Food, Fire, Music—Catching up With Chef Roger Mooking

Food, Fire, Music—Catching up With Chef Roger Mooking

Trinidad-born, Canadian-raised Chef Roger Mooking finds inspiration everywhere he travels. That inspiration doesn’t just find its way into his cooking—it’s also given some unique flavor to his music. A passionate artist in the kitchen as well as the studio, Roger is a man who hosts/co-hosts several culinary shows including “Man Fire Food” (his signature series focused on grilling and BBQ) and “Man’s Greatest Food” (Cooking Channel); “Greatest of America” (Travel Channel); plus “Everyday Exotic” and “Heat Seekers” (Food Network). Roger’s thirst for adventure and food discovery has led him all over the globe to experience a variety of cuisines and meet amazing people along the way. As a prolific Juno award-wining recording artist who recently released fourth solo album, “Eat Your Words”; this world-traveler and culinary innovator has a zest for life that’s the perfect recipe—combining all of the skills he has honed in food and music throughout his expansive dual career.
Image credit: Lumenville Inc.
On His Background I come from a family with Chinese, Spanish, Dutch, African and Irish roots, and my birthplace of Trinidad is the most diverse island of the Caribbean. When my family moved to Canada during my childhood, I grew up in a West Indian household where my mom would always cook diverse dishes. It had a tremendous impact on me. My experience with food and traveling is just an extension of my lineage and history. I use food and music and the trajectory to explore those things further.
On Childhood Memories My brother was a DJ, and my dad used to collect a lot of records. We’d have Santana, Simon & Garfunkel, Jose Feliciano, Calypso, and old school hip-hop. In my house while eating breakfast, we would always be talking about what we were going to have for dinner. In the background, there would always be records playing. It was lively and vibrant household—lots of laughing and screaming while cooking food. That’s how I came up. It’s in my pores, and it’s in everything I do now. When I started cooking in restaurants around 15, I started getting interested in rapping so I would take all my money from work and go to a recording studio or rent equipment to build studios in the basement and do recordings. I was always working in restaurants then doing music. I split time between two jobs, and I still do it now.
How Traveling Influences Him Traveling gives my music (and food) a very global feel. Going around to different cultures gives you a sense of people. People are all the same, but the nuances of a society give color to the whole picture. Whenever I am in the studio trying to make music, or if I am in the kitchen trying to make a dish for a restaurant, I am always thinking about how to take some of those influences from my travels. Sometimes it’s the sound of the guitar or the frequency of the notes we’re picking; sometimes it’s the balance of where I want the chili or the sour to hit the palate at certain time. All of those things are nuanced and influenced by the travels. I need to see a lot. As an artist or creative person, the influences are more important than the output.
On Places That Surprised Him I have seen way more diversity in food over the past 10 years. Before when I went to Texas, I would only find Texas-style BBQ. Now when I go there, I can get some of the best Pho outside of the Philippines or Vietnam—some of the best is in Houston! There is also incredible diversity in Austin and Portland, Oregon. It’s been great to see the transition. It’s happening in other parts of the world too, and in places within America that you wouldn’t expect.
On His Bucket List I haven’t dived into South American BBQ. I’ve done Korea, China, Japan, and Malaysia, but South America has a deep tradition of cooking over fire. I would love to explore more of that firsthand and hands-on, as well as South Africa and Africa. There is a fantastic tradition of cooking over fire there, and in Turkey too where there is an amazing culinary thought process. I am interested into diving into that and psyched to learn.
On Combos He Can’t Live Without Pork with bok choy. Coriander and cumin for beef. Sumac with chicken. Marinades with herbs like sage, basil, oregano, thyme, or rosemary and olive oil with garlic and black pepper. Leave that in the frig for a few days and then add fruits like apples and grill.
What He’s Passionate About My real passion is what real people in other countries are doing in their houses, like grandmothers cooking in Turkey and their neighbors. They may be making the same dish, but in a different way. In Italy and Bologna, seeing older men skinning anchovies—what are they doing with them? Real culinary inspiration is to go to the roots of the dish. Stef Schwalb
A born and bred New Yorker, Stef Schwalb’s love of everything culinary knows no bounds. Her claim to fame? Her Jameson-infused, dark chocolate chip oatmeal cookies. Fun facts! Stef was once a finalist in Dunkin’ Donuts’ Create Dunkin’s Next Donut Contest, and she won a trip to New Zealand based on a 140-character Sauvignon Blanc tasting note Tweet. She is currently communications manager at Gregory White PR, where she writes about enticing food and wine experiences at wineries and wine regions across the globe.

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JUNE / JULY 2019 – Minnesota

