Food festival@ Savitribai Phule Pune University: students team up to bring in taste of homelands

Food festival@ Savitribai Phule Pune University: students team up to bring in taste of homelands

Search Food festival@ Savitribai Phule Pune University: students team up to bring in taste of homelands Students from 24 countries presented exclusive food items from their cuisine at the food festival which saw Yukta Mookhey, actor and the winner of the Miss World 1999 pageant, as the chief guest and Ekapol Poolpipat, consul general of Royal Thailand as special guest. pune Updated: Feb 08, 2019 16:05 IST HT Correspondent Hindustan Times, Pune Visitors at the food festival at Savitribai Phule Pune University on Tuesday. (Left) A Mauritius delight and a fish dish from Mozambique seen displayed. (Pratham Gokhale/HT Photo)
The International centre of the Savitribai Phule Pune University (SPPU) organised a food festival on February 5, Tuesday which is part of the International Youth Festival 2018-2019 with the theme ‘Energise, Innovate and Create : Peace and Harmony.’
Students from 24 countries presented exclusive food items from their cuisine at the food festival which saw Yukta Mookhey, actor and the winner of the Miss World 1999 pageant, as the chief guest and Ekapol Poolpipat, consul general of Royal Thailand as special guest.
Mookhey and Poolpipat visited every stall accompanied by Nitin Karmalkar, vice-chancellor, SPPU, and appreciated the efforts put in by the students.
“It feels great to be part of such an event, where there is so much energy and enthusiasm among the international students,” she said. “A majority of the students studying in Pune colleges and staying in the International centre hostel hail from Middle East or Africa. It is interesting to see them come together to recreate the tastes of their home country for the visitors and friends from other countries,” said Vijay Khare, head, International Centre, SPPU.
Khare said that students worked more than a day for making the food festival, a memorable event.
Nafissa Amado from Mozambique who is studying Microbiology at Fergusson College joined hands with her friend Silvia Massitela, who is pursuing B Com from Symbiosis College, to make fish Carrepau, Cassovo , Bean Stu and Mokldi, which are exclusive to Mozambique.
“It is exciting for us to prepare and showcase our dishes in India,” said Nafissa.
At least 20 dishes were presented by each group of international students. There were food counters from Thailand, Iran, Iraq, Sri Lanka, Mauritius, Afghanistan, Yemen, The Gambia, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bostwana, DR Congo, Maldives, Malawi, Tajikistan, and Turkmenistan.
“We spent at least 10 hours in making some of these dishes. We all pitched in with food ingredients and helped each other in preparing the dishes. It was great fun to work on dishes that we consider as regular and explain them to the visitors and friends,” said Paimora Kalandarbekova, Kazakhstan, undergraduate student of Business Administation at Brihan Maharashtra College of Commerce (BMCC).
“Try our creamed Suji, and the hunger busters which we have made in both vegetarian and meat options, along with Chakalaka. Drink Gemere, a special ginger juice, best for the summers,’ said Desmond Latelang, a native of Botswana and studying in Modern College. He was helped by his friend Janet Keetile who is studying at Fergusson College.
Aslam Jamadar, student of Indian film Studies, SPPU, who visited the food festival said, “ This is my first visit to a food festival. Although the event began late, it was impressive. I found the food at the Afghanistan stall quite good. They served Chicken Pulao and juice, which was good. Also, it was not costly, as compared to the food at the Thailand counter.
At least 150 including, the students and staff of SPPU visited the food festival.
First Published: Feb 08, 2019 16:04 IST

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Change of Scenery: New Travel Books 2019

