Food for the soul

Food for the soul

Food for the soul 06/04/2019
From Kashmir to Kanyakumari anywhere you travel in India, there is no love more compassionate than the love of food. Food is actually the ingredient that binds people together in India. Anywhere we travel within India, the first thing we search about is what all delicious food/ dishes we will get to eat when we reach there. In this respect, we the people of India have been very lucky. Each region and state has its delicacies.
Madhya Pradesh, a state rich in nature, culture and hospitality offers a plate full of mouth-watering delicacies. Madhya Pradesh offers everything to satisfy your foodie soul. Foods from the state don’t discriminate whether you are a vegetarian or a meat eater. Each one of us can get delightfully delicious food. Here is a list of some amazing dishes that you shouldn’t miss out on when visiting the state.
Poha
While poha is a popular breakfast eaten all across the country, it originated in the state of Madhya Pradesh.
Bhutte Ka Kees
As the name suggests, this typical street food of Madhya Pradesh is mainly bhutta(corn). If you’re someone who doesn’t like your food to be too spicy, then bhutte ka kees is an ideal dish for you to enjoy here.
Daal Bafla
Daal bafla, influenced by the Rajasthani specialty daal bati, is a popular dish in Madhya Pradesh. Wheat dough is shaped into balls (called bafla), cooked until they become crisp, and then dipped in ghee.
Seekh Kebabs
The food of Madhya Pradesh is majorly influenced by Mughal cuisine, including the state’s most popular non-vegetarian dish—seekh kebab.
Palak Puri
Palak puri is a healthy and nutritious meal that is often enjoyed during breakfast, as well as lunch.
Bhopali Gosht Korma
Bhopali gosht korma is prepared with slow-cooked mutton and a peppery Indian gravy. As the name suggests, this is a famous dish in Bhopal, and visitors can find it all throughout the city.
Biryani Pilaf
Much like Lucknow in Uttar Pradesh, Bhopal is famous for Mughlai food in Madhya Pradesh. Biryani pilaf is a common delicacy in the city, with mutton being the main type of meat.
Chakki Ki Shaak
This dish is another one influenced by Rajasthani cuisine. Chakki ki shaak features steamed dough in a spicy Indian gravy, and it is served as a side dish on festive occasions.
Malpua
Malpua is India’s very own pancake, which is prepared by deep frying batter in ghee. It is then dipped in sugar syrup to add sweetness.
Mawa Bati
Mawa bati is a unique sweet dish found only in Madhya Pradesh.
Jalebi
Jalebi is a sweet dish savored all across the country and liked by all—both kids and adults. Consumed during breakfast and as an evening snack, jalebi is something you just cannot miss on your trip to the state. Related Posts Hyatt’s presence in India to expand from 19 cities to 27 cities by 2020 Mystery Rooms launches Masquerade

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Vegan Eggs Florentine

Brunch doesn’t get any better than this Vegan Eggs Florentine. Made with tofu, spinach, and dairy-free hollandaise sauce, this recipe is perfect for Easter, Mother’s Day, or any day you’re craving a savory breakfast dish.
Florentine When relating to food, the word “Florentine” refers to spinach. It’s said that Catherine de Medici, who was born in Florence, introduced spinach to French cuisine. A dish that is prepared a dish prepared “à la Forentine” would be one made with spinach. Traditionally, the spinach would be simmered in butter, which is a little too decadent for my tastes.
Eggs Florentine customarily consists of toasted bread or English muffins, poached eggs, and spinach topped with Mornay sauce. Mornay sauce is a creamy béchamel that has added cheese.
The Difference between Benedict and Florentine Benedicts and Florentines are similar. They both use toast or an English muffin as a base, and they both contain poached eggs and a creamy sauce. Eggs Benedict is usually made ham and hollandaise sauce, whereas eggs Florentine has spinach and a cheese-laden Mornay sauce.
I shared my recipe for Tofu Benedict a few months ago, and I cheated slightly, adding greens and tomatoes, mainly because I wanted to get my veggies in. To give it a slight cheesy flavor, I also added a little bit of nutritional yeast to my hollandaise. Tempeh bacon stood in for ham.
Vegan Egges Florentine Here in this tofu-based vegan eggs Florentine, I’m using lightly sautéed spinach. Since my hollandaise sauce recipe is already a little cheesy thanks to added nooch, I used it, rather than veganizing Mornay sauce.
I’ve changed up the tofu for this recipe, too. In my vegan Benedict recipe, I dipped slices of tofu in nutritional yeast and spices and then baked it to perch atop my English muffins. This Florentine recipe uses baked tofu, but this time it’s silken tofu. Rather than dip slices in nutritional yeast and spices, I’ve blended them together in a food processor and poured the mixture into a baking dish. By baking silken tofu, it gives it a custardy, eggy texture that complements the spinach and toast really well. Don’t worry if the tofu falls apart when you take it out of the dish – it will still be delicious.
I have cooked the tofu in a pan on the stovetop like an omelet. While it does technically work, it’s very messy, and it sticks everything. I prefer to bake it and let it do it’s thing in the oven.
The kala namak in this recipe gives the tofu a little bit of an eggy taste. Kala namak is also known as black salt, it can sometimes be found with the Asian at the grocery store. I usually buy it at an Indian spice market.
Vegan Eggs Florentine Can be Made in just a Few Easy Steps! First, you mix up the tofu and spices. Then, you mix the tofu with nutritional yeast and spices and bake it. Next, you quickly sauté the spinach. Finally, you assemble the dish by placing the spinach and tofu on a slice of toast or English muffin and then drizzling it with hollandaise sauce. You can make this vegan Florentine recipe with toast, English muffins, or even biscuits. If you prefer kale, arugula, or chard over spinach, go ahead and use one of them instead. But, shhh… don’t tell anyone that you’re Florentine isn’t really “à la Florentine.”
I like to make vegan Eggs Florentine for breakfast on lazy Sunday mornings. It’s a great dish to serve at a family brunch, and it’s perfect for brinner!
Vegan Eggs Florentine
Brunch doesn’t get any better than this Vegan Eggs Florentine. Made with tofu, spinach, and dairy-free hollandaise sauce, this recipe is perfect for Easter, Mother’s Day, or any day you’re craving a savory breakfast dish.
This recipe will make 4 servings on English muffins or regular-sized toast. If your bread slices are large, you may only get 2 or 3 servings.
1 12-ounce package silken tofu 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1 tablespoon cornstarch 1 teaspoon lemon juice ½ teaspoon turmeric ½ teaspoon onion powder ½ teaspoon garlic powder ¼ teaspoon sea salt ¼ teaspoon kala namak ((black salt)) ¼ teaspoon black pepper 1 teaspoon neutral flavored oil 1 shallot ( thinly sliced) 2 garlic cloves (minced) 5 ounces baby spinach 4 slices of your favorite bread (toasted) 1 recipe Hollandaise Sauce Preheat your oven to 375°. Lightly oil a baking dish or line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Blend the silken tofu, nutritional yeast, cornstarch, lemon juice, turmeric, onion powder, garlic powder, sea salt, and kala namak in a food processor or high-speed blender until smooth and creamy.
Pour the tofu mixture into the baking dish. Smooth it out with a spatula or the back of a wooden spoon. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until the tofu turns golden brown and puffs up a little
Heat a large pan over medium-high heat and add the oil. Place the sliced shallot and garlic in the pan and cook, stirring frequently, for 3 minutes or so, or until the shallot and garlic are fragrant and begin to brown. Add the spinach to the pan and stir until it begins to wilt. It should only take two or three minutes. Placing the lid on the pan will speed things up. To assemble the tofu Florentine, use a fork or spatula break the tofu apart into four equal (or close to equal) sized pieces. Don’t worry if it falls apart. Top each piece of toast with a big spoonful of spinach and a piece of the tofu. Drizzle on the Hollandaise Sauce. Serve hot.
If you enjoyed this recipe, you might also like: Tofu Benedict Cheesy Tofu Breakfast Sandwiches Breakfast Quesadillas Biscuits and Gravy Breakfast Sandwiches The post Vegan Eggs Florentine appeared first on Dianne’s Vegan Kitchen .

