Everybody’s Talking About Jamie – The Apollo Theatre, London West End

Everybody’s Talking About Jamie – The Apollo Theatre, London West End

The post Everybody’s Talking About Jamie – Apollo Theatre, West End appeared first on London Unattached – London Lifestyle Blog .
Here’s why Everybody’s Talking about Jamie. Jamie’s been on my radar for some time now, so I was delighted to finally get along and see for myself what Everybody’s Been Talking About! I took my daughter as I thought it might be rather up her street (she is completely consumed with watching Netflix’s ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race’) – and I was right‌
‘Everybody’s Talking About Jamie’ is a thoroughly joyous, ballsy, colourful musical, based on BBC3’s ‘Jamie: Drag Queen At 16’ – a 2011 documentary which followed a determined Sheffield lad on his journey to become a drag queen, defying and overcoming the prejudices and obstacles he faced along the way.
With this wonderful stage production, director Jonathan Butterell breathes vibrant new life into Jamie’s inspirational story.
The show opens with a punchy classroom scene which embodies the trials and tribulations of teenage life – as well as the heart-breaking lack of hope for less privileged youngsters in today’s harsh climate‌We watch Jamie’s classmates putting aspirations aside in the face of tough realities.
Raw teen energy makes for a thrilling edginess, and personalities shine through with ‘And You Don’t Even Know It’ – a catchy number which introduces the cast of young characters and their evolving stories. Jamie’s studious best mate Pritti (Sabrina Sandhu) wears a hijab and specs. Dean (Luke Baker) is the perennial class bully, and Hayley Tamaddon plays their long-suffering teacher, Miss Hedge.
The star of this show is, of course, Jamie New, played with remarkable sensitivity and camp irreverence by Layton Williams, who began his career – at the tender age of 12 – playing Billy in the West End production of Billy Elliot. Williams’s brilliance finds its reflection in a genuinely touching performance from Rebecca McKinnis as Margaret, who as Jamie’s single mother makes enormous sacrifices for her beloved son. I was really moved by her beautifully heartfelt rendition of ‘He’s My Boy’.
Writer and lyricist Tom MacRae makes an excellent partnership with ‘The Feeling’ front-man Dan Gillespie Sells, whose music works magic with tantalizing pop songs which hit all the right emotional chords. Anna Fleischle’s clever set deftly transforms from a classroom into Jamie’s domestic world – and Luke Hall’s video design adds a splash of razzmatazz.
A slick, fast-paced – if occasionally a little one-dimensional – narrative sweeps us along on a quest for identity and self-acceptance, as Jamie searches for a way to fulfil his destiny. He’s got diva dreams, and he’s making plans to wear a dress to the school Prom – a prospect that’s making the local community distinctly nervous! Jamie’s dad is conspicuously absent and unenthusiastic, but Mum is absolutely 1000% on board. On the way, we meet loveable Hugo, fabulously played by Shane Ritchie of EastEnders fame. Hugo runs the local ‘frock-shop’ – an establishment which specialises for the drag community.
Love and support – and many touching moments – propel our hero forward, to his night‌as undisputed Queen of the Prom‌..
This is an enormously uplifting, inspiring celebration of individuality, diversity, and triumph over adversity. It’stightly choreographed, spirited, and passionate, brimming with the frenetic energy of a brilliant teenage cast.
Why is Everybody Talking About Jamie?
It’s an evening full of fun – and it pulls on your heart strings nicely, too.
Everybody’s Talking About Jamie –
Apollo Shaftesbury,
Shaftesbury Ave,
Soho, London W1D 7EZ
Until January 25 2020
For an alternative ‘Educational’ Musical you might like to check out our review of Matilda The Musical , also showing in the West End, London.
Looking for places to eat pre or post theatre? Here are some of our London West End recommendations.
Pre-Theatre Dining London West End Restaurants in Covent Garden, Leicester Square and Soho where there’s a good pre-theatre dining menu Dishoom Covent Garden, Indian Cafe Review London’s favourite casual Indian restaurant, Dishoom serves up amazing cocktails and comfort Indian dishes
Continue Reading Continue Reading Bill’s Covent Garden A chain, but one of the good ones – Bills offers a great all day dining menu at reasonable prices
Continue Reading Continue Reading Inko Nito Soho – Review Great pan Asian fusion dishes at Inko Nito
Continue Reading Continue Reading l’Escargot, Soho – Review l’Escargot is a Soho classic that still serves a great pre-theatre set menu which somehow manages to create a timeless tradition
Continue Reading Continue Reading CERU Soho – Review Levantine cuisine that will bring sunshine into your life even on the most dismal English day – Ceru is recommended
Continue Reading Continue Reading Ed Baines at Randall & Aubin Soho For some of the best fish in London at cafe prices, try Randall and Aubin – don’t miss the Zucchini fries either
Continue Reading Continue Reading Vapiano Soho – A Simple Concept for Fresh Food Simple pasta and pizza served cafe style without too much fuss
Continue Reading Continue Reading Pre-Theatre Dining at  Le Restaurant de PAUL Great value Pre-theatre menu from Le Restaurant de Paul
Continue Reading Continue Reading The Delaunay Pre-Theatre Dinner A classic Grand European Cafe serving great all day brasserie food and close to London’s West End Theatres
Continue Reading Continue Reading Roka Aldwych – Pre-Theatre Offer Great Japanese food doesn’t always come cheap – but the pre-theatre menu at Roka gives you a chance to eat a light dinner at a reasonable price AND experience the great food at Roka
Continue Reading Continue Reading
The post Everybody’s Talking About Jamie – Apollo Theatre, West End appeared first on London Unattached – London Lifestyle Blog .

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Spanish Souvenirs!

