into his own kitchen space. In the mean time, Charles keeps his team motivated by creating a learning environment and encouraging his employees to have their own opinions and ways of doing things, as long as the results are the same in the end. He wants them to enjoy the work that they’re doing and understand that this is valuable experience that they can take with them as they go through the food industry.
For Charles, being an immigrant is the toughest part of the business to handle. He’s found that because he’s an immigrant, the chances of him getting a loan or renting kitchen space on his own are low because although his financials are good, once he’s asked about his background, people no longer want to be involved. He feels that how he’s built his business up isn’t being considered as equally as someone who isn’t an immigrant and it’s just another hoop he has to jump through. Because no bank will give him a loan, he’s had to do everything with his own money or borrow money from friends and family, which has been really tough for him. Although he’s still paying some of that borrowed money back, he says that things are getting better because he doesn’t have to borrow money from anyone anymore and he’s able to pay his employees. However, the most rewarding part for him is the personal freedom he has now to grow his business and focus on the dream that he’s had for many years. He has a drive to keep grinding not only for himself but also for his cause: to make African food part of the New York food scene. He loves that African food is now being mixed into the culture of New York and that people are discussing it. The more progress he sees, the more passionate he gets about his business. He also sees progress happening in Botswana, where he says more and more young, male chefs are starting to emerge and he loves that after being ridiculed when he was younger, the culture is changing there as well. He’s motivated to keep working as hard as he can by the financial changes that he sees happening in the business every month as well as the strength of the company and the quick pace at which they’re growing. He knows the business is headed somewhere and it gives him hope. He believes that in the next five years, Jaa Dijo Dom could be something bigger than just a catering company.
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peppering the knowledge

Tuesday, April 23, 2019 peppering the knowledge Some youthful experiences appear to be almost universal. At least, for those of us who share the age burdens of the Boomer class.Whenever I start reminiscing about our family’s first set of encyclopedias, I meet with knowing nods. Especially, when I describe how I opened volume after volume to follow related subjects until most of the set surrounded me on the living room floor as if I were being attacked by high-grade paper bombers.That bit of nostalgia wandered by while I was reading The Oregonian this morning. Apparently, the queen of the 30-minute meal, Rachel Ray is returning to the Food Network. But that fact is not what triggered my encyclopedia reverie.Describing how American tastes have broadened in the last thirty years, the article noted: “Today, she is as likely to pull a bottle of gochujang out of the fridge as she is a bag of tater tots from the freezer.”My memory for nouns is not what is was. (Well, it probably is what it always was — faulty — but we seniors always think forgetting a word is just one step away from being warehoused for senility.) Gochujang? I knew I knew the word. But it just hovered in the back of my mind hiding behind gorgonzola, gefilte fish, and giblets.So, I relied on what now substitutes for my memory. The Internet. And I nearly slapped my forehead when I realized not only do I know what gochujang is, I have almost a half gallon of it in my refrigerator in Barra de Navidad. It is a fermented chili paste. I use it in a lot of my cooking. Especially, soups.Of course, I could not stop there. As I read through the article, another fact caught me up short. This one, I have long known. Or I have known it, at least, since 2011 when I read Charles Mann’s 1493: The New World Columbus Created ( strangers in the garden ).Before then, if you had asked me about chili peppers, I would have assumed that the cuisines most famous for their spicy dishes (Szechuan, India, Thailand) had used chilies for millennia. And I would have been wrong. As we almost all know now, the DNA in every chili on the face of the planet came from Mexico (though there are some botanists who contend at least one chili, the habanero, originated in the Amazon). With that one possible exception, you can thank the early inhabitants of Mexico, a people about whom we know very little, but who predated the great Mesoamerican civilization, for developing the cultivar version of the chili pepper, as well as maize, beans, and tomatoes. Whoever they were, they may have been the world’s most successful developers of new farm crops.Europe, Africa, and Asia were naive to the existence of the culinary magic of chilies until Columbus took samples home to Spain, where it was grown as a substitute for peppercorns, one of the items that had spurred Columbus to sail west.The Portuguese were quick to learn the value of chilies as a trade commodity. By the end of the 1400s, they had taken chilies to their colonies in Africa and Asia. The result is that we now think of Thai chilies as being endemic to Asia when they are nothing more than descendants of their Mexican mothers.On my Australia cruise, most of the food was bland enough to be served in a Manitoba rest home. The only exceptions were the Indian dishes and the occasional Szechuan and Thai stir fries that added layers of taste and tear-certifying piquancy. And for that, I thank Columbus and some anonymous Portuguese traders for distributing the hard work of a series of unknown Mesoamerican geniuses.As soon as my cold clears a bit more, I will put all of their contributions to good use in my Mexican kitchen. But I need to get there first. at

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This free event will bring Indian culture and cuisine to Hampton Roads

This free event will bring Indian culture and cuisine to Hampton Roads By – April 24, 2019 Taste of India is one of the largest Asian Indian festivals in Virginia. (Southside Daily/Courtesy of ODU)
The 13th annual Taste of India festival, to be held at Old Dominion University’s Ted Constant Convocation Center, will bring the culture and cuisine of India to Hampton Roads on April 27.
