Fast Growing Indian Fast Casual, Curry Up Now, Secures First New Jersey Location in Newark

Fast Growing Indian Fast Casual, Curry Up Now, Secures First New Jersey Location in Newark

Fast Growing Indian Fast Casual, Curry Up Now, Secures First New Jersey Location in Newark June 4, 2019 ·
Curry Up Now has secured its first of five locations planned for Northern New Jersey in Newark at 58 Halsey Street, which is slated to open in early Fall of this year.
The Innovative Indian Concept Will Open In The City’s Business District This Fall
Newark, NJ ( RestaurantNews.com ) Curry Up Now, the largest and fastest growing Indian fast casual concept in the United States, has secured its first of five locations planned for Northern New Jersey in Newark at 58 Halsey Street. The restaurant, slated to make its debut in early Fall, will open within a mixed-use development alongside tenants like Whole Foods, Petco, and Barnes & Noble. This opening will mark the first Curry Up Now location in the Northeast, and joins more than 40 franchised units in development across the country.
“We were thrilled to land our first Curry Up Now location in Newark’s business district, in a fast-growing neighborhood in the heart of the city, close to Rutgers University, Prudential Center, Red Bull Arena, and major businesses in downtown,” said Pritesh Benjamin, New Jersey franchisee. “We’re very proud to soon introduce Curry Up Now’s Indian street food and innovative eats to the people of Newark, where we know our guests will not only experience high-quality Indian cuisine but also an enhanced ambiance deeply inspired by the brand’s Indian roots.”
“It’s exciting to be entering into new markets across the country and to have the opportunity to spread Curry Up Now’s iconic Tikka Masala Burritos, Sexy Fries, Indian street foods, and traditional Indian offerings from coast to coast,” said Akash Kapoor, Founder & CEO of Curry Up Now. “We can’t wait to begin our Northeast expansion and think that Newark will be a great launchpad for us, especially because New Jersey is one of our most requested locations from our fans on the East Coast. We also love the fact that there is a dense lunch and dinner population around our upcoming location, and that we are located in a great redevelopment project in Newark.”
Curry Up Now began as a food truck, founded in 2009 by husband and wife duo Akash and Rana Kapoor and ably supported by co-founder and Senior VP of Operations, Amir Hosseini, which quickly gained steam and became known in California for its innovative and interesting approach to Indian cuisine. The brand’s popularity resulted in multiple restaurant openings around the San Francisco Bay Area, and today, Curry Up Now operates three food trucks and six corporate brick-and-mortar locations, two of which also house the brand’s craft cocktail bar concept, Mortar & Pestle. From the start, the brand has been known for taking traditional Indian flavors and presenting them in friendly, recognizable formats. Fan-favorite menu items include their iconic tikka masala burritos, quesadillas dubbed ‘Quesadillix,’ Deconstructed Samosa, Sexy Fries, and Naughty Naan, as well as a Street Snacks
menu and traditional Indian Street Food menu. Ingredients are clean and sourced from local vendors whenever possible, and the menu is designed to support alternative diets in an effort to accommodate all guests no matter their dietary preferences.
Experts in the hospitality industry project that Indian food will continue to be the fastest growing ethnic food segment in the U.S., making room for Curry Up Now to solidify its position as a front runner in the segment. Within the last year, Curry Up Now has been recognized by the restaurant industry’s top publications for its innovative approach to Indian cuisine and huge potential for growth. The concept was featured in QSR’s 40 Under 40, Nation’s Restaurant News’ 2018 Breakout Brands, listed as #20 in Fast Casual’s Top 100 Movers & Shakers 2019, and named a Hot Food & Beverage Chain by the International Council of Shopping Centers.
In 2018, Curry Up Now solidified multi-unit franchise deals in nearly every major region in the country, including the West Coast, Northeast, South, and the Mountain States. The brand currently has 41 franchised and corporate stores sold and in varying stages of development across the country, including locations in Atlanta, GA; San Ramon, CA; Sacramento, CA; Irvine, CA; Salt Lake City, UT; and New Jersey, which are expected to open throughout 2019. The brand has pending franchise deals in 13 additional states, and aims to have another 100 units sold by year’s end, with an additional 200 units sold in 2020. For more information on the growing Indian fast casual, follow @CurryUpNow on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter or visit www.curryupnow.com .
Curry Up Now is partnered with Fransmart, the industry-leading franchise development company behind the explosive growth of brands like Five Guys Burgers and Fries, The Halal Guys, and Qdoba Mexican Grill, as their exclusive franchise development partner to grow the brand. The concept is currently looking for experienced multi-unit foodservice operators to develop franchise territories in top 40 major media markets across the U.S. To learn more about franchising opportunities with Curry Up Now, visit http://go.fransmart.com/CurryUpNowApply .
About Curry Up Now
Curry Up Now was established in 2009 by Akash Kapoor and his wife Rana, and ably supported by co-founder and now Senior VP of Operations, Amir Hosseini. The concept, which is known for its innovative spin on traditional Indian cuisine, has been recognized in publications such as Zagat: ‘5 Hottest Fast-Casual Chains,’ EATER SF: ‘SF’s Best Indian Restaurants,’ 7×7: ‘100 Things To Eat Before You Die,’ QSR: ‘40 Under 40,’ Fast Casual: ‘Top 100’ Movers & Shakers, Nation’s Restaurant News: ‘2018 Breakout Brand,’ and International Council of Shopping Centers: ‘Hot Food & Beverage Chain.’ Curry Up Now currently operates six brick-and-mortars and three food trucks in California’s Bay Area, and has both corporate and franchised units in development across California, New Jersey, Colorado, Utah, and Atlanta, GA. For more information about Curry Up Now, visit www.curryupnow.com .
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Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat: Samin Nosrat’s top cooking tips