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The Punjab – Famous North Indian Restaurant in Covent Garden
Established in 1946, we are the oldest North Indian Restaurant in the UK, serving distinctive Punjabi cuisine to generations of diners in Covent Garden. Fourth generation family owned, we feature an eclectic Punjabi atmosphere with many historical pictures on our silk walls.
Then UK has really old restaurants too: http://www.punjab.co.uk/our-history.html
Pre-Pakistani times…so when they started selling indian food and it got famous many just joined the brand…though not all…And many made a new introduction by adding Paksitani/ indian cuisine…

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Vietnamese culture introduced at ASEAN Bazaar in Argentina

Home / World Localities / Vietnamese culture introduced at ASEAN Bazaar in Argentina Vietnamese culture introduced at ASEAN Bazaar in Argentina
Foreign visitors at the Vietnamese stall (Photo: VNA)Buenos Aires (VNA) – The ASEAN Committee in Argentina , which groups the embassies of Vietnam , Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines and Indonesia , organised an annual ASEAN bazaar on April 6, featuring a wide range of their traditional handicrafts, food and musical performances.
The event aimed to promote cultural exchanges, introduce the nations’ images and people, as well as to boost their mutual understanding and relations with the host nation.
Vietnam Embassy showcased lacquer paintings, silk products , conical hats, ao dai ( Vietnamese traditional long dress), cuisine, and tourism products .
Speaking at the opening ceremony, Indonesian Ambassador to Argentina Naryatie Siswojo, who is also the current rotating chair of the ASEAN Committee, said this was an opportunity for the participating countries to introduce its own images and
diplomat also highlighted the solidarity and cooperation within the bloc amid regional integration as reflected through the organisation of such annual event.
ASEAN, or the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, now groups Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia , Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore,
bloc and Argentina signed the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in August 2018, opening a new development period in bilateral ties. -VNA Google News: Trourism Indonesia site-en.vietnamplus.vn Clinton waxes poetic on childhood in Hope April 7, 2019 ADVERTISEMENT Most View Travel News – Thai tourism sees growth in li… The Thai tourism industry recorded total international arrivals of 31.25 million in January-October 2018, up 7.84%, generating an estimated 1.63 tril… Russia’s programme for domestic and inbound … CAPA publishes more than 400 global News Briefs every weekday, covering all aspects of the aviation and travel industry. It’s the most comprehensive s… ICoMS 2019 2nd International Conference on Mathema… 2019 2nd International Conference on Mathematics and Statistics (ICoMS 2019)—Ei Compendex and SCOPUS We welcome your participati… Russia allocates funding for six year tourism deve… CAPA publishes more than 400 global News Briefs every weekday, covering all aspects of the aviation and travel industry. It’s the most comprehensive s… Russia sees 25% increase in domestic tourism traff… CAPA publishes more than 400 global News Briefs every weekday, covering all aspects of the aviation and travel industry. It’s the most comprehensive s… IATO’s 34th Convention Providing succour to … Inaugurating the 34th annual Convention of the Indian Association of Tour Operators (IAT O) in Visakhapatnam, KJ Alphons, Minister of State for Touri… Zeman begins four-day state visit to Israel | Radi… The Czech president, Miloš Zeman, begins a four-day state visit to Israel on Sunday. While in the country Mr. Zeman will become the first Czech states… Azerbaijan approves agreement on tourism cooperati… CAPA publishes more than 400 global News Briefs every weekday, covering all aspects of the aviation and travel industry. It’s the most comprehensive s… Zeman begins four-day state visit to Israel The Czech president, Miloš Zeman, begins a four-day state visit to Israel on Sunday. While in the country Mr. Zeman will become the first Czech states… Power 100 2018: Gold Coast’s most influentia… To use this website, cookies must be enabled in your browser. To enable cookies, follow the instructions for your browser below. Facebook App: Open li… ADVERTISEMENT

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Stay at Palms

I stayed at Palms for around 3 months. The place has great ambience and excellent facilities. The spa, steam and sauna is a bliss. The food and restaurants options is excellent. The Thai live kitchen is one of the unique experiences and the chef is master in his field. All the cuisines be it Indian, Italian it is very tasty. All the housekeeping staff are helpful and great service. The front desk and reservations are appreciation worthy. I would especially like to appreciate Rahul who was always cheerful at front desk and made things easier. A great service

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Europe One Of The Seven Continents History Essay