The festival showcases the diversity and pageantry of Indian culture with food, vendors and an Indian fusion and Bhangra dance competition that has grown to include nine college teams from across the eastern U.S.
The event runs from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Admission and parking is free.
Old Dominion has been a sponsor of Taste of India since its inception. Vinod Agarwal, professor of economics and director of the University’s Economic Forecasting Project, is one of the organizers.
“This event gives residents a taste of India without leaving Hampton Roads,” Agarwal said. “As the world becomes a smaller and smaller place to in which to live, we need to be aware of cultural diversity around the globe by learning to ask questions and be inclusive.”
Taste of India is one of the largest Asian Indian festivals in Virginia, attracting crowds of 7,000-10,000. The most popular, single-day cultural event organized by a single ethnic group in the region, Taste of India is a collaborative effort among hundreds of Indians living in Hampton Roads.
This year’s theme is “Rivers: The Lifelines of India,” which serves as a reminder to nurture and protect these natural resources not just in India, but worldwide.
Cultural programming will run throughout the day, culminating with the dance competition at 2:30 p.m. The contest, which awards $1,000 to the winning team, grew from demonstrations of traditional Indian dance.
Educational activities will also be conducted throughout the day, and a $5,000 Taste of India scholarship will be awarded to a senior graduating from a Hampton Roads high school.
For more information about the event, see the Taste of India website .

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Taste of Chicago 2019 Culinary Lineup – July 10-14 in Grant Park – Free Admission (Chicago, IL)

Pix724 Pix724 is a division of Pix International,LLC(pixintl.com ) Photo Features & Linda Matlow(lindamatlow.com) contact: editorial at pixintl.com **PRIVACY POLICY 5/23/18** http://pixintl.com/privacypolicy 20180523.htm *We may receive commission or product from items discussed or promoted on this website. * This site may contain affiliate links for products we Love! We cover our events at our fave destinations. Copyright DMCA policy: pixintl.com/copyright_statement.html Thursday, April 25, 2019 Taste of Chicago 2019 Culinary Lineup – July 10-14 in Grant Park – Free Admission (Chicago, IL) MAYOR EMANUEL ANNOUNCES LINEUP OF 82 LOCAL EATERIES FOR 39TH ANNUAL TASTE OF CHICAGO PRESENTED BY DOORDASH Taste of Chicago welcomes 37 new Chicago-based restaurants, food trucks and shared kitchens The free-admission festival offers food, music, arts and more this July 10–14 in Grant Park Mayor Rahm Emanuel and the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events (DCASE) today announced the lineup of 82 eateries that will participate in the 39th Annual Taste of Chicago presented by DoorDash – the world’s largest free-admission food festival – this July 10–14 in Grant Park. Showcasing Chicago’s diverse culinary scene, this year’s list of 41 five-day participants, 24 pop-ups and 17 food trucks will offer Taste-goers an endless variety of more than 300 menu items to suit every palate. “As the culinary capital of the world, the Taste of Chicago will give residents and visitors alike the opportunity to sample some of the greatest foods this city has to offer,” said Mayor Emanuel. “Since its inception, the Taste of Chicago has become a summertime staple and this year’s lineup of world-renowned restaurants, food trucks and pop-ups will be even more vibrant and diverse than ever before.” This year Taste of Chicago is excited to welcome its new presenting sponsor DoorDash, the largest and fastest growing on-demand destination for door-to-door delivery in more than 4,000 cities in the United States and Canada. DoorDash connects Chicagoans with their favorite stores and restaurants, including many participating in this year’s Taste of Chicago festival. “Connecting people with the best in their cities is core to the DoorDash mission and we’re excited to partner with the city of Chicago to bring the best in local food to residents and visitors this summer,” said David Bornoff, Head of Brand at DoorDash. “Our partnership with Taste of Chicago is so important to us, as Chicago has an incredibly diverse culinary scene and is filled with residents who care deeply about the food choices they make.” Taste of Chicago will present a wide range of offerings with 37 newcomers to the event in 2019, a 48% increase from 25 in 2018. The new food eateries include 11 five-day participants, 17 pop-ups serving for one or two days and 9 food trucks. Additionally, the festival