Over 2,000 miles – lots of travel – total of 8 days, 2 travel days by me, 2 travel days on the bus – 3 sightseeing days….
Sites Visited:
0. Day Zero – Travel Day
Just a travel day to pick-up; however, visited the Garst Museum in Greenville, Ohio on the way. See separate post.
1. Day One – Travel to Middleton, Wisconsin
Another travel day…
2. Day Two – Middleton, Wisconsin to Duluth, Minnesota
Excellent scenery today, in Wisconsin drove past the gateway to the Wisconsin Dells and Baraboo (Circus World), then up to Superior Wisconsin and the Frasier Shipyard with two iron ore freighters being repaired. Stunning scenery of Lake Superior, freighters in the distance, lake front, downtown Superior and Duluth. For the next two days, wonderful scenery, plus drove past the Glensheen Mansion in Duluth.
2a) Split Rock Lighthouse
Split Rock Lighthouse is located southwest of Silver Bay; the structure was designed by lighthouse engineer Ralph Russell Tinkham and was completed in 1910 at a cost of $75,000, including the buildings and the land. It is considered one of the most picturesque lighthouses in the US and claims to be the most photographed spot in Minnesota.
Split Rock Lighthouse was built in response to the great loss of ships during the famous Mataafa Storm of 1905, in which 29 ships were lost on Lake Superior. One of these shipwrecks, the Madeira, is located just north of the lighthouse. The lighthouse is built on a 133-foot sheer cliff eroded by wave action. The octagonal building is a steel-framed brick structure with concrete trim on a concrete foundation set into the rock of the cliff. It is topped with a large, steel lantern which features a third order, bi-valve type Fresnel lens manufactured by Barbier, Bernard and Turenne Company in Paris, France. The tower was built for a second order lens, but when construction went over budget, there was only enough funding remaining for the smaller third order lens. The lens floats on a bearing surface of liquid mercury which allows near frictionless operation. The lens is rotated by an elaborate clockwork mechanism that is powered by weights running down the center of the tower which are then reset by cranking them back to the top. When completed, the lighthouse was lit with an incandescent oil vapor lamp that burned kerosene. At the time of its construction, there were no roads to the area and all building materials and supplies arrived by water and lifted to the top of the cliff by crane. The light was first lit on July 31, 1910. Thanks to its dramatic location, the lighthouse soon became a tourist attraction for sailors and excursion boats. So much so, that in 1924 a road (now Minnesota State Highway 61) was built to allow land access. In 1940, the station was electrified and the lamp was replaced with a 1000 watt electric bulb. Notwithstanding that the light has been retired, every November 10 the lighthouse emits a light in memory of the SS Edmund Fitzgerald which sank on that date in 1975. The lighthouse is also turned on for other evens.
The light was retired in 1969 by the U. S. Coast Guard. The lighthouse is now part of the Split Rock Lighthouse State Park and is operated by the Minnesota Historical Society. The site includes the original tower and lens, the fog signal building, the oil house, and the three keepers’ houses. One of the three keepers’ houses is restored to appear as it did in the late 1920s. The second keepers’ house is now the home of the site manager, while the third one is used for storage. Only the first keepers house is open for touring. In addition to touring the lighthouse and the one keepers house, was able to tour the fog horn building, the oil house used for storage of oil, gas, kerosene, etc. – built like a fortress due to concerns about explosions and the ruins of the old tram used to bring material up to the top of the cliff where the buildings are located. Walked part way down the stairs next to the old tram, but opted not to do all 172 stairs. However, did climb to the top of the lighthouse – really only one flight of stairs, but tight circular stairway. Both the lighthouse and the keepers’ house had docents in period costume. The foghorn was used at the first sign of fog, smoke, or snow. Until it was decommissioned in 1969, the fog siren served as an audible warning for ships when inclement weather led to reduced visibility. The foghorn sounds two to three times an hour, albeit at a reduced sound level. Also, a state park employee provided a great introductory lecture. At the Visitors Center, “The Story of Split Rock Lighthouse” explores the history and scenic beauty of this Northern Minnesota tourist destination, as well as the drama of storms and shipwrecks on Lake Superior. This 13-minute film uses original footage, rare archival footage, and first-person accounts from newspapers, storm survivors, lighthouse builders, and lighthouse keepers.
Outside the Split Rock Lighthouse Visitors Center is the historic anchor of the Madeira. This anchor was salvaged from the shipwreck of the 5000-ton steel barge, Madeira, which was tossed up against Gold Rock Point, about a quarter mile northeast of here, during the fierce storm of November 27-28, 1905. As the ship broke apart on the vertical face of Gold Rock Point, one of her crew, Fred Benson, carrying a coil of rope, leapt to the rock and, in the snow and dark, climbed the 80-foot cliff, secured the rope, and threw it down to the rest of the crew. Nine of her crew of ten men survived by climbing the rope to safety at the cliff top. One man died in the attempt as the ship broke apart and sank. It was this storm in 1905 that prompted the building of the lighthouse. Also, a very nice gift shop. Great stop.
3. Day Three – Duluth
3a) North Shore Scenic Railroad, The Historic Duluth Union Depot and the Lake Superior Railroad Museum in Duluth
The Duluth Depot is a historic train station, built in 1892, serving seven different rail lines at its peak. Rail service ceased in 1969 and the building was threatened with demolition until it reopened in 1973 as The Depot St. Louis County Heritage & Arts Center. The building houses three exhibiting museums (the Duluth Art Institute, Lake Superior Railroad Museum, and St. Louis County Historical Society Museum), four performing arts organizations (Arrowhead Chorale, Duluth Playhouse, Matinee Musicale, and Minnesota Ballet), and serves as the departure point for the North Shore Scenic Railroad. Many local materials were used in the French Norman-style building, including granite, sandstone, and yellow brick. After two years of construction, the depot was completed in 1892 at a cost of $615,000. A large train shed originally covered the building’s platforms, but it was removed in 1924 and replaced by the canopies that remain. Over the next 77 years it served seven different railroads (Duluth & Iron Range, Duluth, Missabe, & Iron Range, Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic, Duluth Missabe & Northern, Great Northern, Northern Pacific, Saint Paul & Duluth) before it closed in 1969.
The Lake Superior Railroad Museum has seven steam, 14 diesel, and two electric locomotives; and more than 40 other pieces of rolling stock. The collection includes the William Crooks, which became the first locomotive to operate in the state of Minnesota in 1861, and Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway Number 227, a 2-8-8-4 “Yellowstone” locomotive that was among the largest steam engines to operate. Most impressive were the two large snow removal pieces of rolling stock, along with the recreated cobblestone streets past storefronts from the turn of the century. There are also displays of beautiful dinning car china, elegant private coaches and several model train displays. Not enough time to thoroughly see the museum, but very nice. Also, the gift shop did not open until after we departed (we were on a special earlier train just for our group).
The North Shore Scenic Railroad is a heritage railroad that operates between Duluth (departing from the Historic Union Depot in downtown) and Two Harbors (almost 30 miles away); however, some excursions run a shorter distance. The railroad is owned by the Lake Superior Railroad Museum and offers passenger excursion trains between mid -April and to late fall / December each year. The railroad started up in 1990, using the Lakefront Line once owned by the Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway. DM&IR’s successor, Canadian National, still has trackage rights over the line. The North Shore Scenic Railroad operates excursions along the historic Lakefront Line, a 26-mile section of rail between Duluth and Two Harbors. This rail corridor served a vital link in the transportation system for over 100 years. Known originally as the Lake Division, it connected the isolated Duluth and Iron Range Railway with America’s expanding rail network. In 1886, when the Lakefront Line was first built, it was joined by a one-mile extension of the St. Paul and Duluth Railway at Fifth Avenue East in Duluth, providing the D&IR with access to downtown Duluth as well as to other railroad carriers at the Head of the Lakes.
The train departed at 10 am for a two hour ride to Two Harbors, with boxed lunch on the train. This train was only for our group. The Two Harbors station is a historic train station, built in 1907. The large two-story depot was the third depot on the site. The Minnesota Iron Company developed the Duluth and Iron Range Railroad in 1883, laid out the town of Two Harbors in 1885, and built depots to conducts its business. When the rail line was completed to Duluth, it was used as a transfer point for passengers, lumber, and mining supplies. When passenger service ended in 1961, the depot was donated to Lake County.
Excellent ride, pretty scenery, interesting history. Actually rode part way on the CN (former DM&IR line), but did not encounter any freight trains. At Two Harbors, was able to view the large iron ore docks in the far distance, with large ore stockpiles and lots of loose pellets on the rail tracks. Enjoyable train ride. Our ride was only two hours; the general excursion is a full-day (over six hours), two hours from Duluth to Two Harbors, two plus hours of free time in Two Harbors and then the return two hour ride to Duluth. Would enjoy completing the full excursion.
3b) Gooseberry Falls State Park
This popular North Shore park features spectacular waterfalls, scenic overlooks, a wonderful visitor center and superb trout fishing. Gooseberry Falls is the gateway to the North Shore. It is known for its spectacular waterfalls, river gorge, Lake Superior shoreline, Civilian Conservation Corps log and stone structures, and north woods wildlife. Listen to the thunderous roar of the Upper, Middle and Lower Falls of the Gooseberry River, as it plummets through a rocky gorge. Watch for waves or ships on Lake Superior from an ancient lava flow known as the Picnic Flow. The park has recorded over 225 species of birds that nest or visit the park, 46 species of mammals, and ten species of reptiles and amphibians. Of special interest to visitors are white-tailed deer, black bears, gray wolves, pine martens, migratory Lake Superior salmon and trout, a variety of conifer-dependent birds, ravens, and the herring gulls that establish nesting colonies along the lakeshore.
Geologists have determined that about one billion years ago, the earth began to split apart along the area now known as the North Shore. Lava flowed out onto the earth and cooled to form volcanic bedrock. Several lava flows can be seen at the Upper, Middle, and Lower Falls and south of the Gooseberry River along Lake Superior. These basalt lava flows are also the birthplaces of Lake Superior agates. About two million years ago, glaciers (up to a mile high) advanced into the region. As they ground across the area, they changed the landscape dramatically. About 10,000 years ago the last glacier melted back, filling the infant Lake Superior and beginning the erosional process that creates waterfalls.
At different times, the Cree, the Dakotah, and the Ojibwe lived along the North Shore. As early as 1670, the Gooseberry River appeared on explorer maps. The river was either named after the French explorer Sieur des Groseilliers or after the Anishinabe Indian name, Shab-on-im-i-kan-i-sibi; when translated, both refer to gooseberries. In the 1870s, commercial and sport fishermen began to use this area. By the 1890s, logging became the principle use of the land around the Gooseberry River. In 1900, the Nestor Logging Company built its headquarters at the river mouth and a railway was used to carry the pine to the lake for rafting to the sawmills. Because of fires and intensive logging pressures, the pine disappeared by the early 1920s. With the rise of North Shore tourism in the 1920s, there was a concern that the highly scenic North Shore would be accessible only to the rich. As a result the Legislature authorized preservation of the area around Gooseberry Falls in 1933. The following year, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) began to develop the park. CCC crews built the park’s stone and log buildings and the 300-foot long “Castle in the Park” stone retaining wall. They also laid out the original campground, picnic grounds and trails. The area officially became Gooseberry Falls State Park in 1937. The CCC camps closed in 1941, but the park’s CCC legacy lives on. Designed with ties to the CCC, a new visitor center/wayside rest and Highway 61 bridge was opened in 1996.
Toured the Upper, Middle and Lower falls – fairly crowded with lots of people in the waterfalls. Very scenic, photo op, but lots of walking and steps. Did not visit the fourth falls (named the Fifth Falls!).
3c) Vista Fleet Cruise
This was a two-hour dinner cruise, departing and returning to Duluth. The fleet includes two ships, the Vista Queen (about 40 passengers) and the Vista Star (our ship – the larger ship holding almost 200 passengers). The Vista Star is a three level ship (two mostly indoor with the top level outdoor). Our seats were on the first level, but there was great access to the outside in the front of the ship. Passed under the Aerial Life Bridge twice, plus pass the Duluth Lighthouse. Beautiful scenery, great sights, interesting narrative provided, wonderful weather, good food, just a great experience.
3d) Aerial Bridge – Duluth
The Aerial Lift Bridge is the landmark in the port city of Duluth (population of 86,000). The span began life in 1905 as the US’s first transporter bridge. (Only one other was ever constructed in the country, Sky Ride in Chicago). In 1929–30, the span was converted to a vertical lift bridge (also rather uncommon, although there are six such bridges along Ontario’s Welland Canal), and continues to operate today. The US Army Corps of Engineers maintains a nearby maritime museum. The bridge can be raised to its full height of 135 feet in about a minute, and is raised about 5,000 times per year. The span is about 390 feet (120 meters). As ships pass, there is a customary horn-blowing sequence that is copied back. The bridge’s “horn” is actually made up of two Westinghouse Airbrake locomotive horns. Long-short-long-short means to raise the bridge, and Long-short-short is a friendly salute.
The bridge opens every 30 minutes during the season for pleasure boats and whenever for the large cargo ships. For the biggest vessels, the bridge must start its ascent while they’re 1.5 miles out. The bridge spans the Duluth Ship Canal, which was put through the miles-long sand spit named Minnesota Point (commonly referred to as Park Point by locals). The natural mouth of the Saint Louis River is about seven miles farther southeast, and is split between Minnesota and Wisconsin. Creating this gap in the sand spit meant that residents who lived on the new island needed to have a way to get across.
The bridge is very similar to the only other one of its kind in the world, which is in Rouen, France. Decades ago, pedestrians were able to ride on the bridge when it was raised. But, this was outlawed in the early 1980s after a horrible accident that claimed the life of a woman when she was crushed by the steel bridge. The bridge operation is primarily through electric power derived from storage batteries that are charged by generators. If power lines fail, the generators can be operated by a diesel engine. There are two 450 ton concrete block weights on each end, lifted by electronic pulleys to raise and lower the bridge
Very impressive and a thrill to ride beneath on the cruise.
4. Day Four – Duluth to Bloomington and Minneapolis
4a) Mall of America
In 1982, the Minnesota Twins and Vikings relocated from the Metropolitan Stadium in Bloomington to the Metrodome in downtown Minneapolis. This created an unprecedented development opportunity for 78 acres of prime real estate. Three years later, the Bloomington Port Authority purchased the stadium site and began entertaining proposals for development. Mall of America was chosen from four final proposals, and on June 14, 1989, developers and local dignitaries broke ground. On August 11, 1992, when Mall of America® opened its doors, 330 stores opened for business and more than 10,000 employees started their first day of work. Today, Mall of America hosts more than 400 events a year, ranging from concerts, to celebrity appearances and fashion shows. Each year, more than 42 million people from around the world visit the mall (almost 8 times the population of the state of Minnesota), generating about $2 billion each year in economic impact for the state. It is the largest mall in the US in terms of total floor area (including Nickelodeon Universe), the fifth largest mall in North America in terms of leaseable space and the twelfth largest in the world. The mall is managed by the Triple Five Group (which in turn is owned by Canada’s Ghermezian family, along with the West Edmonton Mall).
The Mall of America has a gross area of about 4.9 million square feet or 96.4 acres, enough to fit seven Yankee Stadiums inside, with 2.5 million square feet available as retail space. More than 530 stores are arranged along three levels of pedestrian walkways on the sides of the rectangle, with a fourth level on the east side. In the Mall alone, there are more than 50 dining options and stores ranging from the very high end (Coach, Michael Kors, etc.) to the practical. The only bookstore at the Mall, however, is Barnes & Noble. There are at least two hotels attached to the Mall. In addition, there is a full Mercedes car dealer in the mall. The entertainment options include – Nicklelodeon Universe (rides in the center of the Mall), mazes, theaters, etc. The two visited were the FlyOver America and the Sea Life (the aquarium). The aquarium was a pretty standard set-up, larger than the one in Cleveland, but not as big as others visited. There was an ocean tunnel, touch tanks and feed the stingrays. Instead, the highlight was FlyOver America experience.
FlyOver America and FlyOver Canada – A fully immersive experience utilizing special effects, breathtaking images and cutting-edge technology, FlyOver America is a ride like no other. FlyOver America uses the latest in flight ride technology to give you a bird’s eye view of America’s most awe-inspiring sights. One sits in a suspended chair, your feet dangling, in front of a gigantic spherical screen. Special effects including wind, mist and scents, combined with the chair’s motion, makes it seem like you’re truly soaring. Plunge into deep valleys and trace the path of their rushing rivers. Feel the wind in your hair as you glide over tranquil lakes and marvel at the snow-capped mountains towering above. Take in the sights and sounds of buzzing urban settings and the expansive wild lands of the west. By the journey’s end you will be in true awe of the breathtaking splendor of our country. Coast to coast, valley floor to mountain top, you’ll travel more than 10,000 miles without leaving Mall of America! Incredible! Riders are immersed in a giant half-spherical dome screen with feet dangling 10 to 40 feet above ground, with many special effects. Did the combo of both America and Canada. Each experience lasts about 10 plus minutes, plus the pre-boarding experience. The Canadian experience was almost empty, while the America had more guests, but still no long lines. Although pricey, this was INCREDIBLE! The scenery, the effects, the feel, the whole atmosphere just all worked together to create a very real, beautiful, AWESOME experience. If I had more time, would have purchased the all-day pass. Would even consider returning to the Mall of America to do again and again. It was that fabulous!
4b) Twin City Tour
This was an two and half hour coach tour with two stops – Viking Stadium and Guthrie Theater’s Bridge. Viewed lots and lots of upscale mansions in Bloomington, Edina and Minneapolis, along with lots of lakes and parks. There are 13 lakes of at least five acres within the borders of Minneapolis. Of these, Bde Maka Ska is the largest and deepest, covering 421 acres with a maximum depth of 89.9 feet. The US Secretary of War, John C. Calhoun, sent the Army to survey the area that would surround Fort Snelling in 1817 in the area of Minneapolis. Calhoun had also authorized the construction of Fort Snelling, one of the earliest American settlements in the state. The surveyors named the water body “Lake Calhoun” in his honor. Calhoun’s legacy as a slaveowner and pro-slavery politician led critics to question whether he was the best person to be honored. As a result, recently the lake was re-named the original Indian name, which means Lake White Earth or Lake White Bank.
In addition, saw the Mary Tyler Moore statue in downtown Minneapolis and other Mary Tyler Moore sites. The Mary Tyler Moore statue was commissioned by TV Land and placed at the corner of Nicollet Mall and 7th Street in 2002, near the site of the iconic final shot in the opening credits, when Mary throws her tam in the air. Also saw the house that was used for exterior shots of Mary’s apartment for the first five seasons of the show. She lived on the top floor and Rhoda lived in the attic apartment.
4bi) US Bank – Viking Stadium
Built on the former site of the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome, the indoor stadium opened in 2016 and is the home of the Minnesota Vikings. It was the first fixed-roof stadium built in the NFL since Ford Field in Detroit, which opened in 2002. The total cost was over $1 billion, with $348 million from the state of Minnesota, $150 million from the city of Minneapolis, and the balance over $550 million from the team and private contributions. It is made up of a lightweight translucent roof and glazed entrances with giant pivoting doors, aiming to get as much natural light from the outside as possible. The roof is made up of a fluorine-based clear plastic, and is the largest in North America, spanning 240,000 square feet. The roof’s slanted design, inspired by Nordic vernacular architecture, allows the stadium to endure heavy snow loads. Snow accumulates in areas that are more safely and easily accessible, and also moves down the slanted roof into a heated gutter, the water from which drains to the nearby Mississippi River. In addition, a series of massive, swinging doors being assembled on site, the largest of which is 95 feet tall and 50 feet wide and weighs more than 57,000 pounds, pivots open towards downtown Minneapolis, letting in the cool breeze. In addition to the vaguely Viking shape of the structure, there is a large steel Viking ship positioned outside. The seating capacity of the stadium is 66,860 for most games, slightly more than the Metrodome, and can be expanded to 73,000 for soccer, concerts, and special events, such as the Super Bow
4bii) Guthrie Theater – The “Endless” Bridge
Erected when the new Guthrie Theater went up in 2006, the Endless Bridge sticks out of the blue behemoth like a flagpole off a wall. Though it looks ugly from ground level, the observation deck is a place of peace, with clean, hard lines edged on all sides by shined metal. Looking over the Mississippi, with its lazy meanderings and raging falls, the 180-degree view captures the spirit of the Twin Cities. The view is the only falls on the Mississippi River and the Stone Arch Bridge.
The Endless Bridge is neither endless, nor is it really a bridge. It doesn’t cross water, and, in fact, it never gets closer to the Mississippi River than 275 feet. However, it offers the single best view of the Mississippi River anywhere along its 2,552 mile length. The original Guthrie Theater opened in May, 1963, based on Sir Tyrone Guthrie’s 1959 idea for an off-Broadway regional theater that could focus on high quality productions without the financial pressures of a Broadway play. This is a cantilevered bridge that extends 178 feet north of the building to a point that is 50 feet above the West River Parkway. The vantage point is located just downstream of Upper Saint Anthony Falls, and it offers a sweeping view of the falls area and the historic Stone Arch Bridge. The structure is a steel truss that is counterbalanced by the weight of the building. It extends from the building between the 4th and 5th floors. The observation deck has a series large steps for sitting or standing, which gives the feel of a theater space with the Mississippi River being the stage.
4c) Fireworks at The Stone Arch Bridge – SKIPPED The Fireworks, BUT Saw The Bridge as Part of the Twin City Tour
The Stone Arch Bridge is a former railroad bridge crossing the Mississippi River at Saint Anthony Falls in downtown Minneapolis.. It is the only arched bridge made of stone on the entire length of the Mississippi River. It is the second oldest next to Eads Bridge. The bridge was built to connect the railway system to the new Union Depot, which at that time was planned to be built between Hennepin Avenue and Nicollet Avenue. The bridge was completed in 1883, costing $650,000 at the time (about $20 million today). Located between the 3rd Avenue Bridge and the I-35W Saint Anthony Falls Bridge, the Stone Arch Bridge was built in 1883 by railroad tycoon James J. Hill for his Great Northern Railway, and accessed the former passenger station located about a mile to the west, on the west bank of the river. For a time, the bridge was dubbed “Hill’s Folly” until the value of Hill’s new bridge as a passenger rail link became evident. The structure is now used as a pedestrian and bicycle bridge. Fireworks are launched from nearby Hennepin Island. The bridge offers views of the Minneapolis skyline, Pillsbury “A” Mill, the Mill City Museum, and many other places in the district, and is near both the restaurants of Main St SE and the Guthrie Theater.
5. Day Five – Bloomington to Davenport Iowa
5a) Circa 21 Dinner Playhouse – Holiday Inn Play
Circa ’21 is housed in the historic Fort Armstrong Theatre which opened in 1921. The theatre was originally a vaudeville and silent movie house, among one of the most popular and unique of its day. Walter Rosenfield and Joseph Hopp were the two men who invested their time and money in the theatre stating that they had faith, not only in the film industry, but also in the area that eventually was to become the Quad Cities. The $500,000 cost of the theatre’s construction was said to represent one dollar for every brick used in the exterior structure, an enormous sum in its day. Architect Benjamin Horn drew heavily from Fox and Sauk Indian symbols for his design. A fine example is the great warrior Blackhawk’s countenance overlooking the stage from the proscenium arch. This was a stunning building, really enhanced the theater.
The theatre originally contained a 1,566 seat auditorium, a dance salon, a photography studio, Hickey Br others Cigar Store and Soda Fountain (located where The Garden Shop is today), a nursery, and attractive green rooms for the actors. The Fort Armstrong remained a movie theatre for the next 55 years, with each successive operator adding individual touches to modernize the building. Yet, over the years as the film industry became more competitive, the older, more grandiose movie houses, burdened with high overhead expenses and skyrocketing utilities, soon were unable to keep up with the sleek new mall theatres. Slumps in ticket sales pushed the theatre even closer to closing its doors forever. In August of 1976, the theatre was purchased for its present use as a dinner theatre. The interior was remodeled into Las Vegas-styled seating and currently seats 334 on the main floor.
This is one of only two dinner theaters in the US with a performing wait staff (I’ve been to the other one also). The wait staff is called the Bootleggers and they put on a show (singing and dancing) prior to the play. The musical was Irving Berlin’s Holiday Inn (previously saw the movie and this play!). Song-and-dance team Jim Hardy and Ted Hanover split up when Jim decides to ditch show business and run a farm in rural Connecticut. The farm, which comes complete with a wisecracking, live-in handywoman, proves less than successful. The unexpected visit of Jim’s old showbiz buddies inspires him to turn it into an inn open only on holidays, featuring lavish musical entertainments. Based on the classic film, this joyous musical features thrilling dance numbers, laugh-out-loud comedy and a parade of hit Irving Berlin songs, including “Blue Skies,” “Heat Wave,” “Cheek to Cheek,” “Easter Parade,” “Steppin’ Out With My Baby,” and “White Christmas.” Excellent production and enjoyed the play. Theater was full, but the set-up did not make it seem crowded and very easy to view the musical. A Winner, plus a great meal. Would enjoy visiting this theater again.
6. Day Six – Davenport Iowa to Return
Another travel day….
7. Day Seven – Travel Day
And a final travel day
Stayed at:
1. Drury Inn – Dayton North (two nights) – to and fro – On the 2nd floor on the way, and on the 5th floor on the return. Each room had two beds and a tub. Standard Drury set-up. Hotel was full on the return.
2. Fairfield Inn – Middleton, Wisconsin (one night) – Suburb of Madison. Very nice, modern room with two beds and a tub, but on the first floor (not my favorite).
3. Country Inn & Suites – Duluth, Minnesota (two nights) – Technically in Duluth, but very far from the downtown area, not near anything except across from the Miller Hill Mall. Room on second floor, one king bed, but a tub. Very nice, clean, newish, but not as upscale as last night’s Fairfield Inn. The indoor pool had a fancy tube-style slide. Fancy fire pit out front. Hotel offered a very nice “goodie” bag when we departed.
4. Hampton Inn &Suites – Minneapolis/ Bloomington West (one night) – Located not too far from the Mall of America. Room on the second floor, two beds, but only a shower.
5. Country Inn & Suites – Davenport, Iowa (one night) – Room on third floor, with two beds, tub, but the water stopper did not work. This was the least impressive hotel on the trip; clean, but not as nice as the others – more downscale.
Memorable Meals :
Does not include fast food (McD’s, Culver’s or Arby’s) or Cracker Barrell. Breakfasts were nothing notable, except that on the first day at the Country Inn in Duluth there was cottage cheese.
2. Day Two – Dinner at Black Woods Restaurant – Two Harbors, Minnesota – Excellent cedar planked salmon with maple sauce, large baked potato and a fancy large popover-style roll.
3. Day Three – Boxed Lunch on the Northshore Scenic Railroad (from The Vanilla Bean café in Two Harbors) – Large ham and cheese sandwich, home-made kettle chips, dill pickle, and large chocolate chip cookie.
4. Day Three – Dinner Cruise on the Vista Star in Duluth Harbor – Enjoy bluegrass music performed by regionally award winning musicians coupled with spectacular cuisine from the OMC Smokehouse. Indulge in the classic menu of Chopped Brisket, Pulled Smoked Chicken, Bacon Bleu Cheese Potato Salad, OMC Cole Slaw, BBQ Seasoned Pork Rinds, Fresh Fruit and Cookies! Excellent meal served picnic style buffet. Enjoy a relaxing dinner cruise with beautiful music and narrated highlights of the harbor. Take in never-ending views of Duluth’s unique skyline and harbor activity.
5. Day Four – Lunch at Hot Indian – Food Court at Mall of America – Bloomington – Rice bowl (brown basmati rice flavored with coconut milk and garlic), with spinach paneer (fresh spinach and cubed paneer in a fiery ginger garlic curry), along with mango chutney. Plus a side of Indi Frites (russet and sweet potato fries in a crispy seasoned batter) served with pickled aioli chutney. Very good!
6. Day Four – Dinner at Noodles & Co. in downtown Minneapolis – Japanese Pan Noodles, consisting of caramelized udon noodles in a sweet soy sauce, broccoli, carrots, black sesame seeds and cilantro.
7. Day Five – Dinner at the Circa 21 Dinner Playhouse in Rock Island, Illinois – Served choice of tossed salad, veggie soup or cottage cheese (selected cottage cheese) Buffet included Carved Maple Glazed Ham, Mama’s Meatloaf, Fried Chicken, Tilapia LÍmon, Spinach-Artichoke Lasagna, Garlic Parmesan Whipped Potatoes, Crimini Wild Rice, Sugar Snap Peas and Vegetable Medley. Food was much better than typical dinner theater buffets. The spinach-artichoke lasagna in a white cheese sauce with cottage cheese (instead of ricotta) was OUTSTANDING. Best meal of the trip. Would return for the meal even without the theater.
Random Thoughts:
1. This trip included a new state (Minnesota), a new travel provider, and two new sites from 1000 Places to See Before You Die – USA & Canada:
**** Mall of America – Minnesota’s #1 Attraction and a Paean to Consumer Consumption
What wonders abound in this suburban shopping mall large enough to hold 32 Boeing 747s?… This four-story mega mall lures more than 42 million visitors each, a staggering statistic that almost rivals Disney World at 52 million!
**** The North Shore – Picture-Perfect Shoreline Along Superior’s Big Blue
Highway 61 links it all together, hugging the lakeshore and creating one of the nation’s most acclaimed scenic drives. Though the area is busy with visitors and resorts, it remains untamed, sandwiched between the rugged Sawtooth Mountains of the Superior National Forest and the wide, wild horizon of the world’s largest freshwater lake.
Duluth is the southern gateway in the region, a busy shipping port of some 80,000 people that offers an array of charms for visitors – a parade of Great Lakes freighters passing beneath its iconic lift bridge, the handsomely refurbished waterfront, and several block of well-preserved 19th-century buildings along Superior Street, the downtown’s main drag.
Travel north on Highway 61, though, and you quickly leave behind Duluth’s small-city charms for the commanding scenery of Lake Superior. Twenty miles away, grab your camera to visit Split Rock Lighthouse, sitting atop a dramatic 170-foot bluff rising out of the lake.
Near Split Rock, the road begins skipping over one river after another, as they tumble from the Sawtooth Mountains over waterfalls and basalt ledges into Lake Superior. Many of the falls and river mouths are protected s state parks — including Gooseberry, Temperance, Tettegouche, and Caribou Falls
2. Although did not visit Glensheen Mansion, drove by this 39-room mansion, 12-acre estate on Lake Superior. This is one of three mansions in Minnesota listed in National Geographic Guide to America’s Great Houses. Definitely want to return to the North Shore and visit this mansion. There are also other attractions on the Mesabi Iron Range that I want to visit, plus undertaking the full day train ride on the North Shore Scenic Railroad. All in all a great trip.

