Final Fantasy 15, roti canai and the new PS4 game that harks back to rhythm action greats

Final Fantasy 15, roti canai and the new PS4 game that harks back to rhythm action greats

@vics_viper
Arguing about the best Final Fantasy is a risky, often fiery business – they’re a nebulous group of games, each offshoot and strand having devotees and detractors in equal number – so let’s argue about something a bit more straightforward instead. Where can you find the best cuisine in the world? There’s only one real answer: Malaysia . It’s not even up for debate.
You’d know that if you’ve ever sampled the food, of course. Achat! Assam pedas! Laksa! Nasi lemak! Rendang! Or that perennial favourite, roti canai; a dish that consists of a flatbread whose dough is rolled and re-rolled so that when it’s fried it’s deliciously flaky and soft, served alongside a curry. It’s an Indian dish that’s been given a flourish in its journey to Malaysia; like so much of the cuisine there, it blends aspects of different nearby cuisines to create something proudly Malaysian.
Still, it was something of a surprise to see roti canai make a cameo as a dish in Final Fantasy 15, appearing as part of its succession of exquisitely-modelled food as it was served up in the in-game city of Lestalum. That cameo came courtesy of one proud Malaysian on the team who found himself heading up the design of Final Fantasy 15’s cities – a key part of the game, given their absence in the last mainline entry, Final Fantasy 13.
“They were virtually non-existent, right!,” Wan Hazmer, who now heads up his own studio, tells me as we talk about how he got Malaysian food into Final Fantasy 15. “At first I didn’t want to put in these things – Lestalum was supposed to be a city that seems poor at first, but is thriving on a certain economy which in this case was an electric generator. We based the architecture on Cuban architecture, the markets were all Middle Eastern – and they wanted to know what’s the most perfect food culture. And I was like, hello! Malaysia! ” The combat plays out a little like Kingdom Hearts, with your the rhythmical timing of your moves essential to success.
It’s a detail I adore in Final Fantasy, and not just because it’s a reminder of such a delicious dish – it speaks to the personality that’s baked into this, one of the most divisive of entries into Square Enix’ long-running series. I think that, no matter where you stand on it – and, personally speaking, I loved it – you can agree it’s a game with an abundance of character, and one of the great achievements of its director, Hajime Tabata, was allowing the personality of his staff’s creators shine through in these incidental touches.
“Well, Tabata-san, he was very good at assigning tasks to people,” says Hazmer. “We have this term which means making sure that person truly enjoys what they’re doing, assigning the right jobs to the right people. So for example – we had a game designer on the vehicle team. He was a truck driver for seven years, studied CG for six months and that’s it, he joined Square Enix. We had really, really crazy people like that. The art director – the game was so big, we needed three art directors – one of them, he’s crazy about animals. He knows the bone structures of a lot of animals, can go to Okinawa and just grab a snake on the road and know exactly what it is – he was in charge of the monsters in the game.”
Hazmer himself was working on Final Fantasy 15 for seven years – indeed, before it even was Final Fantasy 15. “I went for the orientation at the company for the first time, this lengthy thing then asked what I’d be working on,” he says of his first day at work – and his first professional job in the games industry. “They said it was Final Fantasy Versus 13, and I was like ‘sorry, what – did you just say Versus 13 ?’ I thought I’d be working on a mobile game or something! It was such a surprise.”
The best part of a decade later – and several high profile changes to the game itself, of course – and Hazmer looks back on the whole thing fondly. “It was a fantastic experience, you know! I got to work with people who made my favourite Final Fantasy – 7 – with the art director and Nomura-san, Tabata-san had worked on Crisis Core. They’re wonderful directors. Then to become lead game designer for such a big project, that was such an honour. And a lot of pressure, of course!”
After all that, though, you can’t blame Hazmer for heading off to do something different – a decision he’d made some five years before finishing up work on Final Fantasy 15, letting his team know his plan and then seeing it through. Hazmer moved back to Kuala Lumpur, setting up a new studio – Metronomik – to explore music-based games and to help put Malaysian talent on a global platform.
“The original impulse was my belief that Malaysians have talent,” Hazmer says. “Do you know any original Malaysian IP?” he asks – and quite honestly, even though I visit the country once a year to spend time with my partner’s family, all I really know is that it’s a prime location for outsourcing, with the likes of Codemasters having studios in the capital to help with asset creation among other things.
“Malaysia has so much to show in terms of culture. I wanted to go back with the know-how of FF15, then try to prove ourselves with our first game, and then from there – I’m an advisor for four universities – use our experience. Malaysians have two problems – we’re either too proud of our culture, or not proud enough. Some people think that Malaysia is more local. In fact, the word local in Malaysia – people use it to mean low quality. Then there’s the other side, where people think that Malaysian culture is so good, if you put just one hint in there, everyone’s going to like it. You should put it in because you’re proud of it, not just because of Malaysian culture.” Subscribe to our YouTube channel
Hazmer set up the studio with his cousin Daim Dziauddin – another graduate of the Japanese development scene, having worked on Street Fighter 5 – and their first project is a distillation of everything they loved playing together while growing up in Malaysia. No Straight Roads is a rhythm action platformer, with Tim Schafer humour served up with some late 90s Sega style. It’s part Psychonauts, part Jet Set Radio, part Space Channel 5, and it all makes for quite the intoxicating mix.
Work on the project only started towards the tail-end of 2017, and No Straight Roads is fast approaching release – a development cycle that’s a far cry from the protracted one Hazmer experienced on Final Fantasy 15. It’s a cycle the studio wants to commit to for its future projects, too.
“It’s all about employee motivation, you know,” he says. “You’ve noticed our logo? It’s a metronome with a heart. It’s not because we want to make music-based games – we also want to manage your pace of life. We don’t do overtime, at all. We want to make sure we consistently make games. When we had a demo for TGS, we did it in nine months. It’s about making games quickly, which is very motivating. We have a sprint meeting every two weeks, we change goals every two weeks, there’s a very flat hierarchy.”
Hazmer wants to give back a little, too – part of his plans involve opening up a school in Malaysia – and with No Straight Roads it’s also about serving up something that’s proudly Malaysian to the global market. As much as there are strands of Dreamcast classics and Tim Schafer’s games in what I played, it’s the Malaysian teams’ flourishes that really makes it stand out – a certain buoyancy and energy in how it plays out, the colloquial dialect of Malaysian-English that the characters speak – bringing the local aspects of Malaysian culture to a worldwide audience is what makes it unique. Sometimes we include links to online retail stores. If you click on one and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. For more information, go here .

