Feast for the eyes: Food photography on show in Berlin | Arts 07.06.2019

Feast for the eyes: Food photography on show in Berlin | Arts 07.06.2019

Featuring works from Cindy Sherman, Wolfgang Tillmans, Nan Goldin and many more, a new exhibition at C/O Berlin, “Food for the Eyes. The Story of Food in Photography,” celebrates the idea that we are what we eat.
‘Food for the Eyes’: The story of food in photography Hot Dogs Taken from Martin Parr’s “The Last Resort” series capturing the Liverpool beach resort of New Brighton in 1983-85, hungry bathers are shown purchasing snacks — most especially hot dogs with sauce — while swimming at the working class coastal getaway.
‘Food for the Eyes’: The story of food in photography Haming it up The “Sausage Photographs” from 1979 were one of the breakout works for Swiss art duo Peter Fischli and David Weiss. The bizarre sausage characters are dressed in cloaks made of ham and processed meat, with the humorous work having been inspired by a trip to a Zurich supermarket.
‘Food for the Eyes’: The story of food in photography Summer on a plate “Summer still life” is a 1995 work by German artist Wolfgang Tillmans featuring a plate of blueberries, cherries, grapes, a tomato and an apricot. Sitting amid paraphernalia on a window ledge, the vivid mix of colors evokes a summery combination of flavors.
‘Food for the Eyes’: The story of food in photography Lemonhead With her painting “Peluquería” (“Hairdressing Salon”), the photographer Ouka Leele forces the viewer to think from the perspective of 1979. Is this just a successful advertising aesthetic? A colorful and undoubtedly refreshing image used to market lemonade? Either way, it awakens the senses.
‘Food for the Eyes’: The story of food in photography Guilty pleasure This image of pink pig cupcakes arouses both pleasure and discomfort. On a level, they look appetizing; but there’s something offputting, even sad, about these swine sweets. The picture is from Martin Parr’s 1998 “Common Sense” series taken in Weston Super Mare, a seaside town in North Somerset, England.
‘Food for the Eyes’: The story of food in photography Beach picnic The tormented face of a woman lying on a beach is reflected in sunglasses in the midst of what looks like the rancid remains of a gluttonous beach picnic. The American photographer Cindy Sherman here uses food to evoke a broader societal sickness.
‘Food for the Eyes’: The story of food in photography Carb loading The Austrian-American photographer Arthur “Weegee” Fellig famously captured New York street life — along with scenes from the city’s illicit underground — during the 1940s. This snapshot of a man shoveling a massive fork of pasta into his mouth is in fact Phillip J. Stazzone, a soldier on leave who his making the most of his favorite food.
‘Food for the Eyes’: The story of food in photography Feminist cooking show Martha Rosler’s video installation “Semiotics of the Kitchen” (1975) is a parody of the then growing popularity of cooking shows on television in the 1970s, and the idea that a “woman’s place is in the kitchen.” The American artist transforms harmless everyday kitchen utensils into menacing weapons as the woman rises up against her domestic bondage.
Author: Nikolas Fischer, Rayna Breuer
‘Food for the Eyes’: The story of food in photography Hot Dogs Taken from Martin Parr’s “The Last Resort” series capturing the Liverpool beach resort of New Brighton in 1983-85, hungry bathers are shown purchasing snacks — most especially hot dogs with sauce — while swimming at the working class coastal getaway.
‘Food for the Eyes’: The story of food in photography Haming it up The “Sausage Photographs” from 1979 were one of the breakout works for Swiss art duo Peter Fischli and David Weiss. The bizarre sausage characters are dressed in cloaks made of ham and processed meat, with the humorous work having been inspired by a trip to a Zurich supermarket.
‘Food for the Eyes’: The story of food in photography Summer on a plate “Summer still life” is a 1995 work by German artist Wolfgang Tillmans featuring a plate of blueberries, cherries, grapes, a tomato and an apricot. Sitting amid paraphernalia on a window ledge, the vivid mix of colors evokes a summery combination of flavors.
‘Food for the Eyes’: The story of food in photography Lemonhead With her painting “Peluquería” (“Hairdressing Salon”), the photographer Ouka Leele forces the viewer to think from the perspective of 1979. Is this just a successful advertising aesthetic? A colorful and undoubtedly refreshing image used to market lemonade? Either way, it awakens the senses.
‘Food for the Eyes’: The story of food in photography Guilty pleasure This image of pink pig cupcakes arouses both pleasure and discomfort. On a level, they look appetizing; but there’s something offputting, even sad, about these swine sweets. The picture is from Martin Parr’s 1998 “Common Sense” series taken in Weston Super Mare, a seaside town in North Somerset, England.
‘Food for the Eyes’: The story of food in photography Beach picnic The tormented face of a woman lying on a beach is reflected in sunglasses in the midst of what looks like the rancid remains of a gluttonous beach picnic. The American photographer Cindy Sherman here uses food to evoke a broader societal sickness.
‘Food for the Eyes’: The story of food in photography Carb loading The Austrian-American photographer Arthur “Weegee” Fellig famously captured New York street life — along with scenes from the city’s illicit underground — during the 1940s. This snapshot of a man shoveling a massive fork of pasta into his mouth is in fact Phillip J. Stazzone, a soldier on leave who his making the most of his favorite food.
‘Food for the Eyes’: The story of food in photography Feminist cooking show Martha Rosler’s video installation “Semiotics of the Kitchen” (1975) is a parody of the then growing popularity of cooking shows on television in the 1970s, and the idea that a “woman’s place is in the kitchen.” The American artist transforms harmless everyday kitchen utensils into menacing weapons as the woman rises up against her domestic bondage.
Author: Nikolas Fischer, Rayna Breuer
Food is much more than the basic need for daily sustenance, giving credence to the saying that “we are what we eat.” Daily meals also express human desires and fantasies, our cultural beliefs and social structures, our relationship to the land, and the animal world. It’s no wonder that food has been a central theme in art, and indeed photography, throughout the ages.
The exhibition “Food for the Eyes. The Story of Food in Photography,” opening June 8 at C/O Berlin, showcases the tastiest work of world-renowned artists including Nobuyoshi Araki, Peter Fischli and David Weiss, Nan Goldin, Rinko Kawauchi, Laura Letinsky, Martin Parr, Irving Penn, Martha Rosler, Cindy Sherman, Stephen Shore and Wolfgang Tillmans, among others.
Organized by the Aperture Foundation, New York in collaboration with C/O Berlin, the exhibition broaches a range of themes: family, tradition, home life, wealth, poverty, gender, race, disgust, satisfaction and consumption.
Drawing from fine art, fashion photography, journalism and advertising, the exhibition is broken into sub-themes such as “Still Life,” which asks how photographers have revived and reworked the original painting genre; “Around the Table,” examining the ritual of food sharing and the way the practice reflects broader cultural values; while “Playing with Food” explores creative interpretations of sometimes quirky cuisines across broad cultures.
Reflecting contemporary culture
The “Sausage Photographs” (1979) by the Swiss artist duo Peter Fischli and David Weiss embody some of the more humorous works on show, with bizarre sausage characters dressed in cloaks made of ham and processed meat. The works is well-complemented by British photographer Martin Parr’s image of cupcakes dressed as pigs, and which gives a twist to a British culinary cliché.
Meanwhile, photographs by Cindy Sherman and Martha Rosler reflect more seriously on the relationship between women and food, with the latter questioning the traditional place of the woman in the kitchen.
Read more : On the frontlines with women war photographers
Martha Rosler’s “Semiotics of the Kitchen” from 1975 sees a woman seeking liberation from domesticity using kitchen utensils as weapons
Extracurricular activities
The exhibition includes a complementary program that aims to further play out the connections between art and cuisine.
For example, the monthly “Breakfast Club” combines a morning meal at the C/O Berlin café with a guided tour of the exhibition; while the lecture “Is it only food when you eat it?” by Dutch “eating designer” Marije Vogelzang (“What is the meaning of food? What functions, values, and traditions do we attribute to it today?”) will be accompanied by her own “Food Massage” performance aiming to upend established conceptions of food and eating.
There will also be a cooking evening with artists from the exhibition, and a culinary summer cinema program.
“Food for the Eyes. The History of Food in Photography” runs June 8 through September 7 at C/O Berlin.
Martin Parr’s ‘Brexit Britain’ After the battle The legendary Magdalene May Ball is over, the battle on the dance floor a done deed. This man indulges in a cat nap — complete with pillows. Photographer Martin Parr shows the British simply as they are: in this case, deeply exhausted and in reverie.
Martin Parr’s ‘Brexit Britain’ British in Germany The tattoo says “English and Proud” but this shot was taken in Germany. The small town of Bad Fallingbostel had a British army base up until 2015. Ahead of the withdrawal of the British forces from Germany, Martin Parr looked for traces of Britishness in and around Hanover in 2013.
Martin Parr’s ‘Brexit Britain’ From up above Parr chose the bird’s-eye view for this image of his British compatriots. His photograph shows British sun worshippers on the beach of Sorrento in Italy. The towels and clothing of the sunbathers lying close together provide a contrasting play of colors with the black sand.
Martin Parr’s ‘Brexit Britain’ Click, click, but no cheering It’s all a question of perspective: Here, professional photographer Martin Parr takes Queen Elizabeth II’s point of view. It’s an unusual one as what she sees in front of her is an excited group of people taking pictures, apparently held back only by the state car, yet nobody is cheering.
Martin Parr’s ‘Brexit Britain’ A dance of color These Indian Bhangra dancers seem to dance as lightly as a feather through a room in Edinburgh, Scotland. In this image, too, Parr, who usually does not arrange his photos, relies on a play of colors between the actors and the calm background. Martin Parr, who was born in 1952, is one of the leading British documentary photographers.
Martin Parr’s ‘Brexit Britain’ So near, and yet so far away Summer in Cornwall on the English coast: Children and adults stare at the sea, the waving red flag warning them to stay out of the strong currents in the cool water before them. With strong colors and faces turned away, Parr’s photo captures a sense of danger in the beyond. His photos, he says, are particularly cherished outside Great Britain.
Martin Parr’s ‘Brexit Britain’ Dog and hat Parr photographed this sun worshipper of mature age on a beach in France, giving it the subtle title, “Nice, France.” The picture is typical of the Magnum Agency photographer and conveys one of his favorite themes: the aging human being. Parr himself is 66 years old. The photo exhibition entitled “Only Human: Martin Parr” is on show through May 27, 2019 at the National Portrait Gallery in London.
Author: Stefan Dege (als)

