Enjoy a chilled staycation in Dubai at Dukes The Palm

Enjoy a chilled staycation in Dubai at Dukes The Palm

Middle East A weekend in Dubai , Dubai staycations Dukes The Palm a Royal Hideaway Hotel , trending destinations dubai , where to stay in Dubai Enjoy a chilled staycation in Dubai at Dukes The Palm Dial down the pace at Dukes The Palm, a Royal Hideaway Hotel , and indulge in a staycation in Dubai during Ramadan 2019, complete with two delicious iftars to try
If you want to spoil yourself with a serene staycation in Dubai…
… sequester yourself away at Dukes The Palm, and spend a weekend in Dubai soaking up the hotel’s unique brand of quiet luxury. Catch some early morning rays on the stretch of private sand before cooling down in the infinity pool and then floating along the lazy river. Next, yoga buffs can stretch out by joining an expert-led class. Alternatively, get the heart rate pumping at the gym, where a cross training session will put you through your paces.
Yet more fun
If you have kids in tow, there’s plenty to entertain them at Dukesy Kids Club. Designed for ages 5 to 12, edutainment rules with a fun line-up of activities served up alongside healthy and nutritious food. Speaking of which, foodies are in their element here, with the stylish yet understated Great British Restaurant (GBR), authentic Indian cuisine at Khyber, and prime cuts of beef at West 14 th Steakhouse on the menu. Iftar at GBR
For a classical Middle Eastern iftar…
… head to GBR which is ready to welcome you during the Holy Month with an abundant selection of traditional Middle Eastern cuisines and international fare. Plus, you can take your pick from live cooking stations manned by talented chefs. Menu highlights include Emirati lamb harris, imperial couscous from Morocco, Murgh Rizala from India and succulent mixed grills. Catering to all ages, you can bring the whole family to this nightly dining event during your weekend in Dubai. Unwind to the sounds of the live classical oud musician. Lastly, finish off your meal with a cup of aromatic tea or Arabic coffee. From sunset until 9pm. Dhs185 per adult and Dhs95 per child.
To feast on Indian delicacies after sunset…
… reserve your table at Khyber. It’s ideal for those seeking a more extravagant iftar experience, with its delicious take on North Indian cuisines that’ll take you on a tantalising trip to the Mughal era. Pick from a selection of vegetarian and non-vegetarian dishes, including samosa chaat and juicy keema seekh kababs. Moreover, there’s hearty mains such as roghan josh and classic daal makhana on offer. For dessert, the restaurant’s distinctive take on rasmalai andsheer kurmaare sure to steal the show. From sunset until 9pm. Dhs185 per adult and Dhs95 per child.
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What are some ideas for designing a Punjabi restaurant

A Punjabi restaurant should feature pictures, decor, and memories of India. Food should also be inspired by authentic Indian cuisine.

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Diabetes Diet : Eat Onion To Beat The Summer Heat And Regulate Blood Glucose Levels

US English Female Diet ( Nutrition ) 3 hours from now 12 Views Onion may benefits diabetics during summers Red onion contains the flavonoid quercetin Red onion also contains sulfur compounds
Diabetes is a condition that affects the body’s ability to process blood sugar normally, leading to an excess of glucose in the blood. There are two different types of diabetes – Type-1 diabetes and Type-2 diabetes. While the former is a result of the pancreas producing little or no insulin, the latter is a lifestyle disorder, resulting from the body becoming insulin resistant. Diabetes affects millions of people in India every year and common symptoms of the condition include frequent thirst, frequent urge to urinate, fatigue and hunger and even blurred vision in some cases. Diabetics need to be very careful about what they eat on a daily and even hourly basis.
There are certain foods and drinks that people can include in their diet to regulate their levels of blood sugar and onion is one of them. The vegetable may prove to be beneficial for diabetics, especially during summers. Onion for diabetes: The veggie may prove beneficial for diabetics Onion For Summers
Onion is an indispensable part of the Indian cuisine. It’s used in preparing almost every curry and rice dish, and is a common part of sides and accompaniments like chutneys, salads etc. Onion also comes with a number of health benefits, including boosting skin and hair health, as well as protecting the body against symptoms of heat stroke. Red onions , which are the most common onions used across the Indian subcontinent, are rich in the compound quercetin, which is a flavonoid and which is said have anti-histamine properties. This means that it stops the release of allergen histamine from cells. It may, therefore, help prevent rashes due to heat on the skin. It also helps in preventing allergies and fights inflammation in the body.
Also Read: Onions For Summer: Can Carrying An Onion In Your Pocket Protect You From Heat Stroke? Onion For Diabetes
Onion or onion juice may be consumed during summers to fight adverse impacts of the heat, as well as to regulate levels of blood sugar. A recently published review of studies on the impact of quercetin has indicated that the compound may help diabetics. The review that was published in the journal Phytopherapy Research said that daily consumption of quercetin supplements in dosage 500 mg or above for eight weeks, lowered blood glucose levels in metabolic syndrome patients. The participants were at a high risk of developing diabetes.
Also Read: 11 Best Onion Recipes | Easy Onion Recipes | Pyaaz Recipes
Another study conducted on rats concluded that diets containing 5 percent onion extracts for a period of 28 days were able to decrease fasting blood glucose levels. These anti-diabetic effects of red onions come from the presence of both quercetin and sulphur compounds in it.
Also Read: 6 Surprising Ways to Use Onions Other Than Cooking With Them!
Onion for diabetes: Red onions contain the flavonoid quercetin
Include red onions in your salads, sandwiches, savoury porridges, brown rice dishes etc. to reap the benefits of the vegetable. Pregnant women may be advised to stay away from excessive consumption of too much onion. In case of food allergies or chronic illnesses, it is advised to consult your dietitian or physician before adding any food to your diabetes diet. Source:

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For excellent Indian try Happy Valley in the centre. It’s in our top 3 of Indian to different resorts we go to. Also, Rhodos Palace by the marina for very good Greek food. You might have to go early or pre-book though as it’s not massive. You said you like mixed grill or steak, well there are loads of restaurants that do multi-cuisines as opposed to specifically one style, check out some reviews for the best steak and grill places.