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5 places for great Jewish food in the Buffalo area – Buffalo News

At one point in time, Buffalo was rich with Jewish delis and restaurants.
But one by one, Mastman’s Deli on Hertel Avenue, Reuben’s N.Y. Deli in Amherst and Tel Aviv Cafe by Falafel Bar in the JCC, among others, have all shut their doors. These closings made it hard to find a good roast brisket or potato pancake, especially during the non-holiday times of the year when you can’t rely on your family’s home cooking.
But if you know where to look, there are some Buffalo restaurants serving stellar Jewish cuisine. For New York City transplants or UB students from downstate looking for a taste of home, here are my top five picks for ordering Jewish food in Buffalo.
Frank Gourmet Hot Dogs
707 Kenmore Ave.
Ironically, the best bowl of matzo ball soup I’ve found in Buffalo is at a gourmet hot dog joint. The rest of Frank’s menu may not exactly be kosher, but it hits this Jewish staple out of the park.
A bowl of soup will run you $6, which is a little bit pricey, but the portions are generous. The broth is bursting with flavor and schmaltz –– rendered chicken fat, a popular ingredient in Jewish cuisine –– and includes one giant, fluffy matzo ball. Pair it with a sky-high pastrami sandwich ($12) and you’re good to go.
The only catch is that matzo ball soup and pastrami are part of Frank’s cycling specials menu. Check its Facebook page for updates on when the restaurant is serving up the dishes next.
[Read more: Frank adds half-smoke to Buffalo’s eating lexicon]
Risa’s
285 Delaware Ave.
If you’re craving a cup of bubbe’s soup but Frank’s isn’t serving, Risa’s, which very well may be the last true Jewish deli in town, is a no brainer.
At the recommendation of The New’s food critic Andrew Z. Galarneau, I checked out Risa’s for a sandwich and cup of soup, and wasn’t disappointed. For $7.50, Risa’s runs a steal of a lunch special offering half of any sandwich and a cup of soup. The chicken noodle matzo ball soup ($4.55 for a full bowl) is light yet filled with lots of schmaltzy flavor. Risa’s variation is chocked full of chicken meat, veggies, noodles and two al dente matzo balls creating a lip-smacking concoction.
I paired my soup with a roast brisket sandwich ($8.95), which was filled to the brim with juicy cuts of meat that melted in my mouth. Risa’s also serves other Jewish sandwiches like whitefish salad ($7.95), pastrami ($8.95) and kosher beef salami ($8.25).
[Throwback: See when Risa’s replaced Reuben’s NY Deli ]
Potato pancakes at Scharf’s German Restaurant and Bar. (Derek Gee/Buffalo News file photo)
Scharf’s German Restaurant and Bar
2683 Clinton St., West Seneca
I can’t talk Jewish food without mentioning potato pancakes. While some places serve them only around the holidays, Scharf’s serves delicious latkes year-round.
An appetizer of either two, four or six potato pancakes will run you $5.50, $9.50 and $13.50 respectively. The potato pancakes are fluffy and buttery on the inside but have a perfect char on the outside, offering a crisp bite that ends with a velvety rush of potato. These potato pancakes are massive — one takes up half the plate. The dish comes with a side of applesauce, the classic dipping condiment for potato pancakes.
[Review: German food without much of an accent at Scharf’s ]
The Bloom & Rose
Farmers & Artisans, 4557 Main St. and the Elmwood-Bidwell Farmers Market (starting May 11)
Almost every culture has a dough pocket-style street snack, and for Jews, it’s the knish. Offering a blend of traditional fillings and more contemporary fusion fillings, The Bloom and Rose serves one of the best knish in town.
Currently, The Bloom and Rose sells knish with classic onion and potato filling, spinach and feta filling, and an Indian samosa filling. Each is made with local ingredients. Seasonal flavors rotate in and out throughout the year. The outer crust of the knish is buttery and flaky. Once you bite in, the juices from the filling absorb into the dough, making each bite even more savory. One knish is $4, or you can stock up with three for $10 or 12 for $35.
House of Hummus
1150 Hertel Ave. and 502 Elmwood Ave.
Although falafel may not have originated from Israel, it plays an iconic role in Jewish cuisine and is widely known as the national dish of Israel. Lucky for Buffalonians, there’s tons of great falafel in town, my favorite being from the House of Hummus.
For $6.49, the falafel wrap, four generously sized falafel and Jerusalem salad wrapped in pita, is a steal. House of Hummus boasts the “fluffiest falafel in Western New York” and they aren’t kidding. While some falafel can be dry, these have the perfect outer crisp but maintain a soft, moist inside.
The addition of the Jerusalem salad (finely chopped parsley, tomatoes, cucumbers, lemon, olive oil and tahini) creates the perfect bite and makes the wrap super refreshing, especially on a hot summer day.
[Review: House of Hummus brings Middle Eastern flavors to Elmwood]
Email mkalnitz@sun-news.com if you’ve got any recommendations for Jewish food in the Queen City.
Story topics: Bloom and Rose / Buffalo guides / delis / Farmers and artisans / House of Hummus / jewish / Scharf’s