Read More…

Augusta boasts food truck evenings, outdoor films, masquerade balls, Brewfest

increase font size Augusta boasts food truck evenings, outdoor films, masquerade balls, Brewfest Maine’s capital city will hold a number of events that showcase Mill Park, old Fort Western and the downtown. By By NANCY MCGINNIS Correspondent Read Article People ride a train past a slide as they tour around Mill Park on June 30, 2018, during the Kennebec River Day Augusta. Kennebec Journal file photo by Joe Phelan
Whether you’re looking for recreation, education, celebration or relaxation this summer, it can all be found in Augusta, Maine’s capital city.
If you have an appetite for culinary adventure, the Calumet Club will host another wildly popular Food Truck Friday on June 14 from 5 to 9 p.m. The event will take place rain or shine at the Club parking lot at 334 West River Road.
Enjoy the unique cuisine of area food trucks such as Pinky D’s Poutine Factory and Blazing Tomato Pizza. Joel Jolicoeur will provide musical entertainment. Beverages will be available for purchase, as will the Calumet’s Pot of Gold: buy tickets for a chance to win money every hour. This event is free; however, a ticket is needed to enter. For more information, visit calumetclub.com or call 207-623-8211.
What a difference a week makes. On Friday evening, June 21, the Calumet Club is the place to be if you love to dress up and glide across the dance floor. Plan to spend the evening in style at the Augusta Downtown Alliance’s ‘Casino Royale 207’ starting at 7 .pm. Those attending this masquerade ball, which is sponsored by O&P Glass and MaineGeneral Health, are required to don semi-formal wear and a mask. Tickets are $25 each or $40 per couple. Guests will enjoy a customized hors d’oeuvres menu, a specialty cocktail, a silent auction as well as a live auction featuring local celebrities, mock “gambling” tables, photography by Dave Dostie and live entertainment including music by Chris Lothridge.
June 29 marks the return of Kennebec River Day, sponsored by the Kennebec Valley Chamber of Commerce. The event, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Mill Park along the Kennebec River, will offer “a day of endless possibilities” for all ages, according to the chamber. There will be craft vendors, music and food trucks as well as lawn games and special activities for children. For more information, contact the chamber at 207- 623-4559 or by emailing [email protected] The pavilion is full during the Kennebec River Brewfest on June 30, 2018, that was part of the the Kennebec River Day in Mill Park in Augusta. Kennebec Journal file photo by Joe Phelan
Also sponsored by the Chamber at Mill Park on June 29 from 11 a.m. to 4.pm. will be the Kennebec River Brewfest (age 21 and over), featuring a variety of local Maine breweries offering 4-oz. beer tastings under the pavilion. This year’s Brewfest, presented by Highbrow, will also for the first time it includes a number of local distilleries offering 1/2 oz. tastings of their spirits. Every attendee will receive a wristband, with a special wristband for your group’s designated driver. Live music entertainment will include Ron Bergeron Music, The Business, Memphis Lightning and The Court Jesters. For more details, prices and advance tickets, contact the chamber.
And that same evening, June 29, will mark the kickoff of the Front Street Music series. The concert will feature the southern roots rock, blues, R&B, funk and soul music of the renowned Jamie MacLean Trio. The concert takes place at the downtown Augusta riverfront, on Front Street behind Cushnoc Brewing. Gates open at 6:30 p.m., the music begins at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20 in advance online and $25 the day of the show. One-hundred of the proceeds will support the ongoing restoration of the historic landmark Colonial Theater.
Speaking of history, you won’t want to miss the unusual Independence Day observances hosted by Fort Western, the oldest existing (French and Indian War era) wooden garrison in North America, shining a unique light on 300 years of Maine and New England history. Augusta boasts not only a fourth of July parade, but thanks to Fort Western there will also be a 13-gun cannon salute, a ‘feu de joie’ (musket salute) and the annual traditional reading aloud of the Declaration of Independence, with Augusta Mayor Rollins doing the honors. Fireworks, also an annual Augusta Independence Day tradition, will be set off at Mill Park at 9 p.m. Re-enactors Jackie Fournier, left, and Stan Novak take down a Grand Union flag and swap it out for one with 13 stars and stripes on July 4, 2017, at Old Fort Western in Augusta. Kennebec Journal file photo by Joe Phelan
And for those whose appetite for history is whetted at the Fort on Independence Day, mark your calendar for Aug. 24 and 25 when Fort Western will stage a French and Indian war re-enactment.
Finally, for something completely different, the Augusta Downtown Alliance is also partnering with the Children’s Discovery Museum, to present the return of Movies in the Park. Waterfront Park, that is, in downtown Augusta.
The free outdoor summer movies will begin at dusk on four summer Thursday evenings. July 11 will be “date night,” July 18, “Throwback to the Classics,” and the Aug. 1 and Aug. 8 showings will be family films. Check out their “Movies in the Park 2019” event page on Facebook for more details about food, prizes, sponsors and movie titles as they are announced. Share

Read More…

Takeaway chef was called ‘worse than a dog’ after refusing to cook smelly ‘green-tinged’ chicken