Friday, April 5, 2019 Europe One Of The Seven Continents History Essay Europe iodine Of The Seven Continents History Es scanEurope convention exclusivelyy ace of the seven continents of the mankind. Although referred to as a continent, Europe is actually only when the western fifth of the Eurasiatic attainmass, which is confound up primarily of Asia. Modern geographers broadly speaking desc clapperclawe the Ural Mountains, the Ural River, variance of the Caspian Sea, and the Caucasus Mountains as forming the main demarcation line between Europe and Asia. The name Europe is mayhap derived from that of Europa, the daughter of Phoenix in Greek mythology, or possibly from Ereb, a Phoenician word for sunset.The second bittieest continent (Australia is the smallest), Europe has an ara of 10,355,000 sq km (3,998,000 sq mi), bargonly it has the third largest macrocosm of all the continents, 730 million in 2008. The northernmost point of the European mainland is Cape Nordkinn, in Norway the reciprocal ohmerlymost, Punta de Tarifa, in southerly Sp ain near Gibraltar. From west to east the mainland ranges from Cabo da Roca, in Portugal, to the north-eastern slopes of the Urals, in Russia. Europe has long been a centre of great cultural and economic achievement. The ancient Greeks and Romans produced major civilizations, historied for their contributions to philosophy, literature, fine invention, and g e realplacenment.www.hezel.com/globalreport/IntrotoEurope.pdfRomans had some minor influences on their food as food came in from various parts of the ex locomoteding empire and perhaps cardinal major influences. Their own Roman agricultural roots, which continued to be chance uponn as a fearful ideal through with(predicate)out the history of the Empire, and the Greek influence. The wealthier Romans had Greek slaves, who would cook for them. R.W. Davies in The Roman Military Diet, in 1971 writes that in that location is archaeological evidence that Roman soldiers in the magnetic northern provinces would eat more heart and soul than pile back in Italy, and even acquired a seek for beer. And certainly as more Germans became Roman soldiers, they would open brought their pickences into the army and back to Rome. www.hezel.com/globalreport/IntrotoEurope.pdfMuch of Roman food was foundationd on combining sweet, sour and savoury tastes all in one dish, just as Chinese food still does today. The taste for seasoner dishes in this way not single survived the fall of Rome, it remained the practice through the Dark Ages, the Middle Ages and honest up until it was finally e actuallywherethrown by the revolution in French prep aredness that was to occur in the 1600s.The subjective regionsThe geological underpinning of Europe includes, from north to south, an ancient mass of stable, crystalline rocks a broad belt of relatively level sedimentary materials a district of amalgamateed geological structures created by folding, faulting, and volcanism and a region of comparatively recent mountain-build ing activity. This geological pattern has helped create the numerous natural regions that make up the landscape of Europe. One of the major criteria accessing the type of food people eat is geographical location and the climate i.e. People hold in coastal areas eat more of sea food and people living in on the face of its cull food as per the availability in the region.http//books.google.co.uk/booksClimateAlthough much of Europe lies in the northern latitudes, the relatively warm seas that rim the continent give most of interchange and western Europe a objurgate climate, with cool winters and mild summers. The prevailing westerly winds, warmed in part by passing over the North Atlantic Drift ocean current, bring precipitation throughout most of the year. In the Mediterranean climate area-Spain, Italy, and Greece-the summer months are usually hot and dry, with almost all rainfall occurring in winter. From slightly central Poland eastward, the moderating effects of the seas are reduced, and consequently cooler, drier precedents prevail. The northern parts of the continent excessively relieve oneself this type of climate. Most of Europe receives 500 to 1,500 mm (20 to 60 in) of precipitation per year. Climate is one of the most important factors determining the consumption of food i.e. People living in cold places prefer hot foods and vice versa.www.climnet.orgPeopleAlthough it is not precisely known when humans first lived in Europe, they credibly migrated in that respect from the east in several waves, mostly via a no longer extant land bridge from Asia Minor into the Balkans and by way of grasslands north of the Black Sea. Parts of Europe had a considerable human population by about 4000 bc. Geographical barriers much(prenominal)(prenominal) as forests, mountains, and swamps helped divide the peoples into radicals that remained largely key out for long periods. Some intermixing of peoples occurred as a result of migrations, however. europeanhistor y.about.comLanguagesEuropeans speak a childlike variety of linguistic communications. The header linguistic groups are the Slavic, which includes Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Polish, Slovenian, Macedonian, and Serbo-Croatian the Germanic, which includes English, German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, and Icelandic and the Romance, which includes Italian, French, Spanish, Portuguese, and Romanian. These languages view basically the same origins and are grouped as Indo-European languages. Other Indo-European languages include Greek, Albanian, and Celtic languages such as Gaelic, chisel, and Breton. In addition to the Indo-European language speakers, the continent has groups of people who speak Finno-Ugric languages, such as Finnish, Hungarian, and Saami, as tumefy as speakers of the Basque and Turkish languages. many a(prenominal) Europeans use English or French as a second language. europa.eu/languages/en/home devotionIn the early 2000s the gre at majority of Europeans were Christians. The largest single religious group, Roman Catholics, lived mainly in France, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Ireland, Belgium, southern Germany, and Poland. An separate large group was composed of followers of Protestant faiths, concentrated in countries of northern and central Europe such as England, Scotland, northern Germany, The Netherlands, and the Scandinavian nations. A third major Christian group was composed of members of an Orthodox church. They lived principally in Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, Serbia, and Montenegro. In addition, there were Jewish communities in most European countries (the largest of them in Russia), and the inhabitants of Albania and Turkey were predominantly Muslim.www.geographia.comThe British IslesBritish CuisineOver decades British culinary art put one across seen lots of changes because of trade, war, empire, immigration and inheritance of different cultures.(http//www.lonelyplanet.com/map s/europe/England/)Backg fattenUnited Kingdom is located in Western Europe, islands including the northern one-sixth of the island of Ireland between the North Atlantic Ocean and the North Sea, northwest of France and North and west at this, the land tends to be higher and the climate colder and wetter. To the south and east hills are generally low and summers warmer and drier. The British culinary art is influenced by the British climate.Climate plays important role in formation of cuisine. Britain has a cold and beautiful climate which is suitable for growing apples and other fruit vegetables so there are more fresh vegetables. Ireland is everyday for spudes and because of cold climate lot of people are prefer to eat nerve center and recoil so this strongly affects cuisine of great Britain . Britain food handed-downly been base on fresh vegetables and midpoint with some sauces as well as beef beloved whiner and porc also known in the United Kingdom. We can see British cuisine has been multicultural. In ancient beats influenced by the Romans and in medieval whiles the French. When the Frankish Normans invaded, they brought with them the spices of the east cinnamon, saffron, mace, nutmeg, pepper, and ginger. sugar came to England at that time, and was considered a spice rare and expensive. Before the arrival of cane sugars, honey and fruit juices were the only sweeteners.Because the agriculture practices of the Roman and Norman periods of England greatly influenced the recipes and culinary atmosphere in early kitchens long later on those areas were through. Stewing and stuffing various farm and game meats originated from those periods, as well as clapperclawing and spicing. Wales was famous for raising sheep, so lamb with mint sauce was a staple welch dish. In England, dishes such as steak and kidney pie, bangers and mash and Yorkshire pudding have embedded themselves in the food history of the country. Some of these traditions carried over to continental Europe and beyond, especially during the height of trading and colonization in the 17th and 18th centuries.British Empire got a lot of benefits from different countries cousins such as from East Asia adopted tea and that was exported to India. past Indian curry style also adopted in Britain and some famous sauces such as k etceteraup , mint sauce , Worcestershire sauce and Controversy has raged throughout the whole of Britain though after source foreign secretary Robin Cooke hailed Chicken Tikka masala as Britains true national dish.