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Comment on Is India A Part Of Asia? by Mabel Kwong

India is one of the largest and most diverse countries in the world, geographically and culturally expanse.
Located above the equator and comprising of thousands of ethnic groups, faiths, languages, cuisines, customs and celebrations, one can say India has a prominent mark on Asia. Holi Festival Melbourne 2019
However, India is unique in its own way with many referring to the country as its own continent. So it begs the questions: is India a part of Asia? Or just a neighbour? More importantly, do Indians see themselves as a part of Asia?
Comprising 29 states and 7 Union territories, India spans an area of approximately 3,287,263 km 2 . This is three times smaller than the United States and two times smaller than Australia. As of 2019 India has a population of over 1.3 billion which is steadily rising.
I’ve always been fascinated by India and hope to visit someday. Throughout my life I’ve had quite a few Indian friends and acquaintances, and they’ve always liked sharing with me about how life is like in India.
Over the years through blogging, I’ve met quite a few bloggers from India. Over the years it has been eye-opening getting to know their stories about India and why they proudly call India home. So for this post I had a chat with these very lovely bloggers to find more about India and what it means to them – and asked if India is really a part of Asia . Holi Festival
Geography and continents
In terms of geographic location, India rubs shoulders and shares similar surrounds with other Asian countries. One can argue that India is a part of the ‘ Asian continent landmass ’. Being in the same location entails sharing the same place, same space, sharing borders, being one together . Indian and Western philosophy writer Rajagopal from Graleview eloquently describes India as being marked by mountain and sea: ‘Bounded by the Great Himalayas in the north, it stretches southwards and at the Tropic of Cancer, tapers off into the Indian Ocean between the Bay of Bengal on the east and the Arabian Sea on the west.’
Similarly, lifestyle, craft and travel blogger Somali over at Life11 reckons most Indians see India as a part of Asia. Learning about India and continents in geography classes at school, Somali describes India’s place in this world, ‘We (Indians) think of countries bordering Bangladesh (e.g. Myanmar) and moving eastwards and down, as falling under South East Asia.’
Notably, India has its own tectonic plate called the Indian Plate and that leads to the argument India is its own continent. Some 140 million years ago the supercontinent Gondwana below the equator split up into different plates – one of these plates being the Indian Plate. Researchers at MIT found this Indian Plate gradually drifted northwards up past the equator, and 10 million years later collided with the Eurasian plate which comprises the UK and the South-East Asian region.
In other words, at one point and even now India is arguably a continent (it has its own plate). In more recent times, India is arguably a country and sub-continent (joined with one big place). Holi Festival
Centralised trade, similar cultures
In today’s globalised world, economic trade, culture and faiths transcends borders. India has always been a peak trading hub in the Asian region, considered a part of Asia’s shared economy . Historically India has been a hub in the Maritime Silk Road and a major spice trade centre as early as 3000 BC . Today India is ranked as a major power in the Asian region according to the Asia Power Index; it is a nation with vast economic resources (minerals, banking, logistical systems). New Delhi is Singapore’s second largest trading partner in ASEAN group and in 2018 there were lower tariffs on more than 30 products under a free trade agreement.
Alongside a shared economy, there are numerous shared lifestyle traits between India and Asian countries, and no surprise why India is considered a part of Asia . For instance, in Chinese, Japan and Korean cultures, listening to one’s elders is esteemed and togetherness over individuality is valued. Many communities in India share these same sentiments in a time where arranged marriages, family consent, paying respects to ancestors at temples and celebrating festive occasions with large family gatherings and lots of food is still the norm. There’s not forgetting faiths such as Hinduism and Buddhism are followed widely throughout India and the rest of Asia, and celebrations such as Diwali and Thaipusam are celebrated all over the region as well. Amer Fort, Jaipur. Photo cred: Arv
When asked what comes to mind about India, life philosophy writer and author Nihar from Makeup and Breakup sums it up as, ‘Family, food and festival…the moment I think about India. It is the country where relationships are love of family that matters more than anything, the country where cuisine culture is an art and the country where festivals are celebrated throughout the year.’
Similarly, photographer Arv over at JaipurThruMyLens thinks India is undoubtedly a part of Asia. He feels, ‘Unlike the west, where material possessions are paramount, in India like other Asian countries, people and relationships matter the most.’
Another photographer from India, Sreejith from Santiago the Shepherd also adds, ‘More than the similarities in physical features, the real connection is culture and tradition. We could very well relate to the family values, parent-child relations, joint family structure of people of other Asian countries.’
Share the same lifestyles and values, share the same outlook on life. And chances are you feel part of a tribe. Monkey Temple, Jaipur. Photo cred: Arv .
Standout landmarks and stereotypes
The architecture and natural surroundings of a country is enriched in history and embedded with stories of how it came about and evolved over time as its own place. As such, a country’s notable landmarks and tourism sector might very well make it memorable and stand out on its own . What a country is known for and projects to the world often leaves impressions on travellers passing through and also those afar who follow current affairs.
Today India is very much a tourist hotspot, attracting over 10 million foreign visitors in 2017. For one, India has scenic landscapes and bustling side-streets to take in and roam. As former teacher, writer and author Balroop Singh over at Emotional Shadows describes India, ‘Tourism puts India at the top of the world, as it offers incredible beauty – the magnificence of the Himalayas in the north, the grandeur of the Thar desert in the west, the spectacular backwaters of Kerala in the south.’
Common stereotypes heard (normally shared through word of mouth) tends to give a certain impression of a country over the other. Cultural stereotypes seemingly separates and segregates India from the rest of Asia . For instance, Arv points out his state of Jaipur could improve on cleanliness and traffic – and it has been reported Jaipur might lose points in a national cleanliness ranking amidst absence of urban maintenance funds.
This is quite true though, but changing: on the political front, Narenda Modi was elected Prime Minister in a 2014 historic election based on hope and promise of inclusive politics , however there is still not enough jobs created. Word Trade Park, Jaipur. Photo cred: Arv .
In 2012 India’s Planning Commission said 29.8% of India’s 1.2 billion people live below the poverty line. If recent findings are to be believed, last year’s Brookings Institution report found India is no longer the country with the most people facing extreme poverty; the World Poverty Clock predicts those living in extreme poverty is slated to fall to just 5% of India’s 70.6 million population.
As such, it’s not hard to see how India may be seen as backwards and less developed compared to Singapore, Japan and South Korea – a world away from first world developed places.
When asked to ponder about how others perceive India, HR Professional Parul from Happiness and Food mentions there are many snake charmers in India, but that doesn’t make India a land of snake charmers. She also brought up the 2008 movie Slumdog Millionaire and says, ‘Though the movie made millions it showed India in a very bad light. Yes there are slums in India but then the movie extrapolated a lot.’
When asked about how others around the world perceive India, Sreejith offers, ‘It’s largely based on their exposure to the world around. Most of the people whom I interact consider India is very much part of Asia.’ Holi Festival
Dark vs light skin Asians
Are Indians considered non-Asian because of the shade of their skin which is usually darker than those who live in other parts of Asia? In a world where racism exists, there’s stereotypes and social discrimination surrounding skin colour. Fair skin is usually associated with those living in the developed West and darker skin with those from developing countries or countries in the Middle-East and African regions.
Can a certain skin colour identify with a certain race and country? Maybe. However more realistically, our skin colour doesn’t necessarily define our heritage or where we come from. It’s important to remember in the era of debating colourlines , identities are fluid and the spectrum of skin colour is incredibly wide.
Fair skin has long been popular in India and in fact using skin whitening beauty products is an accepted norm here. Indeed the spectrum of skin colour is vastly varying, and some Indians possess darker or lighter skin tones over other Indians – some possess the fairer-skin-gene SLC24A5 which is a gene some Europeans possess too. At the end of the day, Indians see themselves as one and recognises their differences which at times, aren’t afraid to talk about. That said, Somali suggests we should be cautious about talking about culture, colour and diversity: ‘Mostly different Indian communities get along well. There are jokes about different communities, which are commonly shared and generally people don’t seem to mind those. Nowadays, (we) should refrain from jokes targeted towards a particular community as however harmless these may seem, such jokes may perpetuate bias against a community.’ Holi Festival * * *
India is a country constantly evolving with the times. Certain parts of India are seemingly leading the way towards a more progressive country just like many other countries in Asia, and hence a progressive Asia . The southwestern state of Kerala is an example: it’s the only state in India which lies high in the Human Development Index (HDI), has a high literacy rate, low infant mortality rate due to advanced health and education facilities and opened India’s first transgender school . Rajagopal proudly states his hometown Kerala ‘serves as a model for the rest of India’.
One doesn’t have to be away from a certain state in India to see that it has changed in a short span of time. Having relocated to Bangalore, Parul observes, ‘In bigger cities, the life is so fast that there is no time to find out how your neighbor is. Now when I go back home, I feel that it has changed. (Some) people who made my hometown a home are no longer around. There is change and there is also no change.’
Also, Somali’s hometown is Delhi and she shifted base to Mumbai almost 25 years ago, and adds, ‘Every year or two, when I go to Delhi, it appears alien to me as I feel it has changed a lot, in terms of structures, layout and traffic.’ Holi Festival
Today’s generation will lead the way in the years to come. The millennials are leading the way in India: over 400 million of them are increasingly tech-savvy, turning to the Internet to live lives of convenience while making a living, becoming part of a rising middle class.
Interestingly enough, many of India’s open-minded younger generation are respectful of long-held Asian traditions. For instance, arranged marriages are still the norm but modern arranged marriages are becoming more common where both parties meet each other prior to marriage. In a sense, Indians proudly carry their culture with them wherever they go. Balroop sums it up, ‘Generation Z is more open minded, tolerant and focused. They do follow the main traditions but are daring enough to question what seems illogical to them.’
Only time will tell where India is headed in terms of developing a sustainable economy and becoming one of the world’s most liveable places.
But as for cultural identity, for many India is indeed a part of Asia, and Asia a part of India.
What comes to mind when you think of India? * * *
Thank you very much to these bloggers for helping me understand India better and contributing to this post:
Rajagopal – Graleview | Somali K Chakrabarti – Life11 (Scribble and Scrawl) | Nihar R Pradhan – Makeup and Breakup | Arv – JaipurThruMyLens | Sreejith P Nair – Santiago the Shepherd | Balroop Singh – Emotional Shadows | Parul – Happiness and Food Advertisements