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Your subscription gives you instant access exclusive feature articles on notable figures in the publishing industry, he latest industry news, interviews of up and coming authors and bestselling authors, and access over 200,000 book reviews. Change of Scenery: New Travel Books 2019 Long lines at the Louvre? Crowds at the Colosseum? New guidebooks offer tourists a latitude adjustment By Jasmina Kelemen Feb 08, 2019 Long lines at the Louvre? Major crowds at the Colosseum? New guidebooks offer tourists a latitude adjustment. Change of Scenery: New Travel Books 2019 Long lines at the Louvre? Crowds at the Colosseum? New guidebooks offer tourists a latitude adjustment By Jasmina Kelemen | Feb 08, 2019 It’s an ongoing conundrum for guidebook publishers: how to encourage tourism without engendering overtourism, a term that’s become increasingly prevalent in the travel industry. With major European cities inundated by visitors, signs of a backlash have prompted local governments and travel organizations to collaborate on solutions that would ease the crush without stymieing an industry that pumps millions of dollars into regional economies. “We are looking at how to facilitate this dialogue between government and industry and then also providing a voice to support solutions,” the CEO and president of the U.S. Tour Operators Association, Terry Dale, told trade publication Travel Weekly in a January article titled “2019 Opens with Strict Measures Combating Overtourism.” Guidebook publishers are playing a role, by encouraging responsible travel that focuses on experiencing city life like a local, which often means venturing outside the touristy center. Take Rome, for instance. Much of the city “has no tourism at all and prices that are about half the price of what you find at Piazza Navona,” Rick Steves says, referencing a square that’s popular with visitors. “You can see all the clichés—and that’s okay—or you can make friends and have a transformational experience.” Those experiences are available in even the most popular destinations, he adds. “You can go to those touristy cities and you can do them differently.” The notion of experiencing destinations in new ways drives several initiatives being put forth by travel publishers. Whether they’re enticing tourists to venture beyond a city’s well-trod attractions or introducing a standalone guide to a region that was previously dispensed with in a single chapter of a longer book, travel publishers are responding to the challenges presented by modern tourism. Urban Renewal In May, Moon is launching the Moon City & Beyond series, which acknowledges overtourism by steering travelers toward less-visited neighborhoods and day-trip destinations. Grace Fujimoto, Moon’s v-p of acquisitions, says the issues that Barcelona in particular has faced—slashed tour bus tires and antitourism graffiti there have garnered international headlines—directly influenced the philosophy behind the series. Moon Milan & Beyond by Lindsey Davidson, for instance,not only mentions Lake Como, where George Clooney famously has a home, but also covers Lake Garda and Lake Maggiore, which may receive less media attention but still hold plenty of appeal. In Moon Florence & Beyond , Alexei J. Cohen recommends various strategies for avoiding the city’s infamous crowds: lingering over lunch the way Florentines do, or heading to nearby Pistoia, where an 11th-century palace dominates the main square. “These books are different in terms of the pace we’re encouraging,” Fujimoto says. “We’re showing how to slow things down.” The series adds two titles in July, covering Venice and Copenhagen. Even guidebooks that don’t specifically grapple with issues of overtourism are adopting many of the same tenets as they reach out to younger travelers, who tend to be more willing to explore emerging neighborhoods in search of a city’s creative pulse. Fodor’s is launching the Inside city guide series, a spiritual successor to 2015’s Fodor’s Brooklyn , says editorial director Douglas Stallings. The typical Inside guide will zero in on a city that hasn’t yet reached peak tourist attention— Inside Lisbon pubs in May, and Inside Nashville and Inside Berlin follow in June—and appeal to a “different kind of traveler, who’s looking for more than just tourist sites,” he notes. (For more about Inside guides, see “ Drawn from Experience .”) May’s Inside Paris differs in that it’s a mature destination, Stallings says, but here too, the book glances at the city’s iconic monuments but focuses on neighborhoods off the typical tourist route. To see the most interesting street art, for instance, the guide directs travelers to the Oberkampf and Canal St.-Martin neighborhoods. “We acknowledge that people still want some guidance, so we look at 10–15 hotels that we really like,” he adds. “But the focus in these books is not where to stay but how to enjoy a place.” Hardie Grant has a few new offerings in this vein. It launched its Curious Travel Guides, which delve into art, culture, cuisine, and coffee, with 2018’s Sundays in Paris by Yasmin Zeinab. In March the series turns to the Tuscan capital with Lost in Florence by Nardia Plumridge, who, like Zeinab, is a blogger with a follower count in the several tens of thousands. “You don’t really need a book to tell you the obvious tourist stuff,” says publisher Melissa Kayser. “People are still looking for unique or hidden experiences.” Australian travel writer Ben Groundwater seeks out the atypical in 10 international cities—including Esfahan, Iran, and Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam—in Go Your Own Way (Hardie Grant, Apr.), a guide geared toward solo travelers. Also from Hardie Grant, the new Half-Full Adventure Maps (Feb.)target a different niche group, Kayser says: college students.Launching with London, Melbourne, New York, San Francisco, and Tokyo, the fold-out maps depict illustrated, walkable itineraries and include call-outs to supplemental online content, including a local music playlist. Blank spaces allow users to record their experiences—hence the “half-full” map. Countryman Press, with its new Weekender line, hopes to appeal “to the young denizens of particular big cities,” says senior editor Róisín Cameron. The series kicks off in June with Beachy Weekend Getaways from New York City by Teddy Minford . A sample three-day itinerary imagines a traveler on the four o’clock train out of town and schedules a weekend full of locally sourced seafood and plenty of cocktails, helpfully suggesting where to get the best “hangover-curing greasy breakfast” on Sunday morning. In Easy Weekend Getaways from Seattle, also out in June, Anna Katz offers two-day sample itineraries for both adrenalin and bliss seekers, and assumes that both will want to find the nearest winery by the end of the day. The World on a Platter Travelers’ hunger for authentic experiences is also literal, giving rise to culinary-focused tourism that privileges what to eat over what to see. It’s popular enough that publishers are devoting entire series to the phenomenon. “Food is never just about food—it’s access to an experience,” begins Bloomsbury’s Eat Like a Local New York, part of a series that debuts in March with guides to London, Paris, and Tokyo, in addition to New York. Each guide lists more than 100 restaurants, cafés, bars, and markets recommended by a cast of locals. A short essay introduces each section, imparting visiting epicures with the sorts of tips that come from years of gastronomic trial and error. “An appropriately crackly-meets-squishy bagel could never be mistaken for bread,” as the New York locals boast in a section on the ubiquitous breakfast carb. The 12 Dishes guides from niche publisher Red Pork Press (dist. by IPG), which arrive in North American bookstores for the first time this spring, aim to demystify regional specialties for new visitors and nudge travelers to the side streets and alleyways where locals congregate, and where menus aren’t necessarily written in English. “Travel has become so much more homogenous, and food is one way to tap into what’s authentic,” says Leanne Kitchen, who coauthored the series with Antony Suvalko. “You will have much more memorable travels if you put yourself out of your comfort zone. We’re telling you, ‘Here’s where to go and how to do it.’” Penang in 12 Dishes (Mar.)leads gastronomes through the city’s melting-pot of Indian, Malaysian, and Hokkien Chinese flavors, and offers advice on how to pick out a durian, which beach bars to visit, and more. Ho Chi Minh City in 12 Dishes (Mar.) serves up showcase bites and makes a detour through the city’s rich coffee culture. Guides to Shanghai and Singapore will be released in June. At Countryman Press, L.A. by Mouth (Mar.) by comedian and food and travel writer Mike Postalakis is the second entry (after 2018’s Buffalo Eats by Arthur Bovino) in the Travel to Eat series. Postalakis angles his coverage toward his particular interests—standout tacos, hangover-helper brunches, and the best burgers. In May, having already poured beer and coffee, Lonely Planet Food adds to its Global Tour line with a close-up on spirits. Global Distilleries Tour offers readers the choicest tipples in more than 30 countries, including singani, made in Bolivia from white Muscat of Alexandria grapes, and rakija, or Balkan fruit brandy. Expanding Horizons Amid the books that zero in on a single city or interest, guidebooks that offer a broader scope remain popular. Moon is combining two areas of travel that it previously treated separately with the Drive & Hike line, launching in May. Moon Drive & Hike Appalachian Trail itineraries supplement road-trip info with maps for day hikes of six miles or less. The guide also offers coverage of breweries, barbecue, and more in towns along the way. “People are more interested in outdoor travel plans,” Fujimoto says. “This makes it more accessible.” Additional Drive & Hike guides will include one for the Pacific Crest Trail. In April, Firefly Books is adding more Canadian provinces to its Nature Hot Spots series with 110 Nature Hot Spots in Manitoba and Saskatchewan by Jenn Smith Nelson and Doug O’Neill, and the series is venturing to the U.S. for the first time with 150 Nature Hot Spots in California. The state’s topographical diversity, coupled with a population greater than that of Canada, made it a natural choice for the line’s debut in the U.S., says editorial director Steve Cameron. Insight Guides responds to calls for more sustainable travel with a second edition of Insight Guides Great Railways (Apr.) , which had gone out of print. The ubiquity of inexpensive, short-haul flights has made Europe smaller than ever, but it has also made many Europeans more aware of their growing carbon footprint, says Nick Inman, one of the contributing authors to Insight Guides Great Railways . “There’s far more consciousness about climate change,” he notes. “People are starting to rediscover trains and realizing Europe has a brilliant network.” The book’s rail itineraries connect points throughout Europe and could be used, for example, to transport a traveler from London to Romania, a country that is also getting a major guidebook update. An uptick in interest in Eastern Europe since Insight Guides Romania pubbed in 2007 indicated it was time for a refresh, travel editor Tom Fleming says. Insight Guides isn’t the only publisher casting an eye toward Europe’s geographical margins. Though Rick Steves Italy has been in publication for more than 20 years, its coverage never included Sicily. That changes in April when Avalon publishes the first edition of Rick Steves Sicily , a destination the eponymous author says surprises and delights first-time visitors. “Sicily doesn’t hit you on the head like the Leaning Tower of Pisa or Big Ben,” Steves says. Instead, it offers some of the best examples of Greek architecture that aren’t already overrun with tourists. “I was blown away by the ancient sites.” What truly draws Steves to Sicily, he says, are the people. Tourists are not only welcome in Sicily, which has lagged far behind the mainland in receiving visitors, but, he adds, “they’re invited to the party.” Because Sicily sees fewer tourists, Steves says, it offers a traveler the opportunity to become “a cultural chameleon.” Those looking for that sort of local immersion will find guidance in Steves’s new guidebook and in many others this season. Jasmina Kelemen is a writer who divides her time between Houston and Caracas and has reported from Europe, the Middle East, and the Americas. Below, more on the subject of travel books.