(http//britishfood.about.com/od/introtobritishfood/f/questions.htm).During two world war Britain faces lot of problem to transport goods from one country to another so that also effected to British as well as worldwide cuisine because many of goods and commodities become short. Because of that sympathy Britain cuisine got lot of changes such as they only based on the regional food and meat which they utilize to produce.UK divided in to 4 main partsEnglandScotlandWalesNorth IrelandThe FoodWe may have a several ideas about proper British Food. exactly the most popular dish in England at the moment is Curry?The national dish of England is not a lily-livered Tikka masala it is a well known fact. Honestly, unless you are from England yourself, you really wont get it properly. Its just a good example of how England takes on other cultural elements and makes them part of their own heritage. Or something less cheesy to that effect. The other thing is that those who have worked in the curry houses before, have got better jobs, or gone to university.Englands immigration policy has become very aggressive recently, and while I think such a policy should be based on food, if it has such a significant effect on the restaurant and hospitality industry,www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/British food has tralatitiously been based on beef, lamb pork, chicken and angle in other words we can say is based on meat and meat products.The most common typical foods eaten in Britain include Sandwich, tip Chips, and Pies curries.www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/EnglandBritish cuisine is based with their geographical background and their temperature. Originally England has natural traditional cooking ingredients i.e. meat fresh herbs and green leafy vegetables with honest season because of that they got strong flavour traditional dishes such as roast beef , pork chop, mash tradeatoes , steamed vegetables and sauces. Being an island, Britain has always a fresh picture of sea food from sea, salmon, Dover sole, mackerel. As well as after some time, it includes different European and Asian cuisines interaction thats break uped from British Empire during time of post war.Some of the best pudding comes from England such as sticky pudding. As well as some obtuse pudding also popular in England. Looks give care a black sausage. It is make from dried pigs blood and fat. Eaten at break spendthrift timeTraditionally England has been known as a country of beefeaters and beef because the United Kingdom is largest beef maker in the Europe and third largest beef producer in the world. British beef is finest in the world it is based on the breeds, the grass, and climate and farming skills. Kent is a garden of cattles.Yorkshire pudding is most popular in England. Its make with the mixture of flour, egg and milk. Yorkshire pudding always goes with beef because it absorbs all the juice from meat and taste great with beef.England is famous for onion gravy and mash this mostly serves as accompaniment of beef, meat and chicken and some vegetable dish. In England many restaurant serve typical breakfast and that is really well because its includes bacon, pork sausages, fried scrambled egg fried smelt smoked haddock, tomato, fried green tomatoes, grilled whole pluck baked beans, oven roasted potatoes fresh fruits and juices.A sandwich has always been a very popular snack, but the first to eat one was the earl o f sandwich 1718 1792. He was a dedicated risk taker and ref employ to leave the gambling tables to eat. During the marathon gambling sessions he asked a waiter to bring him a mo of ham between two pieces of bread, and so invented the sandwich. Thats got really famous in England and sandwich also got include into the high tea. High tea is a basically meal and tea which is served between four and pentad o clock in afternoon. Afternoon tea includes cake, pastries, sandwich, clotted cream and tea.England is traditionally famous for its traditional classic dessert such as from pies to fruit crumbles and summer puddings do with berries as well as cakes flavoured with spices and dried fruits, filled with jam. Plum pudding with brandy sauce is considered English traditions. supranational cuisine.www.wiley.comScotland frugal food is simple, with a heavy emphasis on meat. Roast lamb, roast beef steaks. From the past few centuries Scottish cuisine centered on making use of every scrap of food available. This attitude is seen in the Scottish national dish called haggis. It is make up of chop heart, liver, and lungs of sheep put these ingredients in a bag made up of sheep stomach. Scotland is famous for their oatcakes which made with pinhead oat and its really healthy and nutritiousOne of the famous stocks served in the Scotland which is made with mutton, beef, chicken and some diced vegetables is known as Scotch broth. It should be thick and served piping hot. Scotland is famous for sea food for example oysters, Mussels, Prawns, Scallops, Crabs and Lobster. Because Scotland is surrounded with water and have good climatic condition to produce a good quality sea food.Example of Scottish sea food dishes Glasgow Oyster ShotOysters, with horseradish dressing, lemon, Tabasco and a shot of Vodka.Seared Tuna SteakCous and red onion, sesame root soya dressingPan Fried BreamWith beetroot rosti and beurre blancBaked HalibutBlack pudding crustScotland is known specially for it s shortbread which is made with traditional way and black bun it is easy fruit cake made with raisins almonds brown sugar, cinnamon and ginger. Scottish game food is also famous.such(prenominal) as grouse, Wild Scottish Pheasant, Wild Scottish Pheasant is very lean, with a rich game flavour found only in truly wild.WalesWales is famous for its traditional laver bread which is made with boil seaweed and served with fine Welsh oatmeal into little cakes and fried into nappy patties with eggs, bacon and cockles for a traditional Welsh breakfast.The components of aWelshbreakfast. Some common lark abouts are bacon, sausages, cockles, laver bread, eggs, fried mushrooms, tomatoes, and smoked fish. It is also possible to see some cold ingredients, like fresh fruit and cereals, although these may not always be ofWelshorigin. The bacon and sausages in aWelshbreakfastare ideally made in Wales, with traditionallyWelshingredients. TheWelshtend to like their bacon thick, and it may also be hea vily marbled withFat, depending on what part of the pig it comes from. Cockles are small shellfish which are harvested from the rocky coastline of Wales cockles are said to be in particular fine. Only two vegetables cultivated in Waless i.e. leeks and cabbage. The national dish of Wales is cawl a word for broth or dope up that is a classic one pot meal. Cooked in an iron pot. Is made up of bacon lamb, cabbage, reinvigorated potatoes and leeks.Welsh cakes breads include Bara brith the famous bread with raisins and orange peel. Federal IrelandIn Irish history there are three major periods they are before potato arrived, after potato arrived and after the potato failed. Potato came to Ireland by way of South America and then staple over there. All the population of ire land was depended on potato because it was more profitable than other crop after 1844 all crop regularly failed nationwide about 20 years and there many people beginning getting weak and starved to death. Then there was big change in diet they start importing a cheap cornmeal and eating pork but that doesnt work so they once more moved to oatcakes carrots turnips and local vegetable.Irish exertion is a classic example made from mutton, potatoes, onion with flavoured parsley and thyme. Traditional food include soda bread originally made in the huge black cooking pot and leavened with baking powder and soured milk. In old days is made up of milk left from previous day.Colcannon is a dish made up of potato, cabbage and garlic. carragheen moss is another Irish delicacy, seaweed that is collected and driedInternational cuisine.www.wiley.comSeasonal availability of British IngredientsJanuary Cornish cauliflower, Sprouts, compel rhubarb.February spring shallots, purple sprout sprouts, celeriac, and leeksMarch garlic shoots, new-seasons garlic, nettles, sea kale.April razors clams, guinea fowl and pheasant eggs, Jersey empurpled potatoes, wild sorrel, St. Georges mushrooms.May asparagus, peas, broa d beans, watercress.June new seasons carrots, sprouting broccoli, wild salmon, sea trout, radishes, sea beet, wild fennel, horseradish, strawberries, apples, chamomile.July tomatoes, setoff beans, lettuce, gooseberries, strawberries, raspberries, cherries, thyme, sweet corn.August gooseberries, pears, Dorset blueberries, sloes.September pumpkins, beetroot, chard, pears, field mushrooms, crab apples, blackberries.October mussels, turbot, chanterelles, oysters, oyster mushrooms, puff balls, Coxs orange pippins, walnuts, Kentish cob nuts.November Swede, parsnips, capital of Israel ArtichokesDecember quince, goose.Type of cooking in United KingdomTop of FormCooking in waterCrabs example crab bisque. Pulses and legumes (lentils, chickpeas),fish seafood chowder. Meat andpoultry track down chicken breast. muggyMeat, fish steamed sea bassPoultry smoked duck breast, vegetables,potatoesand pasta.RoastingMeat.Example roast turkey with chipolata and Yorkshire puddings served with cranbe rry sauce. Roast leg of lamb served with mint sauceGrillingMeat and fish.Example rib eye steak, pork chop, fillet mignonFryingVegetables, meat and fish.StewingMeat example Irish bulk largeCooking equipments used in British cuisineDeep fryer- This method involves hot up food by submerging it completely in fat. It used as a commercial means of cooking fast food. This process is carried out at a higher temperature so that the food is sealed, becomes crisp and brown.Stock pot stock pot is very popular in United Kingdom. Stock pot is type of remit and long cooking and stock pot is a cylindrical, deep pan with a heavy lid. (http//yowspot.com/Buy_Sell2/ go out/smc3/35351.jpg)Salamander When the heat source is above the grill bars, it is called as a salamander.Grill Grill is traditional British equipment were food is cook in grills may be charcoal or gas.Braising pan braising pan is a specially designed for braising a beef meat etc. it is two handled oval or rectangular pan with perfect lid. It braising pan are used on stovetop or in the oven. gelatin mouldsJelly mould is very popular in the Britain. Jelly moulds used to come in different shapes and sizes. It made up of copper or tin(http//www.istockphoto.com/file_thumbview_approve/1591325/2/istockphoto_1591325-metal-jelly-moulds.jpg)Pie dish pie dish used for baking fish, for different traditional pie such as chicken pie, mushroom pie and pork pie. It is made up of earthenware or metal dish.