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There is so much to bite into within the foodservice pie in Southeast Asia

Articles / There is so much to bite into within the foodservice pie in Southeast Asia There is so much to bite into within the foodservice pie in Southeast Asia By: Deepika Chandrasekar 04/19/2019
Southeast Asia is a growing gastronomic hub with a strong focus on local palettes, as well as an openness to international flavours. Indonesian consumers contributed the highest foodservice sales in Southeast Asia of nearly USD38 billion in 2018. The highest per capita foodservice spend came from Singapore, with the average consumer spending just over USD1,000 a year. Dining out is seen as valuable bonding time
While eating out was previously considered an activity mainly reserved for special occasions or celebrations, it is now looked at as an opportunity to spend quality time together. Eating out is not considered merely a transactional necessity and instead treated as an enjoyable experience.
As consumers in millennial-abundant Southeast Asia are becoming increasingly time-strapped, eating out of the home is seen as a means to unwind, relax and bond over quality meals with special ones. In the Philippines, there is an inherent family-orientated culture that permeates the dining out aspect. Malaysians are a step ahead in that they enjoy the experience of hunting for food deals together as part of the shopping and dining experience. Globalisation opens Southeast Asian markets to international flavours
With rising disposable incomes and consumers in Southeast Asia becoming more sophisticated, outbound travel has increased. Exposure to foreign culture and flavours led consumers to expect to see more foreign cuisines in their own countries. To meet this demand, more international food players have been entering foreign markets.
Thai consumers, for instance, crave authentic foreign foods such as Japanese, Indian and Korean cuisine. Not only do international brands like Hard Rock Café and Sake Sushi meet the local demand, they also cater to the influx of tourists, serving as familiar, comfort food to them. Another growing trend on the back of globalisation throughout Southeast Asia is the popularisation of contemporary fusion cuisines. In Malaysia, cuisines like Viet Thai, Malaysian Western and Mexican Indian are scaling in popularity. Third-party delivery services surge in the foodservice space
Delivery is the fastest growing opportunity in the foodservice realm in Southeast Asia. With the phenomenal growth of technology in these markets acting as an enabler of delivery services, third-party players are rising to the occasion rapidly and offering consumers a convenient option for meal solutions. More importantly, numerous small chains or independent players previously unheard of are now jumping onto third-party delivery platforms to strengthen their visibility.
From the consumer point of view, the increasing accessibility, availability and variety of food provided by these third-party delivery services serve as a solution to time-pressed consumers and frustrating traffic situations in cities like Jakarta and Bangkok.
Grab Food has a dominant presence throughout Southeast Asia amidst the likes of Foodpanda, Deliveroo and Go Food. Apart from the convenience factor, consumers are more enticed by the numerous promotions and discounts provided by these players. These apps were originally meant to encourage the use of cashless payments in countries like Singapore and Indonesia but have now turned into food discovery platforms with attractive deals.
The consumer foodservice industry has great potential in Southeast Asia with eating out becoming an integral part of bonding time. While consumers are exploring their own local food more, they are also actively seeking global cuisines. Foodservice delivery is growing faster than ever as consumers seek convenience and great food deals. Tags

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Putting aside historical conflict & oppression, Turkish Kebab House might be the best bet for those dishes. I don’t believe manti or lahmacun are on their menu at the moment, but they definitely have been in the past.
I would love to see a restaurant or food truck dedicated specifically to Armenian cuisine, though.
(On a similar note, for folks underwhelmed with our city’s Indian options, check out Sherpa Kitchen or one of our other Nepalese restaurants.)

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5 Vegan Recipe Books By Black Cooks You Should Be Reading, Because Food Inspiration Awaits