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What do the gods eat?

A confused atheist and a procrastinating agnostic from Delhi traverse the length and breadth of the country, from Rongmesek, Meghalaya, to Spiti in Himachal, to understand food across India’s religions and communities. Photographer Devang Singh and writer Varud Gupta set out to “explore the culture and cuisine of India without ripping off someone else’s idea” and ended up creating a snapshot of the foods and rituals of a cross section of religions spanning animistic folk deities, Hindu gods, Parsi and Jewish prophets and Buddhist monks. Their stories also hold up a mirror to lesser known practices and food habits of the worshippers of these faiths.
Their travels led them to the varied intersections of food and faith which moves far beyond the bhog offered to the gods. Instead, they ended up looking at “how faith can inform the food of a community, and, surprisingly enough, how food can in turn influence faith.” The resulting book, Bhagwaan Ke Pakwaan, is part travelogue, part catalogue of recipes and part a retelling of history of India’s cities, its lesser known corners and its people. A tongue-in-cheek millennial irreverence sets it apart from other more academic explorations of the topic. Both Singh and Gupta corral together their diverse backgrounds—Singh gave up his history degree to become a photographer, director and producer, while Gupta left behind a career in business to try his hand at a variety of professions, including that of a cheesemonger and a bartender—to bring a freshness of perspective to the subject.
According to food writer and historian Pushpesh Pant, “Temple foods of India are a resplendent part of our cultural heritage. We in India believe that whatever is the best, cooked or otherwise, is fit for the gods.” And this idea translates across geographies, through rituals of fasting, feasting and sacrifices. The food that is offered to the gods is an extension of the food habits, seasonal produce and agricultural practices of the region. While rice and grains form an important part of blessings, spirits produced from them are integral to many ceremonial feasts and meat becomes both an element of sacrifice as well as a matter of sustenance. Therefore, ideas of the sacred and forbidden foods also keep shifting across religious practices.
Among the Karbi tribal community of Meghalaya, chicken and copious rice beer form an important part of the rituals related to eating and praying. In Udvada, Gujarat, the town that became “a rallying point of Parsi culture in India”, habits were determined by the local Gujarati food, Indian spices, influences of the British Raj, and the abundance of local fish. Food also continued to be an important part of the Parsi jashan , or religious thanksgiving ceremonies. Even rituals of death were accompanied by snacks like the deep-fried papra and bakhra .
The small community of Baghdadi Jews in Kolkata fused the rules of kosher eating with fish, coconut milk, the influence of Muslim chefs and spices to create a wonderful tradition of Indian Jewish food. The Arabic fried potato dish aloo makallah became a variation of the Bengali aloo bhaja and was served with hilbeh , originally chutney from Yemen which has been adapted with local ginger, coriander and chillies. Nowhere is the elaborate nature of temple food more apparent than in the Jagannath Temple in Puri. Every day, Lord Jagannath is offered the chappan bhog, or a spread of 56 food items which is then sold to devotees. Cooked with a specific dietary mandate—the food is purely vegetarian, with even ingredients like tomatoes, potatoes, green chillies, onions, ginger and garlic forbidden—the pungency of asafoetida, the potency of paanch phoron and the richness of ghee and jaggery lend this repast its flavour.
Finally, there is the heart-warming butter tea that keeps the monks of Spiti going in the winter months. Buddhism, having evolved to accommodate the scarcity of fresh produce in the area, is defined by the triad of barley, dairy and meat.
Though Gupta and Singh have only scratched the surface of India’s multifaceted and pluralistic religious traditions, their stories are real, personal and unprejudiced. And above all, they bring to the fore a selection of food and culinary rituals of both India’s gods and its humans.