Raja’s Indian Cuisine which has since closed (Image: Evening Gazette) Get the biggest daily stories by email Subscribe Thank you for subscribing See our privacy notice Could not subscribe, try again later Invalid Email
A takeaway chef who was called “worse than a dog” after raising concerns about food safety has been paid damages.
Zak Mohammed was shouted at, threatened and sworn at during a shift at Raja’s Indian Cuisine in Grangetown before being sacked without notice.
As a result the tandoori chef, who was 51 at the time, took his former employers to court and successfully sued them for unfair dismissal and racial harassment.
The case was heard last year and Mr Mohammed has since been awarded a total of £13,125. Read More New mayor Andy Preston scraps charge for heavy waste collections as part of review
The employment tribunal had heard how the chef lost his job of three years in 2017 after an argument at the Birchington Road premises.
He had spoken to his line manager, Mohammed Suleman, who was the father of the manager director, over his concerns about being asked to cook meat which he considered was unfit for preparation.
Mr Mohammed said he had noticed that the chicken which he was asked to prepare had a strong odour and had a green tinge to its colour. Raja’s Indian Birchington Avenue (Image: Evening Gazette)
Mr Mohammed made a recording of the conversation and alleged Mr Suleman shouted and swore at him.
He said Mr Suleman responded saying: “If you’re not going to listen to me get out.
“I have got powers. I’ll get you kicked out of the country and if you go back to home I’ll get you done there – I’ve got powers.”
He claimed Mr Suleman told him: ”I’ll vanish you from the world – get out of here, I’ll kick you out of here.”
Mr Mohammed who earned £9,360 a year working 24 hours a week at the takeaway, also alleged Mr Suleman told him he would be beaten and said he was “worse than a dog”.
His clothing was thrown in a bin and he had to go home in his chef’s whites.
The incident at work caused him anxiety and loss of sleep, he told the tribunal, and he had sought medical help. Teesside Justice Centre (Image: Evening Gazette)
Mr Mohammed’s evidence was not challenged during the tribunal and he was described by the panel judge as “a credible witness”.
The Middlesbrough chef, who has since found other employment, was awarded £13,125 for injury to feelings and unfair dismissal.
Teesside Live has attempted to contact the bosses from Raja’s Indian Cuisine which has since closed.
Like the Teesside Live Facebook page to get the latest news in your feed and join our group dedicated to court and crime coverage . You can also follow us on Twitter and Instagram .
To receive alerts on the latest breaking news, download our free app for Apple or Android here . Have a story? Contact us on social media or email . Read More