Vison of Life by Sanjay Vison of Life…It speaks about my views towards what’s happening around us, though many of the things represents Pune, a becoming Metro in Maharashtra,India yet most of us live in similar city life. In city day to day life all we face is problems around us; from traffic to water to slums to power supply & many more, but who has solutions? That’s why the name Vison of Life! Sanjay Deshpande Wednesday, May 8, 2019 Spanish Souvenirs! — “Who’s to say what a ‘literary life’ is? As long as you are writing often, and writing well, you don’t need to be hanging-out in libraries all the time. Nightclubs are great literary research centers. So is Ibiza!” …Roman Payne. “Cities, too, are embracing digitization. Barcelona has installed in-ground parking sensors and launched connected public transportation as part of its Smart City strategy”… John T. Chambers. Well, I think above two quotes defines characteristics (read attitude) of the two cities of Spain, both famous for their own specialties! Yes I am writing about cities (big exception “Apale Pune”) after a long time (may be a decade) but then I haven’t visited any in the long time & happy the fast broke with these two names (three actually but third one is separate subject) as year after years visiting forests & natural reserves yet there is a small wish list for me to visit few places & if Ibiza was surely not in it Barcelona was long pending! Right from the days when I first came across terminologies like Urban Planning, Public Transport, Civic Infra the name Barcelona was included in the To Visit List & finally it took my forester friends group only to make my wish list become a reality. So in a way its forest only which made me travel to the place named Spain & made me realize there is so much to learn & adopt & so little I have done! Well, Spain is one of the largest & most historic countries in Europe though not as advanced or rich destinations like Germany, England or France, neither it carries glamorous heritages the places like Budapest, Rome or Prague has & certainly it’s not as scenic as Austria or Salzburg or Swiss Alps but then I will say is it has dash of every above thing making it wonderful destination to visit! We the Indians are funny lot, we often visit places going by what people speaks about them or what’s been shown in our Bollywood movies & after the popular movie Jindgi Na Mile Dobara, in which three bachelors travels across the Spain countryside for celebrating pre marriage freedom of one of friend, a journey which starts as fun, ends up with soul searching for each of them; suddenly Indians came to know there is place named Spain which they should visit as it has much more to explore than Bull Fights & yes there is a festival also where people throws Tomatoes on each other! Well, Spain is lot more than that actually & as the first quote by Pyene, who wrote one of the best books on travels i.e. “Cities & Countries”, let’s talk about Ibiza! When our forester groups decided about visiting Spain & three destinations, Ibiza, Barcelona & Valencia, I knew very little about Ibiza, just that it’s an island & famous for beaches! Well, when I told my sons that I am going to Spain & Ibiza, their faces turned purple! As then I came to know Ibiza if world’s Goa actually so you can imagine my sons’ excitement about their forest loving father visiting Ibiza! As I said Ibiza is an island with green hills covered in rolling mists & clouds & beaches covering most of the periphery! While starting for Spain we have been told that this will be good season & lots of sun & warmth but as the flight approached Ibiza, it was all cloudy & raining heavily & I thought gone is our sight-seeing with such weather to welcome but then that’s what I knew little about Spain & her weather mood changes! The airport of Ibiza was in a way show case of what it hold behind i.e. everything in bright colors & lots of bikini wear shops along with cocktail serving joints right outside the gate of flight! More to my astonishments most of the cabbies were women & do mind language is a big problem in Spain. Yet when asked about clouds & rains our driver smilingly said tomorrow it will be sunny & clear sky! I looked outside of window & dark clouds & wished I could have such trust in our weather forecast (well it’s much better now sure). The cab pulled along our hotels porch & we were welcomed by opening of chilled champagne bottle by the lobby manager, well this is what Ibiza is, I said to myself! And next day morning when I woke up for walk (that’s best thing you can do at any new place, a long walk) it indeed was sunny & clear blue sky outside & I realized this is western culture, they do what they say & or they flatly refuse! And then next three days exploring Ibiza by every possible mean on feet, local bus & taxi sometimes; we were located near to old city which is spread around an old castle or church. I am deliberately not putting names to the churches or streets or castles as one sitting in your home or office it hardly makes any difference & second & really don’t remember as all are Casa D Something or Saint D Something type names which sounds all same for me! Ibiza being an island has many water boats for transportation as water ways are major part of the same. We took a ferry to old town from a jetty right in back yard of our hotel & trust me every my planning book funda I saw melting down in very first sight of Ibiza. As right along the shore there are lots of buildings even new also. And then the old city which is a huge conglomerate of shops, cafes, bars, & residences around the castle cum church! I have been told Europe is costly affair for shopping but frankly that’s relative term & I personally found Spain much at part to our country as its not is much good shape on financial front & if the tourists don’t spend on shopping, how you are going to make revenue & if you want tourists to shop you need to keep food & goods in their budges is simple funda which they are wise enough to understand & adopt! And Ibiza has full of all such shopping places right from hand made goods to souvenirs to branded items to lure tourists & when tourists are done with shopping well, there are beaches, sand, cocktails & paella i.e. Spanish cuisine made of rice with vegetables or meat or fish, to make them relax! The best part of Ibiza apart from beaches, yachts & shopping is the old town around the central castle/church; walking through those narrow cobble stone paved lanes I was living like some English novel chapter as people sitting on chairs on pavements, people walking on streets, people shopping, people drinking wine, people clicking selfies, people with their pet dogs & bright sun with blue sky, I realized this is Europe! Even the sea side promenades is worth studying, in-front of my eyes images of sea side walk near Hotel Taj in Mumbai came & I was thinking how great that site can be made if worked on these lines, alas only if had it been Ibiza! Well, what we earn from places like Ibiza as have we not our very own Goa to match its vibrancy, is what many will ask! Let me tell you, it’s the difference of scale & variety of presenting everything is what we should learn. Though the season at Ibiza was yet to start so we couldn’t actually experience night life or the party type mahaaol yet even what was on show, was enough to give the idea of what Ibiza offers to its patrons! Apart from party night & shopping, Ibiza is center for art & culture for Spain with hundreds of studios, art galleries & art schools giving opportunity to thousands of youngsters to take route of art, which is dearly missing from our once art rich country! I took back colors from Ibiza & lots of them as well the way you use these colors in everything you create! And then if Ibiza is happening, vibrant typical tourist heaven then Barcelona is all time awake, buzzing, celebrating life yet very businesslike city where old meets new with grace! And when the name Barcelona pops up then first thing comes to mind of most (well football lovers I meant) is FC Barca i.e. the world’s one of the most decorated football club’s home town! One can’t say he or she visited Barcelona if the trip doesn’t includes the tour of the FC Barca stadium again not just a sports ground but an engineering marvel in itself! I am not great follower of football but I like any game especially ground game & no two minds this game has great energy in it! And with names like Messy, Suarez, Nyemar & Innista playing here no wonder from all over the world tourists come to visit FC Barca which is smart enough to en-cash this fan following. The audio visual tour of the club ends in a three storied shopping store which sells everything from tee-shirts to key-chains with FC Barca on it! We the Indian’s love cricket shade more than the Europeans loves football & why cant in place like Mumbai we make something like this at Wankhde Stadium or at Eden Gardens in Kolkata where histories have been wrote & legends like Gawaskar, Tendulkar, Kapil Dev, Dhoni or Kohali has mesmerized one twenty crore Indians with their game for years after years! It’s not commercialization of the game which many can say but its conserving heritage of the sport which has kept this country united is a fact! FC Barca is a tribute to every sport & sportsman who has given something to the game is what they say! And apart from FC Barca the city is one of the best planned smart city with wonderful public transport system where eight lines of Metro serves you twenty four hours in tune with bus system. Do mind, Spaniards doesn’t like English much yet even once in four days we needed to use taxi for our commuting such is the system of public transport. Once you buy a 48 hour ticket then you can hop in or hop off on any public transport line of the city any numbers of time with an app in you cell phone which guides you towards nearest bus stop or Metro station to your destination from your location & timings of the bus or train too! Well, that’s why even the millionaires of the city you can see riding Metro or Bus here as its time saving & comfortable! And unlike London or Moscow, the Metro here is fairly young i.e. recently developed leaving us no space to face-off saying “oh these cities has it since long back that’s why it’s possible or easy for them”! Just like FC Barca one more name rules the city & that is legendary architect Antonio Gaudi, whose forms & structures gave new dimension to the construction industry! His buildings are now in a way monument & his residence has been developed in one of the best conserved structure. No wonder even his incomplete building i.e. Sagrada Familia Cathedral also has become most visited place of the city for the tourists. Now, this I say is being great where the jobs you left incomplete also becomes memorial! On this background I remembered images (read condition) of so many so called heritage structures in our Smart City Pune; do I need to mention names! It’s the people (citizens) in the city which makes the city, indeed really true & if they have Gaudi then more applauds for the citizens of Barcelona that they acknowledged his greatness & conserved that & marketing it perfectly, who has stopped us doing that here in Pune? One more thing you notice in Barcelona & that is public places & lots of them where plantation has been done to conserve biodiversity & yes in Pune we have many but these gardens are actually forests in Barcelona with grass, shrubs, mid level trees & big tress all growing together in harmony making it a complete life cycle! And yes do visit Rambla Street, one of the world’s most loved shopping market where you will be zapped by the sheer verity of eating stuff which is displayed in such a way that you must be Saint if you comes back without buying anything & needless to say with millions of people visiting every day no shouts, no garbage or no horns of vehicles! What I found most interesting about Barcelona is the way it lives life even being a business center i.e. on Sunday evening in a full summer tourist season every brand’s fancy shop on Passeig de Gracia i.e. main shopping road of the city, was closed as Spanish people loves their holiday & probably life is something more than making money for them! Call it arrogance or foolishness but by me they have understood the purpose of living & that’s why I saw a café or bar in every block of buildings & every such bar was in operating means the owners must be making some money sure! I think when we visit places like Spain, agreed the Euro vs. Rupee scale refrains us from shopping much ( for most visitors) but as usual we took back some magnets or key-chains & yes selifies as our souvenirs but real souvenirs is the learning which we must take back about understanding the way we should live as a society as well as an individual, which we conveniently leave behind like excess baggage & start behaving as a perfect Punekar the moment we hit the roads by spitting on road or jumping red signal or refusing to wear helmet & we feel we are a Smart City! To conclude, there is a poster hanging at the end of the tour of FC Barca Club, it says “If you can’t support us when we lose then don’t cheer for us when we win”! That’s the attitude mate… mind it! —