(http//www.phantomcanyonranch.com/pottery/oval-4-baking-dishes.jpg)Tart mouldsTart mould is used for making different sweet and savoury tart. Tart mould is made up of still or metal.Yorkshire pudding mouldsYorkshire pudding mould is specially made with non-stick metal and its available in different shapes like round and rectangularFrying pan frying pan is basically made for shallow frying or some time deep also it is made up of metal with one handle. little terror pansA brat pan gets its name from the German word to fry, thoug h in German they are called tilting pan, do far more than fry.These large, rectangular tilting pans still have a place in large kitchens for mass catering, with built-in heating (gas or electric) and are a versatile cooking device.The tilt feature can be electrically operated or a manual hand driven mechanism.They can boil, braise, steam, poach, stew and fry either deep or shallow frying.OvensThere are few meals as quintessentially British as theSunday Roast. Even if you dont twainer with other British classics like steak and kidney pie, or Cornish pasties there is hardly anyone (except vegetarians of course) who doesnt enjoy some variation of the good old Sunday lunch. It could be roast beef with Yorkshire pudding, or roast lamb with mint sauce, roast chicken with stuffing or roast pork with crackling and apple sauce, but whichever meat you choose there should be some wonderful crisp roast potatoes to eat with the gravy or pan juices.These are the equipment are most popular in United KingdomSpanish CuisineMap of Spainhttp//www.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http//www.historiae.org/images/SpainSpain IntroductionSpain is situated in southwest Europe. It borders Portugal in the west and in the northeast Spain borders France and the Principality of Andorra. In the south, the region of Andalusia borders the British territory of Gibraltar. There are several languages used in Spain but the official language is Castilian Spanish, which is often thought of as just Spanish.Spain and Portugal are surrounded by water the Iberian Peninsula is comprised of these two countries. Spains northern coast is washed by the Atlantic Ocean.The north east coast looks onto the Bay of Biscay. The Atlantic Ocean also surrounds the west of the Iberian Peninsula, which is largely Portuguese territory the exception being Galicia in the northwest of Spain. Some parts of the southern Spanish coast also face the Atlantic, but moving eastwards through the Strait of Gibraltar the Spanish coast meets the Mediterranean Sea.http//www.appliedlanguage.com/HISTORY OF SPAINMany cuisines are influenced with the other cultures and this happens even with the SPAINISH Cuisine, but that was long time back and as other influences incorporated, Spain has developed the cuisine which is uniquely its own.Most of the Spain is surrounded with water and shares the border with northeast France and Morocco which is just short distance where the Mediterranean meets the Atlantic. So it is very obvious for Spain to get open(a) to the cultures and cuisines to the neighbouring countries. Every region of Spain has added own variations to these different cultures. Seafood is largely added into the cuisine as it is largest coastal area in the Europe. Spain got many things from different countries and cultures .Phoenicians brought sauces by sailing through Mediterranean, Roman gave the ingredients of spices and association of understanding it, and the Greek ingenious them with the olives and olive oil and the cultures who influenced Spain are Jews, Carthaginians, but the moors who influenced the Spanish cuisine very strongly.Ref International cuisine. www.wiley.comMoors rule Spain for more than five hundred years and left their mark on the Spanish cuisine, they brought fruits such as almonds, figs, bananas, oranges. Which Spanish people eat even now a days. The spices brought by the moors included cinnamon, cumin and nutmeg, served with chicken they way they are now, and the magnificent golden saffron. Paella and Gazpacho the world famous rice dish and cold soup is a gift from moors to the Spanish cuisine. Without moors Spanish cuisine would never be the astronomical pleasure. While Christians taught the Spanish to eat pork.While Columbus sailed in late 14th century Introduced tomatoes to Europe which is now the base to the Spanish cuisine.So we can imagine as Spanish cuisine is influenced with many other cultures of other countries which makes the cuisine more and more pop ular day by day.Ref http//www.spanish-fiestas.comFood cultures in Spain In general, in Spain the food culture, the way that a meal is planned and eaten is more relaxed than in the UK, people await to be in less of a hurry to get through their food.The cuisine of Spain is amazingly varied. The gastronomy the art and science of good eating, varies by region dramatically.The gastronomy in Spain is heavily influenced by the different cultures which have passed through the Iberian Peninsula Roman, Visigoth, and Arabic. Other major influences are the Phoenicians, the Greeks and important events such as the discovery of the Americas. For this, Spanish cooking is rich in flavour and aromas. spanishfood.about.com/Of all the mentioned events, the ones that have had the most influence on Spanish gastronomy are The Roman Invasion. They developed wine, oil and wheat production. Part of this production was exported to other areas of the Roman Empire. The Invasion of the Moors. They contributed t heir knowledge of water management for agriculture to what the Romans had left. They also introduced oranges, lemons, rice and aubergines to Spain. The discovery of the Americas. The Spanish brought from the Americas potatoes, maize, cocoa, tomatoes, and peppers. All of these products form a part of our current gastronomy. spanishfood.about.com/Eating out in Spain is relatively cheap and meals are usually literal instead of gourmet. The Spanish tradition of tapas is a good way to sample the local food. Tapas are small dishes of snacks which are served anytime especially in small bars. They cover all types of foods from seafood to vegetables. Many Spanish people make an evening in bar to trying different tapas. Another of Spains favourites is Serrano Ham. Spain is famous for its fish delicacies and simply mustiness be sampled, especially if you get to coastal areas. Paella has long been a Spanish favourite, based on either meat or seafood. Every region in Spain has its own speciali ties.spanishfood.about.comCLIMATE OF SPAINSpanish cuisine is made of very different kinds of dishes due to the differences in geography, culture and climate. It is heavily influenced by the variety of seafood available from the waters that surround the country, Spain being the second largest (after Japan) consumer of fish. As Spain has had a history with many different cultural influences, the magnificence and variety of its cuisine is overwhelming, but all these ingredients have made up a unique cuisine with thousands of recipes and flavours. The international influences are perhaps most obvious in Barcelona.spanishfood.about.comRegions of SpainThe Spanish regions are divided by many mountain ranges. This separates them geographically, but has also led to cultural differences as well. The climate too varies enormously, both across the regions and from winter to summer. Both these factors have contributed to the creation of distinctive local food traditions.The South normal images of Spain are of the southAndalusiaThe region comprises the whole of the south coast, looking east on the Mediterranean from Almeria province, south to malanga and out on to the Atlantic beyond Gibraltar. Attracts the tourist beaches and another of fishing farming. A wide variety of shellfish are found in the warm Mediterranean, and from the Atlantic come big fish such as shark and tuna.Wonderful crops of asparagus and strawberries grow in the Guadalquivir Delta.Almeria, with the help of irrigation supplies tomatoes Peppers to all of Europe. The rusty green olives grow where nothing else will, and orange and lemon trees loaded with fruit, surrounded the hamlets.Andalusia is said to be zone of frying. But in villages old fashioned stews of beans or chickpeas are common. Gazpacho is traditional Spanish soup made up of tomatoes and green peppers.Ref International cuisine. www.wiley.comSangria the chilled mixture of wine and citrus juice made in a big jug is another summer cooler. It belongs to a world of siesta afternoon of dainty peace.MurciaTo the east of Andalusia lies Murcia, another Moorish province, indeed they ruled here until 1609. This is another garden area with the Huerta de Murcia festering bright green parsley and broad beans. They cook the beans in slow fire when its tender mix with tomato sauce and served in a breakfast. Stuffed peppers with aubergines and cous cous flavoured with parsley are popular in this region. Ref International cuisine. www.wiley.comCentral SpainAt 700m/22300ft the Meseta is the high heart of Spain and comprise nearly half the country. This is Castilla a great plain with Madrid in the middle, which divided in to two rather different halves. Ref International cuisine. www.wiley.comNorthern Castile and LeonTierra de pan y vino (land of bread and wine) is one description of the Duero Valley. Bread has mystical significance in the great grain plains of Old Castile. Because In the Middle Ages there were a number of Jewish converts to the church who had become convinced Christians by studying and practicing the Jewish Mystical TraditionThe bread basket of Spain produces round hogazas, big close grained loaves, and houses retain their circular ovens, even when they are no longer work.Legumes are dairy farm fare, well flavoured garlic. Chickpeas and lentils grow here. In the north east region sheeps milk is used to make cheese- soft, duster Burgos and the celebrated manchego. Ref International cuisine. www.wiley.comMadridThe city dish is cocido, is probably one of Spains national dishes. Cocido is based on a, which simmers away all day, hardly bubbling. In the old days households made it every day, for poached meat used to be the hallmark of the middle-class kitchen. From this pot comes a series of magnificent things. But callos (tripe) is so popular that it has moved from the home to become bar fare.CaldoThis is clear stock, rich with many meat juices. Famous as clear soup with sherry in it, it is drunk world-w Posted by