Nigella Lawson called her debut cookbook “essential”, Yotam Ottolenghi deemed it “revolutionary in its simplicity”, while Ruby Tandoh learned more “in 15 minutes than from a lifetime of trial and error”. It’s fair to say that Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat – the debut cookbook from California-based chef and writer Samin Nosrat – broke new ground when it hit shelves in 2017. The book was a labour of love (“It took me almost three years to write the first four chapters,” says Samin) and sets out her philosophy: that anyone can cook well if they learn to balance the four essential elements of the title. It’s about trusting your senses and instincts rather than sticking rigidly to a recipe, so you can become that infuriating person who looks at a half-empty fridge and can magic up a delicious dinner out of seemingly nothing.
Since then, it’s been made into a hit four-part Netflix series and won numerous awards. So when Leiths School of Food and Wine announced that Samin would be teaching a cooking class in London, Stylist was first in line for what turned out to be a riotous evening of hilarious anecdotes, cooking advice, restaurant recommendations (her all-time favourite is London’s Rochelle Canteen) and the best green beans we’ve ever tasted (the secret? Slow-cook them in garlic for two hours). Here are the tips we’ll be implementing at home immediately.
You may also like 9 easy picnic wins: the simple, yet impressive recipes to up your al-fresco game The mandoline is your secret weapon (but with great power comes great responsibility) While your Spiralizer may be languishing in a drawer and that avocado masher which seemed like such a great idea at the time was inevitably usurped by a fork, the mandoline is one tool worth investing in. It can shave fennel, julienne carrots and prep your veg in double quick time, but it can also slice your finger open if you’re not careful. “The Japanese mandoline is a really wonderful, inexpensive tool for shaving things,” says Samin. The key is to create a flat edge to work with, which often means cutting your vegetable in half. “I didn’t do that with a butternut squash once and had to go the emergency room and get 26 stitches.” Consider us warned. Use the finger guard and take it slowly if you’d rather be eating potato dauphinoise than spending the evening in A&E.
Not all salts are created equal Salt is salt, right? So when a recipe insists on flaky sea salt but all we have to hand is Saxa, we can just substitute one for the other, can’t we? Wrong. Regular table salt can taste two to three times as salty as the flaked variety, so when a recipe asks for 1 teaspoon of salt, “it’s meaningless,” says Samin. Taste your salts and get to know how salty they are and adjust while you cook to achieve the perfect level of saltiness. “Apart from the crazy handful of salt I put in pasta water, my advice is not to use more salt, it’s to use salt better and to know when you’re adding it and in what form.” Salt your food nice and early and you’ll end up adding less at the table.
Where there’s salt, there shouldn’t automatically be pepper While you’ll be hard-pushed to find a dining table in Britain that doesn’t have a trusty salt and pepper shaker to hand, the two shouldn’t automatically go together. It’s a particular bugbear of Samin’s. “I don’t hate pepper, I love pepper, I am just very particular about where pepper should be,” she says. “To me, pepper is a spice and I’m really careful about which spices and herbs I’m using based on which country and which cuisine’s food I’m cooking.” In Mexico, it’s common to provide salt and chilli flakes on the table, for example, while Morocco favours salt and cumin. Salt will always be key for bringing out flavour but adapt other seasonings to the food you’re preparing.