Read More…

Understanding The Concepts Of Acculturation

Understanding The Cin wizard casepts Of AcculturationIt is very in-chief(postnominal) to understand the concepts of ethnic change in the lead discussing acculturation. A bilinear model regarding the changeion to a new assimilation is proposed by John Berry and his colleagues . These authors theorized the following four acculturation attitudes consolidation, assimilation, separation, and marginalization based on combining all high or low levels of acculturation and enculturation (see Figure 3.1). The meaning of these four unalike attitudes is explained.As John Berry claims, integration involves immigrants accepting the new purification, while maintaining close ties with their original culture. These immigrants learn and follow topical anesthetic customs without losing their bond with their customs from their homeland. They argon both highly assimilated and enculturated as sh declargon in the diagram below . Assimilation, on the new(prenominal)wise hand, involves immigran ts who totally accept the new culture, and reject their original culture. These immigrants will learn the language and follow local customs so thoroughly that no trace of their original heritage remains. People become assimilated in American purchase order when they erased their heathenish identity, unlearned their heathenish cultural get alongs and beliefs, and accepted the core set of mainstream American culture .Separation occurs when immigrants reject their new culture and live according to the customs of their original culture. These immigrants blend in to a new culture and find people from their homeland, and live as if they be still in their original culture, just now in a different place . Marginalization represents immigrants who reject the new as well as their original culture. These immigrants no longer feel comfortable with their heritage, but the new culture does non appeal to them either .According to Berry, the attitude affects the emergence of acculturation . For example, as immigrants prepare to go to the U.S., they may suck in decided to assimilate into the culture. However, upon arrival they call that they reject many customs of their new country. As a provide they change their attitude from assimilation to integration. Thus, the attitude changes according to the various traits of the immigrants. Portes and Rumbaut argue for ternion major factors that can usurpation and change the attitude of immigrants.According to Portes and Rumbaut three factors are vital to understanding the acculturation trajectories of contemporary migrants. The first factor is their educational background, fluency in the incline language, and economic and class status in their homeland. The countenance factor refers to the social policies of the host government and the historical and contemporary perceptions and attitudes of the mainstream society toward a particular immigrant group. The third factor is the immigrants social presence and networks and their family structure. The educational background of the immigrant groups and their social class back home are the social and cultural capital that they bring with them, which has an enormous impact on their economic assimilation. Although all three factors help determine how immigrants will acculturate into the larger mainstream American society, the second factor is the virtually relevant to shaping the acculturation outcomes of many nonwhite immigrants, especially of those immigrant groups who have pocket-sized social and cultural capital and are not white. unconstipated though the Indian Diaspora is racially distinct from the larger American mainstream, professional Indian Americans have an abundance of human-cultural capital acquired through their advanced education, knowledge of the English language, and social class in their home country. The low political profile of the Indian Diaspora alike gives them a degree of invisibility that shields them from the scrutiny of the larger mainstream culture .The three major factors of acculturation presented by Portes and Rumbaut naturally change the course of the process for many immigrants. For example, an immigrant with poor English skills, who is determined to assimilate, may find it inconceivable because of the language barrier and decide instead to integrate into or even separate from the host culture. Bhatias work illustrates the process of how these factors affect Indian immigrants as they adapt to their new culture.Indians after immigrating to America, inevitably undergo some type of adjustment or acculturation process. Though inside the home Indian immigrants could maintain their culture, once outside the home, the system or society itself forced Indians into the acculturation process on all levels of culture. It is necessary to understand how immigrants acculturate in the U.S. As irrigate and Bhatia suggest, unlike many Caribbean immigrants, most Indian professionals are middle class, live in subu rban America, and are not subject to the structural inequalities of low wages, racism, and crazy neighborhoods . However, in that location are some parallels in how both these groups of migrants come to terms with their racial and ethnic identity. On adept hand, the Indian migrants are very knightly of their Indian ethnicity and heritage. On the other hand, they invoke what Bhatia calls the discourse of selfsame(prenominal)ness and universal humanity to distance themselves from their racial and ethnic identity . In other words, they get wind that certain costs associated with being Indian are painful and hurtful and that invoking the discourse of sameness is meant to establish equivalence with the white majority. For example, Indian immigrants compare their captures in the work place with those experiences of white Americans in an attempt to show equality with the majority. In one of Bhatias interviews an immigrant credits his own hard work and accomplishments for his positi on in the company, while If I was a white American male, you know, maybe there would be prejudice because Im too short. So being an Indian, I dont think it spue me at a different spot. Or at least, thats how I feel .Sunil Bhatias study demonstrates that the members of the transnational Indian Diaspora are more comfortable with a cultural identity than a racial identity because their insertion in the transnational Diaspora has transformed them from being Indian to being people of food color .The look for illustrates the multiform nature of the acculturation of Indian immigrants. As demonstrated above, the attitude of the immigrants toward their new host country is only a starting point for the process. As these immigrants experience their new culture, their own personal background reshapes their attitude, and changes the management they interact with people, regardless of nationality. Clearly Indian immigrants move through a process as they acculturate to their new surroundings .While Berry, Portes and Rumbaut and Bahtia all approach the subject from different directions and perspectives, and though they may not agree with one another, it is clear that each body of research illustrates a complicated process of acculturation. Taken individually the research results may appear to be contradictory, however, a closer analysis shows that their research actually supports one another. The attitude of the immigrants, studied by Berry, plays a major spot in the process, but these attitudes may change in response to the three major factors touching acculturation presented by Portes and Rumbaut. This ever changing process has been documented in Bhatias work, which demonstrates that immigrants adapt individually to their new culture, in this case the coupled States. That means there is no set formula for determining what will happen to an immigrant once he or she arrives. This process takes place within any immigrant to any country, thereof it will be beneficial to demonstrate specifically some of the elements unique to Indian immigrants, and how these elements fascinate the process.3.2 Influencing Elements of Acculturation3.2.1 FamilyPerhaps the most important element to carry on for Indian immigrants is family. As these Indian immigrants relocate to the U.S., start a family and begin the process of finding their place in society, it is important to understand the processes which influence the impact of acculturation on their families. To first-generation Indian immigrants and their children, family plays a vital use in their lives.Hodge agrees with this assessment, and points out the stark difference amidst Indian culture and westbound culture. westerly culture emphasizes the individual, material success and secularism. The Indian culture, by contrast, places much more value on community, especially the family, and on spiritual matters .Acculturation plays an important role in understanding virtually the family structure, including f amily conflict as well as differences between first and second-generations. For example, the process and outcomes of acculturation determine which values are important to the first-generation and therefore retained and passed on to the succeeding generations. In addition, the process of acculturation might also determine stayations for subsequent generations. For example an assimilated individual would expect the same from his or her children.Most of the work reviewed on acculturation includes some variables related to the family structure, including family conflict, specifically intergenerational family conflict.Some scholars dedicated their studies to South Asian families. Among them, for example, Mathews provided a more widely distributed consideration of South Asian families to explain how they function. First, she explains the relationship of the family in a social order, where the father is usually considered the head of the family, which continues to be the traditional rep resentation of Indian families in America. Furthermore, she describes the role of both father and mother in the family, in which the mother usually takes care of the household and raises the children and the father usually serves as purpose maker and provider .Bringing up the children in a new and different culture, which often conflicts with their core ethnic values, creates problems for not only the parents but also for their children. As values may be extracted from both the native culture and host culture, it is inevitable that conflicts arise. Thus, in this case both parents and children struggle to balance family values of their own culture with the family values of the mainstream culture. In addition, according to the traditional Indian family, the eldest person is considered to be a decision maker such as career decisions for family members or approving marriages. This naturally means parents, especially in the first-generation, make the important decisions .Clearly the att itude of immigrants from India to the U.S. will be greatly influenced by the strength of their bond to their traditional family values. This attitude will steer them through their acculturation process.3.2.2 DressAccording to Khandelwal, Indian American immigrants have a commingle type of acculturation regarding dress. It is quite different for men as compared to women. In the case of men, they adopted western dress more easily than women ascribable to the influence of colonialism. Indian American men started wearing a western vogue of dress even from the first-generation. However, most of these first-generation Indian immigrants do not have a correct idea of the weather and climate system of the U.S. For example, an Indian man, who came to America in the winter of 1994, was wearing a light silk suit and shivering outside. atomic itemize 53 old man saw him and told him Son, this is not the time to show off your new silk suit. I told you how it is going to be cold here today. If you catch a cold or become sick, nobody will take care of you in this country. Here you have to take care of yourself. All the money your family worn out(p) on making this suit for America will go down drain in one doctors visit here. There will be other occasions when you can use this suit .Indian women immigrants are recognized mainly by their traditional dress called sari. therefore many female Indian immigrants try to preserve their culture by continuing to wear this kind of traditional dress. Saris are considered works of art receivable to the careful design and color combinations. However, in the workplace they alternatively wear western style clothing. An Indian woman who immigrated to America during the 1990s was forced to wear westward dress due to her job requirements as a cashier in a store. She said the following See, I have to wear these mens clothes here. Its ok because I am doing mens job here. Our clothes do not fit in this American culture. To feel Indian, we ca n wear our own clothes when we are not on the jobBefore coming to America, she had never worked outside of her house and wore only traditional clothing. However, she adapted to the Western dress because American culture forced her to do so .Khandelwal continues to suggest that US born immigrant children are unlikely to continue wearing traditional dress. For example, young female immigrants in America prefer having readily made kurta-pyjama outfits to the saris, because they do not know how to wear these saris . At the same time, weddings among Indian Americans still continue to be traditional, in which the couple wears traditional dresses either bought in America or brought from India during a visit to the home country. However, due to some specific reasons, some of the Indian American immigrants and their children mostly use western styles