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5 Restaurants to Enjoy a Koroga in Nairobi

5 Restaurants to Enjoy a Koroga in Nairobi written by Lucy Munene 8th July 2019
You can’t pass a month without going to a koroga with your friends in Nairobi. Koroga means ‘stir’ in Swahili which roughly explains the concept. Korogas are an outdoor dining experience where a variety of food is cooked in semi-private huts. In the same way that Kenyan culture and Indian culture coexist within the country, the food cooked during a koroga is a combination of Kenyan and Indian staples. Nyama choma and kachumbari will feature in a koroga spread right next to paneer and butter chicken. More often than not ready-to-order starters, cooking materials and drinks are provided. Though there might be a dispute as to exactly when korogas became a thing in Kenya, the nature of coming together to eat and drink is inherently Kenyan. Mint Shack
This is the perfect place to have a small koroga with a view of Karura forest. Let the breeze carry the smell of your feast as you sit back and relax to the sounds of meat grilling. Caribea
Caribea is the best place for a large group. With bandas big enough to accommodate 30, a Barcadi bar and enough grilling stations, this is the ideal place to experience korogas on a larger scale. Spice Roots
Spice Roots embodies the modern koroga which features a combination of Kenyan and Indian cuisine. Enjoy your nyama choma with a side of expertly cooked kebabs and extra spicy naan. Mystique Gardens
Not from the X-Men movies but an actual koroga restaurant in Nairobi. Their menu mostly consists of Indian cuisine so expect lots of flavour and vegetarian dishes. Dial-A-Koroga
If you can’t make it to any of the aforementioned places then with a quick phone call, the koroga can come to you! All you have to do is set up your plates and call up your friends, they’ll do the rest.
For more updates on the best restaurants around, recipes, reviews, nightlife guides and more, follow Yummy Magazine, online and in print!

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New North Indian Restaurant- Now Open in Dubai Healthcare City

July 3, 2019
Dubai Healthcare City is fast growing as a foodie hub with number of restaurants and cafes opening. Memsaab Curry & Tandoor , an authentic North Indian and tandoor restaurant is the new addition to the dining scene in DHC.
Memsaab Curry & Tandoor has a bigger branch in JLT, the DHC one is a tiny outlet with a few tables indoors as well as outdoors. Nevertheless it is a cute and cosy venue with comfortable seating area.
The interiors are plain and simple. Though small, it is a decent and clean place to have a meal. Given a choice I would order from them rather than dining in the restaurant.
Their menu has North Indian as well as Indian Chinese cuisine and features a range of soups, salads, snacks, starters, mains and desserts along with cold and hot beverages. They have good options for vegetarians and non vegetarians. Being vegetarians, we ordered only the veg food.
On arriving we were served complimentary glasses of Jaljeera and colorful Namkeen with dips. We liked it. We also tried their refreshing Lassi .
As our starters, we ordered Paneer Tikka and Veg Seekh Kebab . The paneer tikka was alright but the seekh Kebab was way too spicy.
The highlight of our dinner was the main course. And every dish was perfectly cooked and tasted incredibly delicious. They make the best Dal Tadka in town and it is an absolute must-try.
We also loved their Miloni Tarkari which had a medley of veggies cooked in a rich and flavorful gravy. The Tandoori Rotis were fresh off the tandoor and went well with both our curries. The Sufiana Pulao made with a hint of saffron was fragrant and packed a delicious punch.
To indulge in our sweet cravings, we had the scrumptious Gulab Jamun . Best way to end a delicious Indian meal.
Overall, we enjoyed our dinner experience. Good food that is reasonably priced with generous quantity that is Memsaab Curry & Tandoor for you. The restaurant is worth trying or ordering, if you’re in DHC part of the city.
Phone: 04 526 9178

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Beef Kofta Curry

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Beef kofta curry is a spicy Indian curry (some also say Pakistani), that consists of minced beef meatballs and a ton of spices. If you like your curries with maximum amount of flavour and a bit of a kick, then this easy beef kofta recipe is definitely for you. Think of this curry as Indian comfort food!
Typically, one uses beef meatballs but it’s not uncommon to use lamb mince or mutton mince as well. If you enjoy a hearty and meaty Indian style curry, then I encourage you to give this beef kofta curry a go. It’s very simple and it will give you a chance to play around with Indian spicing. If you feel like making a similar curry, you can also try this lamb bhuna . Pair with traditional Indian sides like naans, rotis or white rice. Adjust the level of spice to your liking! how to make beef kofta curry
If you are looking to improve your Indian cooking skills, then learning how to make this beef kofta curry will certainly do the trick. Beef kofta curry is a very common dish in the Middle East as well as in Southern and Central Asian cuisine. ‘Kofta’ originates from the Persian word ‘ koftah ’ which means pounded meat. Simply put, they are balls of ground meat, which usually consist of beef, pork, lamb or chicken. So, depending on the region, you can create your own version of beef kofta. In essence, whatever it’s name, you won’t find a country that doesn’t include some sort of meatball recipe.
In the Middle East, a beef kofta curry comprises lamb or mutton. For some, these flavours can be too bold. In the Balkan region, pork and beef are used. By the way, don’t confuse koftas with kebabs or souvlakis from the region. Kofta are solely minced meat meatballs with lots of spice. You can pair them with almost any type of curry sauce, so if you’ve made a large batch feel free to freeze them and reuse. Also, feel free to put your own spin on this recipe and experiment with your favourite spices.
Here are a couple of substitutes you might want to read about before you proceed with this cook:

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Sucrose

D -fructofuranoside In sucrose, the components glucose and fructose are linked via an ether bond between C1 on the glucosyl subunit and C2 on the fructosyl unit. The bond is called a glycosidic linkage . Glucose exists predominantly as two isomeric “pyranoses” (α and β), but only one of these forms links to the fructose. Fructose itself exists as a mixture of “furanoses”, each of which having α and β isomers, but only one particular isomer links to the glucosyl unit. What is notable about sucrose is that, unlike most disaccharides, the glycosidic bond is formed between the reducing ends of both glucose and fructose, and not between the reducing end of one and the nonreducing end of the other. This linkage inhibits further bonding to other saccharide units. Since it contains no anomeric hydroxyl groups, it is classified as a non- reducing sugar . Sucrose crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2 1 with room-temperature lattice parameters a = 1.08631 nm, b = 0.87044 nm, c = 0.77624 nm, β = 102.938°. The purity of sucrose is measured by polarimetry , through the rotation of plane-polarized light by a solution of sugar. The specific rotation at 20 °C using yellow “sodium-D” light (589 nm) is +66.47°. Commercial samples of sugar are assayed using this parameter. Sucrose does not deteriorate at ambient conditions. Thermal and oxidative degradation Sucrose does not melt at high temperatures. Instead, it decomposes at 186 °C (367 °F) to form caramel . Like other carbohydrates , it combusts to carbon dioxide and water. Mixing sucrose with the oxidizer potassium nitrate produces the fuel known as rocket candy that is used to propel amateur rocket motors. C 12 H 22 O 11 + 6 KNO 3 → 9 CO + 3 N 2 + 11 H 2 O + 3 K 2 CO 3 This reaction is somewhat simplified though. Some of the carbon does get fully oxidized to carbon dioxide, and other reactions, such as the water-gas shift reaction also take place. A more accurate theoretical equation is: C 12 H 22 O 11 + 6.288 KNO 3 → 3.796 CO 2 + 5.205 CO + 7.794 H 2 O + 3.065 H 2 + 3.143 N 2 + 2.998 K 2 CO 3 + 0.274 KOH Sucrose burns with chloric acid , formed by the reaction of hydrochloric acid and potassium chlorate : 8 HClO 3 + C 12 H 22 O 11 → 11 H 2 O + 12 CO 2 + 8 HCl Sucrose can be dehydrated with sulfuric acid to form a black, carbon -rich solid, as indicated in the following idealized equation: H 2 SO 4 (catalyst) + C 12 H 22 O 11 → 12 C + 11 H 2 O + Heat (and some H 2 O + SO 3 as a result of the heat). The formula for sucrose’s decomposition can be represented as a two-step reaction: the first simplified reaction is dehydration of sucrose to pure carbon and water, and then carbon oxidises to CO 2 with O 2 from air. C 12 H 22 O 11 + heat → 12 C + 11 H 2 O 12 C + 12 O 2 → 12 CO 2 Hydrolysis Hydrolysis breaks the glycosidic bond converting sucrose into glucose and fructose . Hydrolysis is, however, so slow that solutions of sucrose can sit for years with negligible change. If the enzyme sucrase is added, however, the reaction will proceed rapidly. Hydrolysis can also be accelerated with acids, such as cream of tartar or lemon juice, both weak acids. Likewise, gastric acidity converts sucrose to glucose and fructose during digestion, the bond between them being an acetal bond which can be broken by an acid. Given (higher) heats of combustion of 1349.6 kcal/mol for sucrose, 673.0 for glucose, and 675.6 for fructose, hydrolysis releases about 1.0 kcal (4.2 kJ) per mole of sucrose, or about 3 small calories per gram of product. Synthesis and biosynthesis of sucrose The biosynthesis of sucrose proceeds via the precursors UDP-glucose and fructose 6-phosphate , catalyzed by the enzyme sucrose-6-phosphate synthase . The energy for the reaction is gained by the cleavage of uridine diphosphate (UDP). Sucrose is formed by plants and cyanobacteria but not by other organisms . Sucrose is found naturally in many food plants along with the monosaccharide fructose . In many fruits, such as pineapple and apricot , sucrose is the main sugar. In others, such as grapes and pears , fructose is the main sugar. Chemical synthesis Model of sucrose molecule Although sucrose is almost invariably isolated from natural sources, its chemical synthesis was first achieved in 1953 by Raymond Lemieux . Sources In nature, sucrose is present in many plants, and in particular their roots, fruits and nectars , because it serves as a way to store energy, primarily from photosynthesis . Many mammals, birds, insects and bacteria accumulate and feed on the sucrose in plants and for some it is their main food source. Seen from a human consumption perspective, honeybees are especially important because they accumulate sucrose and produce honey , an important foodstuff all over the world. The carbohydrates in honey itself primarily consist of fructose and glucose with trace amounts of sucrose only. As fruits ripen, their sucrose content usually rises sharply, but some fruits contain almost no sucrose at all. This includes grapes, cherries, blueberries, blackberries, figs, pomegranates, tomatoes, avocados, lemons and limes. Sucrose is a naturally occurring sugar, but with the advent of industrialization , it has been increasingly refined and consumed in all kinds of processed foods. Production History of sucrose refinement Table sugar production in the 19th century. Sugar cane plantations (upper image) employed slave or indentured laborers. The picture shows workers harvesting cane, loading it on a boat for transport to the plant, while a European overseer watches in the lower right. The lower image shows a sugar plant with two furnace chimneys. Sugar plants and plantations were harsh, inhumane work. A sugarloaf was a traditional form for sugar from the 17th to 19th centuries. Sugar nips were required to break off pieces. The production of table sugar has a long history. Some scholars claim Indians discovered how to crystallize sugar during the Gupta dynasty , around AD 350. Other scholars point to the ancient manuscripts of China, dated to the 8th century BC, where one of the earliest historical mentions of sugar cane is included along with the fact that their knowledge of sugar cane was derived from India. Further, it appears that by about 500 BC, residents of present-day India began making sugar syrup and cooling it in large flat bowls to make raw table sugar crystals that were easier to store and transport. In the local Indian language, these crystals were called khanda (खण्ड), which is the source of the word candy . The army of Alexander the Great was halted on the banks of river Indus by the refusal of his troops to go further east. They saw people in the Indian subcontinent growing sugarcane and making granulated, salt-like sweet powder , locally called sākhar (साखर), pronounced as sakcharon (ζακχαρον) in Greek (Modern Greek, zachari ζάχαρη). On their return journey, the Greek soldiers carried back some of the “honey-bearing reeds”. Sugarcane remained a limited crop for over a millennium. Sugar was a rare commodity and traders of sugar became wealthy. Venice, at the height of its financial power, was the chief sugar-distributing center of Europe. Arabs started producing it in Sicily and Spain . Only after the Crusades did it begin to rival honey as a sweetener in Europe. The Spanish began cultivating sugarcane in the West Indies in 1506 ( Cuba in 1523). The Portuguese first cultivated sugarcane in Brazil in 1532. Sugar remained a luxury in much of the world until the 18th century. Only the wealthy could afford it. In the 18th century, the demand for table sugar boomed in Europe and by the 19th century it had become regarded as a human necessity. The use of sugar grew from use in tea, to cakes , confectionery and chocolates . Suppliers marketed sugar in novel forms, such as solid cones, which required consumers to use a sugar nip , a pliers-like tool, in order to break off pieces. The demand for cheaper table sugar drove, in part, colonization of tropical islands and nations where labor-intensive sugarcane plantations and table sugar manufacturing could thrive. Growing sugar cane crop in hot humid climates, and producing table sugar in high temperature sugar mills was harsh, inhumane work. The demand for cheap and docile labor for this work, in part, first drove slave trade from Africa (in particular West Africa), followed by indentured labor trade from South Asia (in particular India). Millions of slaves, followed by millions of indentured laborers were brought into the Caribbean, Indian Ocean, Pacific Islands, East Africa, Natal, north and eastern parts of South America, and southeast Asia. The modern ethnic mix of many nations, settled in the last two centuries, has been influenced by table sugar. Beginning in the late 18th century, the production of sugar became increasingly mechanized. The steam engine first powered a sugar mill in Jamaica in 1768, and, soon after, steam replaced direct firing as the source of process heat. During the same century, Europeans began experimenting with sugar production from other crops. Andreas Marggraf identified sucrose in beet root and his student Franz Achard built a sugar beet processing factory in Silesia (Prussia). The beet-sugar industry took off during the Napoleonic Wars , when France and the continent were cut off from Caribbean sugar. In 2010, about 20 percent of the world’s sugar was produced from beets. Today, a large beet refinery producing around 1,500 tonnes of sugar a day needs a permanent workforce of about 150 for 24-hour production. Trends A table sugar factory in England. The tall diffusers are visible to the middle left where the harvest transforms into a sugar syrup. The boiler and furnace are in the center, where table sugar crystals form. An expressway for transport is visible in the lower left. Table sugar (sucrose) comes from plant sources. Two important sugar crops predominate: sugarcane ( Saccharum spp. ) and sugar beets ( Beta vulgaris ), in which sugar can account for 12% to 20% of the plant’s dry weight. Minor commercial sugar crops include the date palm ( Phoenix dactylifera ), sorghum ( Sorghum vulgare ), and the sugar maple ( Acer saccharum ). Sucrose is obtained by extraction of these crops with hot water; concentration of the extract gives syrups, from which solid sucrose can be crystallized. In 2017, worldwide production of table sugar amounted to 185 million tonnes. Most cane sugar comes from countries with warm climates, because sugarcane does not tolerate frost. Sugar beets, on the other hand, grow only in cooler temperate regions and do not tolerate extreme heat. About 80 percent of sucrose is derived from sugarcane, the rest almost all from sugar beets. In mid-2018, India and Brazil had about the same production of sugar – 34 million tonnes – followed by the European Union , Thailand , and China as the major producers. India, the European Union, and China were the leading domestic consumers of sugar in 2018. Beet sugar comes from regions with cooler climates: northwest and eastern Europe, northern Japan, plus some areas in the United States (including California). In the northern hemisphere, the beet-growing season ends with the start of harvesting around September. Harvesting and processing continues until March in some cases. The availability of processing plant capacity and the weather both influence the duration of harvesting and processing – the industry can store harvested beets until processed, but a frost-damaged beet becomes effectively unprocessable. The United States sets high sugar prices to support its producers, with the effect that many former purchasers of sugar have switched to corn syrup (beverage manufacturers) or moved out of the country (candy manufacturers). The low prices of glucose syrups produced from wheat and corn ( maize ) threaten the traditional sugar market. Used in combination with artificial sweeteners , they can allow drink manufacturers to produce very low-cost goods. High-fructose corn syrup In the United States, there are tariffs on the importation of sugar, and subsidies for the production of maize (corn). High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is significantly cheaper than refined sucrose as a sweetener. This has led to sucrose being partially displaced in U.S. industrial food production by HFCS and other non-sucrose natural sweeteners. Some people regard HFCS as unhealthy. Clinical nutritionists, medical authorities, and the United States Food and Drug Administration have dismissed such concerns because “Sucrose, HFCS, invert sugar, honey, and many fruits and juices deliver the same sugars in the same ratios to the same tissues within the same time frame to the same metabolic pathways”. While scientific authorities agree that dietary sugars are a source of empty calories associated with certain health problems, the belief that glucose-fructose syrups such as HFCS are especially unhealthy is not supported by scientific evidence. The FDA does endorse limiting the consumption of all added sugars, including HFCS. Types Harvested sugarcane from Venezuela ready for processing Since the 6th century BC, cane sugar producers have crushed the harvested vegetable material from sugarcane in order to collect and filter the juice. They then treat the liquid (often with lime (calcium oxide) ) to remove impurities and then neutralize it. Boiling the juice then allows the sediment to settle to the bottom for dredging out, while the scum rises to the surface for skimming off. In cooling, the liquid crystallizes, usually in the process of stirring, to produce sugar crystals. Centrifuges usually remove the uncrystallized syrup. The producers can then either sell the sugar product for use as is, or process it further to produce lighter grades. The later processing may take place in another factory in another country. Sugarcane is a major component of Brazilian agriculture; the country is the world’s largest producer of sugarcane and its derivative products, such as crystallized sugar and ethanol ( ethanol fuel ). Beet Sugar beets Beet sugar producers slice the washed beets, then extract the sugar with hot water in a ” diffuser “. An alkaline solution (” milk of lime ” and carbon dioxide from the lime kiln) then serves to precipitate impurities (see carbonatation ). After filtration, evaporation concentrates the juice to a content of about 70% solids, and controlled crystallisation extracts the sugar. A centrifuge removes the sugar crystals from the liquid, which gets recycled in the crystalliser stages. When economic constraints prevent the removal of more sugar, the manufacturer discards the remaining liquid, now known as molasses , or sells it on to producers of animal feed. Sieving the resultant white sugar produces different grades for selling. Cane versus beet It is difficult to distinguish between fully refined sugar produced from beet and cane. One way is by isotope analysis of carbon. Cane uses C4 carbon fixation , and beet uses C3 carbon fixation , resulting in a different ratio of 13 C and 12 C isotopes in the sucrose. Tests are used to detect fraudulent abuse of European Union subsidies or to aid in the detection of adulterated fruit juice . Sugar cane tolerates hot climates better, but the production of sugar cane needs approximately four times as much water as the production of sugar beet. As a result, some countries that traditionally produced cane sugar (such as Egypt ) have built new beet sugar factories since about 2008. Some sugar factories process both sugar cane and sugar beets and extend their processing period in that way. The production of sugar leaves residues that differ substantially depending on the raw materials used and on the place of production. While cane molasses is often used in food preparation, humans find molasses from sugar beets unpalatable, and it consequently ends up mostly as industrial fermentation feedstock (for example in alcohol distilleries), or as animal feed . Once dried, either type of molasses can serve as fuel for burning. Pure beet sugar is difficult to find, so labelled, in the marketplace. Although some makers label their product clearly as “pure cane sugar”, beet sugar is almost always labeled simply as sugar or pure sugar. Interviews with the 5 major beet sugar-producing companies revealed that many store brands or “private label” sugar products are pure beet sugar. The lot code can be used to identify the company and the plant from which the sugar came, enabling beet sugar to be identified if the codes are known. Culinary sugars Grainy raw sugar Mill white Mill white, also called plantation white, crystal sugar or superior sugar is produced from raw sugar. It is exposed to sulfur dioxide during the production to reduce the concentration of color compounds and helps prevent further color development during the crystallization process. Although common to sugarcane-growing areas, this product does not store or ship well. After a few weeks, its impurities tend to promote discoloration and clumping; therefore this type of sugar is generally limited to local consumption. Blanco directo Blanco directo, a white sugar common in India and other south Asian countries, is produced by precipitating many impurities out of cane juice using phosphoric acid and calcium hydroxide , similar to the carbonatation technique used in beet sugar refining. Blanco directo is more pure than mill white sugar, but less pure than white refined. White refined White refined is the most common form of sugar in North America and Europe. Refined sugar is made by dissolving and purifying raw sugar using phosphoric acid similar to the method used for blanco directo, a carbonatation process involving calcium hydroxide and carbon dioxide, or by various filtration strategies. It is then further purified by filtration through a bed of activated carbon or bone char . Beet sugar refineries produce refined white sugar directly without an intermediate raw stage. White refined sugar is typically sold as granulated sugar, which has been dried to prevent clumping and comes in various crystal sizes for home and industrial use: Sugars; clockwise from top left: Refined, unrefined, brown, unprocessed cane Coarse-grain , such as sanding sugar (also called “pearl sugar”, “decorating sugar”, nibbed sugar or sugar nibs ) is a coarse grain sugar used to add sparkle and flavor atop baked goods and candies. Its large reflective crystals will not dissolve when subjected to heat. Granulated , familiar as table sugar, with a grain size about 0.5 mm across. “Sugar cubes” are lumps for convenient consumption produced by mixing granulated sugar with sugar syrup. Caster (or castor ) (0.35 mm), a very fine sugar in Britain and other Commonwealth countries, so-named because the grains are small enough to fit through a castor which is small vessel with a perforated top, from which to sprinkle sugar at table. Commonly used in baking and mixed drinks, it is sold as “superfine” sugar in the United States. Because of its fineness, it dissolves faster than regular white sugar and is especially useful in meringues and cold liquids. Castor sugar can be prepared at home by grinding granulated sugar for a couple of minutes in a mortar or food processor. Powdered , 10X sugar, confectioner’s sugar (0.060 mm), or icing sugar (0.024 mm), produced by grinding sugar to a fine powder. The manufacturer may add a small amount of anticaking agent to prevent clumping — either cornstarch (1% to 3%) or tri- calcium phosphate . Brown sugar crystals Brown sugar comes either from the late stages of cane sugar refining, when sugar forms fine crystals with significant molasses content, or from coating white refined sugar with a cane molasses syrup (blackstrap molasses). Brown sugar’s color and taste becomes stronger with increasing molasses content, as do its moisture-retaining properties. Brown sugars also tend to harden if exposed to the atmosphere, although proper handling can reverse this. Measurement Dissolved sugar content Scientists and the sugar industry use degrees Brix (symbol °Bx), introduced by Adolf Brix , as units of measurement of the mass ratio of dissolved substance to water in a liquid. A 25 °Bx sucrose solution has 25 grams of sucrose per 100 grams of liquid; or, to put it another way, 25 grams of sucrose sugar and 75 grams of water exist in the 100 grams of solution. The Brix degrees are measured using an infrared sensor. This measurement does not equate to Brix degrees from a density or refractive index measurement, because it will specifically measure dissolved sugar concentration instead of all dissolved solids. When using a refractometer, one should report the result as ” refractometric dried substance ” (RDS). One might speak of a liquid as having 20 °Bx RDS. This refers to a measure of percent by weight of total dried solids and, although not technically the same as Brix degrees determined through an infrared method, renders an accurate measurement of sucrose content, since sucrose in fact forms the majority of dried solids. The advent of in-line infrared Brix measurement sensors has made measuring the amount of dissolved sugar in products economical using a direct measurement. Consumption Refined sugar was a luxury before the 18th century. It became widely popular in the 18th century, then graduated to becoming a necessary food in the 19th century. This evolution of taste and demand for sugar as an essential food ingredient unleashed major economic and social changes. Eventually, table sugar became sufficiently cheap and common enough to influence standard cuisine and flavored drinks. Sucrose forms a major element in confectionery and desserts . Cooks use it for sweetening — its fructose component, which has almost double the sweetness of glucose, makes sucrose distinctively sweet in comparison to other carbohydrates. It can also act as a food preservative when used in sufficient concentrations. Sucrose is important to the structure of many foods, including biscuits and cookies, cakes and pies, candy, and ice cream and sorbets. It is a common ingredient in many processed and so-called ” junk foods “. Nutritional information

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Sockeye fishery a model of salmon recovery, sustainable food