You may also like Killing Eve: this character was originally meant to be portrayed by a man Choose your salt, fat and acid based on the cuisine you’re cooking If you’ve not already seen the beautifully illustrated flavour wheels in Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat that show which flavours work well for different cuisines across the globe, follow Samin’s simple rule: “Choose the right salt, choose the right acid, choose the right fat for the country or the cuisine whose food you’re cooking.” Samin prepared an Italian-style fennel and radish salad with a lemon vinaigrette, but if you prefer Vietnamese flavours, for example, you could swap the fennel for cucumber, lemon for lime, olive oil for a neutral tasting oil, and white wine vinegar for rice wine vinegar. “I’m still using all of the same elements – a salt, a fat, an acid – but I’m shifting to the cuisine that makes sense.”
Samin Nosrat’s shaved fennel and radish salad Cut your vegetables on an angle to make them look cheffy Forget a microherb garnish or elegant smear of sauce – the speediest way to make your food look professional is to cut your vegetables on an angle. “Things look so much fancier when you cut them on an angle,” says Samin. The principle behind it is that there are very few straight edges in nature, so if you mimic the shape of the vegetables you’re cooking with, it’ll look more natural. For runner beans, that means chopping them on a diagonal rather than straight across, and for carrots you can try the roll cut or ‘oblique’ technique, where you cut it into roughly equal conical chunks at a 45-degree angle.
Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat author Samin Nosrat at Leiths School of Food and Wine Work flavour into your fat “Fat is an incredible carrier of flavour,” says Samin. Picture this: if you were to take two pans, one with water, one with oil, slice two cloves of garlic and place one in each pan, then heat them for a little while, when you remove the garlic, the water would taste pretty much like water, whereas the oil would have taken on an intense garlic flavour. “That’s because all of those flavour molecules get absorbed into the oil in a way that they never get absorbed into water,” says Samin. “You always want to work spices or aromatics into whatever fat you’re using and that way it’s built into the entire foundation of the dish.” So if you’re making a citrus-flavoured cake, work lemon zest into the butter before creaming it with the sugar, or steep garlic in olive oil to make sure the flavour carries all the way through.
Don’t get mad, get even “Pound the chicken breast, people!” was Samin’s cry as she hammered chicken breasts ahead of breading and frying. When cooking meat that is uneven in thickness, such as chicken breast, you need to pound it so that it all cooks at the same rate. And no one wants to be served up half-raw chicken. Simply season, oil and cover with plastic before going at it with a mallet. Similarly, no heat source is ever completely even – be it a gas ring or an oven. Check what you’re cooking and move things around – either the pan itself, or the food within it, to make sure it cooks evenly all over.
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Enter your email address Let’s go! Frying things in clarified butter makes them taste amazing Long before ghee was adopted by the wellness crowd as the latest ‘superfood’, it was used in Indian cooking for thousands of years. It’s the reason a lot of Indian food tastes so good. Ghee is a type of clarified butter that adds a delicious rich, buttery flavour to whatever you’re cooking in it. “You can’t fry in straight butter, you have to clarify it to get rid of the milk solids [which burn at low temperatures],” says Samin. Clarified butter is made by melting the butter slowly until the water evaporates, then skimming off the milk proteins. But enough of the science. Food fried in clarified butter tastes amazing . Like, I’m-never-deep-frying-anything-in-oil-again amazing. If you can’t be faffed with making your own, do yourself a favour and grab a jar of ghee next time you go shopping. Your fried chicken will thank you.
Leiths School of Food and Wine host regular masterclasses at their kitchen at 16-20 Wendell Road, London, W12; for more information, visit leiths.com
Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat by Samin Nosrat (£30, Canongate Books) is out now
Photography: Charlie McKay for Leiths School of Food and Wine