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How to order outside your culinary comfort zone in Melbourne

Rou jia mo, a type of Chinese hamburger, from EJ Fine Food (aka Xi’an Famous). Photo: Eddie Jim Where to try these dishes in Sydney
It’s been scientifically proven that we prefer what we know. If you studied high school psychology, you’ll recognise this phenomenon as the Familiarity Principle or Mere-Exposure Effect. It has implications for food preferences, too. Australian cuisine is defined by multiculturalism. We are lucky to be exposed to a variety of cuisines and dishes and for decades we have embraced so many of these cuisines. At least in part.
But it is time to be even more adventurous in our eating.
There are so many dishes specific to the cuisines we already love that we have not even heard of. I’m not claiming to be an expert on Asian cuisines. I’m of Eastern European decent and Jewish heritage, and have an insatiable curiosity, a healthy appetite, a research addiction and a passion to try different things.
When we think of Vietnamese cuisine most of us will think of pho, the deliciously addictive signature noodle soup. But did you know there is another equally divine noodle soup called bun bo hue? This is a call for us all to step outside our culinary comfort zones.
I hope you will join me on my quest to #EatCuriously. Because I know there’s no better way to learn about another culture and place – or ourselves – than by eating something new. Like bao? Try rou jia mo
Fifteen years ago, David Chang introduced a modern, high-end take on the Chinese steamed pork buns to New York City at Momofuku. Many similar bao concepts followed, including in Australia. Rou jia mo, a common street food in north-west China’s Shaanxi province, is traditional bao’s lesser-known and arguably more delicious cousin, sometimes called a Chinese hamburger. Slightly fermented, the bun has a pleasing chew that balances the juicy, slow-cooked pork, lamb or beef. The best are heavily seasoned with cumin and chilli. At EJ Fine Food in the city (confusingly also called Xi’an Famous) these delights cost $6 each and have “G’DAY MATE” printed on their paper pockets, just screaming to go viral.
Where to try it:
EJ Fine Food, 260 Russell Street, Melbourne Advertisement You will now receive updates from Good Food – Newsletter Good Food – Newsletter
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Shaanxi-Style Restaurant, 943-945 Whitehorse Road, Box Hill
Zha jiang mian, a Chinese version of spag bol. Photo: Sofia Levin Like spaghetti bolognese? Try zha jiang mian​ or jajangmyeon
In northern China you will eat a dish similar to what we know and love as spag bol. Zha jiang mian is a dish of fat Shanghai wheat noodles, piled with finely minced pork that’s been simmered in fermented soybean paste until it’s a deep mahogany colour. Invasion, communism and internal disputes led to many Chinese families resettling in South Korea before World War I, and they brought zha jiang mian with them. There it has morphed over the past 100 years to become jajangmyeon, taken from the phonetic pronunciation of the Chinese dish. You’ll notice the difference immediately: it’s the colour of wet mud due to liberal use of black beans that forms a runnier sauce. The noodles are often slimmer, too, and the Korean predilection for sugar means it’s sweeter. Both are great dishes worthy of your attention.
Where to try it:
Zha jiang mian at EJ Fine Food, 260 Russell Street, Melbourne
Jajangmyeon at Korchi City, 441-443 Little Bourke Street, Melbourne, also shop 2, 299 Clayton Road, Clayton
The bun bo hue served at Hem 27 in Flemington. Photo: Wayne Taylor Like pho? Try bun bo hue
If you only ever order pho, you’re missing an entire country’s worth of fragrant and comforting noodle soups. The north of Vietnam tends towards lighter, fresher flavours versus heavier use of spices and a shrimpy pungency the further south you venture towards the Mekong Delta. Start somewhere in the middle with bun bo hue, a spicy beef soup originating in central Vietnam, which is on most Vietnamese menus. It’s admired for layered flavours that are more complex and funkier than pho, with shrimp paste, lemongrass and pork blood producing a flavour-bomb threesome. Dig into the slices of pork and beef, slurp the vermicelli noodles and think of congealed blood cubes as carnivorous tofu.
Where to try it:
Pho Tam, shop 1, 7-9 Leeds Street, Footscray
Hem 27 , shop 27, 320-380 Epsom Road, Flemington
A lamb pastry at Dolan Uyghur Food Heaven. Photo: Joe Armao Like meat pies? Try the Uyghur version
Unlike the pies ubiquitous at the footy, the Uyghur version hails from China’s Xinjiang province, which linked Asia and the Middle East on the Silk Road, resulting in spice-heavy dishes. Somewhere between a classic minced meat pie and a borek, but served sliced like a quesadilla, the Uyghur meat pie contains lamb mince (most Uyghurs eat halal), onion and is heavily seasoned with pepper and cumin. The flaky, chewy pastry is shallow fried and more similar to a spring onion pancake than a Four’n Twenty.
Where to try it:
Dolan Uyghur Food Heaven , 706 Station Street, Box Hill also at 166 Little Lonsdale Street, Melbourne
Kaynam Xinjiang Restaurant, 101 Koornang Road, Carnegie
Jhol momo, momo dumplings in spicy soup. Photo: Sofia Levin Like soup dumplings? Try jhol momo
The delicate wrappers and hot soup of xiao long bao are warming, comforting and fun to eat. So too is the lesser-known jhol momo. Momo dumplings are common in Nepal, Tibet, Bhutan and northern India, but jhol momo, dumplings in spicy soup, are trickier to find here. Soup bubbles away in huge pots, a simple mix of tomato, lemon, coriander, salt, and a touch of Sichuan pepper – sometimes with chicken stock. There’s usually a vegetable option.
Where to try it:
Samba’s Jhol Momo, 528a Sydney Road, Brunswick
Momo Station, Tivoli Arcade, 235-251 Bourke Street, Melbourne
Banh cuon (pork and prawn filled steamed rice paper rolls) at Xuan Banh Cuon in Sunshine. Photo: Mal Fairclough Like rice paper rolls? Try banh cuon
The best way to never have a dry rice paper roll again is to order northern Vietnam’s banh cuon instead. Advanced chopstick skills are required to grip banh cuon’s glistening, folded rice paper. These steamed and fermented rice batter sheets contain seasoned pork mince, prawn and bouncy chopped wood ear mushroom. They usually come with sliced luncheon meat, sprouts, Vietnamese herbs and nuoc cham fish sauce.
Where to try it:
Xuan Banh Cuon , 232 Hampshire Road, Sunshine
Thanh Ha 2, 120 Victoria Street, Richmond Like nasi lemak? Try nasi padang