BAKER RIVER — Several small metal boats followed by drifting nets took turns late last week riding the Baker River’s flow from the Highway 20 bridge in Concrete down to its convergence with the Skagit River.
As each group of two or three fishers hauled in their nets, they revealed varying numbers of shiny salmon; some just a handful, others a dozen or more. Then they waited their turn to return to the water.
“They’re all camped out along the shore here,” Upper Skagit Indian Tribe biologist Jon-Paul Shannahan said of the congregation at the Baker River. “It’s a community event, and it’s a historic village site, so it’s bittersweet for them to come back to these ancestral lands to fish.”
Tribal officials welcomed first-time visitors to the river’s banks to observe as several members labored during the quick and intense fishery — it opens for 26 hours twice this year, the first being 7 a.m. June 27 to 9 a.m. June 28. Among the guests were chefs and seafood distributors from restaurants and markets in Bellingham, Seattle and other areas of the state.
“Instead of farm to table, it’s more like river to table,” Shannahan said.
They were there to see first-hand where some of their salmon comes from, as well as to hear how the fishery has regrown, from a low of less than 100 fish in the 1980s to returns consistently in the 10,000 to 30,000 range.
Riley Starks, marketing manager for Lummi Island Wild, which acts as a cooperative that purchases and sells seafood from the region’s sustainable fisheries, said the organization wanted to see and show off the Baker River fishery since it is growing, highly regulated and done through a partnership between the tribe and a private electric company that operates the Baker River Dam.
Tribe General Manager Doreen Maloney also highlighted the partnership with Puget Sound Energy’s Baker River Dam operators, as well as with the state Department of Fish and Wildlife, with which the tribe co-manages the fishery.
“We can only do this with cooperation from the state agency and PSE,” she said. “Here is what we can do if we work together.”
Lummi Island Wild President Emeritus Keith Carpenter said he was impressed with the intense management of the tribe’s fishery.
“This is undoubtedly the best-managed fishery in the world,” he said.
Its start depends on operators at the Baker River Dam allowing just enough flow to put the river at about 4 feet deep.
Then the tribe starts its drifts like clockwork, with a roster of boats that rotate on and off the river, getting 6.5 minutes each time it’s their turn to take out their net.
Twenty-three boats — some carrying families like Scott, Trudy and Janelle Schuyler — were on the roster June 27.
“It’s really a family affair,” said Maloney, who is on the tribal council and head of the tribe’s natural resources department.
Tribal and Lummi Island Wild representatives said the fishery is managed with consideration for the endangered Southern Resident orcas — making it a prime source of seafood that will soon be labeled as “ orca safe .”
“The fishery is managed for orcas by limiting impacts to chinook,” Shannahan said.
Chinook salmon are the endangered Southern Resident orcas’ preferred food. The Puget Sound chinook population includes fish from the Skagit River being listed as a threatened species since 2005.
AVOIDING ORCA IMPACT
The freshwater fishery doesn’t harvest any fish that an orca may have eaten.
“Once they’ve left the saltwater and they are in the river, they will never be in front of an orca again,” Carpenter said.
Still, the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe is careful to avoid catching chinook salmon, which are in the Skagit River at the same time as the sockeye run, by strategically keeping most fishing in the quarter-mile section of the Baker River below the dam and using nets that are too small to catch chinook.
Shannahan said up to 90 percent of the fishing is done in that quarter-mile stretch where chinook are rare, but sockeye can be abundant on their journey to Baker Lake to spawn.
“The chinook tend to go into the Sauk, Suiattle and Cascade rivers; They don’t duck into the Baker much at all,” he said.
Still, the tribe’s sockeye fishery is timed between the peaks of the spring and summer chinook runs on the Skagit River, in an effort to further avoid them.
“It’s the timing, the location and the gear restrictions that limit the impacts to chinook,” Shannhan said.
The tribe limits its nets to 5.25-inch mesh, which can catch sockeye that average 5 pounds per fish, but not the larger chinook salmon that average 10-15 pounds, according to Fish & Wildlife.
“The chinook bounce off of it … They are too big to get gilled in it,” Shannahan said. “You’ll see a chinook bob on the net and then they’re gone.”
Lummi Island Wild General Manager Ian Kirouac said the Upper Skagit sockeye fishery meets the three main bullet points outlined in the new Orca Safe Initiative launched by the organization to fight misinformation about the impact of river fishing on the whales and highlight responsibly-sourced fish.
The three bullet points are being what’s called a terminal fishery where the fish are done with the ocean portion of their life cycle, sustainable management of the fishery and use of gear that results in little or no bycatch.
SEEING THE SOURCE
The factors required for inclusion in the Orca Safe Initiative are important to chefs and seafood markets that tout sustainably sourced fish.
About a dozen of those on the food service side of the fishery were excited to see the harvest and collect their freshest 25-pound boxes of Baker River sockeye yet — pulled from the river and placed on ice that very morning.
“This is really special,” Lummi Island Wild’s Carpenter said as chefs from Keenan’s at the Pier in Bellingham, Rifugio’s Country Italian Cuisine in Deming and Pike Place Chowder in Seattle gathered at the river.
Excitement built among chefs and guests, including the famed fish-throwing Pike Place Fish Market and major distributor U.S. Foods as they waited to walk to the riverbank to see the fishing in action.
“How exciting,” said Richard Balogh, executive chef at Rifugio’s, as he changed his shoes to cross the muddy terrain.
Carpenter said the Baker River sockeye are particularly prized due to their sourcing from the glacier-fed Skagit River watershed and their high fat content, which boosts nutrition and flavor.
“These fish are second to none,” he said. “They have consistently better fat content (than other Pacific Northwest fish).”
Colin Kiplinger of Seattle’s Pike Place Fish Market was thrilled to see where some of the fish he tosses at Pike Place Market comes from.
“We should have this fish in a few weeks,” he said.
CELEBRATING RESTORATION
That Baker River sockeye can be prepared for market places and dinner plates is a sign of success.
Thirty years ago, there were simply too few. In 1985, the return dipped to a record low of 99 fish. But in recent years, the sockeye have returned in the thousands, with a record about 32,000 in 2015, thanks to the efforts of the co-managers and changes at PSE’s Baker River Dam.
The return could top that record this year, according to the Fish and Wildlife forecast that calls for about 34,000 of the fish to make their way upstream.
Maloney said that’s a great success, but the co-managers have their sights set a run of about 60,000 fish each year.
Arnold “Arnie” Aspelund, a fishery scientist with PSE, said the sockeye recently started making their way up the Skagit River to the Baker River and the trap used to hold the fish at the dam until they can be transported to Baker Lake by truck.
According to Fish and Wildlife data, the first fish was seen in the trap June 10, and more than 600 fish were trapped and trucked to the lake in the next couple weeks. They’re expected to arrive in the hundreds each day through late July.
“We’re going to see numbers begin to escalate in the next few weeks,” Aspelund said.
In addition to managing the dam to support the short fishery and collect and transport the fish, PSE plays another important role in managing the fishery by running a Fish and Wildlife hatchery program on Baker Lake.
The hatchery uses traditional methods for incubating salmon eggs, as well as a one-of-a-kind spawning beach that mimics the natural setting where the fish would have spawned before the dam was built, causing Baker Lake to inundate shoreline habitats.
“These beaches are very innovative,” Shannahan said. “It’s basically a controlled natural environment.”
In a third and final act of “life stage interventions,” as Aspelund puts it, PSE funnels young fish in the lake through what’s called a surface collector to get them downstream of the dam for their journey out to sea.
“Here we are, observing a fishery,” he said. “It’s a process that has evolved since these fish were on the brink about 30 years ago.”
— Reporter Kimberly Cauvel: 360-416-2199, , Twitter: @Kimberly_SVH , Facebook.com/bykimberlycauvel More from this section

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Vietnam fare in Jayanagar

It’s been two decades since I came to India from Vietnam. I came here to study but fell in love with the place and people and decided to stay back and make Bengaluru my home. Over the years, I met my husband and adjusted myself to the food, culture, lifestyle of this place.
Initially, I had a culture shock in every aspect — from restrictions to food. The way I grew up and the things that I grew up learning was very different in how things worked in India. I had to unlearn a lot of things during my stay here.
The one thing that took me a while to get use to was the food. For me, Indian cuisine is about curries and spices — something I am not familiar with at all.
Yes, we do make similar dishes or use methods that are alike but the way spices are used is not similar in any manner. In fact, the overall flavour is completely different.
Since I came here as a student, I lived in a hostel. I missed home very much, especially the food. I craved for Vietnamese food.
Unfortunately, in early 2000s, the ingredients that I wanted weren’t easily available in the market. I had to find alternatives.
In Vietnamese dishes, we mostly use beef and pork. We also use a lot of stock from these meats — it helps with the flavouring.
When we couldn’t get what we were looking for, we learnt to use chicken stock instead.
Looking for vegetarian versions of it wasn’t really an option as it’s not common in our culture at all. We really like our meats.
But years went by and Bengaluru slowly became the IT city that it is. This was a good thing for us as it meant that there would be more imported ingredients available. We soon started seeing items from Korea, Thailand and Japan. Those were easily alternatives we were happy to get our hands on.
Eventually, Bengaluru residents too were open to trying new cuisines, Vietnamese included.
Two decades later, I can happily say that there are many takers in the city for Vietnamese cuisine.
I’d be lying if I said that I was surprised that they adapted to it so quickly.
As a restaurateur, I thought that I might have to alter the taste and make it in a way that would suit the Indian palate. Thankfully, I didn’t have to work on it much. Diners were quite open to enjoying the real thing.
Having said that, finding ingredients is still a challenge. We can’t often get our hands on certain company products or herbs that would give its authentic taste.
That’s the only time we use what is available in the markets here.
Just like us, Vietnamese cuisine has also changed over the years. In the last couple of years, people in Vietnam are following a healthier lifestyle and cutting down on their meat consumption.
This lead to the introduction of vegetarian dishes.
It may not sound much but at least three to four vegetarian meals a month are prepared at home.
I’ve changed over the years too. I’ve learnt how to make a few South Indian breakfast items like idli, dosa and chutney, to name a few. And my Gujarati mother-in-law taught me how to make some of the dishes. Though mine aren’t too traditional, I think I have learnt a lot more than I thought I would.
But for now, keeping home close my heart, here’s a recipe of ‘Vegetarian Pho’, a simple but wholesome dish.
The ingredients are easily available and anyone can make it. Don’t forget to have it with some hoisin and sriracha sauce.
Diep Vu
Co-owner of ‘Patio 805’, Jayanagar
Ingredients
For Broth
Vegetarian Pho
Vegetable broth, 6 cups Sliced onions, 3 large Fresh ginger, 100 gm Sliced carrots (coin-shaped), 120 gms Brown sugar, 1 tbsp Ground black pepper, 1 tsp Cinnamon sticks (toasted mildly), 2 Black cardamom, 4 pods Star anise (toasted mildly), 5 to 6 Cilantro stems and leaves, 5 to 6 Lemons (sliced in half), 1 1/2 For Pho
Rice noodles, 220 gm Soft tofu, 100 gm Bean sprouts, 2 cups Green onions, 4 Chopped cilantro, 1/4 cup Fresh basil leaves, 1 cup Sliced bird eye chilli pods, 2 Lime wedges, 1 Method
To make broth: Place all ingredients in a large pot with six cups vegetable stock. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer, covered, one hour. Strain broth, and return to pot. Discard solids. To make Pho: Cook rice noodles, drain, and rinse under cold water. Divide among four large soup bowls. Ladle the broth over noodles, and top with tofu, sprouts, carrots, bok choy, and green onions. Serve cilantro, basil, Sliced Bird eye chilli and lime wedges on the side to be added as per liking. Pro tip: Serve Sriracha and Hoisin Sauce by the side as well.

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25 Kids From Around The World Photographed With What They Eat In One Week