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Dining Aboard the HHAS Vegan Cruise

Home » Blog » Dining Aboard the HHAS Vegan Cruise Dining Aboard the HHAS Vegan Cruise June 3, 2019 Vegan Cuisine , Vegan Travel
Eating delicious vegan food is unquestionably one of the best parts of cruising with us on the Holistic Holiday at Sea vegan cruise (HHAS). Our HHAS menu is entirely vegan and almost all dishes are made from scratch using high quality whole foods. Much of our food is organic. In foods that are not available in organic, we emphasize non-GMO.
Curious about specific meals and how the dining works? We’ve created this cheat sheet to help guide you.
A quick note before we begin: There are other people on the ship who aren’t a part of the HHAS vegan group, and MSC Cruises offers these guests a regular menu. There are also people in our group that aren’t 100% vegan. The MSC meals and our vegan meals are prepared separately. Those who want non-vegan food can ask the server for the regular MSC Cruises menu. Breakfast and Lunch
For breakfast and lunch, people have the option of going to the buffet or going to the specified main dining room for a waiter-served meal. Breakfast is served from 7:30-9:00am. Lunch on sea days is 11:30am-1:30pm. Lunch on port days is 12:00-4:00pm in the buffet.
In general, the typical breakfast choices in the vegan section of the ship’s buffet include dishes from our HHAS dining room menu, such as miso soup, porridge, greens and some daily specials like scrambled tofu, plus several vegan dishes prepared by MSC chefs, such as breakfast frittatas, potatoes and other veggies, beans, grits, oatmeal, and fruit. The typical lunch choices in the vegan section of the ship’s buffet are items from our HHAS five-course dining room menu as well as a variety of vegan dishes prepared by MSC chefs, which may include Indian or other ethnic dishes, pasta dishes, rice, beans, veggies, salads, and fruits.
During breakfast and lunch, a few tables are set aside in each dining room for vegan-only dining. Only items from the HHAS vegan menu may be ordered in these areas. Look for the designated vegan only tables as you enter the dining room or ask the maître d’ for directions. Dinner
For dinner, the HHAS group fills both of the main dining rooms at the 6 pm seating. The other guests on board do not attend this meal. Our full vegan dinner is only served in the dining rooms at the 6 pm seating. Craving a late night snack? After dinner, there is vegan pizza in the buffet. During the parties and socials, which typically begin around 10 pm, there may be vegan pizza, vegan ice cream, or vegan hors d’oeuvres. Dessert
We don’t use any processed cane sugar, honey, or artificial sweeteners in our meals. Most of the desserts are made with either rice syrup or maple syrup, or a combination of the two. For people who do not want any concentrated sweeteners, including maple syrup and rice syrup, fruit is almost always an option for dessert. Gluten-Free and Allergies
Almost all of our dishes are gluten-free, and when gluten is in the meal, it’s clearly marked on the menu, and a gluten-free option is almost always available. We also have a vegan menu option with no added oil.
If you have food allergies or are curious about the ingredients, please check the ingredients lists that are posted at the entrance to our dining room for each meal. How Seating Works
Our group has open seating in the dining room, which means that people can sit where they like. For those looking to meet other singles, we have “singles only” tables. Look for these designated tables as you enter the dining room or ask the maître d’ for directions. Questions?
If you have questions about the meal options or dining in general, email or call us toll-free (within the US): 1-800-496-0989 or Ph: 1-828-749-1959. Search for:

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Auckland’s dirtiest restaurants revealed

Local Auckland’s dirtiest restaurants revealed
An Auckland Council investigation into the city’s food hygiene has identified 18 outlets as being in need of improvement, with 7 receiving a ‘critical’ E grade and being forced to close until issues could be rectified.
Amongst the issues cited by the Council, which inspected restaurants between March and May, were cockroach-ridden floors, “critical cleaning risk”, and pest infestations.
Another 11 businesses received a D-grade, allowing them to stay open whilst they addressed the issues cited. These establishments will be inspected again 2 months after the initial inspection.
The 7 eateries which received an E-grade were Ghazal Indian Cuisine in Glen Eden, The Café Helensville, Sui Yuan in Mt Albert, Dosa Plaza Metro City, Baab Korean Restaurant in Auckland Central, Dosa Plaza Mt Roskill, and India Bar and Restaurant in Ellerslie. According to the Herald, Dosa Plaza Metro City, India Bar and Restaurant, and Dosa Plaza Mt Roskill have all since been allowed to reopen having fixed their problems.
Dosa Plaza Metro City has even been reissued with an A-grade. Owner Theo Namh told the Herald, “We are glad to inform that with a lot of hard work and just in the matter of three weeks we have rectified all issues including the one of a rogue cockroach incident which was really rare previously.”

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Culinary genius Jiggs Kalra dies at 71 in Delhi – India Today

Culinary genius Jiggs Kalra dies at 71 in Delhi India Today
Jiggs Kalra dies at 71 Jiggs Kalra, famous food columnist, restaurateur and author, who was popularly known as the ‘czar of Indian cuisine’, passed away today on Tuesday, June 4, 2019 at the age of 71 in Delhi. Kalra was reportedly suffering from a long illness and died in the early hours of morning today. With a career spanning 50 long years, Jiggs was also known as the ‘taste maker to the nation’ who helped revive the regional cuisines. His phenomenal work includes reviving age-old delicacies like the famous Galouti Kebabs and taking Indian cuisines to international platforms. A culinary … Share

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‘Maa ki Baat’ is Chef Ranveer Brar’s ode to motherhood