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Castling at Potentino

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Otherworldly is one way of describing Castello di Potentino , an eleventh-century citadel girdled by greenery. West of Seggiano and south of Monte Amiata in southern Tuscany, the castle vaunts an air of exceptional happenstance where everything feels possible and possibilities become practical. Englishwoman Charlotte Horton spotted the potential before anyone else, lovingly restoring the rubble into the regal residence it is today and planting site-sensitive grape varieties in the volcanic soils. Charlotte’s wines are among the most beguiling in the Montecucco area. Ethereal, elegant and energised, they are elixirs entwined with the sense of place made from Alicante, Sangiovese and Pinot Nero grapes grown side by side in the same four-hectare vineyard.
Get practical at Potentino this April.
First up is Pilates with Patrice Munro , a residency ranging from the whole week to a few days or a single class focusing on a new-found understanding of your body from April 14 to 22; a four-day Scent and Scentability residential workshop, led by The Scent Trail author Celia Lyttleton, to develop your sense of smell, creating perfumes and enjoying aromatic food and wine (April 25 to 29).
Book ahead for May’s five-day Yoga Retreat with Gunn Haglund , former news presenter and media executive turned Asthanga yoga practitioner. From May 11 to 17, yoga enthusiasts and beginners are invited to dynamic vinyasa flow and meditative yin yoga sessions, al fresco vegetarian meals, and reading or relaxing by the pool. Learn how to cook simple regional Indian cuisine at Potentino as Swati Deshpande and Avinash Kumar (chef formerly at London’s River Café) demonstrate how to make dishes from locally sourced ingredients during the weekend of May 17 to 20.
And more
The month’s activities continue with The Florentine and Decanter ’s Emily O’Hare and her Wine Sense course: four days digesting the fundamentals of the wines of Italy according to the internationally recognized WSET course (May 22-26). End May by joining the American professional painter Timothy Allen for a luxury getaway: seven days of painting from life with the aim of crafting an oil portrait in a landscape.

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Mapping African Cuisines: Q&A with Tuleka Prah

Mukunyadzi: What inspired you to start the My African Food Map ?
Prah: I happened to be looking for a recipe because I felt like [eating] some kind of comfort food which was connected to my upbringing. I went online to look for some recipes because I just didn’t want to wing it anymore. I don’t know, maybe this is part of your experience, but a lot of foods from black kitchens are very improvised. You’ve maybe watched someone make it a couple of times, but then you just kind of improvise.
Anyway, I started looking around, and all the pictures of the dishes were terrible and the content was really badly exhibited. I thought that it lends to the stereotype of African food being just for sustenance—just like survival based. Most of the food I’ve eaten on the continent always tastes really good. Even though the pictures looked rubbish, I knew those dishes tasted good.
If I didn’t know what this tasted like, I would be immediately put off and I wouldn’t want to try it. So, I thought, “Instead of just complaining about it, why don’t you do it then, and see what you can do?” Filmmaker Tuleka Prah created My African Food Map to highlight’s Africa’s most popular dishes.
Mukunyadzi: You mentioned how African food is seen as just sustenance by some people. Do you think that the image of African food has changed for the better in recent years?
Prah: No. I don’t want to sound like a pessimist. I think there’s been a step forward, but that’s mainly because people—Africans in the diaspora and Africans on the continent—are creating content related to food in places where they’re interested in reporting from. So, there are a lot of Nigeria-based blogs and websites and things like that, but those are still self-funded.
In the food internet world, there’s been so many, aesthetically-speaking, leaps forward that people have taken but I feel like a lot of these blogs that feature African foods are still a little bit behind. Of course, there is some kind of shift from the time that I started doing this project, but it’s definitely not at all where it could be. When you go to Netflix, there are an infinite amount of programs on foods from other countries. And besides Parts Unknown , there’s really no quality content about food from the continent.
Mukunyadzi: Would you like to do a TV-version of My African Food Map?
Prah: I’ve tried, in the last couple of years, to pitch Food Map to TV channels because I needed, obviously a better source of funding so that I could do more work and visit more countries for the project. The resounding feedback has always been, “Oh my god, this is such a great idea. Let’s see if we can find a co-production partner.” And then it never pans out. And then they always want to really low-ball it.
Mukunyadzi: What’s the scene in Berlin in terms of food from the continent?
Prah: My god. Non-existent. For some interesting reason, Ethiopian food has kind of crossed over… there are more people who know more about Ethiopian food than they would about, say, Senegalese food. I find that interesting.
I would say, for example, Ghana, Nigeria, that band of the African continent, their food and their types of sauces are like Thai curry—they’re fiery and rich. And I think, if people knew more about it, if it was like a popular trendy food to eat, it could easily, easily become a favorite for people, because it’s quite straightforward once you know what the taste is that you’re going for.
Maybe you’ve caught me on kind of a pessimistic day. I don’t really see how things will change unless there is a concerted effort from the companies with the funds to rebrand and re-market how African foods are seen by people, globally. I think that once people start to do that and once money starts going into promoting foods from the continent, in a way that is up to par with how everybody else’s foods are being exhibited or showcased, then I think little pop-ups will come up, and people will start their little food trucks, and there’ll be more. There’ll be more. Lamb bredie is one of five recipes representing South Africa in her series.
Mukunyadzi: You mentioned that Ethiopian food is fairly well-known compared to other African cuisines in Berlin. Could it be that there’s an element of exoticism involved? Sometimes a certain type of cuisine is seen as a very exotic thing, so people are much more willing to try it, even if it scares them a little bit. It sounds terrible because why would you want to exoticize something?
Prah: I see what you’re saying. I actually had a conversation with someone from the U.K., with an Indian background. I was talking about whether or not if it irritates her, as someone with that background, every now and then when parts of your heritage are, as you said, exoticized, and then commodified. Someone’s like, “Oh my god, I love yoga…” while at the same time, they will look disparagingly at other aspects of your heritage.
The subcontinent is still seen as a place where people are climbing over each other to get the scraps. It’s just like… the food is just as raggedy as the people—that whole vibe. And it doesn’t help that when they do look at the foods, they’re like, “Ew, that looks really gross. What is that?”
Mukunyadzi: So, you have to deal with these very deeply-rooted ideas of what the food is and who the people who make the food are.
Prah: Exactly. Food is always tied to the people. That’s actually why My African Food Map, for me, is in many ways low-key, high-key, quite political.
Mukunyadzi: What’s been your favorite experience of this project, so far?
Prah: My favorite experience is consistently the thing when people are like, “You’re on holiday?” And I say, “Oh, I’m actually here doing this food thing,” I ask them what their favorite dish is, and people get really excited about it. They’re like, “Oh, no, no, no, but not that, you should try this.”
Sometimes people are surprised. I remember a lot of people in Senegal said, “You want to know about Senegalese food?” They were a little bit surprised that there was interest in it.
Mukunyadzi: You must have been eating really well. What’s your favorite dish that you’ve documented?
Prah: Yeah. Thiebou dieune is 100 percent at the top of the list. It’s basically a fish and rice paella. It kind of blows my mind because a lot of the ingredients used—like rice, tomatoes, fish—are things that are familiar. You’d think that you’ve got every single flavor out of them, but when you eat this… When I was in South Africa, there was this cook who made this dish called lamb bredie . It was so, so, so good. It’s one of the project’s South Africa features.
If I had money I would have the people who make the dishes travel with me and go to different cities and do cooking workshops so you could learn how to cook these dishes, directly. Doro wot is an Ethiopian chicken stew usually served at big celebrations.
Mukunyadzi: How do you find the people who you interview for these recipes?
Prah: I just ask. I remember in Kenya, for example, I was collected by this taxi driver. I talked to him about food because the ride from the airport to the place was quite long. He would tell me, “Oh, you should go here. You should take photos here. You should speak to this woman.” I would talk to another person who said, “Oh, you know who makes the best thing? You should speak to this person.” Then I try and find out how to get to that person.
Mukunyadzi: How do people react when you ask to film them while they’re cooking?
Prah: You have to get comfortable with them. They have to be okay with you. That’s the other thing that you don’t really see. Those people that I’m dancing around with the camera, they’ve gotten to the point where we’re cool. I have to be very respectful. It’s a very tough job, actually. I have to be really observant, and I have to feel it out. I have to see if maybe this is the kind of situation where I immediately offer to get all the ingredients, or I should slip them some money at the end, or if no money should be involved because that would be offensive. There are all these little subtleties that I have to navigate.
Mukunyadzi: What do you hope viewers get out of your project besides learning how to make various dishes?
Prah: I hope people gain an interest in whatever country that I cover. If, for example, you’ve never considered visiting Senegal, if you don’t even know where it is on the map—which I’m sure a lot of people don’t—maybe this will inspire you to look it up. And then maybe when they go there, they’ll have an inkling of what they could try, food-wise.
For people who are Senegalese who know the food, I hope that when they watch the videos or they look at the photos, they’re like, “Yep, those are my people. That’s my food.” I want them to be really proud of it, and to share it, and feel like it’s a fair and good representation of the foods that they are familiar with.
Mukunyadzi: Are there any other projects that you’re working on?
Prah: When I’m not filming the Food Map, there’s this thing I do that’s called African Food Friends , which is about documenting the experiences of black people in the diaspora who are meeting and connecting over food.
What I typically do is go to different countries and find people who are big on social media and well-known in their countries. They identify as being from that country while being black, so I know that they have probably had the experience of white Europeans looking at them and saying, “Well, you’re not us.” I film the discussion over a meal that I prepare. The meal is always something inspired by recipes or dishes from a black kitchen, whether it’s South American, North American, or African. It’s interesting for me to see and hear how they navigate their identities.