7 hours ago Stocksy / Bonninstudio
For black people considering going vegan or simply trying to eat more plant-based dishes, it might seem like there’s little choice for flavoursome recipes from our cultures. But there are so many incredible black vegan cookbooks you should be reading , all of which prove why diversity in the vegan culinary world is so necessary and show how vegan food can be for everyone.
Vegan food might be a bit overwhelming at first, it’s difficult to know where to start, what ingredients to use, and the best recipes to cook, especially if you’re used to a certain style of food. But plant-based cooking can be enjoyable, fun, and jam packed with flavour. And for those of us who struggle to get inspiration on our own, these cookbooks really will switch up your cooking game.
Simple-to-follow vegan cookbooks by black cooks like these are proving that plant-based food can still be delicious and there is no need to miss out on the home comforts and culinary classics from our cultures. In fact, these cookbooks are illustrating how loads of dishes from Afro-Caribbean cuisines are already vegan-friendly. From musicians to Youtube sensations, these cookbooks are a great place to start your plant-based journey. 1. Caribbean Vegan By Taymer Mason Caribbean Vegan / Taymer Mason
This cookbookproves there’s much more to Caribbean flavours than just coconuts. Caribbean Vegan by author Taymer Mason teaches what flavours, herbs, and spices you’ll need to get that authentic Caribbean taste. With over 200 recipes, Caribbean Vegan will show you how African, French, Asian, and Indian influences combine to create that Caribbean taste. 2. Ziggy Marley and Family Cookbook: Delicious Meals Made With Whole, Organic Ingredients from the Marley Kitchen Ziggy Marley and Family Cookbook
Who better to teach you about delicious Jamaican plant-based recipes than Ziggy Marley, Bob Marley’s eldest son? His family-oriented cookbook is inspired by dishes from his childhood with a focus on Ital and more traditional Caribbean cooking. Ital food is a style of cooking celebrated by those of the Rastafarian faith and falls under the vegan category. 3. Rachel Ama’s Vegan Eats Rachel Ama’s Vegan Eats
London-born Rachel Ama is a wonderful cook who talks through easy-to-follow plant-based recipes on her Youtube channel . She’s now got a new cookbook that will be out this June and it’s stuffed full of some of her beloved every day vegan recipes many inspired by her Sierra Leonean and St Lucian roots. 4. Afro-Vegan: Farm-fresh African, Caribbean, and Southern Food Remixed By Bryant Terry Afro-vegan / Bryant Terry
Afro-Vegan by Bryant Terry, a food activist and cook, remixes classic dishes and flavours from the African diaspora. From recipes inspired by the Kenyan dish “irio” to moroccan tagines, and corn grits from the deep south in the US, this book has a little bit of everything in it. 5. Sweet Potato Soul: 100 Easy Vegan Recipes for the Southern Flavors of Smoke, Sugar, Spice, and Soul By Jenné Claiborne Sweet Potato Soul / Jenné Claiborne
Born in Atlanta and better known as Sweet Potato Soul, Jenné Claiborne, is pretty big in the vegan online community, with over 400 thousand subscribers on her Youtube channel Sweet Potato Soul. Her cookbook of the same name has over 100 simple recipes for delicious soul food and southern U.S.-inspired dishes.