Named for its city of origin in West Sumatra, nasi padang is steamed rice served with various choices of pre-cooked dishes that are cooked early in the morning and stacked in the window of Padang joints in Indonesia. Customers point to the dishes they fancy and eat them with nasi (steamed rice). Dishes might include beef rendang, fried chicken, jackfruit curry, boiled cassava leaves, tempeh, fried fish, offal and my personal favourite, fried cow lung (it’s somewhere between beef jerky and a Pringle).
Where to try it:
Salero Kito, Tivoli Arcade, 235-251 Bourke Street, Melbourne
Garam Kitchen, shop 4, 51 Buckley Street, Noble Park Like samosas? Try medu vada or masala vada
“Vada” is a term that describes an assortment of savoury fried bites popular on the streets of India, served as a snack or for breakfast. If you enjoy a good samosa, this is almost a guaranteed win. Try masala vada, a chubby flying saucer of whole lentils freckled with curry leaf that has a crunchy outside and spongy middle, or medu vada, a doughnut-shaped spiced lentil fritter. Both hail from south India and are vegetarian-friendly.
Where to try it:
MKS Spice’n Things, stores in Ashwood, Dandenong, Epping, Preston and St Albans Like hot fried chicken? Try deep-fried giblets
Nose-to-tail dining and minimal-waste cooking continues to be a trend, but many are still squeamish when it comes to organs, odds and ends. Deep-fried chicken giblets – the bits of a bird in between the leg, breast, wing and thigh – are a great place to start. Anything is delicious when deep-fried, and chicken offal is no exception. The biggest challenge for the uninitiated is the texture and crunch, which to others is more interesting than the predictable flesh of common cuts. Best taken with Cass or Hite beer (as pictured, right).
Where to try it:
Pelicana Chicken , shop G5, 163 Franklin Street, Melbourne
Ohsso, 28 Hardware Lane, Melbourne Like laksa? Try khao soi
All the best parts of laksa are replicated in khao soi, a traditional coconut curry noodle soup from Chiang Mai , also common in Laos and Myanmar. Both are creamy, perfumed by spice, oily in a good way and satisfyingly filling. Khao soi has another level of umami from fish sauce and pickled cabbage or mustard greens hidden among springy egg noodles. Spiked with palm sugar and turmeric, the best bowls are so thick the soup behaves more like sauce than broth. Brittle dried noodles are served as a garnish, alongside lemon to cut through the unctuousness. It usually comes with chicken, but beef and tofu are also widespread.
Where to try it:
Oneyada , 239 Victoria Street, Abbotsford
Farang Farang, 10-12 Riddell Parade, Elsternwick
Make it: Cheat’s khao soi recipe Like fried rice? Try bak chang
Swap standard fried rice for bak chang (pictured right), glutinous sticky rice stuffed with any number of ingredients wrapped in a flat leaf (also called bak zhang, lo mai gai or zongzi depending on where you’re from, the leaf used and the shape of your rice). Regardless of which version you eat, pork filling is common, as is dried shrimp, mushroom and salted egg yolk. Lo mai gai is a popular yum cha dish, so order one among friends while you have sesame prawn toast as a back-up.
Where to try it:
Colonial Coffee, inside Colonial Fresh, Westfield Doncaster, 619 Doncaster Road, Doncaster
Penang Flavours, 694 Doncaster Road, Doncaster Like curry? Try bunny chow
Bunny chow doesn’t involve munching on rabbit. It’s curry served in half a hollowed-out white bread loaf, particular to South Africa. Bunny comes from the word Banya, which refers to the Indian population that migrated to Durban to work the sugar cane plantations. The filling can be any kind of curry, but lamb and mutton is customary, made with hand-ground spices such as cardamom, chilli, cinnamon and coriander seeds.
Where to try it:
Ostrich and the Egg, 6 Inkerman Street, St Kilda
Taste of Africa Cafe and Deli, 105 Main Street, Croydon Like pork belly? Try jokbal
The best pork belly has fatty layers that dissolve and don’t have to be chewed for five minutes. Jokbal, a Korean dish of pig’s trotters, has similarities to pork belly. It’s braised for hours in soy with sugar, spring onion, ginger and garlic, then deboned and sliced. The result is succulent, tender meat with gelatinous bits of skin that soak up flavour and melt away when eaten. There’s also a spicy version cooked in a sweet red chilli sauce made from gochujang, sugar, vinegar and fermented soybeans. Jokbal might not have pork belly’s crisp skin, but it comes with lettuce for wrapping and saamjang for dipping.
Where to try it:
Chicken and Jokbal, 467 Riversdale Road, Hawthorn East
Dosirock, shop 1, 280 King Street, Melbourne Like crepes and omelettes? Try jian bing
Jian bing is one of the most popular street food brekkies in China. In Taiwan a similar version is called dan bing. Vendors cook an oversized, paper-thin crepe by ladling batter onto a circular griddle and spreading it outwards in a circular motion. An egg or two is cracked over the top and any number of ingredients will be scattered on before it’s folded up and handed over: hoisin and chilli sauce, youtaio (Chinese doughnut) or fried wonton skin for crunch, spring onion and coriander for freshness and sometimes pickled mustard greens for bite.
Where to try it:
Sunny Cafe, 6 Balmoral Avenue, Springvale
Pancake Village, Box Hill Central, 1 Main Street, Box Hill Like bibimbap? Try sundae
There’s more to Korean food than barbecue, bibimbap and kimchi. Branch out and order sundae (also soondae; pictured right), also served with rice. Don’t skip to the next paragraph when I mention it’s a type of blood sausage; it’s the mildest you’ll taste and a fantastic introduction to the genre, much subtler than black pudding, more noodle than offal. Rice vermicelli is packed into the casing and interspersed with pork blood, onion, garlic and ginger. Instead of tasting metallic and bitter, there’s a mellow sweetness, almost dark chocolaty notes. It’s common in soups and stews but best appreciated by itself.
Where to try it:
Mr Lee’s Foods, 5 Old Lilydale Road, Ringwood East
Mook Ji Bar, 406 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne Like spring rolls? Try popiah
Spring rolls have been around since the Jin Dynasty, more than 1500 years ago. It’s time to explore a little, and popiah are a hell of a lot less greasy. They’re popular in south-east China and across the Taiwan Strait in Taiwan, as well as in Malaysia and Singapore. Bigger than spring rolls but smaller than burritos, a paper-thin pancake is rolled around shredded vegetables and meat. Its wrapper can be made from flour or mixed with egg, the latter richer and more filling. Biting into one might reveal crunchy peanut sauce and chilli, disguised beneath a browned edge that’s been crisped in a pan.
Where to try it:
Teh Tarik Corner, 443 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne
Straits Cafe, 241 Stud Road, Wantirna (weekends only)
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The Best Healthy Fast Casual Restaurants In NYC