received a 12% increase in the number of applications from food businesses located across the city and representing a wide variety of cuisines. Visit TasteofChicago.us for festival details, including a complete list of restaurants, food trucks and culinary businesses. New Eateries at the 2019 Taste of Chicago include : 90 Miles Cuban Café Big Wang’s Chinese Street Food Black Dog Gelato Gordo’s Homemade Ice Cream Bars Hakka Bakka Indian Kati Rolls Jason’s Deli Pink Flamingo (Flamingo Rum Club) Pink Taco Whadda Jerk Yvolina’s Tamales “Taste of Chicago truly represents our city’s culinary diversity,” said Sam Toia, President and CEO, Illinois Restaurant Association. “Five-day vendors, pop-up restaurants and food trucks from Chicago’s vibrant neighborhoods showcase their specialties, and along with chef-led cooking demos, festival-goers are guaranteed a satisfied appetite and fun for the whole family. We can’t wait to welcome the thousands who will come out and enjoy what Chicago is all about—iconic experiences, global flavors and unbeatable hospitality.” All culinary participants will offer signature menu items, including additional selections of the popular “Taste of” portions priced at $3.00 or less, allowing guests the opportunity to sample an even greater variety of items. Admission to the Taste of Chicago is FREE, and tickets for food and beverages can be purchased in strips of 14 tickets for $10. Whether craving the robust flavors found in ethnic cuisine, epicurean delights, sweet treats, classic Chicago dishes – and more – Chicagoans and visitors won’t want to miss this year’s Taste! NEW! Taste of Chicago Community Dinners New this year, Taste of Chicago vendors may participate in the 2019 Taste of Chicago Community Eats Program, an opportunity to host a community organization or group for a free, community meal. The dinners will all take place on Wednesday, June 26, at restaurants and venues across the city to create a positive social impact and extend the reach of Taste of Chicago. More information will be announced in June. Lifeway Foods Taste Kitchen The Lifeway Foods Taste Kitchen dishes up a full menu of cooking demonstrations by local and national chefs including Chef Mary Nguyen of Saigon Sisters , Chef Martial Noguier of Bistronomic , Chef Michael Sheerin of Taureaux Tavern and Chef Giancarlo Valera of Tanta Chicago . Each day of the cooking demonstrations held on the Buckingham Fountain Plaza will feature a different culinary theme. Wednesday, July 10 Best Lists will highlight award-winning chefs, restaurants and those with dishes that have been featured on various “best of” lists. Thursday, July 11 City Streets will feature chefs and restaurants from the many notable or historic city streets across Chicago. Friday, July 12 Healthy Eating will spotlight delicious dishes that are also healthy, gluten-free, vegan or vegetarian. Saturday, July 13 Spicy Hot will star a variety of cuisines that bring the heat. Sunday, July 14 Mac N Cheese Smackdown is a fun-and-friendly showcase of chefs “battling it out” for Mac N Cheese supremacy. The full schedule of cooking demonstrations will be announced in June. CH Vodka Cocktail Lounge, Goose Island Backyard Brewery and Stella Rosa Wine Garden The CH Vodka Cocktail Lounge, the city’s largest pop-up bar, will offer mixology specials to enjoy by Buckingham Fountain. The specialty cocktail menu during the Taste of Chicago will include two new refreshing drinks, the Chicago Mule (made with Jeppson’s Malort and CH Vodka) and the Peach-Mango Lime Rickey, as well as their much-loved Tropical Rum Punch and Bourbon Pineapple Smash. The popular Goose Island Backyard Brewery will offer Taste-goers a select list of craft beers and ciders that include Goose Island Born and Raised, Goose Island Next Coast IPA, Goose Island Natural Villain, Virtue Cider Mezzo Spritz, Golden Road Mango Cart, Elysian Spacedust IPA and many more. The Stella Rosa Wine Garden featuring the Riboli Family Wines , awarded the American Winery of the Year for 2018 by Wine Enthusiast, will offer an array of wine varietals including Bodega Sangria, Stella Rosa Platinum, Maddalena Rose, Maddalena Pinot Grigio and other selections. Concerts at the Petrillo Music Shell Taste of Chicago will also present a diverse mix of national and international artists at nightly concerts at the Petrillo Music Shell along with a daily schedule of local artists at the Goose Island Stage. The complete music and entertainment lineup will be announced in early May . In 2018, more than 1.5 million residents and visitors enjoyed Taste of Chicago, reflecting the vibrant diversity of the City of Chicago. Over 3,000 people were employed by Chicago restaurants and vendors, and