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Masala Art

…6th floor, Siam Icon. One thing we noticed immediately is that the kitchen is behind a large window: we saw all of our order being prepared. In one go, we ordered veggie biryani, roasted eggplant mash, bindi and garlic nan. The order took 20-25 minutes…a good sign that yesterday’s goop wouldn’t be reheated (I’m looking at you, Mrs. Balbir). The meal was worth the wait: smoky goodness from the eggplant, crisp okra in tomato sauce, tasty biryani and the fresh nan pulled from the tandoori oven. All excellent, fresh, and flavorful. Imo, the best Indian cuisine I’ve had in Bangkok. Our next visit in the very near future will include tandoori specialties, cucumber yogurt, and different veggie dishes. Surprisingly (for the location), the checkbin (including one Heineken) wasn’t too bad.
Attached Images S__9338910.jpg (113.1 KB, 118 views) S__9338915.jpg (109.0 KB, 115 views) S__9338914.jpg (67.2 KB, 114 views) S__9338916.jpg (59.8 KB, 112 views) S__9338917.jpg (81.5 KB, 113 views) Majestically enthroned amid the vulgar herd Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 02:33 PM #2 Norton Days Work Done! Join Date Oct 2007 Last Online @ Location Roiet Posts 28,987 Will be in Bangkok next week. Looks worth a try.
https://www.masala-artbkk.com/menu Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 02:34 PM #3 tomcat Thailand Expat Join Date Nov 2005 Last Online @ Posts 9,664 …^definitely worth a try: you won’t be disappointed…(PM me for damage)… Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 02:53 PM #4 Norton Days Work Done! Join Date Oct 2007 Last Online @ Location Roiet Posts 28,987 Originally Posted by tomcat …^definitely worth a try: you won’t be disappointed…(PM me for damage)… I have general damage idea from Menu link. If it is good, damage is inconsequential.
Only in town a couple of days but will try to get to Masala Art.
Must hookup with a couple old friends. Both in restaurant biz so will get a good feed. Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 03:14 PM #5 Dragonfly Thailand Expat
Join Date Oct 2015 Last Online 21-04-2019 @ 05:29 PM Posts 10,199 looks interesting, what’s the damage. Probably around 1500 THB from your previous budget
it looks really clean and nice, though I like to eat that kind of food in a dirty and open air Indian restaurant, it feels more authentic Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 03:22 PM #6 baldrick disturbance in the Turnip Join Date Apr 2006 Last Online Yesterday @ 10:12 PM Location Heidleberg Posts 20,817 Originally Posted by Dragonfly what’s the damage if you were not such a dumb cnut you would add it up from the menu link that Norts provided
if you could not be bothered to do that , then you are doubling down on your image as an oxygen thief Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 03:34 PM #7 Dragonfly Thailand Expat
Join Date Oct 2015 Last Online 21-04-2019 @ 05:29 PM Posts 10,199 says the bitcoin fraud and part time plumber
be a good boy, and get me the damages from the menu Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 04:14 PM #8 baldrick disturbance in the Turnip Join Date Apr 2006 Last Online Yesterday @ 10:12 PM Location Heidleberg Posts 20,817 ^ it was 1250 baht including the happy ending Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 04:57 PM #9 reinvented Thailand Expat Join Date Nov 2005 Last Online Yesterday @ 06:13 PM Location top of soi 2 Posts 1,760 good review as usual, icon is a bit far for me usually but the dearth of decent indian food may push me. Have you tried kebab and curries on Sukhumwit 31 Tomcat, its a bit different but can get a good discount with the eatigo app Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 04:59 PM #10 tomcat Thailand Expat Join Date Nov 2005 Last Online @ Posts 9,664 Originally Posted by reinvented Have you tried kebab and curries on Sukhumwit 31 …we haven’t yet, but sukh 31 looms large on our radar…thanks for the recommendation… Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 05:41 PM #11 Dillinger Thailand Expat Join Date Jul 2012 Last Online @ Posts 25,197 masala art?
the nan looks like the shit Punty eats in supermarket food courts here with his rabbit card Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 05:55 PM #12 Dillinger Thailand Expat Join Date Jul 2012 Last Online @ Posts 25,197
230 baht from Gupta at Big c, including Milky Tea Attached Images 7F7BE9F6-3CA8-4D85-913B-885FBB908C6B.jpg (73.9 KB, 74 views) Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 06:14 PM #13 raycarey Thailand Expat Join Date Jan 2006 Last Online @ Posts 12,708 Originally Posted by reinvented icon is a bit far for me usually but the dearth of decent indian food may push me. they have (or at least used to have) another branch on soi 55.
i ate there a few years back….i remember it as being fine, but not great FWIW, i’ve never gone back. Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 08:29 PM #14 Dragonfly Thailand Expat
Join Date Oct 2015 Last Online 21-04-2019 @ 05:29 PM Posts 10,199 Originally Posted by Dillinger masala art?
the nan looks like the shit Punty eats in supermarket food courts here with his rabbit card good point, that naan was a bit below par, don’t think I would touched it. Better Naan on Soi 3 and sitting outside with the dirty sweating locals is quite the experience. They have the best curry there!!!
but if you are gay and sport a Pierre Cardin shirt, I can see how a nice Indian place might be a better fit. Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 10:19 PM #15 OhOh Thailand Expat
Join Date Jul 2010 Last Online Yesterday @ 10:19 PM Location Where troubles melt like lemon drops Posts 16,840 Originally Posted by tomcat Imo, the best Indian cuisine I’ve had in Bangkok. Good enough recommendation for me.Thanks. Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 10:25 PM #16 NamPikToot Thailand Expat
Join Date Jan 2010 Last Online @ Location in wessex Posts 4,252 Originally Posted by raycarey they have (or at least used to have) another branch on soi 55.
i ate there a few years back….i remember it as being fine, but not great FWIW, i’ve never gone back. Cheap? or .. Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 10:38 PM #17 Dillinger Thailand Expat Join Date Jul 2012 Last Online @ Posts 25,197 Originally Posted by tomcat The order took 20-25 minutes…a good sign that yesterday’s goop wouldn’t be reheated I thought curries got better with age? Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 10:43 PM #18 tomcat Thailand Expat Join Date Nov 2005 Last Online @ Posts 9,664 Originally Posted by Dillinger I thought curries got better with age? …that hasn’t been my experience…certainly not with the offerings available around the Nana area… Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 11:02 PM #19 Dillinger Thailand Expat Join Date Jul 2012 Last Online @ Posts 25,197 ​ Yeah I guess,
homecooked ones only maybe
does get some great reviews that place I see, although to me a nan should be full, of family size, a little burned and crispy on the ends with a great big runny chicken balti gagging to be dipped in and de juiced. Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 11:03 PM #20 NamPikToot Thailand Expat
Join Date Jan 2010 Last Online @ Location in wessex Posts 4,252 Originally Posted by Dillinger ​ ​although to me a nan should be full, of family size, a little burned and crispy on the ends . It does look like its not seen a tandoor. Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 11:06 PM #21 Dillinger Thailand Expat Join Date Jul 2012 Last Online @ Posts 25,197 This is a nan
Attached Images A1E8B76E-E4B3-4522-9996-BEC5A867DC7E.jpg (92.6 KB, 60 views) Reply With Quote: 20-04-2019, 11:20 PM #22 NamPikToot Thailand Expat
Join Date Jan 2010 Last Online @ Location in wessex Posts 4,252 Flying Carpet as we know and love em in the UK Reply With Quote: 21-04-2019, 08:33 AM #23 armstrong Thailand Expat
Join Date Oct 2011 Last Online Yesterday @ 03:30 PM Location Bangkok Posts 1,944 What kind of psycho only has one beer with a curry? Reply With Quote: 21-04-2019, 08:45 AM #24 tomcat Thailand Expat Join Date Nov 2005 Last Online @ Posts 9,664 …a psycho with a life… Reply With Quote: 21-04-2019, 08:55 AM #25 cisco999 Member

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#ExoticUttarakhand – An Attempt to Bring Lesser Known Cuisine into Mainstream