May 5, 2019 The Best Healthy Fast Casual Restaurants In NYC
New York is known for having some of the top fine dining restaurants in the world – that’s a given. But it’s also home to so many incredible fast casual spots for just about any cuisine you could be in the mood for. I get excited for the days I’m out and about so I have an excuse to grab lunch out. Here are my top picks for the best healthy fast casual restaurants NYC. Hu Kitchen
You might have noticed that I’m at Hu Kitchen all. The. Time. It’s in a super convenient location near Union Square, and it’s pretty much a healthy food heaven. The menu is mostly Paleo but also have a ton of great plant-based options. They serve breakfast, lunch, and dinner as well as a full juice bar, cafe, prepared foods, and bakery. I must’ve tried just about everything on their menu and have never been disappointed, but my favorites are building my own bowl, their burgers, breakfast burritos & the Hu crack bar. Blossom Du Jour
Blossom Du Jour is the little sis of Blossom vegan restaurant (another favorite of mine) with a handful of locations across the city. Whether you’re a vegan or not, their take on vegan “fast food” is seriously delicious.
My go-to at Blossom Du Jour is always the Smokey Avocado Wrap – avocado, smoked tempeh, tomato, lettuce, and chipotle aioli – on a gluten free wrap. Charley St
Charley St is a newer kid on the block and became one of my favorites pretty much instantly. With its bright & airy Nolita location, paired with delicious eats + a cafe, I find myself at Charley St at least once a week (I love setting up here to work for a few hours). My favorites on the menu are the PB&J oatmeal, Happy Morning avocado toast, and Tahini Time bowl. By Chloe
I remember it was such a big deal when By Chloe first opened – for good reason – and now they have locations all over the city! They’ve completely raised the bar when it comes to vegan food. My favorites are the Quinoa Taco Salad, Mac’n Cheese and Guac Burger. Sweetgreen
The biggest “chain” you’ll find on this list, but for good reason. You can’t have a healthy eatery roundup and not include the best salad joint in the universe . It’s no secret that Sweetgreen puts all the other salad places to shame, and I’m so glad there are locations all over the city now. Terri
Terri is another vegetarian spot I love, with a few locations in the city. My favorites from there are the Chickpea “Tuna” Melt, the Green Power Smoothie, Gluten Free Vanilla Cupcake, and Portobello Pesto (on a gluten-free wrap). Inday
Inday is one of the more unique fast casual spots in the city, in the best possible way. They offer a healthy take on Indian cuisine with customizable bowls and deliciously interesting ingredients. PokeSpot
The customizable poke bowls at PokeSpot are out of this world. Seriously. You can choose from various bases (including zoodles!) and topping ingredients, or choose one of their signature bowls. You also get quite the bang for your buck – the bowls are huge, so go hungry. Beyond Sushi
Don’t be scared about missing the fish – Beyond Sushi ‘s vegan sushi and wraps are ridiculously good – incredibly flavorful and refreshing. My favorites are their Nutty Buddy Wrap and the Sweet Tree roll. Springbone Kitchen
Springbone brought the bone broth trend to NYC with dozens of different variations and add-ins, along with a delicious menu of mostly Paleo food. I’m a huge fan of their burger (I mean, look at it). Dig Inn
Dig Inn has been around for a long time, but I think about a year ago they redid their menu and it’s seriously better than ever. Dig Inn is always consistent. Their vegetables and proteins are always so flavorful and taste like they were cooked on the spot. Mission Ceviche
Ah yes – more customizable bowls. Mission Ceviche offers Peruvian bowls full of fresh, locally sourced ceviche with tons of topping options. It’s located in the Gansevoort Market in the Meatpacking District. Dez
Dez brought Middle Eastern cuisine to the fast casual world, and I’m so glad they did. Their dishes are seriously flavorful with https://www.loco-coco.com/big, filling portions. I really love their Jeweled Rice Bowl + build-your-own bowl option. Loco Coco
If I’m being honest I’m not usually the world’s biggest fan of smoothie bowls…unless it’s at Loco Coco . They’re bowls are on another level with fresh & unique ingredients. The perfect spot for when you want a meal that’s sweet and refreshing.
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VIDEO: 2Baba, Sharry Mann to headline Surrey’s summer Fusion Festival

Local Entertainment
Surrey’s two-day Fusion Festival this summer will feature performances by Nigerian Afro-pop artist 2Baba and Indian-Punjabi singer Sharry Mann, event organizers announced Wednesday (May 8).
The 12th-annual event, which features an array of music, food and more, will be held at Holland Park on July 20 and 21. Admission is free.
This year, more than 55 pavilions will feature art and cuisine from around the world. New pavilions for 2019 include Venezuela, Uganda, Uruguay, Haiti, Paraguay and Belgium. Additional attractions include an Indigenous village, artisan market, a kids zone, inflatables, sports zone, cooking stage and seven stages featuring more than 200 performers. 200 performers. 55 Cultural Pavilions. 7 stages. 1 festival. #SurreyFusion is on July 20 & 21 with international superstars 2Baba ( @Tuface__idibia ) and Sharry Mann ( @iSharryMann )! RT for a chance to win ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT food tickets. pic.twitter.com/gnITqKAX5R
— Surrey BC Events (@surreybcevents) May 8, 2019
“Surrey Fusion Festival is an excellent opportunity to discover traditional food, art and music from cultures across the globe, right here in Surrey,” Mayor Doug McCallum stated in a release. “I look forward to welcoming all to our most exciting and diverse festival to date that will feature international headliners and homegrown Canadian talent.”
2Baba is a winner of multiple international music awards, including four MTV Africa Music nods, while Sharry Mann is a singer and actor recognized as a leader in the Punjabi music industry. “He is known for his most popular song, ‘3 Peg,’ which has garnered over 360 million views on YouTube,” according to a city release.
Also set to perform this summer is Canadian electro-soul band, Busty and the Bass, known for a style of music that “incorporates two vocalists, a horn section, and a diverse range of musical genres.”
Other artists booked for the 2019 Surrey Fusion Festival include En Karma, Ferre Gola, Aché Brasil, HanYang Arts, Brad Henry, Bukola Balogun, Cedar Hills Caledonian Pipe Band and others.
More event details are posted at surreyfusionfestival.ca .
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Goan-inspired ‘binagoongang baboy’ and other ‘Indianized’ fare | Inquirer Lifestyle