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Coastal Cuisine trail in Delhi

Coastal Cuisine trail in Delhi February 8, 2019 at 5:32 pm The 1,622 km long national highway that connects Kanyakumari to Panvel in Maharashtra, have to tickle your taste buds at the Best of West Coast food festival at the Shangri-La Eros hotel in the heart of the national capital. Being a multi-cuisine pan-Asian restaurant its always on the lookout for something different, hence festivals like these. As one walked in through the wide and innovatively designed entrance of the Tamra fine diner, with an amply stocked bar on the left and an equally tempting dessert counter on the right. The Restuarant offers Southeast Asian, Thai, European and Japanese cuisine from our five interactive live kitchens and also want the guests to sample the best there is of Indian cuisine, a panakam as served up in an imitation “Khullar” with a distinct earthy flavour coming through. The diner is very appropriately named as it harkens back to the time when copper vessels were the key to dishing up a perfect meal. It recreates the rustic and earthy environment of the trading markets of yore when Indian spices, jute, copper, silk, leather and the like were a rage in different corners of the world. There is much that is contemporary too. It was then time for the appetisers and they came in quick succession – delicately flavoured baked prawns, lightly-spiced cheese balls, a crunchy Malabar pomfret, an innovative banana dosa and an extremely soft Bombay duck. Along with the Mohito that had appeared for a table, all this made for a spectrum of flavours that complemented each other. Up next were two starters, Kuzhi Paniyaram and the Attirachi Kurumelagu, which constituted a meal by themselves but one was determined to soldier on. The non-vegetarian mains were an absolute delight, starting with a Maasa Ajadina and Kozhi Seeragam. The mix-and-match paid off – and how. A short break and another mojito and one were ready for the rest — this time the Goan Pomfret curry and Nandu Chops. Both being of the seafood variety, blended perfectly. Given this repast, it was quite natural that one would pick a “desi” desert in spite of the vast variety on offer. Thus, it was the black rice halwa liberally sprinkled with nuts that got the nod and the sweetness was just right. Best of West Coast food festival at the Shangri-La Eros hotel, till February 8. Timings: 12.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m.; 7 p.m. to 11.30 p.m. Cost for two: Rs 5,000 plus taxes (Without alcohol) Related Posts

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15 Essential Indian Restaurants in Los Angeles, 2019 Edition

Curry, naan, vindaloo, and chaats across the LA area
With the outstanding restaurant communities of Koreatown, Thai Town, and Sawtelle Japantown located near the heart of LA County, it is easy to overlook the cluster of authentic Indian restaurants all the way out in Artesia. That area, known as Little India, is known for its amazing collection of fantastic food, but it’s far from the only place to find great regional Indian specialities in Southern California. There’s a wealth of outstanding eateries that specialized in the deliciously complex, deftly spiced cuisine from the deep Valley all the way down to the South Bay. Here are the 15 essential Indian restaurants in Los Angeles, from north to south.
Added: All India Cafe, Bombay Beach, Charga, Lal Mirch
Dropped: Al Watan Halal Tandoori, Paradise Biryani Pointe, Spice Affair, Surati Farsan,

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Every once in a while I really enjoy Indian food. As attractive as Saffron looks, over here high quality traditional Indian cuisine is easy to find and relatively inexpensive. (As is saffron!)