more than 600 artists and performers were hired to entertain Taste-goers over the five-day festival. The event contributes an estimated $106 million annually in total business activity to the Chicago economy. Taste of Chicago is presented by DoorDash and produced by the Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events in coordination with the Illinois Restaurant Association, which manages food and beverage operations. The festival is sponsored in part by CH Vodka, Chicago Transit Authority, Chicago Tribune, CLTV-Chicagoland’s Television, Communications Direct, Eli’s Cheesecake, Goose Island Beer Company, IL Lottery, Lifeway Foods, Pepsi, Riboli Family Wines, Shoreline Sightseeing, Southwest Airlines, and WGN-Television. The 39th Annual Taste of Chicago is July 10–14 in Grant Park with hours 11 a.m.–9 p.m., Wednesday– Friday, and 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Saturday and Sunday. For more information on the FREE-admission festival, visit tasteofchicago.us . To plan your trip to Chicago, visit choosechicago.com. Join the conversation on Facebook at Taste of Chicago and follow us on Twitter @TasteofChi and Instagram @ChicagoDCASE (#TasteofChicago). DoorDash DoorDash is a technology company that connects customers with their favorite local and national businesses in over 4,000 cities and all 50 states across the United States and Canada. Founded in 2013, DoorDash empowers merchants to grow their businesses by offering on-demand delivery, data-driven insights, and better in-store efficiency, providing delightful experiences from door to door. DoorDash Drive is the last-mile logistics platform that powers direct delivery for any business. By building the last-mile delivery infrastructure for local cities, DoorDash is bringing communities closer, one doorstep at a time. Read more on the DoorDash blog or at doordash.com Illinois Restaurant Association Founded in 1914, the Illinois Restaurant Association is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting, protecting, educating and improving the restaurant industry in Illinois. The Association manages the food and beverage portion of Taste of Chicago for the Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events. Visit illinoisrestaurants.org and follow on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events The Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events (DCASE) is dedicated to enriching Chicago’s artistic vitality and cultural vibrancy. This includes fostering the development of Chicago’s non-profit arts sector, independent working artists and for-profit arts businesses; providing a framework to guide the City’s future cultural and economic growth, via the 2012 Chicago Cultural Plan; marketing the City’s cultural assets to a worldwide audience; and presenting high-quality, free and affordable cultural programs for residents and visitors. 41 FIVE–DAY FOOD PARTICIPANTS Arun’s Thai Restaurant

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Where to host your wedding in Pretoria

Pretoria may not have the sea or a mountain, but it certainly has many options to offer the would-be bride and groom. Should one not want to head out to the real wilderness or bushveld north of the city, various locations emulate the atmosphere of the bush in the city where you and your guests can sit high up on a hill overlooking the green canopy of suburbia and gaze at the stars. Our list features these great gems plus bustling inner-city options that will offer a solution for any couple. A’la Turka (Doringkloof East) Situated in the most pristine maintained Yadah castle, this venue begs to be used for a wedding. A’la Turka features real Turkish fig and palm trees, lookout towers and various romantic nooks and crannies, making it perfect for your wedding day. The restaurant can host both the ceremony and the reception – up to 250 people can be seated in the Constantinople lounge and Babylon terrace, which are adjacent to one another. The entire venue can seat 400 guests in various private venues. Tables for up to 60 guests can be set up in the garden and you’ll have the option of different seating arrangements, including the ever-popular daybeds and low Turkish benches. The food is a fusion of Turkish, Lebanese and Greek cuisine, with meze starters that may include a cacik of yoghurt, cucumber and a hint of garlic; kısır of bulgur wheat, tomatoes, fresh mint, fresh parsley, lemon juice, olive oil, paprika and green pepper; and Lebanese hummus bi tahini, a chickpea and sesame-seed purée blended with lemon juice and olive oil. For a main course, adana kebabı – grilled ground beef and lamb blended with herbs and spices – should satisfy even the fussiest meat-eater.