Fashion Zest Quest Asia winners Mika Narciso, Marian Tandy and Bhumika Rai (first, second and fourth from left) pose with Romulo Café’s Enzo Squillantini, Nathan Vasanthan of University of West London, Cyrus Todiwala of Zest Quest Asia, and Aone Rebueno of Romulo Cafè Goan-inspired ‘binagoongang baboy’ and other ‘Indianized’ fare By: Micky Fenix Philippine Daily Inquirer / 07:20 AM May 09, 2019 Zest Quest Asia winners Mika Narciso, Marian Tandy and Bhumika Rai (first, second and fourth from left) pose with Romulo Café’s Enzo Squillantini, Nathan Vasanthan of University of West London, Cyrus Todiwala of Zest Quest Asia, and Aone Rebueno of Romulo Cafè
Three culinary students from the University of West London recently took a seven-day trip to the Philippines, part of their prize for winning a cooking competition this year called Zest Quest Asia. It was a special treat for the trio’s Filipino member, Mika Narciso, who came with her teammates, Marian Tandy and Bhumika Rai.
Their mission was to research on Filipino cuisine and cook at different venues, such as a charity dinner at Romulo Café in Makati, to benefit the “Foundation for Professional Training,” an Opus Dei program for women.
But the main face of Zest Quest Asia that evening was Cyrus Todiwala, one of the founders of the competition. Launched in 2013, it aims to create awareness of Asian cuisine in England, help alleviate the shortage of Asian chefs there, and encourage culinary schools to include Asian cuisine in their curriculum.
It’s funny how, even in the Philippines, we’ve been trying to ask many cooking schools to include Filipino cuisine in their curriculum. Todiwala was all encouragement about Pinoy food, describing the crackle and crunch of the lechon kawali that the team enjoyed in a Pampanga restaurant as “classy.”
Chef Cyrus Todiwala is flanked by Romulo Café proprietors Sandie and Enzo Squillantini.
We expected some Indian cooking that same evening from Todiwala, whose Café Namaste earned a Michelin Bib Gourmand, a new system that awards high-quality food at modestly priced restaurants.
Romulo’s executive chef, Aone Rebueno, and his staff, whipped up Filipino dishes for the students. It must’ve been an intensive learning experience for the student winners, since five of the seven courses were Filipino.
Three appetizers in a row consisted of kesong puti on crackers, a kinilaw of malasugui (marlin) and a rebosado (shrimp in beer batter) with a dip of crab fat aioli.
Even on that hot evening, the soup was welcoming—a clam suam, cooked in corn broth with fried chili leaves.
The salad greens were certainly Filipino—sayote tops with a fruity vinaigrette, lechon kawali bits strewn on top, and edible flowers. Sayote tops are a favorite, but they are getting too expensive—considering that sellers include the heavy, inedible stems in the weighing.
The fish course was apahap, local sea bass, which was pan-seared and served with a mango escabeche sauce.
The kamias sorbet, to cleanse the palate for the heavy main courses, was another welcome cool break.
‘Adobo’
When presenting Filipino cooking, can adobo be far behind? It came in big chicken portions, declared as a confit because it was slow-cooked, combining soy sauce and atsuete oil to the vinegar mix. and then accompanied by ginataang sigarilyas and tomatoes.
The mostly Filipino diners waited for the Goan-inspired binagoongang baboy. The menu described the process. First, the pork was marinated in a mixture of Goa red masala, vinegar and dried shrimp. Then the pieces were slow-roasted and finished with coconut milk.
The process reminded me that Goa has its own version of adobo—the vindaloo. Adlai, which was served with the pork, got the diners talking about this little-known grain that is said to be a better substitute for rice, health-wise, and needing only a little water when cultivating. But then again, adlai isn’t exactly cheap because there is less demand for it.
Filipino “bibingka” and Goan “bebinca”
Dessert consisted of Filipino bibingka and the Goan bebinca. Though a bit similar in name, bebinca is made of layers of coconut, cinnamon and cardamom-flavored batter separated by ghee or clarified butter.
The conversation led to the Indian influence on Filipino cooking, most notable of which is the pickled vegetable which we call achara and Indians call achar, the same word that Warays use.
E-mail pinoyfood04@yahoo.com.

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Singaporean issues open letter to McDonald’s asking why it hasn’t offered an Indian-inspired burger

Singaporean issues open letter to McDonald’s asking why it hasn’t offered an Indian-inspired burger Aravin Sandran noted that he “cannot recall a time when you offered any kind of limited-edition burger, fries, pie or drink in favour of Deepavali or any traditional Indian festival for that matter” in his letter By tweet
A Singaporean has issued an open letter to McDonald’s Singapore, asking why the fast food giant has yet to offer an Indian-inspired burger to local Indians for occasions like Deepavali.
McDonald’s Singapore has offered the Chinese-inspired Prosperity Burgers, Samurai Burgers and Ha Ha Cheong Gai Chicken Burgers and the Malay-inspired Rendang Burgers and Nasi Lemak Burgers during festive occasions but has yet to offer an Indian-inspired meal for occasions like Deepavali.
Asserting that he is “angry because you brought back the Nasi Lemak Burger in time for Ramadan” and because the fast food conglomerate “brought back a burger that at best has been described as a weak and cheap attempt to caricaturise our local cuisine…just so you can earn a couple of extra dollars,” 29-year-old writer, Aravin Sandran wrote:
“Worse yet, I am angry because you’ve recognised a religious observation by a fellow ethnic minority community but you have yet to do anything for Indians.”
Published in the Buro 24/7 online magazine, Aravin’s open letter makes it clear that he is glad that the fast food chain is “thinking of our Muslim brothers and sisters during this fasting month”.
Aravin, however, noted that he “cannot recall a time when you offered any kind of limited-edition burger, fries, pie or drink in favour of Deepavali or any traditional Indian festival for that matter.”
Cheekily asserting that curry sauce and McSpicy Burgers do not count, Aravin wrote that his family sweep over McDonald’s every Deepavali – opting instead for Pizza Hut – because of McDonald’s “typically Western made-for-Chinese menu.”
Noting that the decision to skip over McDonald’s fare wasn’t easy for him since McDonald’s has always been special to him, Aravin wrote: “McDonald’s has always had a special place in my life. It’s where I shared the epic 20-piece chicken nugget set with my two brothers when we were kids; it’s where I pretended to study while secretly making moves on my crush during secondary school; it’s where I binge eat with my best mates after an alcohol-fuelled rave on the weekend as an adult now; and it’s where my girl friends console their broken hearts when their Tinder dates ghosted them like Casper.”
Urging McDonald’s to “demonstrate your support for the Indian community” by offering a one-of-a-kind Indian-inspired burger this Deepavali (27 Oct 2019), Aravin asked: “You don’t have to go all fancy like your counterparts in India; no true Singaporean-Indian would find the idea of a McSpicy Paneer or Green Chilli Naan-Aloo appetising. On the other extreme, going all local on us with a Roti Prata wrap would be a bad idea too. Keep it simple with an authentic, juicy Masala Chicken Burger. That’s how low the bar is at this point.”
Read his open letter in full HERE . SHARE