In memory of Papaji. This is for you.
Exotic Uttarakhand
I love Indian food and regional food from the region itself tastes amazing! Every region has its own uniqueness and that is what makes regional food different from each region. #Purvaiya was my first festival where I enjoyed showcasing my own food from Bihar. #undividedbengal was another regional food promotion where, along with chef Rick, we cooked food, which showed common elements between Bihar and Bengal. Post these festivals, the option was to continue with the same regions, however, a call from Hilton garden inn for a food promotion enabled me to think differently! I knew that Chef Manoj Rawat is from Uttarakhand region and getting to the roots of this cuisine wouldn’t be difficult, even though the efforts in curating what came next, definitely was an enriching experience!
The whole idea behind the creation of #regionalflavours was to promote our own regional food. A trip to Uttarakhand and then cooking with local people were the major highlights.
This time, I would not be in the Kitchen. The food that Chef Manoj is cooking is delicious, simple, rustic and unexplored.
Welcome to #exoticuttarakhand a 10-day long food promotion where you will get to taste amazing food from Kumaon and Garhwal region.
Festival starts at 20th April until 30th April ( Dinner Only at Glasshouse, Hilton GArden inn Bani Square, Gurgaon)
. Come and join us in this regional journey of #exoticuttarakhand Facebook Comments

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Bolton’s top 20 restaurants according to TripAdvisor

EVERYONE loves going out for a meal, but when the choices are endless deciding where to go is a difficult decision.
From cultural cuisine to quaint tearooms to traditional English pub grub, Bolton has it all.
We’ve looked at the top 20 places to eat out according to reviewers on the leading review site Trip Advisor, to make your decision a little easier.
1 The Royal Balti House: The five-star rated restaurant, The Royal Balti House takes the top spot! Based in Farnworth, the Royal Balti House offers Indian, Asian, British, Balti and Bangladeshi cuisine. As well as winning several local awards, the restaurant has 913 excellent reviews out of total 1016 reviews on TripAdvisor. Mker53 said: “The food was first class.”
2 Earthlings: Second place goes to the organic juice bar and café, Earthlings. Situated in Bromley Cross , this café specialises in freshly made, healthy plant- based food and drinks. The five-star rated café, has 122 excellent ratings out of an overall 147 reviews on Trip Advisor. Anne said: “My favourite place to eat. Beautiful food. Good atmosphere. Great staff. I would highly recommend Earthlings for a delicious and nutritious meal.”
3 Casalingo: Casalingo, a family run Italian restaurant in Ainsworth takes the third spot, with a 4.5 rating on Trip Advisor. With vegetarian, vegan and gluten free options available, this Italian restaurant has something for everyone. Lucyb508 said: “WOW! A great evening from start to finish! The food is SO good!”
4 Tapaz Ristorante: Tapaz Ristorante located in the heart of Bolton takes the fourth spot. The restaurant offers Mediterranean, Spanish, Portuguese and European cuisine and has a 4.5-star rating on Trip Advisor. With 441 excellent reviews out of an overall 546 reviews, the modern Mediterranean restaurant offers something for all of the family. Emma C said: “Absolutely fantastic service and excellent food. My favourite place to eat, great with the kids.”
5 The Unity Brook Pub: Traditional pub food is a winner at Unity Brook, located in Kearsley . The family run pub which serves home cooked food at a reasonable price, has a 4.5 rating on Trip Advisor. Bef94 said: “The food is fantastic; all hand cooked and presentation is 10/10. Reasonably priced too especially for how good it is!”
6 Sokrates Taverna: Sokrates Taverna, a Greek restaurant in Horwich is placed at number 6 based on Trip Advisor reviews. The authentic restaurant which serves Greek, Cypriot and Eastern Mediterranean cuisine has a 4.5 rating, with 327excellent reviews out of a total 465 views. ThomasJP89 said: “Been to Sokrates many times over the years and I can honestly say that it never fails to please.”
7 The Kitchen: At number seven the modern Mediterranean restaurant, The Kitchen in Westhoughton . The restaurant, which uses seasonal ingredients has a 4.5 rating on Trip advisor. Sarahoneill075 said: “I still cannot believe how lucky we are to have this amazing little restaurant so local.”
8 Poppins Tearooms: The traditional English Edwardian tea room, Poppins Tearooms, based in Horwich is placed at number eight. With 138 ecellent reviews out of a total 175 this elegant tearoom has a 4.5 rating on Trip Advisor. Poppins Tearooms serve fresh coffee, home-made cakes, scones and light breakfasts and lunches. Andydobs said: “All I need to say is excellent service and excellent food so would definitely recommend a visit.”
9 Ciao Napoli: With 280 excellent reviews out of a total 421 views, Ciao Napoli in Bolton town centre takes the ninth spot. Italian restaurant which has a 4.5 rating on Trip Advisor, serves Italian, Mediterranean and European cuisine. ReviewMole said: “The staff were all really friendly and attentive, the food was really tasty with good portion sizes.”
10 Nick’s Restaurant: Nick’s Restaurant in Chorley Old Road, takes the tenth spot with a 4.5 rating. The local restaurant which serves European and British cuisine has 432 excellent reviews out of a total 609. Ivor J said: “It is a hidden gem. Excellent service with an extensive menu providing superb English food.”
11The Cherry Tree at Blackrod: At number 11 is The Cherry Tree located in Blackrod which has a 4.5 rating on Trip Advisor. The family owned restaurant serves traditional British cooking, as well as fine wines, cask beers and cocktails. Amy B said: “I love this place!! Great atmosphere, lovely food, and fab service.”
12 Nam Ploy Thai Restaurant: At number 12 is the Nam Ploy Thai Restaurant in Chorley Old Road, Bolton, which has a 4.5 rating on Trip Advisor. The restaurant also offers vegetarian, vegan and gluten free options. Sammysmiles32 said: “The staff were fantastic, the food was fresh and the table magician was a delightful entertainer.”
13 Max Italia: At number 13 is the family run Italian restaurant, Max Italia. The restaurant situated in the heart of Horwich which serves traditional and modern Italian food has a rating of 4.5. KathL42 said: “Visited twice in the last fortnight and the food and service is of a consistently high standard.”
14 Spice Valley: The Indian restaurant, Spice Valley based in Horwich takes the 14th spot with a 4.5 rating. The Indian cuisine is available from midday until late evening, with vegetarian, vegan, halal and gluten free options available. Cheryl W said: “Excellent quality food, very fresh and tasty. Good service and reasonable prices.”
15 Achari: The Indian restaurant, Achari is placed at number 15 with 303 excellent reviews out of a total 446 reviews. Situated in Bolton, the restaurant which has a 4.5 rating, offers Indian and Bangladeshi cuisine, as well as vegetarian, vegan and halal options. AntBatters said: “The staff are always very friendly and attentive. They always go above and beyond which makes it my first choice restaurant.”
16 The Toby Inn: Described as an “unexpected delight” by one reviewer, this village restaurant serves up ” top quality food served beautifully served ” to suit any palate. And with 4.5 stars, 248 excellent reviews out of 356, it’s well worth a visit. The Edgworth restaurant is number 16 according to TripAdvisor
17 Roka Mediterranean Restaurant and Cocktail Bar: With a rating of 4.5 the Bolton restaurant Roka Mediterranean Restaurant and Cocktail Bar takes the 17th spot. As well as Mediterranean cuisine, this restaurant in Bradshaw Brow also serves Italian and European cuisine, with vegetarian and vegan options available. 269barbie said: “I can’t praise this restaurant enough. The food is always excellent and the staff are lovely.”
18 Luciano’s at Middlebrook:This is placed number 18. It attracts a near perfect 4.5 rating, with 408 excellent reviews out of 657.
One reviewer stated: “Took my mum for mother’s Day we had the afternoon tea which was amazing , fresh and plenty of food. Great service I will definitely be back to try the main menu.
19 Bob’s Smithy Inn Country Pub and Dining: This family run country Pub and Restaurant in Chorley Old Road, Bolton, serves pub lunches and evening dining in our A La Carte Restaurant using local produce.
It received 326 excellent reviews out of 490 with an overall rating of 4.5.
20 Cafe Italia Bolton: This place in Moss Bank Way provides Italian and European food and is rated 4.5 by its reviewers.
One reviewer said: “A lovely place with great atmosphere. The staff are very friendly and welcoming. I ate the penne arrabatta which was delicious.”