only. For example, Nikki Haley, a daughter of Sikh Indian immigrants and one of the current rising stars in the Republican Party, wears mostly a suit, rejecting the sari in order to relieve oneself greater public acceptance while running for governor of South Carolina in November 2010 .There is a significant difference in clothing style between India and the U.S. Immigrants who desire to retain their cultural style of dress will have different experiences with acculturation than those who are willing to accept western standards. This plays a bigger role in the lives of women immigrants than for men.3.2.3 ReligionReligion plays a major role in the life style of Asian Indian Americans. Religious beliefs and practices are intricately interwoven with the aspects of acculturation and cultural identity of these immigrants. So it is important to understand the influence of religion on the acculturation of Asian Indian immigrants.India is a country of diverse religions such as Hinduism, Islam, Christianity, Judaism and Buddhism. Among these religions, 82.6 % of Indians practice the Hindu religion which makes up a clear majority of the population, while the remaining 17.4% of the population practices Islam, Christianity, Sikhism, Judaism and Parsis . These percentages mull the population of India however, Pakistan and Bangladesh have larger percentages of population which practice Islam. The existence of many religions in India indicates that religion plays a major role for Indian people. Thus, most of the Indian people have one sacred belief, whether it is Hindu, Islam, Christianity, etc.Each immigrant community brought its own sociological traditions from its place of origin, including ethical and religious behaviors. In the same way when Indians first started to migrate to the United States, they essentially had to carry out religious practices and teachings on their own . As the population of immigrants practicing Hinduism increased, so increased the number of religious organizations. With the development of a greater Hindu population practicing religion at home and in specific religious organizations became the norm. Leonard also noted that as the number of Indian immigrants has increased, religion has naturally become more important, as it has become a part of Indian American identity. Hinduism helps Indian Americans differentiate themselves in the United States, from mainstream U.S. culture as well as from other Asian and South Asian groups .Like earlier immigrants, the post-1965 Indian immigrants maintained their belief system, which provided an important way to keep and transmit their values to following generations .Most of the Indian immigrants in America can practice their religion. As an Indian immigrant Rupu notes I think thats what it is about America. Thats what brought everybody here. Its that being American you can be who you want to be and still be an American. Theres a freedom of religion, a freedom of expression .In America, the practice of Hinduism reflects its American surroundings. For instance, most related religious activities take place on weekends in orde r to suit work schedules and priests explain sacred texts in English, quite a than Hindi or Sanskrit .Asian American immigrants faced lot of challenges due to strong religious beliefs which influenced their acculturation. For example, their religious beliefs may be challenged or even presumptuousness up as they are exposed to the religious beliefs, practices, symbols, and rhetoric of the mainstream culture. For Asian American immigrants who are faced with prejudice, racism, and discrimination, religious conversion may provide a sense of refuge and facilitate processes of assimilation and acculturation, which may explain why the majority of Asian Americans in the United States identify themselves as Christian . that one should not assume that Asian American immigrants adopt Christianity merely as a way to be accepted by the majority culture. Indeed, for some Asian American immigrants, Christianity is their religion of choice.However, it is different in the case of immigrants from India. As Khandelwal claims, unlike other Asian immigrants, Indians who are mostly from Hindu religion, have displayed little questioning of their faiths and they are unlikely to convert to another religion. Moreover, Hinduism, the plethoric religion in India, faces the challenge of being a minority religion in America, where Christianity is dominant . These immigrants will therefore face the challenge of maintaining their belief system in the minority, which is opposite from their homeland. This in manoeuvre, will affect their acculturation process greatly as they struggle with their religious views.Clearly religion plays a major role in the process of adapting to a new culture. Religion is especially important for Asian Indian immigrants, who already place a high value on their own belief system. Whether holding fast to their own religion, or converting to some other religion, these immigrants will practice some kind of religion after their arrival in the U.S.3.2.4 FoodIndians w ho have a vast variety of food habits have a hard time adapting easily to Western food. single of the major causes for this lies in the great number of religions practiced by Indian immigrants. As a result of religious food laws many of Indias people do not consume animal products, which include eggs. The work of Bankston and Hidalgo shows that Indian immigrants are highly noncompliant to change their food consumption habits. For example, most Indian Hindus avoid beef and pork, while Pakistanis avoid pork and alcoholic beverages. Most Indians prefer meals from their own culture. However, in households with children, American style meals have become more frequent .Indians have preferred home-cooked meals for a long time, and it has been a part of their culture. They believe that eating at home together with all members of their family is an important ritual for bonding with each other. Many Indian Americans continue to preserve their traditional food habits in America. However, mos t of the Indians are also adapting to Western food. One example is that pizza is the next alternative food in popularity when compared to their native foods, as well as a timesaver when cooking at home. Indian parents in America expect their children to appreciate home-cooked food more than meals eaten outside the home, although sometimes US born children have a hard time understanding why they need to eat homemade food .Some Indians run Indian restaurants, where they serve national food for not only Indians but also other Americans. As Indian food is mainly spicy, the waiters ask American customers if they prefer their food mild, medium or spicy. One owner of an Indian restaurant had the following to say I have seen situations where Indian food can send them sweating all over running to go down their spiciness by drinking more water or juices that is not good for our business, so we try to accommodate them .For many Indian immigrants food plays a major role in the acculturation pr ocess. While religion prohibits complete adaptation to American food, traditional spices and preparation of Indian cuisine varies greatly from that of Western cuisine. This also plays a role in preventing some Indians from accepting the new style of food. Naturally everyone must eat, therefore food plays a major role in the acculturation process.3.2.5 Marriage CustomsAccording to Indian tradition, Indians get married based on an arranged marriage usually within their own community. This tradition has been preserved from generation to generation. The selection of a marriage partner depends on a set of persons recommended by the partners families (with the full approval and consent of the parents). Family or community members continue to be involved in the selection of a suitable mate. The family and educational backgrounds of the potential partner are thoroughly examined before introductions are made. Indians believe that their children will be happier if they are married to someone who shares the same history, tradition, religion, and social customs and who will be able to impart these values to their children, so ensuring the continuity of the community. They believe that such marriages made within the community tend to be more stable and long lasting than those that cross community borders .In fact, many American born Asian Indians encounter tremendous breastworks in dating and marriage. On the one hand, their parents warn them not to date until they marry and expect that the children get married according to an arranged marriage which is a custom brought over from India . Indian parents believe that sexual contact before the marriage is profligate and corrupt. On the other hand, the American born children have friends for whom dating is very common and normal. These immigrants desire to fit in the environment in which they find themselves. Accordingly there have been many cases where some Indian lovers are secretly married, and in the worst case, some co uples have committed suicide as of result of their relationship being rejected by family. However, some Asian Indian American men and women still prefer to return to their homelands for arranged marriages. In these cases, family members at home seek out appropriate possibilities for marriage to their son or daughter. At the right time, the son or daughter returns home to choose from the candidates assembled by their family .Even the other religion practiced by these immigrants plays a role in the process of acculturation. For example Muslim parents usually accept interfaith marriages for boys, because children customarily follow the fathers faith. However, daughters face a greater challenge because parents do not want their grandchildren to lose their Islamic affiliation .Some Indians came after their marriage in India, whereas some came as students. Most of the students have returned to India for getting married. There are also a few instances where an Indian married an American be cause of the relationship between the countries and individuals. Other Indians have dated Americans. However, the fact is that dating is not a traditional Indian custom and Indian parents tend to warn their children not to date, although they are slowly yielding to their offsprings demands to be allowed to date .The situation of arranged marriages in India is changing too. As second-generation immigrants Sanjay and Veera observed thatEven in India you see people pushing back and becoming more Westernized, more mainstream. Ive seen my cousins, and by, 184 leaps and bounds, theyve gone past what is traditional.Indian American young adults dont drink and smoke and have lived a sheltered life. Theyve always lived at home and havent gone out much. My cousins in India are more advanced. A lot of my cousins married their boyfriends .Customs surrounding marriage can have a major impact on the acculturation process. Especially for those coming from India, where marriages are still arranged b y family, the concept of dating before marriage creates an obstacle for many parents and their children. While customs among Indian immigrants are changing, allowing for young people to find their own spouse, many first-generation immigrants have a hard time allow go of old habits. For these families the acculturation process will be influenced by the marriage customs of the U.S.3.2.6 LanguageDifferent languages are spoken in India depending on different regions. Some languages are quite independent and difficult to understand by the neighboring people who speak a different language. In spite of these language differences, most people are able to speak Hindi due to its status as a national language and English due to British colonial rule for two centuries in India. The Indian government recognized the English language as an additional official language. Language is one of the main norms that brings people together and helps them to adapt to the U.S. Proficient English knowledge i s one of the reasons Indians migrate to America, and it also helps them to assimilate more easily into life in America .After 1965 most of the Indians arrived in America from different language groups. However, they all knew English. Most immigrants join Indian communities, where they can practice not only Hindi but also their regional language.As Khandelwal claims, first and second-generation immigrants practice different uses of language in America. As for the first-generation, they tend to speak English and at the same time they tend to maintain their native language. However, first-generation immigrants face linguistic problems to speak American English due to their thick Indian accent. The second-generation immigrants who are already born and brought up in the US are usually thought to speak English with an American accent and rejected their parents Indian accent, in turn their parents considered their childrens English as too American. These second-generation Indian immigrants are involved with Indian languages through movies, songs or when they visit India. Though they understand their parents language, most of them are not able to speak or to write it .According to Khandelwal, the first-generation immigrants tend to be more integrated talk both English and their mother tongue, whereas the second-generation grows up speaking English as a mother tongue and learn their parents language only to satisfy their parents wishes.Obviously, language plays an important role in the acculturation process for Indian immigrants. While many immigrants have already learned English before they arrived, their English proficiency affects their ability to assimilate into the new culture.