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The Sizzling Six

Home / Beaches / The Sizzling Six The Sizzling Six
Galapagos Islands
Why It’s Hot: Luxury cruise travel is coming of age in the Galapagos . Silversea’s elegant Silver Galapagos first raised the bar with balconies, marble-accented staterooms and butler service. The line will up the ante in the summer of 2020 with the new Silver Origin.
The ship will feature three lounges, interactive digital walls, Horizon Balconies that can be enclosed plus ocean -view tubs and showers. And debuting this month is the purpose-built Celebrity Flora, featuring suites as large as 1,288 square feet, menus from a Michelin-starred chef and a glamping option.
Who Goes There: “Anyone who’s taken high school science knows about Darwin,” said Mark Conroy, managing director, the Americas, for Silversea Cruises. “They might not know where the Galapagos is, but they know they want to get there someday.” For frequent cruisers, the Galapagos Islands (which are in the Pacific off the coast of Ecuador) are an aspirational destination .
Sales Advice: If clients are on the fence about going the luxury route, emphasize that more than mere pampering is at stake. Guides can make or break a cruise, and luxury lines scoop up the best.
Luxury lines also feature sophisticated gadgetry, such as underwater cameras and listening devices; glass-bottom Zodiacs; and other trip-enhancing amenities. And many luxury lines include intra-Ecuador air, transfers, complimentary pre-cruise hotel stays and entry fees (not to mention free-flowing spirits) in the cruise price.
Iceland
Why It’s Hot: Cruise ships large and small are increasingly calling on the land of fire and ice. With an ancient Nordic culture and landscape of glaciers, fjords, geothermal activity, waterfalls and volcanic formations, Iceland is otherworldly but welcoming.
Who Goes There: Clients looking to combine a mainstream cruise experience with an expedition-type destination . Princess Cruises, Holland America Line and Royal Caribbean International feature Iceland on Northern European itineraries.
“Celebrity offers a unique Ireland-to- Iceland itinerary, and Oceania will do an extended transatlantic journey in the fall that passes through Iceland ,” said Kimberly Coyne, head of sales for Cruiseline.com. Viking Ocean Cruises, Seabourn and Ponant make Iceland calls, while Windstar Cruises offers a circumnavigation option.
Sales Advice: Reykjavik is Iceland ’s capital, home to a bustling arts and culinary scene. It’s also the gateway to natural wonders such as the famous Blue Lagoon. Other cruise ports include Akureyri, the “Capital of the North,” on the shores of Iceland ’s longest fjord, Eyjafjordur. And Isafjordur in northwest Iceland is a fishing center surrounded by stunning fjords.
inspiredbyiceland.com
Japan
Why It’s Hot: Japan is unlike anywhere else in the world. “Its unique charm comes from its ability to offer something to each and every type of traveler,” said Leanne Greentree, G Adventures product manager. “Japan has it all,” she added, from manicured gardens, temples, shrines and the breathtaking beauty of some of the less-traveled rural areas, to big cities, shopping, nightlife, art and one of the world’s most enviable food scenes.
Who Goes There: Nearly any kind of traveler will enjoy Japan, as it offers something for every taste and budget, but especially foodies and urban travelers who love the hustle and bustle of modern cities.
Sales Advice: Recommend that clients visit in fall or winter, Greentree suggested. Temperatures soar in summer, and temples and gardens are packed with tourists in the spring.
japan. travel
Maldives
Why It’s Hot: The Republic of the Maldives is a sovereign archipelagic nation in the Indian Ocean distinguished by dazzling coral reefs, turquoise waters and white-sand beaches . It features 5-star resorts with overwater villa accommodations. Hotel options include brands like Hilton, Hyatt and Marriott, which are popular with U.S. travelers .
“The Maldives is a hot destination for our Millennials and for our very well-seasoned travelers ,” said Jennifer Doncsecz of VIP Vacations. “The Maldives has been rising in popularity over the last few years, but overall, travel to an exotic destination is key.”
Who Goes There: Honeymooners, Millennial travelers , adventure travelers , sun-and-fun seekers.
Sales Advice: “My advice to travel advisors is to truly learn everything you can about exotic destinations, which have incredible specialist programs and offer great incentives to visit the destination on a fam or at an agent rate,” Doncsecz said. Also, there are opportunities for agencies to be listed on the visitmaldives.com website to attract new business.
visitmaldives.com
St. Kitts and Nevis
Why It’s Hot: St. Kitts blends diverse sun-and-fun activities with a fascinating history and exciting nightlife. Brimstone Hill Fortress National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The St. Kitts Scenic Railway, built between 1912 and 1926 to carry sugar cane from plantations to the sugar factory in the capital of Basseterre, takes visitors on a 30-mile, three-hour circumnavigation of the island.
The smaller half of the dual-island Caribbean nation, 36-square-mile Nevis, is home to 3,232-foot Mount Nevis, a dormant volcano that fe local hot springs. The island has long, splendid stretches of near-empty beach and lush hills dotted with ruins of colonial plantations.
Who Goes There: Families, destination wedding travelers , couples, adventure travelers , luxury travelers and veteran Caribbean vacationers seeking something different.
Sales Advice: The St. Kitts Eco- Park and Kittitian Hill development have become very popular for weddings, said Brenda O’Neale of With This Ring Destination Wedding and Honeymoon Travel Agency. Also in St. Kitts, “the strip in Frigate Bay is a great place to hang out on the weekends with locals,” she said. “Great music and food provide for an awesome experience.”
stkittstourism.kn ; nevisisland.com
Sri Lanka
Why It’s Hot: Recently named Lonely Planet’s top country to visit in 2019, Sri Lanka is becoming “the next bucket list destination ” as the country continues to allow travel in once restricted areas years after the civil war, according to Darshika Jones, regional director for North America at Intrepid Travel .
The less-visited Southeast Asia island has eight UNESCO World Heritage Sites, abundant white-sand beaches and influences of Indian and other Asian cuisines and cultures.
Who Goes There: Sri Lanka visitors tend to be more experienced travelers who have enjoyed the tropics and beaches of the Americas and “are ready for something further and more adventurous,” said Jackie Garrity, product and operations partnership manager at G Adventures.
It’s ideal for the nature lover and ocean lover, and suitable for curious young travelers as well as the “more experienced ones who are young of mind.”
Sales Advice: Intrepid Travel offers 12 unique itineraries in Sri Lanka perfect for families, food lovers, cyclists and wildlife watchers, all carbon offset and locally operated. G Adventures’ Garrity noted that northern Sri Lanka in particular offers a fascinating history and “a very different cultural experience.” The people there are predominantly Tamil and Hindu, whereas the rest of the country has a Sinhalese Buddhist majority.
srilanka. travel Google News: Carribean Beaches site-travelpulse.com

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Ordering off menu at dinner?