‘Maa ki Baat’ is Chef Ranveer Brar’s ode to motherhood Tue, Jun 4 2019 07:09:29 PM
By Vishnu Makhijani
New Delhi, June 4 (IANS): Have you ever wondered “what does mom like to eat?” Enter “Maa ki Baat) a 20-part web series crafted by multi-talented Chief Ranveer Brar, “the perfect ode” to all a mother does for her loved ones.
“Essentially the idea comes from the appreciation (actually under-appreciation) of an Indian senior homemaker and why she doesn’t get the credit she deserves. No matter how far we travel, we always crave the Maa ke haath ka khaana. It’s amazing how a mother translates her love for the family into food, amongst many other things she does for the household. So for me, food worked out to be the medium to give her that credit,” Brar told IANS in an interview.
It went on air on Mother’s Day, featuring quite naturally Brar’s mother Surinder Kaur demonstrating her favorite Rajma recipe and reminiscing her journey as a wife, daughter- in-law and mother who was forced by Partition to uproot her life from a small town to a city. It’s gathered over a million views in a very short time
Speaking about the research and planning process, Brar said: “The idea was to understand the life journey and cuisine. So, we had some random conversations with moms and figured out some amazing life journeys. The process of selection was a mix of their life journeys and understanding the food they cooked.”
“We’ve covered a wide range. There’s Sindhi cuisine, South Indian Brahmin cuisine, UP Kayastha cuisine and many more. More will be revealed as the episodes roll out,” said Brar, who has cooked in the natural way in the hot desert sands of Rajasthan, was featured among the Top 50 Chefs in the Indian Culinary Forum Book, has opened fine diners in the US and Canada – as also Mumbai, hes curates gourmet Indian food on two cruise liners on their Singapore sailings.
Scouting nationwide for guest cooks for the show, Brar has invited mothers nationwide to participate and send in their videos through which they are selected to cook on the show. The upcoming episodes will be featuring mothers from Kerala, Bangalore, Tamil Nadu, and North India.
“After I got back from the US and judged Masterchef India, I realised that there is a huge stream of Indian cooking that I (in fact many of us) haven’t appreciated enough, and that is ‘home-cooking’. I was touched, moved and inspired by the food and the character of a home-maker who is the Chef of the household, and it drove me to go back and re-live parts of my life to understand how my mother and grandmother used to cook and what was their relationship to food, which essentially was how the first idea of the show occurred.
“The idea was simple – bring out the power of the homemaker and start a conversation about the ancestral recipes that Indian home kitchens carry forward. The personality and the character of the Indian mother are that of immense love, selflessness and inner beauty, which she brings to the table along with her food. As an Indian son, this show is my way of giving respect and credit to all Indian mothers from whom my biggest learning was that mothers never let anything go to waste, they even use the simplest of things like ‘Chaawal Ka Paani’. I wanted to understand what are the likes and dislikes of a mother,” Brar added.
He has featured both on the small screen and in a web show. Which medium is he more comfortable with?
“I enjoy both and feel equally comfortable. Having been trained in the Television school of visual media, so to speak, it takes a little bit of adjustment but that said, I love the spontaneity of the medium. There’s no right or wrong really when you are creating content for the digital medium. The focus is to get the message out in the most effective way. We wanted to make this both effective and fun, for the moms as well as the viewers,” Brar explained.
What of the future?
“We’ll keep trying to explore Indian cuisine through various lenses, be it the streets of India, local and hyperlocal regions, to royal families.. This is just the beginning,” Brar concluded. You might also like ‘Maa ki Baat’ is Chef Ranveer Brar’s ode to motherhood

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Czar of Indian cuisine Jiggs Kalra passes away

J. Inder Singh Kalra , popularly known as Jiggs Kalra passed away on June 3. The gastronome, restaurateur, food consultant, author, and columnist was known for bringing a wave of culinary revolution in India. While people remember him from his TV shows on Doordarshan, many associate his name with restaurants like Punjab Grill ,

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Jiggs Kalra, Czar of Indian cuisine, has died

Special Jiggs Kalra, Czar of Indian cuisine, has died Kalra was the first Asian to be inducted in the International Food and Beverage Gourmet Hall of Fame Jiggs Kalra Image: Prabhas Roy/Hindustan Times via Getty Images Jiggs Kalra, the ‘Czar of Indian cuisine,’ passed away this morning, reportedly after a prolonged illness. He was 72. The pioneering restauranteur, food writer and consultant was instrumental in introducing Indian cuisine to an international audience, reviving lost ancient cuisines of the country and elevating age-old delicacies such as the kebabs, served in the erstwhile royal kitchens of India. The first Asian to be inducted in the International Food and Beverage Gourmet Hall of Fame, Jaspal Inder Singh Kalra–popularly knows as Jiggs–had many firsts to his credit. He was the first to conceptualise and host an Indian food based television series. Apart from being one of the firsts to be part of the Indian state contingent across various state visits abroad, Kalra had the privilege of serving political heavyweights such as Princess Diana, Prince Charles, Atal Bihari Vajpayee and Bill Clinton. Over the past three years as the mentor and culinary director at Massive Restaurants, Kalra was instrumental in launching multi-award winning restaurant concepts like Masala Library by Jiggs Kalra, Made in Punjab and Farzi Café and Pa Pa Ya. He also authored over 11 titles on Indian cuisine, including ‘ Prashad ,’ which is also billed as ‘the bible’ for chefs.’His son and daughter-in-law, Zorawar and Dildeep Kalra, are now taking his food legacy forward with Massive Restaurants.