Read More…

Best New Restaurant: Summerhouse at the Liguanea Club

Best New Restaurant: Summerhouse at the Liguanea Club
Thursday, June 06, 2019 Tweet
We are deeply honoured to receive the award for Best New Restaurant at the Jamaica Observer Table Talk Food Awards 2019. Incidentally, this week marks the first anniversary of Summerhouse at the Liguanea Club. We opened in a whirlwind of activity last year, and this has been one of the most rewarding, and simultaneously challenging years that we have had.
Last year we not only published our second cookbook, Provisions , but we also completed the first leg of our US book tour, among other events, and finished up working on an ongoing consulting project. We opened Summerhouse — hiring, training the team, building out and equipping the space in just three months.
To win at this time is significant for the brand and adds to the year-end celebrations of our team. We have been lucky to find a great team that has supported us as we have challenged each other to grow and succeed — which never feels comfortable. But one thing we know after 25 years of doing this is that anything that requires you to expand always feels difficult — at least the first time around.
We recently returned from a series of events in New York City. We were invited to present at TEDx Columbus Circle: The Bold & the Brave — a theme which was totally in alignment with our recent work around heritage and the women of the Caribbean. Among the other presenters were a mathematician, a NASCAR driver and a Fortune 500 CEO. It was empowering to know that we were sharing the stage with these amazing thinkers and doers.
Our talk, “Finding Courage in the Truth of our Ancestors”, was met with great interest and positive responses. We see it as an honour and privilege to tell the stories of our ancestors to a global audience and even more gratifying when you realise that this audience is actually very interested in hearing those stories. Our talk will be live on the site soon.
We followed this with a restaurant takeover at the James Beard Award-winning restaurant Fish And Game by Zak Pelaccio and Jori Jayne Emde in Hudson, New York. Zak came to dinner at Summerhouse a few weeks back and said he loved our vibe and our food and invited us to do the takeover. Of course, we were delighted. Fish and Game is a beautiful restaurant, the perfect space in which to recreate our signature West India Supper. It was a spectacular night — intimate, warm, cosy, fantastic food, incredible natural wines, open-hearth cooking, lots of laughter and great conversation. It was everything we could have ever dreamed of, and not only was it sold-out but we received rave reviews, to boot. It’s wonderful working with like minds — so gratifying. Zak said we opened people’s minds about West Indian cuisine that night. We sure hope so! We just know that we had a ball and made some fantastic new friends.
We have a practice that on our birthday we always make sure to take the time to check in — to look at how far we’ve come, celebrate our accomplishments, acknowledge the losses and clarify where we want to go. So naturally, we’ve done the same for Summerhouse, and we can promise that the upcoming year is going to be one of even more growth with a lot of exciting new adventures for the team and our customers along the way.
We start our first anniversary celebrations with a bang for Father’s Day — we have something extraordinary planned for the dads in our lives on June 17.
‘Summer is Coming’ — this was our opening campaign for a reason. Summer is the signature season for Summerhouse — it represents everything that we stand for — bright, colourful, joyful, vibrant Caribbean living, so naturally, we have a heck of a summer lined up at the restaurant with bigger, better and more expanded signature experiences.
The Veuve Cliquot Champagne Garden series will be back, with new summer menus. Unplugged live music is also on the calendar, and we even have a few more surprises in store as we round out the year with beautiful adventures and curated experiences for our customers to enjoy — as always, amazing music, simply delicious food and great drinks.
Provisions’ North American book tour continues as we step into fall just about September when we have another tour coming up to the southern US — with west coast to follow.
We will also be focusing on more special events and catering this year. Last year we had less time with so much going on, but our long-time loyal clients have been asking so we’re going back to where we started with Ciao Bella.
Summerhouse is a manifestation of our collective identity as West Indian women, sisters, entrepreneurs, cooks, homemakers. These aspects of ourselves are in the brand’s DNA. This year we’re really going to focus on fine-tuning and bringing those pieces of the puzzle together so that our customers can begin to really experience the ethos of the brand and what we represent.
— Michelle and Suzanne Rousseau
Co-principals, Summerhouse at The Liguanea Club
Now you can read the Jamaica Observer ePaper anytime, anywhere. The Jamaica Observer ePaper is available to you at home or at work, and is the same edition as the printed copy available at http://bit.ly/epaperlive ADVERTISEMENT

Read More…

Capella Bangkok Delves Into the Culinary Heritage of the Riverside Community

Capella Bangkok Delves Into the Culinary Heritage of the Riverside Community
Bangkok (Thailand) – June 3, 2019 ( travelindex.com ) – Capella Bangkok, the luxurious new boutique retreat nestled on the east bank of the legendary “River of Kings”, the Chao Phraya, will introduce guests to the rich cultural and culinary heritage of Charoenkrung, its charming and rapidly re-emerging riverside neighbourhood.
Charoenkrung was one of Bangkok’s main thoroughfares up until the early 20th Century, when trade and traffic still depended on the river. For centuries, new settlers docked on the shores of the Chao Phraya, bringing with them not only new thoughts and beliefs, but also fresh hopes and dreams. Charoenkrung became a bubbling melting pot of race, religion and cuisine, and it retains this vibrant character to this day.
Capella Bangkok’s head Thai chef, Wichian Trirattanavatin, was born in Charoenkrung, which makes him the perfect person to showcase the gastronomy of this diverse district. Chef Lek, as he is better known, has a lifelong connection with the neighbourhood; as a child he toured the area’s bustling markets and “hole in the wall” restaurants with his father, who worked as a chef in the area for 40 years. Many of the street food stalls and shophouse restaurants he frequented as a boy are still here today – often run by the same people – and he still pays them regular visits on his trusty scooter.
“It’s the sights, the sounds, the smells and above all the moments that make this place truly special,” Chef Lek says. “There’s so much food here; so much variety. And each dish, every recipe, tells its own story. Charoenkrung is part of my soul, so it is a great honour to introduce the cuisine of my home to international guests. Charoenkrung has always welcomed the world and Capella Bangkok will continue this proud legacy.”
Guests can discover a wide variety of street food snacks and authentic dishes on the streets of Charoenkrung, many of which have their roots in other countries and cultures. Chinese noodles, Southeast Asian satay and Indian curry puffs are all handmade for hungry locals, alongside classic Thai snacks such as moo ping (grilled pork skewers) and sai oua (Thai sausages). Many of the family-run stalls can trace their roots back multiple generations.
Around every corner hidden treasures await; countless reminders of the traditions of Chaorenkrung and the Chao Phraya, just waiting to be rediscovered.
Capella Bangkok will deliver exceptional and authentic dining experiences that are woven into the fabric of their destination. Following in his father’s footsteps, Chef Lek will combine time-honoured recipes and fresh ingredients with contemporary cooking techniques to elevate local cuisine to the highest levels of global gastronomy, delivering delectable and beautifully presented dishes in an exquisite riverfront setting.
John Blanco, General Manager of Capella Bangkok, comments: “At Capella Bangkok, we are focused on creating luxurious and highly authentic experiences that echo the traditions of our destination. Whether it is through art, entertainment or cuisine, we strive to showcase the rich culture of the Charoenkrung district. Our cuisine will reflect the re-awakening of this captivating Charoenkrung neighbourhood.”
The Capella Personal Assistants will help guests at Capella Bangkok craft their own local experiences, providing first-hand encounters with resident luminaries and inspiring them to create and share their own memories about the city’s most intriguing enclave: Charoenkrung.
About Capella Bangkok Capella Bangkok offers 101 suites and the city’s first riverfront villas located within the highly-anticipated Chao Phraya Estate, a more-than-14-acre prime waterfront land development that boasts unprecedented accessibility and 350 metres of riverfront real estate. Designed to evoke the feeling of a personal pied-à-terre with unobstructed views of the river from every room, the luxury property features a signature restaurant curated by celebrated Michelin-starred chef Mauro Colagreco, Auriga Wellness with an extensive list of carefully curated Asian therapies, Living Room — a light-filled, river-facing lounge that will host local artisans, music and culinary delights to reflect the neighbourhood’s passion for food, wellness and culture. Crafted local experiences, provided by the Capella Personal Assistant, will offer guests first-hand encounters with resident luminaries and inspire them to create and share their own memories about the city’s most intriguing enclave.
About Capella Hotel Group Capella Hotel Group, headquartered in Singapore with offices in China, Europe and USA, offers global hospitality management services through two distinct brands. Capella Hotels and Resorts is an ultra-luxury hotel, resort and residential concept designed for the most discerning travellers and offering personalized attention with locations in Düsseldorf, Shanghai, Singapore, Sanya and Ubud as well as hotels planned for Bangkok, Maldives and Sydney.
About Chao Phraya Estate The Chao Phraya Estate enjoys a prime waterfront location in Bangkok’s heritage quarter on an unprecedented 14.2 acres of land. The project is valued at approximately USD 1 billion and development features 3 unique properties – Four Seasons Private Residences Bangkok, Four Seasons Hotel Bangkok and Capella Hotel Bangkok. Construction started in Q3 2014 with expected completion in Q4 2018. The masterplan and design is by Hamiltons International with architecture by Dhevanand Architects Co., Ltd. and interior design by BAMO Inc. and PIA Interior Co., Ltd. The Landscape Designer is P Landscape Co., Ltd.
About Country Group Development Country Group Development (CGD) is the Thailand-based, international real estate development and investment arm of Country Group. With a proven track record of delivering bold and complex asset transformations including Four Seasons Private Residences Bangkok, Four Seasons Hotel Bangkok and Capella Hotel Bangkok; the company is a unique player in the market with a competitive edge from its diversified real estate strategy and ability to leverage from the Country Group affiliate network of companies.