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Old wives’ tales

February 07, 2019 16:18 07, 2019 16:19 IST more-in Theories abound about the origin of chaat
There are those who say the word chaat originated from its literal meaning ‘to lick’. It was so delicious that people licked their fingers and the bowl made of peepal leaves, called donas, in which it is often served. Others think it originated from the term chatpati (tangy). However, no one truly knows the origin.
One story goes thus: During the reign of Emperor Shah Jahan, in the 16th Century, there was an outbreak of cholera. Desperate attempts were made to control it by physicians and sorcerers. One remedy suggested was to make food with loads of spices so that it would kill the bacteria within. Thus was born the spicy tangy chaat , which the entire populace of Delhi is believed to have consumed. A slight variant attributes it to the court physician called Hakim Ali, who realised that the foul water in a defunct local canal could result in serious water-borne diseases and thought the only way to prevent it was to add a liberal dose of spices — tamarind, red chillies, coriander, mint etc to the food. Hence, the food came to be called chatpati (tangy).
However, no one knows the veracity of these stories.
The grandmaster of history of our cuisine and food, KT Achaya, gives plenty of references to various ingredients and dishes which make up the repertoire of chaat s. In his book, A Historical Dictionary of Indian Food , Achaya’s description of dahi vada s is interesting. He says the vada s were first mentioned in the Sutra literature of 500 BC. The Mânasollasa of the 12th Century talks of soaking vadas in milk, rice water or curd. Curd is also mentioned in the Vedas, and curd in Tamil literature is said to have been spiced up using pepper, cinnamon and ginger. Therefore, it may be conjectured that adding curd to the dahi vada and spicing it up with various chutneys and pomegranate seeds could be an ancient habit.
Achaya further writes of how papdi finds a mention in Mânasollasa in the 12th Century as purika . The description fits the present-day papdi which is fried crisp with the addition of cumin seeds and ajwain, using chickpea flour, maida or wheat flour and not puris .
The use of rock salt or sendha namak and black salt with chaat is common. Aloo or potato cubes, fried in oil, is spiced up using a combination of salts, which also have ancient origins. According to Achaya, Mahabharata refers to the use of rock salt or sendha namak and black salt. It is also mentioned in the Buddhist Vinaya Pitaka and by Charaka.
The tale of paani puri can be linked to chappatis . Achaya talks of how cave paintings show balls of dough being made, and how, in Harappan sites, flat metal and clay plates have been seen, which look like the modern-day tava . Hence, chappatis may have a long history, and so do puris .
The Sanskrit word pura, meaning blown up, could be the genesis of the name puris . He further describes puris and paani puris as, “tiny gol guppas , globular puris eaten during festivals or as a roadside snack in North India with a cold, fiery, pepper-mustard liquid concoction”.
Tamarind, whose water-soaked version is the mainstay of panipuris today, was grown in India in prehistoric times. Tamar-ul-Hindi — fruit of India — is how it was referred to by the Arabs and Marco Polo refers to it in 1298 AD as tamarindi .
In Indian Food: A Historical Companion , KT Achaya mentions Sādava from the Buddhist era, which connotes either a spiced fruit dish or a spiced fruit drink. Ginger, cumin and cloves make their way in the Buddhist era. The Aryan era talks of black pepper ( maricha ) and asafoetida ( hing ). Spicing up water including tamarind, and fruits was prevalent.

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20 Amazing Things To Do In Mauritius