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JALESH CRUISES CHRISTENS INDIA’S FIRST PREMIUM CRUISE SHIP AS ‘KARNIKA’

JALESH CRUISES CHRISTENS INDIA’S FIRST PREMIUM CRUISE SHIP AS ‘KARNIKA’
~ Karnika celebrates yet another pioneering step with its campaign ‘India First’~
~ Commemorative Postal Stamp of ?5 released to mark historic sail~
~ 15 sailings between Mumbai-Goa and Mumbai-High Seas till May 2019 ~
~ First International sail from Mumbai to Dubai on May 24, 2019 ~
Saturday, April 20, 2019: Jalesh Cruises, India’s first premium cruise catering to the Indian domestic and international cruise business, christened ‘Karnika’ in an official naming ceremony in Mumbai on Friday, April 19th. Mrs. Shreyasi Punit Goenka took on the mantle of the Godmother of the ship and showered blessings of good luck, success and safety on the magnificent liner.
A special postal stamp of ?5 was also released on the occasion to commemorate the historic occasion on Indian waters. The National Flag was hoisted and the National Anthem was sung onboard the ship.
Karnika marked the occasion while celebrating the achievements of five Indians who are credited to bring international fame to the country by being the first ones to achieve pinnacle in their fields. The personalities included, Mr. Milkha Singh, first Indian Athlete to win a Gold at Commonwealth Games (1958), Shri. Subhash Chandra, Chairman, ZEE & Essel Group, the first Indian to launch a private satellite TV channel (1992), Actor Ms. Sushmita Sen, the first Indian Miss Universe (1994), Mr. Mahesh Bhupati, first Indian to win Grand Slam Tournament (1997) and Ms. Mary Kom, the first Indian woman boxer to win Asian Games (2014).
Shri. Chandra was the chief guest of the occasion. Mr. Punit Goenka, MD & CEO, ZEEL and Mr. Amit Goenka, CEO, International Broadcast Business & Z5 Global were also present on the occasion.
Karnika has been named after a celestial nymph, who according to legend emerged when gods and demons churned the ocean for Amrit, the elixir for life. Apsara Karnika, a celestial maiden stood for exquisite beauty and alluring charm for carrying treasures and pleasures to reward and indulge those engaged in hard labour. The name also reflects a true Indian identity drawing inspiration from the first Indian ghat – Manikarnika in Varanasi, which is considered as one of the oldest Indian city.
The christening ceremony began with a group of priests chanting hymns as the head priest broke the traditional coconut. This was followed by the age-old maritime ritual of the Godmother naming the ship by stating, “I name this ship Karnika. May God bless her, her officers, her staff, her crew and all who sail on her.” The traditional cracking of a champagne bottle on the bow of the ship followed the blessing.
The naming ceremony is a maritime practice and is considered a good luck charm for the captain, crew and passengers sailing the ship.
Mr. Jurgen Bailom, President & CEO, Jalesh Cruises, said, “Jalesh Cruises is immensely proud to give India its first premium ship Karnika, which has been curated to indulge and entertain you in the true Indian style. She is a beautiful ship designed to enthrall both domestic and international guests with the famed Indian hospitality. Our ship will make it possible for Indians to experience cruise vacations closer home with high level of customization that touches the sensibilities of people here.”
The naming ceremony saw an electrifying performance by singer Aakriti Kakkar who sang “Never Enough”, the electric track from the musical drama ‘The Greatest Showman’ for the audience and a special act by stand-up comedian Papa CJ. An after party was held on board with performances by several artists and celebrity DJ Bally Sagoo.
Details of Karnika
The 70,285 ton ship sailed on its maiden voyage from Mumbai to Goa on April 17th. Karnika will undertake 15 sailings for Mumbai-Goa-Mumbai and Mumbai-High Seas-Mumbai between April and mid-May 2019. The ship will undertake its first international sail from Mumbai to Dubai on May 24th, 2019 where it will port until mid-September 2019 before coming back to Mumbai.
On board the ship, passengers will have a variety of cuisines, entertainment, adventure and relaxation to choose from. Additionally, the cruise offers land based excursions at different ports for passengers.
The ship has three fine dining restaurants, which includes Indian cuisine at Waterfront and Chef’s Table and Thai, Malay, Korean, Mongolian, Taiwanese and Japanese cuisines at Chopstix. The ship also hosts nine different buffet and food stations offering a variety of delicacies ranging from street food, barbeque, international grill to patisserie and frozen desserts. The ship also has dedicated cuisine for Jain passengers.
There are nine bars on board the ship to offer a full range of bar menu and international premium spirits.