Read More…

There’s snow place like Victoria’s alpine region in winter

MT BAW BAW
As one of the closest resorts to Melbourne, (two and half hours drive) Mt Baw Baw offers families and first-timers a chance to dip a toe in the snow and see if they like it. With guaranteed snow from the opening weekend though to October 1st, there is plenty of time to learn to ski or snowboard with lessons for all ages. Howling Huskys Tours are a great way to experience the beautiful dogs who live on the mountain. The wide range of tour options include a 45 minute family friendly tour (cuddles and photos included), to the 30 minute ‘Dog Sled Dash’ dog race. There is plenty of accommodation at the resort and three snow play areas for tobogganing, snowshoeing and snowmobile rides. Advanced skiers will not be forgotten with a terrain park offering jumps for advanced skiers and boarders. What’s new in 2019: Guaranteed snow: ​Thanks to their TechnoAlpin Snow Factory, Mt Baw Baw can now guarantee snow on its toboggan run, complete with magic carpet for an easy ride to the top. Guests can also enjoy guaranteed snow on beginner areas, with skiing available from the official season opening on the Queen’s Birthday long weekend. Food trucks galore : ​On major event weekends visitors can enjoy multiple themed food trucks, including Indian and Japanese cuisine and more, allowing for a wider range of food options on the mountain. Yukigassen: ​This year Baw Baw will kick off Yukigassen – a fast and fun Japanese snow fighting competition. Mt Baw Baw will host the National Championships with the winner getting a place in the International final in Japan. This event is also available for groups and schools all winter.
MT BULLER
Perhaps a favourite with Melburnians for its buzzing village vibe and range of activities and venues on offer, Mt Buller sits at 1,805 in elevation. It’s only three hours drive from the city making it do-able for a day trip, but far better to stay the night at one of a wide range of hostels, lodges, luxury hotels and private chalets and take the daily shuttles up the mountain. Buller offers Victoria’s largest lifting system, with 22 lifts covering 300 hectares of skiable terrain, plus more than 40 cafes, bars and restaurants and Australia’s highest cinema. The Buller Kids’ Centre caters for children from just three months old.
What’s New for 2019: Express chairlift: ​Mt Buller will launch its new $6m chairlift this winter. The gleaming 6-seater Bourke Street Express will whisk skiers up Bourke Street in just over two minutes. Koorooa Hotel re-opens – Mt Buller’s famous Kooroora Hotel has made way for a stylish new version including a new retail and rental precinct. More snow: ​Buller’s famous ‘snow guarantee’ goes up another notch in 2019. A new ‘mini’ SnowFactory will top up the cover in the snowplay parks and the learner areas at the Ski and Snowboard School. Skiers can book with the confidence of more snowballs, plumper snowmen and more beginner turns. Park & Ride Snowplay Express: ​A great new service rolls out for peak weekends in July and August this winter. Day visitors save money and skip the worry of wheel chains and driving in the snow by parking at Mirimbah and taking the free shuttle up to the village.
LAKE MOUNTAIN
At only two hours drive from the city, Lake Mountain offers an easily-accessible day visit, as well as low-cost skiing on cross-country trails. It’s great for international visitors short on time and first-timers looking for a taste of snow action. Snow clothing and equipment hire can be ordered online to click and collect. Toboggan slope, snowshoeing, flying fox, laser skirmish, snow tubing and cross-country skiing are all on offer with guaranteed snow for tobogganing and snowplay thanks to state of the art snowmaking systems. The on mountain dining at Lake Mountain Café makes it easy for families who may need quick and regular respite from the cold. Accommodation can be found nearby at Marysville, Buxton, Narbethong and Healesville. What’s new in 2019: Magic Carpets – Brought in at the end of the 2018 season, the new magic carpets at Lake Mountain Alpine Resort have been hugely popular. Snow-goers simply step on the carpet (like a snow travelator) and the carpet does all the work, taking tobogganers and skiers up to the top of the slope – and saving daddy’s legs! Guaranteed snow: Lake Mountain Alpine resort has had a snow guarantee for its village toboggan run for many years, however with a new TechnoAlpin Snow Factory, the resort can now offer a greater level of snow on both the Village and Koala creek toboggan runs from opening weekend, as well as a dedicated cross-country loop if mother nature doesn’t come to the party on time.
DINNER PLAIN Close to Mt Hotham – which is around four and a half hours from Melbourne – Dinner Plain offers a more relaxed vibe and no fee for getting on the mountain. It’s great for both families looking for an easy alpine adventure, or for those who want the best of both worlds, with shuttle buses taking skiers on the 10 minute drive to Mt Hotham. The Snow Park is perfect for beginners and families, with gentle slopes and lessons available and activities including tobogganing, snow tubing, night skiing, snow play, skiing, snowboarding, dog sledding. Dinner Plain is home to Blizzard Brewing Company, Australia’s highest brewery, and the Onsen Retreat + Spa, a Japanese-inspired 40 degree outdoor Onsen perfect for bathing and restoration after skiing and snowboarding.
What’s new in 2019: Photographer Karl Gray has opened a new gallery space and will offer workshops around the Dinner Plain/Mt Hotham area for keen amateur photographers.
MT STIRLING Last but definitely not least, Mt Stirling is only three hours drive from Melbourne and features an authentic alpine adventure with mountain huts, backcountry skiing, snowshoeing and more. It’s an easy and scenic drive from Melbourne through the Yarra Valley to Mansfield. The mountain and offers 68km of cross-country ski trails and cross-country ski lessons for all ages and levels.
Mt Stirling is also home to the Alpine Winter Camp, a unique ski-in, ski-out accommodation option above the snowline. Operated by Stirling Experience, the camp features a central tepee for dining and socialising around the pot belly stove, and seven accommodation tents on raised, insulated platforms. Meals can be delivered. There’s snow place like Victoria’s alpine region in winter So many puns so little time, but with early snow at some of Victoria’s flagship snow resorts, the time is now for visitors to book their winter snow play break.
MT BAW BAW
As one of the closest resorts to Melbourne, (two and half hours drive) Mt Baw Baw offers families and first-timers a chance to dip a toe in the snow and see if they like it. With guaranteed snow from the opening weekend though to October 1st, there is plenty of time to learn to ski or snowboard with lessons for all ages. Howling Huskys Tours are a great way to experience the beautiful dogs who live on the mountain. The wide range of tour options include a 45 minute family friendly tour (cuddles and photos included), to the 30 minute ‘Dog Sled Dash’ dog race. There is plenty of accommodation at the resort and three snow play areas for tobogganing, snowshoeing and snowmobile rides. Advanced skiers will not be forgotten with a terrain park offering jumps for advanced skiers and boarders. What’s new in 2019: Guaranteed snow: ​Thanks to their TechnoAlpin Snow Factory, Mt Baw Baw can now guarantee snow on its toboggan run, complete with magic carpet for an easy ride to the top. Guests can also enjoy guaranteed snow on beginner areas, with skiing available from the official season opening on the Queen’s Birthday long weekend. Food trucks galore : ​On major event weekends visitors can enjoy multiple themed food trucks, including Indian and Japanese cuisine and more, allowing for a wider range of food options on the mountain. Yukigassen: ​This year Baw Baw will kick off Yukigassen – a fast and fun Japanese snow fighting competition. Mt Baw Baw will host the National Championships with the winner getting a place in the International final in Japan. This event is also available for groups and schools all winter.
MT BULLER
Perhaps a favourite with Melburnians for its buzzing village vibe and range of activities and venues on offer, Mt Buller sits at 1,805 in elevation. It’s only three hours drive from the city making it do-able for a day trip, but far better to stay the night at one of a wide range of hostels, lodges, luxury hotels and private chalets and take the daily shuttles up the mountain. Buller offers Victoria’s largest lifting system, with 22 lifts covering 300 hectares of skiable terrain, plus more than 40 cafes, bars and restaurants and Australia’s highest cinema. The Buller Kids’ Centre caters for children from just three months old.
What’s New for 2019: Express chairlift: ​Mt Buller will launch its new $6m chairlift this winter. The gleaming 6-seater Bourke Street Express will whisk skiers up Bourke Street in just over two minutes. Koorooa Hotel re-opens – Mt Buller’s famous Kooroora Hotel has made way for a stylish new version including a new retail and rental precinct. More snow: ​Buller’s famous ‘snow guarantee’ goes up another notch in 2019. A new ‘mini’ SnowFactory will top up the cover in the snowplay parks and the learner areas at the Ski and Snowboard School. Skiers can book with the confidence of more snowballs, plumper snowmen and more beginner turns. Park & Ride Snowplay Express: ​A great new service rolls out for peak weekends in July and August this winter. Day visitors save money and skip the worry of wheel chains and driving in the snow by parking at Mirimbah and taking the free shuttle up to the village.
LAKE MOUNTAIN
At only two hours drive from the city, Lake Mountain offers an easily-accessible day visit, as well as low-cost skiing on cross-country trails. It’s great for international visitors short on time and first-timers looking for a taste of snow action. Snow clothing and equipment hire can be ordered online to click and collect. Toboggan slope, snowshoeing, flying fox, laser skirmish, snow tubing and cross-country skiing are all on offer with guaranteed snow for tobogganing and snowplay thanks to state of the art snowmaking systems. The on mountain dining at Lake Mountain Café makes it easy for families who may need quick and regular respite from the cold. Accommodation can be found nearby at Marysville, Buxton, Narbethong and Healesville. What’s new in 2019: Magic Carpets – Brought in at the end of the 2018 season, the new magic carpets at Lake Mountain Alpine Resort have been hugely popular. Snow-goers simply step on the carpet (like a snow travelator) and the carpet does all the work, taking tobogganers and skiers up to the top of the slope – and saving daddy’s legs! Guaranteed snow: Lake Mountain Alpine resort has had a snow guarantee for its village toboggan run for many years, however with a new TechnoAlpin Snow Factory, the resort can now offer a greater level of snow on both the Village and Koala creek toboggan runs from opening weekend, as well as a dedicated cross-country loop if mother nature doesn’t come to the party on time.
DINNER PLAIN Close to Mt Hotham – which is around four and a half hours from Melbourne – Dinner Plain offers a more relaxed vibe and no fee for getting on the mountain. It’s great for both families looking for an easy alpine adventure, or for those who want the best of both worlds, with shuttle buses taking skiers on the 10 minute drive to Mt Hotham. The Snow Park is perfect for beginners and families, with gentle slopes and lessons available and activities including tobogganing, snow tubing, night skiing, snow play, skiing, snowboarding, dog sledding. Dinner Plain is home to Blizzard Brewing Company, Australia’s highest brewery, and the Onsen Retreat + Spa, a Japanese-inspired 40 degree outdoor Onsen perfect for bathing and restoration after skiing and snowboarding.
What’s new in 2019: Photographer Karl Gray has opened a new gallery space and will offer workshops around the Dinner Plain/Mt Hotham area for keen amateur photographers.
MT STIRLING Last but definitely not least, Mt Stirling is only three hours drive from Melbourne and features an authentic alpine adventure with mountain huts, backcountry skiing, snowshoeing and more. It’s an easy and scenic drive from Melbourne through the Yarra Valley to Mansfield. The mountain and offers 68km of cross-country ski trails and cross-country ski lessons for all ages and levels.
Mt Stirling is also home to the Alpine Winter Camp, a unique ski-in, ski-out accommodation option above the snowline. Operated by Stirling Experience, the camp features a central tepee for dining and socialising around the pot belly stove, and seven accommodation tents on raised, insulated platforms. Meals can be delivered. This