Things To Do In Mauritius
Here is our list of all the best things to do in Mauritius. 1) Visit Port Louis
Port Louis is the capital and largest city, and is definitely one of the first places to visit in Mauritius.
There are so many different things going on here that you could spend more than one day and not cover it all.
For ideas on what to do in Mauritius, head on down to the picturesque central market or bazaar .
This is where you can find locally grown vegetables, exotic foods, local products and spices, arts, crafts and souvenirs. You can find the cheap clothing Port Louis is known for.
Some made locally and other items imported from India and China, they are a great value for you money. It is where the locals also shop for their own stuff including items such as curry and teas.
You can also enjoy the Port Louis Theatre while there. Overall a day in Port Louis is very fun one of the best places to see in Mauritius for the wonderful cultures and traditions.
If you’re interested you can even book a full-day guided tour of the city , which we recommend.
Overall, this colonial city is one of the best things to do in Mauritius. Cannon in Port Louis, Mauritius by HAI YANG [ CC BY-SA 2.0 ] via Flickr 2) Try Deep Sea Fishing
Deep sea fishing is one of the more famous things to do in Mauritius.
There are many species of huge fishes in the surrounding sea, including blue and black marlin, yellow tuna, different varieties of barracuda and sharks, and so many more.
The Marlin World Cup is held off the Mauritius island every year in February-March. There are several world records for fishing, including the Mako shark, blue shark, Bonito, white tuna, and becune.
Many other catches have been close to the record as well.
Most all of the hotels will have fishing boats to hire for an experience of a lifetime! Mauritius travel must include all watersports, but especially should include some deep sea fishing. 3) Head To Caudan Waterfront
The Caudan Waterfront in Port Louis is a meeting place for locals and lovers alike. It also has a great shopping center.
There you can also enjoy street entertainers, a Kiddyland, a wide array of food options and many unique shoppes.
There are many historical buildings to visit on the waterfrom, including the Blue Penny Museum, The Stamp Museum, and the Mauritius Natural History Museum .
These museums should be at the top of your list of what to do in Mauritius to learn of the history of this amazing nation.
The Blue Penny Museum has many rare stamps, including the blue penny and penny orange stamps from 1847 which are among the rarest stamps in the world.
Caudan Waterfront, with it’s rows of shoppes and restaurants, is the perfect place to wander for the day and take in the culture. Caudan Waterfront – things to do in Mauritius – by carrotmadman6 [ CC BY 2.0] via Flickr 4) Check Out China Town
While you are in Port Louis, another famous Mauritius attraction you must see is China Town . There are many shops and restaurants with the unique culture and flavor that you can only find here.
Pharmacies in this area not only have the modern remedies but the traditional Chinese ones that you can try. There are so many vendors and stores selling traditional foods such as chow mein and fish balls that you simply must try. 5) Experience Local Culture In Mahebourg
Mauritius travel will not be complete if you do not visit the relatively undeveloped south section of the island.
Since the majority of this area has no beach it is visited less by tourists and therefore has less development.
This leaves it as the most untouched portion of the Mauritius island and is the best place to see in Mauritius to get a glimpse of true Mauritian life.
It has magnificent scenery and some of the wildest landscapes in the country all along the coastal road from Souillac to Le Morne.
You will also see the Mauritius attraction of Ile aux Aigrettes, the amazing Lion Mountain and the town of Mahebourg along the way that you will want to visit.
As one of the main fishing villages of the nation, Mahebourg is located in the southern section of the island and on the amazing Grand Port Bay.
This is definitely one of the places to visit in Mauritius to get a real feel of the true Mauritians with less outside influence.
The Market of Mahebourg is a wonderful experience where you will find so many unique products, tropical fruits and vegetables, fresh fish, local arts and crafts, spices, teas and much more.
It is where you will be able to become a part of the local customs and traditions.
It should be on everyones list of what to do in Mauritius. Colourful Streets of Mahebourg, Mauritius – by Mark Fischer [ CC BY-SA 2.0 ] via Flickr 6) Ile aux Aigrettes
While in the southern part of the island, one of the great places to visit in Mauritius in Ile aux Aigrettes . This islet is made of an old calcareous coral reef partially covered by sand and soil.
It has international recognition because many of the plants found there grow nowhere else in the world, and it was declared as a nature reserve in 1965.
There are some of the world’s rarest birds here, such as the kestrel and the pink pigeon. Other animals like the Aldabra giant tortoise and the green Gecko Phelsuma can be spotted in the country as well.
The Mauritius Wildlife Fund has made the entire Mauritius island a world-recognized standard for the protection of endangered species and natural resources.
If you feel like spoiling yourself, check out this great luxury relaxation tour at Ile aux Aigrettes that includes, lunch, drinks and activities. 7) Head to Grand Bay
For a fun-filled night out, the locals know what to do in Mauritius – they head to Grand Bay ! There you will find great restaurants, bars and discos as well as more opportunities for shopping.
The La Cuvette beach is a great place to relax and enjoy your visit. This is a real tourist mecca, and you will find some wonderful Mauritius attractions here. Grand Bay, Mauritius – by Giorgio Minguzzi [ CC BY-SA 2.0 ] via Flickr 8) Scuba Dive in Blue Bay Marine Park
Blue Bay is probably the most popular places to see in Mauritius for tourists. With its magnificent beaches and crystal-clear waters, it is certainly the place where you will want to spend a lot of time.
The Blue Bay Marine Park is located on the southeast part of the Mauritius island, and is near the airport and several hotels, which are within walking distance making it very convenient.
It is an amazing place where you can scuba dive , snorkel, surf, sail or enjoy any water sport you desire, or spend the day sunbathing with a tropical drink in your hand. No better way to relax and enjoy your vacation!
There are over 50 different species of corals, some of them very rare, in a unique network of reefs that break the oceans waves to protect the bay.
There are also many fish species in the shallower water that will make any snorkelling or diving a fantastic experience.
If you’re not an experienced diver, but still want to give it a go, you can do an introductory dive at Grand Bay .
Atop the marine park is ‘Ile des Deux Cocos’, an islet within the lagoon should also be on your list of what to do in Mauritius while in this area.