25 Kids From Around The World Photographed With What They Eat In One Week July 5, 2019 Top News We are what we eat. But how do our diets actually reflect us? To find out, photographer Gregg Segal has traveled around the world to shoot kids from different cultures surrounded by the stuff they stuff themselves with. Over the course of 3 years, the photographer has visited 9 countries (the USA, India, Malaysia, Germany, France, Italy, Senegal, the United Arab Emirates, and Brazil), documenting his findings in a book called Daily Bread: What Kids Eat Around the World . “I focused on kids because eating habits start young and if you don’t get it right when you’re 9 or 10, it’s going to be a lot harder when you’re older,” Gregg told Bored Panda .
Kawakanih Yawalapiti, 9, Upper Xingu region of Mato Grosso, Brazil, photographed August 19, 2018 in Brasilia. Kawakanih, a member of the Yawalapiti tribe, lives in Xingu National Park, a preserve in the Amazonian Basin of Brazil. The park is encircled by cattle ranches and soy In the past six months alone, 100 million trees have been felled to make room for When she was born, Kawakanih’s mother, Watatakalu, isolated her from those who didn’t speak Arawaki, their native language. Only 7 speakers of the language remained and her mother was afraid Arawaki would go extinct. In fact, Kawakanih is the first child to be raised speaking Arawaki since the 1940’s and her mother says it’s up to Kawakanih and her two siblings to keep the language alive. Kawakanih has also learned her father’s dialect as well as Portuguese. She loves to read history books, especially ones about the Egyptians. Most of her days are spent playing in the river or helping with chores, like harvesting manioc (cassava), making tapioca and fishing. Every couple of months, Kawakanih travels to Canarana for school where she learns computer skills, though no one in her village owns a computer; there is no electricity or running water. To get to the studio in Brasilia, Kawakanih and her mother traveled 31 hours from their village by boat, bus and car. The red paint Kawakanih wears, traditionally made from ground urucum seeds, protects her from bad spirits and energy. A cluster of seedpods are to the left of Kawakanih’s head. Rainforest tribes have used the entire Urucum plant as medicine for centuries. Kawakanih’s diet is very simple, consisting mainly of fish, tapioca, fruit and nuts. It takes five minutes to catch dinner, says Kawakanih. When you’re hungry, you just go to the river with your net. Funnel Joy Club
“ Daily Bread grew out of another of my projects on consumption and waste called 7 Days of Garbage ,” Segal said. “I asked family, friends, neighbors and anyone else I could convince to save their garbage for one week and then lie down and be photographed in it. It’s impossible to ignore the problem of consumption and waste when you’re lying in it! To me, the most disturbing thing about the garbage I photographed was the packaging that comes with our food. We’ve grown totally dependent on the industries of eating and cooking and the result has been a massive increase in waste. I began to ask, “How have our diets been impacted by this revolution in the way food is produced and consumed?” It struck me that we don’t give enough thought to what’s in our food because we’re not the ones making it! We’ve outsourced the most vital ingredient of life, the connective tissue of families and culture. I thought, “What if we keep a journal of everything we eat and drink for one week to bring our focus onto diet & take ownership of the foods we eat?” #2 Anchal Sahani, 10, Chembur, Mumbai, India
Anchal Sahani, Chembur, Mumbai, India (10 yrs old) photographed March 11, 2017 Anchal lives in a tiny tin shack on a construction site in a suburb of Mumbai with her parents and two siblings. Her father makes less than $5 a day, just enough for her mother to prepare okra & cauliflower curry, lentils and roti from scratch. Anchal would like to return to the farm where she was born in Bihar, go to school like other kids and eventually become a teacher, but she’s kept busy with household chores and looking after her baby brother. When she has time, she dresses up and leaves the construction site to enjoy the fragrance of jasmine and lotus and to watch the neighborhood kids playing cricket and running free. While on her walks, Anchal collects brightly colored chocolate wrappers she finds along the road by the grocery store. Anchal wishes her mother would love her the way she loves her baby brother. Memester Ace Yearly Memester Ace can support 12 Facebook Groups. Facebook Groups support is not available in the elite version. You also get the capability to work with higher caps.The Memester Ace Version can integrate with 25 Facebook Pages, 8 Facebook Profiles, 10 Twitt Six done for you sales funnels includes, funnel templates (Optimizepress and HTML), free offer gifts, email swipes, social media posts and lots more…
In total, Segal worked with about 60 kids, 52 of whom he included in the book. “I began photographing my son and friends of his from school in my backyard in Altadena, CA. I broadened the piece to include kids from other neighborhoods in Los Angeles and then decided the project would resonate more deeply with a global scope. I needed a producer in each country to find the kids. The goal was to represent a diversity of diets in each location. If the rate of obesity in a given country was 25%, I aimed to reflect this percentage in my small sample of kids.” #3 Davi Ribeiro De Jesus, 12, Brasilia, Brazil
Davi Ribeiro de Jesus, 12, Brasilia, Brazil, photographed August 18, 2018. Davi lives with his dad, step-mom and three siblings in a tidy one-room house in the Santa Luzia favela, a slum at the edge of the largest garbage dump in Latin America. The space is filled by three beds, a sofa, TV, refrigerator, two wardrobes, a cooker and a small table where they share their meals. A mosaic of mats and scraps of plywood cover the dirt floor. Davi has his own shelf where he arranges his clothes, his toy car collection, and his mobile. There’s no garbage collection and the power goes down frequently. When it rains, scattered garbage turns to sludge and oozes into homes, but Jesus keeps Davi and his family safe and happy. They go to a church nearby every Saturday night and Sunday morning. Davi’s dad is looking for work as a digger. He has his own pick, shovel and grubber. Davi’s step-mom handles the cooking. Davi will eat almost anything except bitter legumes though most days he has beans and rice, maybe with a little pork. He can cook fried eggs, porridge and pasta for himself. Sometimes there are treats, like sweet popcorn. He never goes to bed hungry. Davi laughs easily and is crazy about kites. He and his friends, Maxwell, Junior and Romário have kite fights in the favela’s empty lots where bored stray dogs scratch at fleas or sniff around for food. Davi adopted five strays and gave them names: Lassie, Beethoven, Tchutchuquinha, Belinha and Piloto. He also has a chicken and wants a horse. He wants to learn all about cars, motorcycles, helicopters and guns, too. His dad taught him to drive and now he dreams of having a Chevy. He’d like to be a cop when he grows up because it’s better to be a cop than a thief. Mapify360 Reseller License will enable you to promote Mapify360 software with a 100% Commision structure or add team members inside Mapify360 Platform.
The photographer said that one of the biggest challenges working with many of the kids was the language barrier. “In many cases, I had to rely on crew members to translate and interpret for me – and hope they were accurately conveying what I wanted them to.” But there were more obstacles Gregg had to overcome, for example, finding the right mix of kids, an experienced crew, equipment and locations that met my needs. ” I needed a studio space with access to a kitchen to prepare the food and a ceiling height of at least 13 feet (the camera height needed to be a consistent 12+ feet above the subject). Organization was critical but sometimes lacking. Making sure that all of the kids kept thorough journals of everything they ate so that those meals could be accurately reproduced, for instance. Fortunately, I had competent producers in most countries. Sometimes, the equipment I had access to wasn’t reliable, which was challenging because the lighting for the pictures needs to be consistent, of course. Another major hurdle was money; this was a very expensive project to produce and generating the funds wasn’t easy. Much of the funding came out of my pocket. I could have really used a benefactor or sponsor!” #4 Ademilson Francisco Dos Santos (11) Vão De Almas, Goiás, Brazil
Ademilson Francisco dos Santos (11) Vão de Almas, Goiás, Brazil, photographed August 19, 2018 in Brasilia. Ademilson is from Vão de Almas, a community of 300 families in the Cerrado region of Goiás. Ademilson’s home is 200 kilometers from the nearest town, a journey on mountainous, unpaved roads through valleys and across rivers – an almost impossible trip during the rainy season. There is no TV, electricity or running water. Villagers bathe, wash their clothes and clean their pots and pans in the Capivara River. Ademilson, the youngest of 7 children, goes to school in the morning (an hours walk from home) and in the afternoon, returns to help his father with farming and collecting native plants. The family cultivates a cornucopia of crops: rice, manihot (cassava), sweet potatoes, squash, beans, gherkin, okra, jiló, orange, lemon, watermelon, corn, coffee and sugar cane. They collect a bounty of native fruits, too: buriti, mangaba, mango, jatobá, pequi, caju, and coco indaiá. They produce coconut oil, mamona oil (castor oil) and sesame and peanut paçoca. They farm without the use of machinery, irrigation or pesticides and fertilize with ash from the burning of the bush. Manihot, the brown root in the upper right hand corner of the photograph, is a staple of Ademilson’s diet. His favorite treats are mangoes and paçoca (similar to peanut brittle). There are many kinds of food Ademilson doesn’t eat because they’re not part of his diet and are completely foreign. He tried a hot dog when he went to the city and hated it. He’d never eaten pizza before coming to Braslila to be photographed. In his portrait, Ademilson is holding buriti, a wild palm from the Cerrado rich in carotenoids and antioxidants which indigenous people refer to as the “tree of life” because of its many uses: its wood goes into the construction of homes and handcrafts; leaves are used to cover houses; fibers are used to make textiles and the orange pulp of the fruit is used for food. Even the seeds of the buriti fruit aren’t wasted; they’re cold pressed by natives who use the oil to protect themselves from the sun and soothe sore muscles.
“Recreating all of the kid’s meals was a challenge of course, too! Kids kept a journal of everything they ate for one week. At the end of the week, producers collected the journals, checked to make sure they were complete and then handed them off to the cooks who’d shop for all the ingredients and reproduce all of the meals. I photographed as many as 5 kids a day, so the cooks were responsible for preparing over 100 meals. These were often 14-hour days for the food-preppers. It was demanding and exhausting! Once all the food was prepped and plated, I’d arrange the dishes and other elements in the frame. Sometimes I’d have the luxury of a food stylist to collaborate with, though often it was just me doing the styling.” #5 Beryl Oh Jynn, 8, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia WP GDPR Fix Pro Single Site The GDPR Pro version provides you with enhanced protection. This version comes with a a GDPR ready privacy policy made by a consulting expert. All you have to do is just grab it and put it on your blog. Also get A GDPR compliant default Terms and Conditions
Beryl Oh Jynn, 8, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, photographed March 25, 2017. Beryl lives in a quiet condominium with her parents and two brothers. She goes to S. J. K. Han Ming Puchong, a national Chinese school walking distance from home. Beryl’s dad is an engineer and her mother runs a day care. Beryl’s earliest memory of food is porridge and cake. Her favorite dish is spaghetti with carbonara sauce. Beryl grows bok choy and spinach in her balcony garden, is not permitted to drink sodas and refuses to eat ginger. She would like to be a cheerleader.
“One of the surprising lessons of Daily Bread is that the best quality diets are often eaten not by the richest but the poorest. In the US, the poor are the biggest consumers of junk food because it’s convenient and cheap. But in Mumbai, it costs $13 for a medium Dominoes pizza, which is way beyond the means of most people. Anchal lives with her family in an 8 X 8 foot aluminum hut. Her father earns less than $5 a day, yet she eats a wholesome diet of okra & cauliflower curries, lentils and roti which Anchal’s mother makes from scratch each day on a single kerosene burner. Shraman , on the other hand, lives in a middle-class Mumbai hi-rise and eats very differently. His family’s extra income means he can afford Dominoes pizza, fried chicken and treats like Snickers bars and Cadbury chocolate.”
“In 2015, Cambridge University conducted an exhaustive study ranking diets around the world from most to least nutritional. Remarkably, 9 of the 10 healthiest countries are in Africa. It seems counterintuitive that some of the poorest countries have among the healthiest diets. But when you look closely at what they’re eating, it makes sense: fresh vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, grains, fish, and legumes and very littled meat (which functions more as seasoning) and few empty calories (processed foods).” #6 Meissa Ndiaye, 11, Dakar, Senegal
Meissa Ndiaye, 11, Dakar, Senegal, photographed August 30, 2017. Meissa shares a single room with his dad, mum and brother in the heart of Parcelles Assainies, which means “sanitized plots.” A treeless, sandy suburb of Dakar, Parcelles Assainies was developed in the 1970’s to house the poor overflowing from the city. Meissa lives opposite the futbol stadium and open-air market, hundreds of stalls selling everything from fresh fish to wedding dresses. In late August, tethered goats line the streets before Eid al-Adha, the Feast of the Sacrifice. Meissa, a devout Muslim and student at Quran School, loves goat meat and sweet foods like porridge, though in the week he kept a diary of his meals, he ate very little meat. More often, he filled up on French bread stuffed with spaghetti, peas or fried potatoes. Meissa’s mum and anties prepare his meals though once or twice a week they get take out. Meissa loves futbol most of all and hopes to be a star player like Messi or Ronaldo. If he had enough money, he’d buy a nice little sports car. He wishes his mum and dad, a refrigerator technician, could immigrate to France so that they can earn enough money.
“The revolution in diet and sameness of what kids around the world are eating,” the Gregg added. “Ultrprocessed packaged foods, empty calories. The children I met have distinct personalities and diverse hobbies, yet they’re often eating in eerily similar ways. Compare the diets of Paulo from Sicily and Isaiah from Los Angeles. In the past, a Sicilian boy would have grown up eating very different foods from his counterpart in the US, but now their diets are converging. Both Paulo and Isaiah eat French fries, burgers, pizza, pasta and white bread. They live continents apart, but it’s as if the boys’ parents have been shopping at the same global superstore!” #7 Rosalie Durand, 10, Nice, France
Rosalie Durand, 10, Nice, France, photographed August 18, 2017. Since her parents split up, Rosalie has lived part time with her mom, and part time with her dad, which allows her to see both the Mediterranean Sea and the French Alps from home. She has a healthy diet (which includes lots of fresh fish, like sardines) thanks in part to her father, a restaurateur, who has taught her to make crepes, salads and lentils with sausage, her favorite dish. The only foods she won’t eat are ratatouille, spinach and cucumber. Rosalie gets her sense of style from her mother, a fashion designer, and plans to be an interior designer. Rosalie is into Thai kickboxing, rock climbing, gymnastics and performs magic tricks. She’s a fan of actors Cole Sprouse and Emma Watson and in her free time goes to the cinema. She notices she’s getting older because she has a phone. There’s nothing missing in Rosalie’s life, though she’d like to go to Los Angeles and explore Hollywood Boulevard. If she had enough money, she’d buy a sailboat or maybe even a yacht. #8 Hank Segal, 8, Altadena, Ca
Hank Segal, 8, Altadena, CA, photographed January 30, 2016. Hank lives with his mom, a voice teacher, his father, a photographer and their dog, Django near the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains northeast of Los Angeles. Hank and his parents have grown sun gold cherry tomatoes, artichokes, zucchini, spinach, pomegranates, yams, snap peas, watercress, rosemary, thyme, basil, Serrano chili peppers, boysenberries, kyoho grapes, raspberries, rhubarb, and watermelon. Hank has an adventurous palette. While eating a fried Branzino at a Lebanese restaurant, he announced, “I’m gonna’ get all Anthony Bourdain on it!” and popped the fish’s crispy eyeball in his mouth. Usually, Hank and his parents talk politics over dinner or succumb to TV. Hank likes his back scratched and figures he must be part dog because his sense of smell is so keen. He especially likes the aroma of melted butter and garlic. He also likes 80’s music because “they really knew how to use the synth.” Hank’s heroes are Albert Einstein, Teddy Roosevelt and Abe Lincoln because he fixed slavery and has a sweet beard. Hank wants to be a mechanical engineer at NASA when he grows up. #9 Sira Cissokho (11 Yrs Old) Dakar