Blue Crane (New Muckleneuk) If you want a bushveld wedding right in the middle of Pretoria, head to Blue Crane and choose from the Blue Crane Restaurant and Bar, the Boma and the Waterfront Deck. The Boma features cocktail tables and wine barrels, a small dance floor area, a dishing-up area, and a private cash bar and bartender. The Waterfront Deck can seat up to 100 people and offers a nice corner that can be turned into a photo booth, with couches and coffee tables. They charge an exclusive-use venue hire fee of R12 500, and you can decide between numerous buffet options such as a braai and spit-braai buffet menu, canapé menu and the standard buffet menu. There’s also a set menu for R250 per person, which features highlights like flame-grilled baby chicken with peri-peri or lemon butter, grilled line fish with a lemon-caper butter, or grilled sirloin with a red wine reduction. They’re extremely accommodating and will be happy to adapt menus according to the wedding party’s needs.
The tastefully decorated dining hall at Blue Crane. Photo supplied.
Brasserie de Paris (Waterkloof Ridge) Have a smart, intimate restaurant-style wedding at this stalwart restaurant, or opt for the sizeable areas outside that can be covered in marquee tents. The rooftop is the most ideal for receptions, where the number of guests will dictate the style of the event – the rooftop with its Bedouin tent can accommodate 80 people for R10 000, while the venue hire fee for the entire restaurant is R18 000. Breakfast venue hire (with a minimum of 20 guests) is R2 000 and Saturday lunch venue hire (with a minimum of 15 guests) is also R2 000. R392 gets each guest a delicious three-course set menu with two options of starters, mains and dessert. Highlights include champagne jelly, kingklip fillet, chocolate fondant and smoked salmon with butter sauce.
The dining area at Brasserie de Paris. Photo supplied.
La Vie Lente (Tiegerpoort) For those who like to be on trend, La Vie Lente in Pretoria East is totally geared for any style of wedding. Closed on Mondays and Tuesdays, La Vie Lente serves modern bistro food in a shabby chic environment that can be done up to meet any bride’s wildest imaginings. A venue hire fee of R5 500 will guarantee exclusive use of the venue from 5pm to midnight for 50 to 70 people, while an amount of R7 000 will secure the venue for 70 to 120 people. There’s also an additional minimum spend of R300 per person for food. A 15% service fee is charged for waitering staff (overtime is charged extra). The restaurant caters for a minimum of 50 guests and décor can be done by an external party of your choice, or they can provide you with an additional Quote: . Starter options include items such as honey-glazed pork belly squares with an apple-and-fennel salad. For mains, choose between items like green vegetable risotto with creamy basil pesto or salmon-and-dill fishcake with crème fraiche and egg noodles. There are also harvest tables and dessert tables.
The enchanted reception hall at La Vie Lente. Photo supplied.
Meadow Green Restaurant at Irene Country Lodge (Irene) Situated at the serene Irene Country Lodge, this restaurant offers many varied options – depending on the number of guests – to prospective couples. Although Irene has several stone churches dotted throughout the village, Irene Country Lodge also offers various venues on the premises. Weddings on the rolling lawns overlooking the large pond and the neighbouring Irene Dairy Farm remain eminently popular. After guests have a drink at the River Bar, they can tuck into various buffet options. The Afrofusion buffet (for R280 per person) features dishes such as bobotie wontons; Malay chicken curry with coconut milk; and rare roast beef with cinnamon pumpkin. The Saturday Night Live buffet (for R295 per person) is served from cooking stations manned by various chefs, while the resident pianist performs her sultry ‘Norah Jones and company’. The Sunday lunch buffet (for R275 per person) features a variety of starters; traditional carvery favourites such as rare roast beef, Yorkshire pudding and osso bucco; and an assortment of salads and decadent desserts. The venue hire fee is dependent on the number of guests and the menu.
Inside the chic dining hall at Meadow Green Restaurant. Photo supplied.
Oriental Palace at the Colosseum Hotel (Pretoria Central) The Oriental Palace is a fun venue to host a wedding in dramatic Indian style. If you relish the inner-city lifestyle – with the sound of honking taxis faintly in the background – then this is the perfect venue for you. There’s ample parking by way of a ramp into the belly of the building. They can seat up to 500 people and will happily design a menu around your budget. The restaurant has plush drapery, and various other rooms that can be set up for the ceremony and the reception. Start with platters containing mutton samosas, beef seekh kebabs and a Greek style salad. Mains can either be plated or buffet, and could include lamb karahi gosht, butter chicken, a vegetable curry and pilau with a mix of naan breads. Do note that no alcohol is served.