Click here for our best tips on getting your open water certification . 9) Check out Aapravasi Ghat and Le Morne Cultural Landscape
There are two UNESCO World Heritage Sites that are both definitely things to see in Mauritius. Aapravasi Ghat and Le Morne Cultural Landscape are both magnificent sights not to be missed.
Aapravasi Ghat was a landing point for the indentured slaves, mostly from India, in the 19th century, following the abolition of slavery in 1834.
It is a fascinating piece of the nations history.
The Le Morne mountain and Aapravasi Ghat are amazing sites that this is definitely one of the best things to do in Mauritius. Le Morne – things to do in Mauritius by Mark Rasdall [CC BY 2.0] via Flickr 10) Visit Champs de Mars
Champs de Mars is a very popular Mauritius attraction for tourists and locals alike. It is one of the world’s oldest horse racing tracks, and the oldest one in the southern hemisphere.
You will also want to include Pamplemousses, one of the world’s best botanical gardens in your itinerary of what to do in Mauritius.
This will be a wonderful day of sightseeing, and should be topped off with some delicious Creole food. 11) Spend a day at Casela Wildlife Park and Yemen Reserve
Other famous Mauritius attractions includes Casela Wildlife Park.
This nature reserve is full of more than 140 bird species from all five continents.
It also includes tortoises, deer, fish ponds, lions, tigers and monkeys just to name a few.
Another similar thing to see in Mauritius is the Yemen Reserve . While not as large as other reserves on the island, you will love this place!
You can get close to herds of deer and other animals as well as enjoy the wide varieties of plant life of the Mauritius island. It also has a wonderful view of the sea. A lioness in Casela Wildlife Park, Mauritius. 12) Explore Domaine des Grand Bois and Domaine du Chasseurhas
For a more unusual idea of what to do in Mauritius, you will want to visit the Domaine des Grand Bois , or Domaine du Chasseurhas. The lush vegetation makes this a beautiful place to spend a day.
You can also see several species of endangered birds, including the kestrel.
This can be found in the Anse Jonchée hills.
Be sure to enjoy the wonderful panoramic view of the sea while enjoying a delicious meal of seafood or venison and drink in a local restaurant. 13) Visit Triolet Shivala in Triolet Village
Mauritius travel would not be complete without visiting the Triolet Shivala. This Hindu temple is located in Triolet, which is the longest village in the nation.
Built in 1819, this is the biggest Hindu temple in the nation and is devoted to the Gods Shiva, Krishna, Vishnu, Murugan, Brahma and Ganesha.
A visit to this temple is one of the things to do in Mauritius that will bring you much closer to the culture and traditions of the country. Triolet Shivala in Triolet Village – by carrotmadman6 [ CC BY 2.0 ] via Flickr 14) Check out the Market Flacq in Flacq Village
As you become more familiar with Mauritius travel, you will want to be sure to visit the village of Flacq .
Located in the eastern side of the country, Flacq has become one of the most important villages of the area.
It is a meeting place for many of the inhabitants of the area.
The Market Flacq is the largest open air market in the country.
This extremely colourful market is one of those wonderful things to do in Mauritius you will not want to miss. 15) Enjoy Chamarel’s Stunning Landscape
Another fantastic thing to do in Mauritius is to visit Chamarel . This area has some amazing coloured soils that you will not want to miss.
It showcases an undulating landscape of the various and contrasting shades of coluor.
There are blues, greens, reds and yellows that are thought to be the result of the erosion of the volcanic ash.
Nearby are the waterfalls of Chamarel that rise up from the moors and showcase an abundance of the native plant life.
After spending the afternoon sightseeing in this area, you will want to stop in Chamarel Village and partake of the local cuisine while watching the sun set over Le Morne and the southern part of the island over the Indian Ocean.
The absolute best way to see Chamarel is by taking part in this epic full-day tour, that includes pretty much all the highlights of the area. Colourful Chamarel – things to do in Mauritius – Photo by ServerS74 [ CC0 ] via Pixabay 16) Explore Balaclava Ruins and Dutch Ruins
For history buffs, your Mauritius travel should definitely include some of the ruins that are still visible on the island.
The Balaclava Ruins was an old estate whose initial foundations were laid down by Mahé de Labourdonnais.
You can still see the original sea walls that protected the estate.
It is very close to Baie aux Tortues, which was names after the myriad of tortoises in the area.
The Dutch Ruins are also one of the things to do in Mauritius.
These ruins were the first Dutch fortifications.
Excavation is still ongoing at this site, which is fascinating to watch. These ruins are located at Vieux Grand Port, the oldest settlements in Mauritius. 17) Enjoy Beach Time in Flic en Flac
Flic en Flac is another must see to have on your list of what to do in Mauritius. Located on the west coast of the island, it has some of the magnificent beaches Mauritius is famous for.
Hotels are within a short walking distance to the beach and offer all of the amenities needed to make it a place you will want to spend days relaxing at.
Enjoy a relaxing spa, sip on one of the famous local ice cold Phoenix beer or Green Island rum at one of the outside bars after playing in the ocean all day! Flic en Flac beach – things to do in Mauritius – by Aurelian Săndulescu (: [ CC BY 2.0 ] via Flickr 18) Visit Martello Towers
Another historical place to add to the list of what to do in Mauritius is the Martello Towers.
This was the scene of an ancient rivalry between old colonial powers and the ingenuity of mankind.
It symbolises the end of slavery and the beginning of Indian immigration.
It is a real symbolical place and one of the most important things to do in Mauritius. 19) Explore Black River Gorges National Park
The Black River Gorges is another fantastic of the things to do in Mauritius. This amazing national park of 6,574 hectares was created in 1994 for the protection of Mauritius’ remaining native forests.
In Black River Gorges National Park , you will see magnificent landscapes, with endemic plants, including a conservation area and rare orchids, and rare bird species. Black Rive Gorges Waterfall, Mauritius. 20) Chill in Souillac, Savanne
Another place to see, and a great idea of what to do in Mauritius is Souillac .
This small seaside resort is right along the rugged coast of the Savanne district.
It is famous for the garden that overlooks the sea at the southern end of the village.
It is named after its founder, Dr. Charles Telfair.
All in all, Mauritius is one of the most amazing countries you will ever see.
No matter what your interests are, you will find it here, all while having the most relaxing vacation you could imagine!