1,004 71 Truck said: ↑ On our November 2018 cruise the table next to us were Indian and vegetarian. Every night the serving staff brought them the most amazing Indian food and lots of it. The serving staff had no problem doing this for this family and were happy to accommodate them. The cruise we just got off this past Saturday we had mentioned this to our head waiter one night and he offered to bring some out whenever we wanted. (there was a table near us again this cruise that appeared to be eating Indian cuisine every night) We had some of the most amazing Indian food brought to our table on Thursday and Friday nights. We told him not to have the kitchen staff go out of their way but he said it was not a problem. I think they make certain dishes on certain nights and offer it to the guest on certain nights. As for asking for something completely not on any of the menus my wife and I would personally never think of doing that. And if you were having an iffy tummy; they do offer a lighter fair menu that is served with things like plain rice and no sauces. Click to expand… But they notify the ship ahead of time for special menus. They don’t just have every single food item in their inventory, like Indian food. We have been on 8 Disney cruises and have also seen this. I have asked the servers about it and they say they make food for those who order it ahead and sometimes have a bit extra. That is probably what you got. Ships are completely different then a regular restaurant. They have limited space and plan everything out by what they think that they will need. You can special order, within reason, of course. DCL will go out of their way to get a person whatever they want to eat. But don’t forget to tip your server extra for the extra work they do. Many times they have to run to a different kitchen to get your special order and they work hard enough as it is.

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Harrison Barnes Delights in Hoops, Culture on India Journey

Social Menu Harrison Barnes Delights in Hoops, Culture on India Journey Warmly welcomed by fans of all ages in Mumbai and Delhi, the Kings forward promoted the growth of basketball overseas and embraced the native lifestyle. by Jordan Ramirez Digital Managing Editor Posted: May 08, traveled 8,000 miles across the globe, but a basketball in his hands and two dozen eager competitors made him feel at home.
On the first stop of his seven-day sojourn to India, the Kings forward took centerstage on a sun-drenched court inside a newly-built Delhi NCR sports complex, encouraging a group of NBA Academy youngsters through ball handling drills and spirited scrimmages.
As he fought off jet lag following a 20-hour trip, Barnes, serving as Sacramento’s ambassador ahead of October’s NBA India Games, took a moment to reflect on how the sport he loves has afforded him opportunities he never thought were possible.
“I’ve been fortunate enough to travel and see most of the world because of the game of basketball,” he said. “It’s humbling just to be in another country, to be playing the game of basketball and have these kids recognize you from watching your team, cheering for you, rooting for you and supporting you. It’s really humbling just to have that experience, when a kid comes up to you and gives you a compliment or asks for your autograph.”
Besides adding a new stamp to his passport, the Iowa native was intrigued by the prospect of experiencing India’s richly diverse culture and zealous NBA fanbase. He’s hoping his visit can help broaden interest and boost the number of kids pursuing the game in a nation home to one of the League’s largest intercontinental audiences.
“The NBA is growing around the world at a crazy rate … (comparing) where it was five years ago to where it is now,” Barnes said. “The fans here are so passionate, so excited, and they’re really just looking forward to seeing it for the first time.”
That first time has been in the works for over five years and will finally become a reality in the fall. On October 4 and 5, Barnes and the Kings will face the Pacers in the inaugural NBA preseason games in Mumbai, fulfilling a lifelong dream of Vivek Ranadivé, the League’s first India-born majority owner.
After taking in the cacophony of squeaking sneakers, bouncing basketballs and screaming voices at the camps, Barnes expects an unprecedented atmosphere inside the NSCI Dome that might even rival the roaring receptions at Golden 1 Center.
“It’ll be crazy when the entire team comes here,” he said. “Tickets sold out in, like, two minutes! So everyone is just really excited to just see an NBA game for the first time, because they haven’t had that experience here.”
Barnes, warmly welcomed with “Namaste,” the customary Indian greeting, by fans who recognized him from basketball telecasts on the country’s cable networks, made appearances on Sony Ten 1 and Sony Ten 3’s NBA wraparound TV shows in Mumbai to cover the Playoffs and connect with viewers.
On his last day in Delhi, he was present for the National Finals of the fourth ACG-NBA Jump, India’s national basketball talent search program, to help identify the top prospects who will receive scholarships and training at the Academy. Barnes recognized immense potential among the 50 attendees, and along with instructing athletes on the finer points of the pick-and-roll, shared his personal mantra with players who pulled him aside to pick his brain.
“The biggest advice I try to give to these kids is, just love the game,” he said. “At this point in time, when you’re developing all the skills and you have a hunger, you just want to make sure that the love of the game is the most important thing and that you keep that as your focus as you continue to build and get better as a player.”
Outside of teaching and learning – “Mera naam Harrison hai” (My name is Harrison), he quickly picked up – and in between 6 a.m. and 8 p.m. workouts, Barnes was able to explore the subcontinent, immersing himself in the culture and getting a glimpse of day-to-day life for locals.
Enticed by the flavorful aromas wafting out of restaurants and marketplaces, Barnes couldn’t pass up the chance to sample the traditional cuisine, indulging in everything from samosas to chicken tikka masala to palak paneer. At eateries Peetra and Eggspectation, every delicacy he tried surpassed his expectations.
“Indian is my favorite food, so it’s hard for me to say which dish was my favorite,” he said. “All of the dishes here were phenomenal. It was unbelievable!”
Barnes later folded his 6-foot-8 frame inside an auto rickshaw for a tour of Mumbai, where he was engulfed by centuries-old historical sites and landmarks. At the Dharavi neighborhood – an area made famous as the setting of the critically-acclaimed film “Slumdog Millionaire” – the 26-year-old, his drenched gray t-shirt clinging to his chest, swung a cricket bat in the field among cheering crowds.
“It was pretty cool just to be able to try something different,” he said.
His sightseeing expedition continued in Delhi, where he took in the scenery at several tourist attractions, including India Gate at the Ravi River, and culminated with a six-hour roundtrip to the city of Agra to view the iconic Taj Mahal.
Barnes, no different than any of the thousands of domestic visitors, was captivated by the majestic ivory-white marble masterpiece as he wandered through the symbolic gardens and opulent interiors.
“It’s one of the seven wonders of the world,” he said. “So just to be able to see it, see the history behind it, and just have that moment of taking a picture and just thinking, ‘Wow, I’m really here because of the game of basketball’ was a pretty surreal moment.”
A week wasn’t enough to check off every destination on his summer itinerary – much less, sample every culinary treat – but it was ample time for Barnes to recognize how passionate the fans are for the NBA and how much of an impact the Kings upcoming exhibition games will have on the region.
“It’s hard to say if basketball is going to overtake cricket some day, but basketball is on the rise for sure. The fans and the kids here, they definitely see it, appreciate it, and they want to be ball players,” Barnes said. “I came here with an open mind, and it’s been a great experience, so I’m really looking forward to coming back with the team in October.” Tags

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