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RIP Jiggs Kalra: Thank You For Helping Indian Cuisine Get Its Rightful Place In the Sun

RIP Jiggs Kalra: Thank You For Helping Indian Cuisine Get Its Rightful Place In the Sun Known for reviving age-old delicacies, like the famous Galouti Kebab, Kalra believed in cooking for the soul. June 5, 2019, 8:36 am
There is no sincere love than the love for food,” said George Bernard Shaw.
T he year was 2011, I had just moved into the National Capital Region (NCR) and one of the most exciting things about this city, was the food. The associations that you make with food last a lifetime. One of the first few restaurants that I visited in this city happened to be Punjab Grill, a venture by J Inder Singh Kalra, popularly known as ‘Jiggs Kalra’.
The taste of the dal makhani was so distinct, that even today, almost nine years later, it takes me back to that lunch.
On 4 June 2019, Jiggs Kalra passed away in Mumbai, aged 71. With many monikers to his credit, the one that perhaps captures his essence is ‘Czar of Indian Cuisine’. Clearly, he played a crucial role in getting Indian cuisine a place in the sun. Promotion Known for reviving age-old delicacies, like the famous Galouti Kebab , Kalra believed in cooking for the soul. Jiggs KalraSource: The FTB Blog/Facebook
Having started his career as a journalist, Jiggs Kalra worked with The Times of India and The Illustrated Weekly .
Subsequently, he started writing a food column in 1970, a time when food writing wasn’t even a big deal. It was his passion for food that made it a success!
Moving from one medium to another in the 1990s, Kalra was a part of India’s first television show on food called Daawat , which would be telecast on prime time every Sunday.
According to a report , it was The Maharana of Mewar who asked Kalra to manage the Shiv Niwas Palace in Udaipur, thus beginning his foray into the world of managing and running a restaurant. He made us all proud when he became the first Asian to be inducted to the International Food and Beverage Gourmet Hall of Fame. RIP, SirSource: Sabyasachi Roy/Facebook
He has authored 11 titles of which Prashad is considered to be a bible for all chefs. He has had the privilege of serving Princess Diana, Prince Charles, Atal Bihari Vajpayee, and Bill Clinton, among the long list of personalities.
Pawan Soni, Founder and CEO of Indian Food Freak, a robust online food community, had the privilege of meeting Jiggs Kalra on a few occasions. Speaking to The Better India , he shares, “The most obvious things that come to mind when I think of him would be food and following close behind are the recipe books he has authored.” “He had a plethora of knowledge when it came to Indian cuisine. If not for his failing health he would very much still have been in the kitchen whipping up the delicacies,” says Pawan. Pawan Soni with Jiggs KalraSource: Pawan Soni/Facebook
In Kalra’s own words , “I can’t think of even one other thing that I could have done, if not this. This is what I was made for and it was the Lord’s will; I’m only executing it.”

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I have found myself put in charge of my wife’s kitchen. She’s a wonderful cook but with no particular cuisine a favorite. Hopefully it is only for three months as she recovers from a major neck operation as a result of her MSA. It is a great responsibility and she has agreed not to play mother hen but let me discover for myself how to do it.
Keith Floyd was probably the best TV chef. Of course he couldn’t run a restaurant but then So I picked up a battered copy of Floyd on France and have decided to “do” ten days of French cooking. I love spicy food, Lebanese, Moroccan, Thai and Indian but I wanted to get back to the subtle flavours of France.
I don’t actually enjoy cooking. It’s quite frightening having the steam oven, main oven, gas hob, air fryer and ice cream maker all going at once. I feel like the Bell Master up on the belfry of a Russian Orthodox Church playing all those bells with strings attached to arms and feet.
But off to France I am. Culinary speaking.

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