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Unrealistically beautiful

Kontakt Unrealistically beautiful
Finally, it’s Sakura season! In Japan, the most beautiful time of the year. It is getting warmer; the cherry blossom trees are blooming, and everyone is just happy that the winter is over! So many tourists all over the world are coming to Japan from the end of march until mid of April, in hope to catch the beautiful Sakura season, which last just a few weeks. I was and still am really excited about it. At the same time, I am sad that I have to work and can’t visit all these beautiful places all day long. Nevertheless, I try to enjoy this time as much as possible. On days where I don’t have to work, I am definitely going outside to discover new places.
Because I am waking up for work at 5am, my daily rhythm is completely different than last month when I was working at the evening. Therefore, I am, even on days where I am off, awake pretty early, which is good in order to be more productive. Even though I woke up around 8am I decided to relax the morning in my apartment. I had breakfast, took a shower, wrote a blog and my essay for school.
Around 12am I went outside and walked on the other side of the Kamogawa river. Because we are walking or running around the whole day on work, I am normally pretty lazy when I have a free day. But it was definitely a good idea to walk instead of taking the metro. The way along the river was already super pretty with all these cherry blossom trees. Amazing! The weather was perfect as well. Finally, sunny and a bit warmer then the last weeks. I really enjoyed it. Furthermore, you discover so much more while walking along the streets then when sitting in the subway.
The way to Shoren-in Temple was longer then expected. I think it took me over 40 minutes to get there. But I already saw the tourist buses arriving when I came closer and closer. I don’t know if they already left or where all these people were. But when I arrived at the temple I was pretty much alone. I wasn’t even sure if that was the right entrance or place to enter the temple, but I guess it was.
I was more interested in the garden then the temple itself. I didn’t even have a picture in mind or any expectations how Shoren-in Temple supposed to look like. The garden was very beautiful, calm and peaceful. I really enjoyed that not so many people were at the same time there as me. While walking a little path through the garden I had a nice view of the temple as well as of the bamboo forest. I definitely didn’t expect that. Overall it is a very small and kind of hidden place. Not a Top 1 tourist attraction, but I really enjoyed it.
Not far from Shoren-in Temple is Chion-in temple, which is a very popular tourist destination. The area is much bigger and totally different. From little pagodas, to cherry blossom trees and a huge temple in the centre. I didn’t go inside the temple, because it was already a lot to see outside. Furthermore, every temple has always a similar look from the inside.
Afterwards I walked along a path from Chion-in temple, which connected straight away to Maruyama park. Maruyama park is popular for the many Sakura trees. Therefore, lots of tourists came here to walk through the park. Furthermore, there was a big food or perhaps spring festival happening. So many people were sitting under the cherry blossom trees, making a picnic, talking and having fun. There were so many different kinds of food trucks around the park. By different kinds of food trucks, I don’t really mean different kinds of cuisines. The food is 98% Japanese. They sell Takiyaki, grilled Octopus, Beef, Fish on a stick, Okonomiyaki, Oysters, Tofu, Matcha Ice Cream and so on. Some trucks offered Chinese and Indian food, which was surprising. In general, it was amazing! All the trees and all the food! But it was just too crowded and busy!
From Yasaka Shrine I walked through Gion back to the Kamogawa River, where I crossed the bridge again. I started to get a little bit tired and exhausted. Therefore, I made my way back home. But that was actually the best part of the day.
The way back home was just stunning. To walk along the little river with all these cherry blossoms is just how I imagined the Sakura season in Japan. It looks like on all these unreal pictures you always see on social media. Just unrealistically beautiful. I couldn’t stop taking pictures. I don’t even want to know how many pictures I already took from the cherry blossom trees, but I can’t get enough. I absolutely love it! Just bad, that when you are alone you have no one taking pictures with yourself inside, to have some memories. But there are definitely bigger problems in this world.
After buying some food at the supermarket, I came around 4pm back to my room. I just cleaned up my mess, watched Netflix, cooked dinner and skyped with my family before I went to sleep.
This day was one of the most beautiful days I had so far here. I kind of saw this city in a different light today, which makes me very happy. Today I fell definitely more and more in love with Kyoto! Werbeanzeigen

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Reasons why you should say yes to HOSTELS in 2018, if travelling in india! – Barsha Mukherjee