Read More…

Indian Food travelling culinary at Ermou street Greek. “pertokoan tertua” by Dimas Yunani

Videos June 6, 2019 Orektiko is an appetizing taste into the finest Greek cuisine. We provide you with all sorts of mouth watering news, recipes and videos from the region. Contact us:

Read More…

On My Pinboard: Vasuki Vaibhav

Kaagadada Doniyalli’ song fame Vasuki Vaibhav is among the leading singers in the Kannada industry. A journalism graduate and theatre artiste, he made his debut as a music composer for ‘Rama Rama Re’ in 2016. Having worked in other regional industries, Vaibhav is noted for his work in ‘Sarkari Hiriya Prathamika Shaale, Kasaragodu’ and ‘Ondalla Eradalla’.
Inspiration
B V Karanth
“My father K Jayaram is my first inspiration. A businessman, he was also interested in arts and theatre; I learnt how to maintain a balance in life from him. Apart from him, theatre artiste and film director B V Karanth is another person I look up to; his compositions and theatre presence are an inspiration in itself. Also, theatre teaches one the importance of teamwork. On the whole, music and theatre are two things that keep me going.”
Music
Vishal Bharadwaj
“I look up to music composer Vishal Bharadwaj, whose compositions are true to the content. The music gets to you even if you sing without any lyrics. My grandmother, a Carnatic
singer, is my first guru. She taught me the basics of music. Theatre includes all genres of music, from folk to western, which is another reason for my inclination towards it. Mohammed Rafi, Kishore Kumar, Shankar Mahadevan, S P Balasubrahmanyam, Hariharan, Yesudas are a few of my favourites.
Travel
Shivamogga
“I am an avid traveller and usually make time to travel at least once a month. I like visiting places that have a lot of greenery. My go-to place is Shivamogga. Whenever I am low, or I don’t have anything planned, I pick up my bags and head there. I visited Kashmir four years ago and fell in love with it. Eastern India, Bali, Turkey, London are some of the places on my must-visit list.”
Films
Charlie Chaplin
“I am a huge fan of Charlie Chaplin and have seen all his films. I like his sarcasm, humour and the message implied in the movie. Coming to films, ‘Nagamandala’, ‘Bhootayyana Maga Ayyu’, ‘Chinnari Mutha’ are a few of my favourites. I also like director Puttanna Kanagal’s films. I admire actors Kamal Haasan, Rajkumar, Ananth Nag, Amitabh Bachchan and Naseeruddin Shah; they don’t act, they become the characters themselves. I also like watching international films, something I picked up while pursuing my masters in journalism.”
Books
Poornachandra Tejaswi
“I like Poornachandra Tejaswi’s works including ‘Karvalo’, ‘Annana Nenapu’ and ‘Jugaari Cross’. Jayanth Kaikini, GS Shivarudrappa, Yashvanth Chithala, Chandrashekhara Kambara are a few other authors that I read. Also, I go by the author and not the genre when I pick up a book. I like analysing their style of writing along with the stories
and content.”
Food
Rasmalai
“I am a foodie. I like Indian food the best. I am up for ‘rasmalai’ and mom-made ‘haalbai’ any time of the day. I also like exploring the different types of regional cuisines. If I go on a trip, I make sure to try the regional cuisine.”

Read More…

The article actually is really vague but makes it sound like this isn’t actually a map of countries. It’s a map of tags on recipes corresponding to different “cuisines”, so whether people called their recipe canadian cusine or angolan cuisine or indian cuisine or w/e. I think the relationship that different foods have to “cuisine” labels and the people that use their source app probably vastly affects the results.

Read More…