Karnika provides a host of on board entertainment for children as well as adults. The ship will offer Broadway shows, Burlesque performances, casino, music and dance nights, movie screenings and adventure activities among others.
The ship offers features that make it convenient and easy for senior citizens and differently abled passengers to enjoy the cruise.
Karnika is also the first Indian ship to provide therapeutic relaxation facilities on the high seas. The on board Spa offers a host of aromatic and natural techniques for relaxation. A state-of-the-art fitness studio and multi-purpose salon facilities are also available to passengers.
The ship has high-end retail therapy for guests to take home duty free products from a host of prominent international brands.
Karnika is also equipped with state-of-the-art venue, modern technology and 24×7 Wi-Fi access, which coupled with exotic cuisine and international hospitality will offer the best corporate parties, off-sites as well as family celebrations.
Jalesh Cruises has initiated bookings for its 2019 itineraries on its website www.jaleshcruises.com or directly through its holiday advisors at 1800 266 8927 in addition to its Sales Business Partners.
About Jalesh Cruises
Jalesh Cruises is the owner and operator of India’s premiere cruise liner – Karnika, which commenced operations from April 17th in Mumbai. Jalesh Cruises is India’s first multi-destination cruise line that has the best of entertainment shows, adventure activities and exotic authentic cuisines packed with international hospitality on the high sea. The cruise is designed & customised especially for the Indian audience and also for the foreigners visiting India to experience the flavour of Indian culture, food & hospitality.

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Indian Fusion 2.0 – The Culinary Lounge – Medium

Indian Fusion 2.0 Kamalika Bhar 17 Fusion food began flooding Indian restaurants and casual eateries in 1999 but it wasn’t till a decade later that chefs in India started to take notice of an increasingly maturing Indian palate and started giving fusion food an all-new meaning. With Indians travelling extensively around the world and culinary shows gaining popularity on TV, people in India have grown a palate that is curious enough to explore beyond the ordinary. This trend encouraged chefs to create unique new-age dishes influenced by more than one world cuisine. Whether it is Italian pizza topped with South-East Asian flavours, blue cheese Naan or a Galouti Kebabs infused with French foie-gras, chefs around the country are continuously redefining and reimagining Indian food forging culinary marriages that are mouth-watering and exciting.
Indian chefs returning from overseas stints bring back with them influences and experiences that lead to some unique culinary creations. French and Italian influences have reduced the pungency and intensity of authentic traditional Indian dishes. Whether it is in ‘Indian Accent’ in New Delhi, ‘Masala Library’ in Mumbai or ‘Pink Poppadom’ in Bengaluru chefs are cooking up gastronomical pleasures across the country.
The wave is however not restricted to India alone, Indian restaurants oversees blending our traditional spices with local influences are gaining in popularity and creating quite a buzz. ‘The Song of India’ a one Michelin star restaurant in Singapore is serving Indian dishes with a twist, be it semolina crusted foie-gras, roast lamb shank spiced with cinnamon and nutmeg or Macademia nut kulfi with Baileys Irish Cream, the menu is all about modernising Indian food, using techniques and ingredients from other cuisines yet maintaining the essential Indian flavours. The menu also includes some quintessential Chinese flavours. Dishes such as the sambal barramundi and laksa chicken kebab cater to the local clientele. As head chef Mural Manjunath observes, “these days, about 40% of the restaurant’s diners are Chinese. Diners want something tasty but in a package they can still understand and identify with.”
Whatever the business model or the approach, food connoisseurs around the country agree that good fusion cannot be all novelty and spectacle. It is the coming together of different flavours, textures, tastes and aromas that either are in contrast to each other or complement each other. Either way, scientifically balancing all the elements and with the correct use of technique, new culinary delicacies emerge.
One thing is for certain; India’s contribution to world cuisine is still at its nascent stages and the possibilities are abound. So now where do we go from caviar-inspired jalebis and jhal muri infused granola bars? Well, we don’t know but sure can’t wait to find out.

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