Written by BARSHA MUKHERJEE Born with a silver spoon, always had a Chauffeur driven car and lavish family holidays? Or maybe born into a conservative family, with mandatory norms to keep long and black hair, no hair colours, or tattoos allowed , kurta pajama came as heredity gifts? Never had the chance to go out to study because you were born in Delhi or Bombay itself, and life has been like home to school and back home and to college and home again.. don’t know what night outs are? Ever played the game called “never have I ever” and always scored the lowest because – 1. You were never allowed to stay out after 7 PM
2. you could never get the opportunity to get sloshed or baked with friends ,
3. You’ve been the ideal child and never bunked college and go on trips, because Mumma never allowed.
4. Could never stroll on roads late at nights with your gang, because you were a day scholar, and found mostly at home in nights sleeping
5. Never ever could wear a short dress to a club actually could never visit a night club because, “log kya kahenge?”– what would people think?
Well this is how I used to be a few years ago until I got my ticket to a university thousands of kilometres away form my home. And then I lived life, yet there are certain things that you desire in life, but can’t do it yet.
And ofcourse if you call yourself a #wanderer, #traveller, #adventure seeker”– I’m sure you must be having a list of
“THINGS TO DO BEFORE YOU DIE”
(Which also reminds me of a similar list, read it here )
➡️No matter if you’re a rich bitch or not.
Because, trust me there’s nothing more interesting than going backpacking with your savings mode on.
⏺️Or have you tried the – “Explore – Earn – Spend” formula yet? If not.. then try it.
Nothing gives you more satisfaction than spending your own hard earned money.
*Also try going casual and avoid the luxurious hotel treatments and 5 star delicacies, once in life because that makes you a tourist and not a traveler.*
And therefore I bring you reasons to why say yes to HOSTELS this year over anything else . 1. IF YOU’RE A WOMAN
Well ofcourse, it’s time that woman put an end to the notion that woman can’t travel until unless led by a man.
I’ve always been fantasizing about traveling alone, with a backpack and a map and roads unknown. But I’ve always been pulled back because –“I’m a woman”. And honestly speaking sometimes you get nervous too and that’s genuine. But as they say fear brings victory.
These days hostels are the best options ever, not because they provide you rooms to share with people but because you can always choose ” who you want to share it with”
Many hostels in India, sharing my experience, offers you all girls room and in some places they also offer you and all female floor.
Now girls what can be better than staying at a dream location ,with the best view in your most comfy dresses? And no worries.. the best trip sorted
2. If you’re COUPLES IN INDIA
Well that’s a thing that always pricks you in the heart , whenever you think of spending some quality time with your darling. But, almost like the climax in Bollywood movies , the hotels play the role of villains in denying couples to stay together. I know nothing is more heart breaking than a NO ENTRY. and here comes the most awaited hero entry, of hostels, and brings you happy endings.
I know, by now you must have already thought of a place, and that’s why I’m providing you with a link down below to got through and make your bookings . Stop blushing now , okay?
3. GOING SOLO? Of course !
I remember how nervous I was when I took my first solo trip, already cancelling one before the actual one happened .
I had my journal totally full with list of places, numbers, cab details, road maps etcetera etcetera ..
but now do you need to worry?
Nope . Because you’ve hostels, cheaper, convenient, and more entertaining. Because even though you’re all alone , away from the known people and their constant bickering and bothering, you’re not really alone when you need company. 4 SEEKING ADVENTURE
When you are backpacking , you seek less baggage, emotional and physical both; and always more adventure. Also what other country better than india, that offers almost every possible thing you can think of with its fairs and festivals complimentary. And that’s why you need one of these hostels which are abundant in hill stations like – Manali, shimla, Rrishikesh, Dehradun, Ooty, Kullu, Darjeeling, Sikkim , Dalhousie, Khajjiar or Jodhpur.
Or metro cities like Delhi, Bombay, Hyderabad or Goa
Because not only the best options at the best rates, but also has to offer you many adventure activities that are famous there along with some entertaining nights, only with a minimal extra payment
5. OUTGOING people, here this is your place .
Out on a business trip, or on official work on a weekend or maybe for an exam scheduled on Sunday and you know no one in the city. Without a second thought book anyone of the best hostels because unlike boring hotel nights with Netflix and a drink all to yourself , hostels in india are always up to organising some real fun events, and since you absolutely love to socialise and meet new people and talk all Night, what do you think is preferable – spending night alone watching Netflix in pajamas or spending the night sharing stories with total strangers , making friends over night also in pajamas ? It’s your call. But if you’re convinced already then you may check the link below, where I’ve selected my top 5 list of best hostels. 6. ON A COLLEGE TRIP
Ohh how difficult it is to manage dining out on Saturdays at a nice restaurant, with the meagre pocket money you’re provided with. I can imagine how it seems to be a distant dream to plan a far off holiday in any state of india.
One of our earliest plan of all girls trip to gujarat could never be implemented as after calculating the expenses of travel and minimal fooding we weren’t left with much money to book a decent hotel, because the cheapest were not really decent and the decent ones weren’t so cheap.
But when I finally found out about hostel rooms, that is not only very cheap with sophisticated furnishings, bathrooms but they also let all stay in the same room, be the strength of group is 4 or 7 or 11. Hostels have solutions for everything. 7. TO EXPERIENCE OFFBEAT TOURISM
Yes! Because when you google for “places to visit ” in Kasol or Goa , google will suggest you temples, monasteries or churches, a few beaches or hill peaks . And hotels will offer you an extravagant one day planned cab ride in and around the city to visit forts and palaces. But only a local resident will guide you through those narrow lanes , or will show you spots that are not commercial and suggest you food and drinks that are must haves . And hostels of India are based on this ideology, to make you experience the things that are not too mainstream, Hostels offer you treks , camping under the stars, bonfires and music, local cuisine as well as a menu full of continental, Italian or French dishes . They will take you on hikes, give you insights of the lifestyle of the city you’re visiting and end the night with a bash. 8. RELIGION AND SPIRITUALITY
Coming to India, from foreign lands ? Or you need some time away from your ever so tiring and back breaking jobs? Going through a bad phase in life, need time for self retrospection? Take a break, it’s easy! Many hostels in India actually are multi faceted, their job doens’t finish after allotting you beds and providing food, but they walk an extra mile and and makes every effort to introduce you to the most wonderful culture of India. Most hostels set amidst beautiful eco friendly locations, gives you all the time and rejuvenation needed. Hostels have programs such as yoga, city walks, heritage walks, photo walks, they have activities which appreciate the local architecture and history . 9. FESTIVALS OF INDIA
Most of us are curious , about all the vibrant colours, lightings , food and all the hot talks about indian festivals. If you’re visiting India to witness one of these festivals, be it holi, Deepawali, Lohri or Onam Pongal , Trust me when I say – hostels are the right place you need to be at. Because , roaming around alone in streets on holi or Shivratri is not only boring, since you don’t know much about the roads, unfamiliar addresses but also because you don’t know what the customs are. But since you wish to live the experience, hostels have the best celebrations within its premises with all the band baja and bash.
They may also organise walks or get togethers in the city where you can enjoy your time. So, “if festivals in India, then hostels in India ” becomes the best combination eventually. 10. IT’S AFFORDABLE, SIMPLE!
The most simple yet most appealing reason is this only. Who else will provide you with a comfy bed and breakfast and other things at such cheaper rates?
One of my personal favourite hostel chains in India , also offers with bed lamps (priority for an avid reader like me) WiFi , rooftop cafes, fully furnished kitchen at places where you can cook yourself, books and games and parties, lockers and showers, new friends and much more awaits you at the least rates you can imagine . Are you looking for a link to search for hostels in India? Don’t worry! I’ve that solution too
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