PLTFRM at Wolwespruit (Erasmuskloof) Situated in the Wolwespruit conservation area, this is a delightful addition to the Pretoria outdoor scene. Sitting on the stoep of the large barn-like structure overlooking sugar-bush Proteas, you could easily forget that you’re in the city. They’ll happily close the restaurant for a wedding, providing the wedding budget matches their usual turnover for the day. They can accommodate a maximum of 200 people (though this will mean that dancing, lounge or bar areas may not be under cover). The menu options include carpaccio with parmesan, rocket, spring onions and balsamic for starters; followed by rib-eye on the bone as a main; and a delicious cheese board with ciabatta, chicken liver pâté, brie, gorgonzola, and an olive-and-fig preserve for dessert.
Outside at PLTFRM. Photo supplied.
Safari Restaurant (The Willows) Safari Restaurant is centrally located in the east of Pretoria with beautifully maintained gardens. They offer an array of wedding menus, ranging from breakfast or brunch to lamb on the spit, potjiekos, braai, platters or the traditional buffet. The potjiekos menu costs between R360 and R385 per person (chicken, beef or lamb) for a minimum number of 40 guests and includes bread with butter and preserves, seasonal salads, rice or pap and a choice of dessert. You can also create your own menu from a staggering selection of items (some quite retro, such as a tuna pancake starter) or Mexican chilli bean salad, paptert, venison pie, gem squash with sweetcorn and a hot fudge pudding. They have a chapel that can accommodate 200 guests and costs R4 000 to hire, while venues such as the Kudu, Waterbok, Olifant and many others can accommodate any number of guests, with venue hire fees that range from R1 400 for the Grotto to R8 500 for the Waterbok.
The outside view at Safari Restaurant. Photo supplied.
Tin Roof Café (Mooiplaats) With sprawling gardens, a covered veranda and musical accompaniment, this restaurant on the outskirts of town makes for the ideal wedding venue. Tin Roof Café is rustic with lots of charm and offers modern contemporary food with a strong emphasis on local ingredients and clean flavours. The venue hire fee is R12 800 and menus range from around R395 per person, with a minimum of 80 guests required to book the entire venue. As for the food, chef Pellie Grobler will happily attend to any requests.
The beautifully decorated reception hall at Tin Roof. Photo by S7udio7 Photography.
Have we missed a fantastic restaurant in Pretoria that hosts weddings? Let us know in the comments section below.

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6 restaurants you must try in St. Paul’s Bay

Restaurants 6 restaurants you must try in St. Paul’s Bay
Found in the Northern region of Malta, St. Paul’s Bay has always been a popular destination for tourists and locals alike. With touristic attractions such as the popular St. Paul’s shipwreck, the city is not short of sensational restaurants that take your taste buds to another level 24 April 2019, 12:22pm TWEET SHARE
1. Il Giardino
Il-Giardino is a restaurant that created history. The first restaurant that provided a Garden where you can enjoy your meal. The menu offers a selection of homemade snacks and mixed platters, however, you can also enjoy a pizza, together with a fine selection of local wines or cocktails.
2. La Bonne Excuse
La Bonne Excuse is a traditional Bistro with a pinch of French in the heart of Qawra, serving French food. The architecture offers a cosy and warm atmosphere just like you would expect in a French restaurant.
3. Da Rosi
Da Rosi is run by a family and is the definition of seafood greatness. However, the menu also includes other cuisines delicacies such as meat and poultry. The restaurant offers a variety of delightful desserts which are homemade or traditional. Da Rosi provides a platform for a complete meal together with a glass of wine.
4. Lovage Bistro
Lovage is a restaurant that is passionate about delivering a proper and enjoyable meal whether it’s with family or friends. The menu at Lovage includes a selection of fine mediterrenean dishes that will make you appreciate the history and cuisine even more.
5. Gate of India
Gate of India is the home of the excellent and quality Indian cuisine that makes your taste budds looking for more. The aim of the restaurant is to provide a consistent yet quality dishes to the people who live for Indian Cuisine. The restaurant provides a fine selection of wine to complete your meal.
6. The Chef’s Table
Found in the heart of Bugibba, The Chef’s Table aims is to give customers a modern fusion of food together with atmosphere here. Run by chefs experienced in 5-star hospitality, the restaurant is sure to keep you amazed at the flexibility of the menu. The restaurant is good for people who have diet requirements as well.
Are you ready to expose yourself for pure food supernova?
Book a table with taaable.com to ensure your place in a selection of great restaurants in Malta or check out the website for opportunities to your restaurants. To read more about the restaurants check taaable blog .

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