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ROHAEV 1 The most marvellous and exceptional stay in Delhi area due to amazing professionals employed by Roseate House!

I would like to express my greatest gratitude and appreciation to all day-to-day employees at Roseate House – Aerocity, New Delhi. It is was an extraordinary experience during my full month stay. Their professionalism, attention to details and sincere humbleness made my stay fully satisfying and exquisite. There are no words to describe the level of service as it reaches full satisfaction. During my month stay, I experienced not only outstanding food variety presenting Indian cuisine at its best but also I had a chance to try dishes from all over the world. The start of my daily routine was always made more pleasant while experiencing sincere approach of fitness personnel guarding my morning strokes, warm smiles and modest greetings from front desk staff, on duty concierge, housekeepers or hotel’s trainees. When returning after a long day at work, I knew that last faces of a day I was to see, would be affectionate faces of the Roseate House professionals. Due to this amazing experience, I am returning to The Roseate House again for another month. It is a truly amazing affair to meet the staff of the highest quality!

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What’s on in Brisbane this weekend

Galleries Camera Icon Jacques Ha poses for a photograph at Chung Tian Temple, Priestdale, Thursday, January 10, 2019 (AAP Image/Richard Walker) Picture: News Corp Australia What’s on in Brisbane this weekend Staff Writer The Courier-Mail February 8, 2019 8:12AM Looking for something fun to do tomorrow? Look no further, here are our top picks for things to do this weekend in Brisbane. FRIDAY Swing That Music For one night only, crooner Tom Burlinson, (Now We’re Swinging, Frank — A Life in Song), jazz vocalist Emma Pask, The Voice Australia season 2) and musician Ed Wilson, (Daly Wilson Big Band) and the highly-acclaimed All Star Big Band (Frank- The Sinatra Story In Song), perform timeless classics from artists such as Frank Sinatra, Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington, capturing the dynamic sound and glamour of the 50s and 60s big band era including hits like It Don’t Mean A Thing, In the Mood, Mr Bojangles and Mack the Knife. Details: Concert Hall, QPAC, $79.90 SATURDAY For the Love of the Game Multicultural Sports Festival The inaugural Brisbane Multicultural Sports Festival will connect with local and migrant communities over the love of sport. Eagle Sports Complex will be a buzz with fans of volleyball and football as they watch teams compete over two full days for great prizes. Watch cricket, volleyball and football (soccer) across three locations at the complex. Details: F.R. Caterson Park, 730 Mt Gravatt-Capalaba Road, Mansfield, Saturday February 9, and Sunday February 10, 9am-5pm, free brisbane.qld.gov.au Eurovision Australia Decides Ten of Australia’s most established acts will battle it out to win the chance to represent the country at global music phenomenon Eurovision. Multi-platinum artist Kate Miller-Heidke, tenor Mark Vincent, pop quartet Sheppard and electric soul duo Electric Fields four of the contenders. The contest will be televised live on SBS and the winner decided by public vote. Hosted by Joel Creasey and Myf Warhurst. Details: Gold Coast Convention Centre, from $25 gccec.com.au Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Experience your favourite movies transformed with the music of a live symphony orchestra in the Harry Potter Film Concert Series. For the first time ever, audiences can rediscover the magic of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire while a live symphony orchestra performs Patrick Doyle’s unforgettable score and Harry PotterTsoars across the big screen in high definition. Details: Brisbane Convention Centre, 1:30pm and 7:30pm, from $59 bcec.com.au Chinese New Year Caboolture Town Square Saturday February 9 See traditional Asian music and dance performances, including a Red Dragon Traditional Lion Dance, Chinese Orchestra performances, magic show and a drumming spectacular and feast on Asian flavours in an Eat Street-style food market. Details: 4 Hasking Street, Caboolture, free Chung Tian Temple Camera Icon Jacques Ha and Stephen Chang at Chung Tian Temple ahead of Lunar New Year festivities. Picture: News Corp Australia, AAP Image/Richard Walker Saturday February 9 will be a traditional Buddhist chanting service at 10am and food fair; Sunday February 10 is the cultural open day with a baby blessing children’s puppet show and pantomime and Kung fu diaplsy. Details: 1034 Underwood Rd, Priestdale chungtian.org.au Chinatown Gold Coast The fifth annual Lunar New Year celebration at the Gold Coast Chinatown from 4pm includes a free screening of Babe at 6.45pm. There’s also a pop up laneway bar, Asian street food market and fireworks at 9pm. Details: Young and Davenport Streets, Southport goldcoast.qld.gov.au The Lanes, Fortitude Valley Follow the chimes of the Chinese Dragon through the Bakery and California Lanes in Fortitude Valley. Chow down on Brisbane’s most famous dumplings (hailing from Northern China!) from Fat Dumpling or an exploration of the delicacies of Korea and Japan from Nom Nom Korean and Nom Nom Ramen and Sake Bar then get a and make 2019 resolutions and blessings upon the Wishing Tree in Bakery Lane. Details: Chinese lion dance through Bakery Lane at 8.30pm and California Lane at 9.30pm, free entry facebook.com/events/533475513807618/ Westfield Garden City Friday and Saturday February 8-9 6pm-8pm; and on Saturday February 9 the Choinese Choir performs 11.20am-1.30pm. Childrens can create their own Chinese lanterns and lucky red envelope through to Sunday February 10. Details: SUNDAY Play On Closing Ceremony Join UQ Art Museum for an afternoon of sport and creativity to celebrate the closing of its exhibition Play On: The art of sport. The Queensland Firebirds, Football Queensland, Queensland NRL, Queensland Reds and Sporting Wheelies and Disabled Association Queensland will be taking part. There will be face painting, jumping castle and scavenger hunt. Details: UQ Art Musuem, St Lucia, 2pm-6pm, free art-museum.uq.edu.au Inala Food Trail The Inala Food Trail is a food discovery experience, showcasing the ingredients and menus of Inala. The festival hosts a $2-$5 food trail with cooking demonstrations and an incredible selection of cuisines. The Inala Food Trail is the authentic foodie event not to be missed. Details: Inala Plaza Shopping Centre and Inala Civic Centre, Corner of Corsair Avenue and Kittyhawk Drive, Inala, Sunday February 10, 11am-4pm brisbane.qld.gov.au The Minni Festival of Indian Dance From Bollywood to Bhangra, Garba to Kathak and Tapori — Brisbane has an incredible and thriving Indian dance scene. Join our city’s best performers and experience the many incredible forms of Indian Dance in the Queen Street Mall. Featuring Dance Masala, Tapori Squad, Gujratri Association of Queensland and Infinity Kathak. Details: Queen Street Mall, Sunday February 10, 11am-1pm, free

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