Sira Cissokho (11 yrs old) Dakar, photographed August 30, 2017. Sira, one of nine children, is from Tambacounda, about 7 hours north of Dakar. Sira’s father is a musician and her mother is a housewife. Sira doesn’t always get enough to eat. On special occasions, Sira’s mom makes her favorite dish, chicken. Many of the foods Sira and her family eat are grown in their garden, including millet and peanuts. Sira has learned to cook Ngalakh, a Senegalese millet porridge. If she had enough money, Sira would buy her parents a trip to Mecca. Of all her possessions, the thing Sira cherishes most is a bracelet her grandfather passed down to her before he died. #10 Greta Moeller,7, Hamburg, Germany
Greta Moeller, Hamburg, Germany, 7, photographed August 11, 2017 Greta lives with her mother and younger sister in Hamburg, but spends quite a bit of time with her grandparents, too. On the path to her grandparents home is a great big chestnut tree and in autumn, Greta searches in the foliage for chestnuts with her little sister. Greta’s favorite food is fish sticks with mashed potatoes and applesauce. She can’t stand rice pudding. One thing Greta is really good at is snapping her fingers, both hands at the same time. At night, while falling asleep, Greta thinks mostly about her mother, who is usually in the next room watching TV. #11 June Grosser, 8, Hamburg, Germany
June Grosser, 8, Hamburg, Germany, photographed August 11, 2017. June’s mom is a fashion photographer, though she hasn’t yet photographed her daughter. June must have observed her mother at work or she’s just a natural model, completely assured in front of the camera. June can sing almost all the songs she hears on the radio – and dance to them. She has no role model. She intends to be her own role model. She’d like a dog, but her parents won’t allow her. She figures if she can make enough money, she may be able to bribe her mother to get one. June’s favorite food is schnitzel. She doesn’t care for curry and truffles and didn’t like broccoli either until now. She is full after meals but hunger returns quickly. At dinner, June doesn’t talk much, but rather listens to her parents discuss politics, elections, and what’s going on in the world. The things she likes most about herself is her hair, her long eyelashes and her imagination, her fantasies. One of her wishes is to fly to the moon, though she’d rather focus on wishes that will be fulfilled. June is reading The Vampire Diaries and as she’s lying in bed at night trying to fall asleep, she often wonders if vampires really exist. #12 Andrea Testa, 9, Catania, Italy
Andrea Testa, 9, Catania, Italy, photographed August 23, 2017 Andrea lives in a single house surrounded by a little garden and lava stones with his parents and 6 year old sister Vittoria. Andrea’s father is an officer in the Italian army and his mother is a housewife who does all the cooking. Andrea’s favorite dish is pasta carbonara with plenty of bacon. He loves the scent of orange blossoms and cherries. He won’t touch cauliflower. If he had enough money, Andrea would buy a drone and a little dog, which he would name “Ettore” (Hector). Andrea performs magic tricks for his family and friends. His hero is Robinson Crusoe. Andrea would like to be a doctor because they make a lot of money. #13 Leona “Nona” Del Grosso Sands, 6, Glendale, Ca
Leona “Nona” Del Grosso Sands, 6, Glendale, CA, photographed January 30, 2016. Nona lives with her mother and Cleo, her beloved cat, in an apartment in Glendale, CA. She can make oatmeal and pancakes and once when her mother was very sick, she fed her. Nona grew a gigantic tomato plant that began to take over everything and is now as big as a tree. Her mother makes her eat vegetables, especially broccoli. Her diet has as many colors as the rainbow, though Nona also has not just a sweet tooth, but many “sugar teeth.” Nona’s role models are her mother, her teachers and Joan Jett. When she goes to sleep at night, Nona sometimes imagines her Nana is an angel watching over her. #14 Siti Khaliesah Nataliea Muhamad Khairizal, 9, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Siti Khaliesah Nataliea Muhamad Khairizal, 9, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, photographed March 26, 2017, Siti lives in a suburb of Kuala Lumpur with her father, a car salesman, her mother, a housewife and her 4 siblings. Mum does all the cooking and sets the rules for the table: recite the Du’a, no water before meals and no chatting during meals though it’s very seldom that the whole family sits down to dinner together because everyone’s so busy. Siti’s favorite dish is spaghetti carbonara and she’s crazy about the scent of fried instant noodles. She goes to a Chinese school where she learns Mandarin, plays the Melodian and practices Taekwando. When she falls asleep at night, Siti wishes her dad would put some money under her pillow. She collects coins of all kinds and foreign currencies. Once she saves enough money, Siti’s going to buy an IPad. #15 Frank Fadel Agbomenou, 8, Dakar, Senegal
Frank Fadel Agbomenou, 8, Dakar, Senegal, photographed August 30, 2017. Frank lives with his older brother and father, a Human Resources Manager in an apartment in a posh neighborhood of Dakar. Frank would like to see his dad and mum together again but he doesn’t think that wish will be fulfilled. Frank cried a couple weeks ago; his mum told him she would take him to the beach but then changed her mind. She’s busy, working as a caterer for parties and fancy hotel events. There is almost nothing Frank doesn’t like to eat. He eats lots of peanuts from the peanut tree on his terrace. He’s especially fond of fish and the family cook knows how to prepare it just right. Frank is an excellent dancer and has mastered summersaults though he prefers watching TV and playing games on his Play Station. The thing that makes him laugh the hardest is when his cousin Coco falls down. Frank dreams of buying a flashy sports car and traveling to Paris. When he grows up, he wants to be a gynecologist. See Also on Bored Panda
Yusuf Abdullah Al Muhairi, 9, Mirdif, Dubai, UAE, photographed August 12, 2018. Yusuf’s mom came to Dubai from Ireland to work as a pastry chef and chocolatier. She married an Emerati man and they had one son before separating. Yusuf loves his mum’s cooking though he makes scrambled eggs and toast all on his own. Yusuf likes to read, draw, climb, ride horses and create science projects. He thinks he’ll either be a pilot or police officer when he grows up. If he had the money, he’d buy a Ferrari. His role models are Batman and his mother. Yusuf wishes for his mum to get married again and that he’ll have brothers and sisters. Lying in bed at night, he thinks back to building a birdhouse with his granddad, fishing with him in the rivers in Ireland and going to Warner Brothers with his grandmom. #17 Adveeta Venkatesh, 10 Years Old, Mumbai, India
Adveeta Venkatesh, 10 years old, Mumbai, India, photographed March 11, 2017. Adveeta, an only child, lives with her maternal granny, who prepares most of her meals, and her parents in a spacious flat with a balcony overlooking Deonar, a suburb of Mumbai. The air is often hazy from fires burning at Deonar dumping ground, India’s oldest and largest landfill, an 18-story, 12 million ton mountain of trash. Adveeta’s mother and father are scientists at a government research center in Mumbai. They make it home in time for dinner. While at the table, no one uses gadgets or watches TV. Before eating, Adveeta says a prayer of gratitude for the food on her plate. A vegetarian, she loves South Indian cuisine, particularly dosas (pancakes made from fermented rice and lentils) served with spicy chutney and yogurt. A few years ago, Adveeta was a picky eater. She didn’t eat 99% of the food she eats now. But as her father discovered during the photo shoot, she’s also eating more snacks and sweets. “I can’t believe Adveeta is eating all that junk!” he commented, as the pictures popped up on my monitor. “I’m going to have to have a talk with her mother!” Adveeta studies drama, performs classical Indian dance and prefers to solve puzzles and riddles than to play with Barbie dolls. She’s only cried once in the last year. While traveling in Jakarta and Bali, she contracted chicken pox and was kept isolated from her cousins. Adveeta plans to be a veterinarian and to contribute extra money to orphanages and animal shelters. #18 Tharkish Sri Ganesh (10) And Mierra Sri Varrsha (8), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Tharkish Sri Ganesh (10) and Mierra Sri Varrsha, (8) Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, photographed March 26, 2017. Tharkish and Mierra’s roots in Malaysia begin with their great-grandfather who migrated from South India to build a better future, but only found work as a rubber tapper before being conscripted by the Japanese to build the “Death Railway” from Siam to Burma in 1943. Tharkish and Mierra live with their mom and dad in a public housing project in Bukit Jalil, a suburb of Kuala Lumpur. Their apartment block is full of friends and noisy in a good way. Their dad works as a gaffer in film production and their mom is a homemaker and does most of the cooking though on weekends they eat KFC, Pizza Hut or Chinese takeout. Mierra dislikes the pungent smell of meat and traces of blood. She prefers candies and chocolates. Her earliest memory of food is rice porridge, her comfort food whenever she falls sick. Tharkish’s favorite food is Puttu, steamed ground rice layered with coconut and topped with bananas and palm sugar. Tharkish doesn’t like onions because they taste weird and leave a funny smell in his mouth. His first taste was Urad Dal Porridge, an Indian baby food made with dal, rice, coconut, cardamon and jaggery (concentrated date palm sap). Mierra says her diet is healthy because her mom avoids foods with preservatives, additives and msg, though after her Daily Bread portrait, she still thinks she could eat less processed food. Mierra loves to read and play badminton and snakes and ladders while her brother is into chess, carom and surfing the internet. Mierra strives to be the top student in her class and wants to be a doctor while Tharkish will be happy with a top 3 finish after examinations and pictures himself an IT engineer. #19 Cooper Norman, 12 (10 At Time Of Shoot), Altadena, Ca, USA
Cooper Norman, 12 (10 at time of shoot), Altadena, CA, USA. Photographed January 30, 2016. Cooper lives in the foothills of Altadena, California with his mom, a school administrator and dad, a human resources manager. Other than the cries of wild parrots and peacocks, his neighborhood is quiet, peaceful, and untraveled. At 4, Cooper began taking karate classes and at 5, he took up classical guitar. He got into bow ties, too, which he wears for his guitar recitals. Cooper last wore this suit to a wedding in Palm Springs. The bride’s uncle was so impressed with Cooper’s table manners that he invited him out for dim sum. At Odyssey Charter School, Cooper plants all sorts of fruits and vegetables. He thinks of himself as an adventurous eater, willing to try almost anything, though Thai food (his mother’s home country) is his favorite. His earliest memory of food is eating Cheerios in his stroller. Cooper plans to be a neurosurgeon when he grows up and, if he has enough money, will buy a teleporter, so he can visit his family in Thailand more often. #20 John Hintze, 7, Hamburg, Germany
John Hintze, 7, Hamburg, Germany, photographed August 11, 2017. John lives with his parents in a large apartment with a garden in a quiet suburb of Hamburg with more trees than cars. John describes himself as an omnivore. He’s fond of eating breakfast in bed. His parents bring him a tray of Musli and toast every morning before school. John loves his grandma’s roast, Chinese curry with cashew nuts and Orange Fanta, though he’s only allowed to drink Fanta on weekends. During the week there is only water. He used to like mushrooms, but not anymore. Once, with his friend Henry, he made a fruit plate with a sushi knife. “I have not yet harvested something to eat, but I could do that. First we’d have to plant something.” John collects minerals like purple azurite, is learning Thai kickboxing, sailing and is an accomplished swimmer. He would like to be an underwater archeologist. His dad has already found and brought back great things from the sea. Once, when he and his dad were snorkeling, a curious octopus approached them – which was both scary and fantastic. When he falls asleep at night, John paints a mental picture of what will happen tomorrow. He hopes his parents will never die. #21 Alexandra (9, Left) And Jessica (8, Right) Lewis, Altadena, Ca, USA
Alexandra (9, left) and Jessica (8, right) Lewis, Altadena, CA, USA. Photographed February 21, 2016. Alex and Jessica live in the foothills of Altadena with their daddy and papa who are engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a NASA field center in La Canada, California. Their yard is filled with food: blackberry bushes, grape vines, and fruit trees – fig, peach, pomegranate, guava, mulberry, jujubes, and banana. They have chickens, too, and eat their eggs almost every day. Jessica loves sweets and pizza with ham and is repelled by beans, peppers, sushi, and chocolate. She’s good at drawing and daydreaming and on weekends the whole family roller-skates at Moonlight Rollerway. Jessica is the richest person on her street besides their neighbor Mary Anne. When she grows up, she wants to be an author and university professor. Alex makes Hot Pockets, pizza rolls, and quesadillas herself, but her favorite dish is macaroni and cheese. She refuses to eat Brussels sprouts or soggy leftover broccoli. She collects rocks and shells and is saving up for an xbox 360 and Nintendo Switch. Alex makes people laugh without even trying because she’s a spaz, she says. Her long-range goal is to get a PhD and have an outstanding career. After the photo shoot, Alex and Jessica took much of the leftover food home to feed their chickens. #22 Isaiah Dedrick, Long Beach, Ca
Isaiah Dedrick, Long Beach, CA, (16 at time of photo) photographed March 20, 2016. Isaiah was raised by his mother and grandmother, who does most of the cooking at home. One day, Isaiah would like to have enough space to grow his own garden. Isaiah’s favorite food is orange chicken and fried rice and he loves the smell of apples sautéed with cinnamon. His mom doesn’t permit him to drink soda and after this photo shoot, Isaiah decided to eliminate snacks from his diet. Isaiah’s wish is that no one will go hungry in the world. He plays the drums and the flute and is studying acting. He’d like to be as funny as Eddie Murphy or Tyler Perry and be able to fly like Superman. #23 Henrico Valias Sant`anna De Souza Dantas, 10, Brasilia, Brazil
Henrico Valias Sant`anna de Souza Dantas, 10, Brasilia, Brazil, photographed August 18, 2018. Henrico lives in a posh suburb of Brasilia with his mom, a film producer and advertising executive, and his two siblings. Henrico’s mom, grandma and maid do the day to day cooking, though Henrico likes to invent his own snacks. His favorite dish is Feijoada, a Brazilian stew of black beans and pork, served with a side of white rice, “farofa” (fried cassava flour), and collard greens. Henrico likes dessert, too: chocolate soufflé; Toblerone and Talento bars; anything with Nutella, “brigadeiro,” a ball of baked condensed milk and chocolate; buttered toast sprinkled with Nescau powder, a treat his uncle invented; and one of his own creations – steak covered with sliced banana. Henrico has mastered video games like Little Big Planet, Lego Marvel and Escape 3. He listens to Justin Bieber, Maroon 5 and Gato Galatico, watches Iron Fist and The Flash on Netflix and is a Star Wars fan. From participating in Daily Bread, Henrico discovered that he eats a wide variety of food. He has no idea what he wants to do when he becomes an adult. There is nothing missing in his life. He is perfectly content. #24 Paolo Mendolaro, 9, Belpaso, Sicily
Paolo Mendolaro, 9, Belpaso, Sicily, photographed August 23, 2017. Paolo and his family of four live in an apartment in Belpasso, a tiny medieval village on the east coast of Sicily founded in 1305. When he steps outside his apartment, Paolo sees the center square and Mother Church of Belpasso with its lava stone staircase and bell tower. Paolo’s mom works full time for a cosmetics company, but makes time to prepare homemade meals for her family like Sicilian Cannolo and Pasta alla Norma. Once a week, they buy a roast chicken or go out for pizza, which Paolo loves most of all. Paolo has learned to make his own pizza and pasta as well as biscuits and big donuts. His grandfather had an overflowing garden and Paolo helped harvest eggplants, zucchini, bell peppers, olives, strawberries, peaches, tomatoes, peas and fava beans. During the week that Paolo kept his journal for Daily Bread, he’d been going to the beach with his family and didn’t follow as healthy a diet as usual; they often ate fast food. Paolo keeps his parents in his prayers. For his mother, he wishes for a dryer machine and a new truck for his father, a carpenter. If he had enough money, Paolo would buy a Play Station 4, a giant Lego set and, at minimum, a one-week holiday for the whole family. #25 Daria Joy Cullen, 6, Pasadena, California
Daria Joy Cullen, 6, Pasadena, California, ph
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