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Long term Japan Resident Sanjeev Sinha Helps in Global Awareness of Japanese Culture: Countryside Japan Transitions from Heisei to Reiwa Period with a Fine Balance Between Culture and Economy

Long term Japan Resident Sanjeev Sinha Helps in Global Awareness of Japanese Culture: Countryside Japan Transitions from Heisei to Reiwa Period with a Fine Balance Between Culture and Economy 2 hours ago ) For the first time in modern history the Japanese empower has decided to resign leading to a change from Heisei Period to Reiwa period from May 1^st 2019. The Heiwa period has led Japan through a new paradigm of balance between modern and tradition and placing Japan into a postindustrial society 5.0. *Author with 4 sisters around 80 years old running the 108 years old Inn Tamaya in Daigo (photo Sanjeev Sinha)* Among many of Japan’s traditions, lacquerware making, known as Urushi in Japanese, goes back to 5000 BCE in Japan during Jomon Period. Japanese lacquerware, paintings, ancient pottery, sculpture, ink painting and calligraphy, woodblock prints, ceramics and origami are known and collected across the world. Famous Ukiyo-e paintings are also a popular collector’s items. More recently manga which is modern Japanese cartoons and comics along with a myriad of other types are being known as Japanese soft power. *Watanabe Kun learning the Lacquer plantation (photo Sanjeev Sinha)* With a history of Japanese capital and arts and culture hubs moving to different locations across Japan, the tradition is also dispersed across different parts of Japan including small towns and villages. Japan is also well known for bullet trains, which is demonstrably the world’s best as a combination of length, speed, frequency, service and most of all safety: not a single accident fatality despite many severe earthquakes in the total history of more than 50 years. The remote rural part of Japan is also well covered by the public transport despite a very mountainous terrain of the country through breath-taking bridges and tunnels. Japan’s urban transport systems are also a wonder, with greater Tokyo having the world’s most extensive and smooth urban rail network of 158 lines with 2,200 stations serving 40 million passenger rides daily, a little more than the total population of the region, which is also world’s largest urban conglomerate, at about 35 million. This is further connected with a dense and frequent bus operation as well as increasingly pedestrian and bicycle friendly urban planning. This is topped with a long-time impeccable record for safety and on-going regular improvements on all aspects. This leads to a very comfortable urban life style in Tokyo with almost zero crime, practically zero unemployment, negligible traffic jams, great healthcare and increasing convenience with omnipresent network of 24 hours convenience stores. Similar is the case for other major cities of Japan like Osaka, Fukuoka, Sapporo, Sendai, Mito etc. This poses a dilemma for Japan as the youth of Japan especially gets pulled into a handful of bigger cities not just for economic attraction but also for the active and playful lifestyle leaving the smaller cities and towns of Japan with dwindling ageing population. *A modern dilemma for traditions* While Tokyo is upcoming as a major international arts and culture hub the traditional culture, arts and craftsmanship of Japan widespread into its diverse landscape of smaller towns are facing a threat. *Sanjeev Sinha, President of India Japan Partnership Group* specializing in promotion of collaboration including technology, finance, arts and culture between India and Japan, was invited by a joint initiative of TV Osaka and TV Tokyo for an experience and global awareness building of Japan’s traditional culture, arts and craftsmanship in smaller towns. In the context, Sanjeev Sinha is also an Advisor at the Committee on Promotion of AI and Inclusion at Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communication of Japan, been an Advisor to the Nagareyama City and for Japanese collaboration of new capital city of Indian state of Andhra Pradesh, President of India Japan Partnership Fund, India Japan Institute of Technology and a guest lecturer of Urban Development at University of Tokyo. The place chosen for the theme Daigo Town is a little-known place in Ibaraki Prefecture, on the border of two other prefectures of Fukushima and Tochigi for the period of April 19^th to 21^st 2019. The town at 160 kilometers north of Tokyo is a host to a small community for plantation and collection of lacquer and more recently for making of inkstones and is the original investor of a popular health food of Japan Konyak. The town also has many traditional inns called Ryokan and hot springs called Onsen, as is common in many places in Japan making it a wholesone trip to experience the local culture, hospitality and economy. The Daigo Town has records of lacquer plantation and harvesting, known as Urushi Kaki in Japanese, for more than half a millennium. Sanjeev and visitors were greeted by Mr. Tobita 84 year old on the slopes of the hills in the town where a new plantation for lacquer is being carried out. It takes 8 to 10 years for a tree to be harvested which takes specialized traditional tools. As the visitors were taken around different plantation sites, they were treated to a wide variety of fresh local food highlighting the hospitality of country side of Japan called Omotenashi. *Return of the youth to the tradition* In the team of 5 people most people were in their 70s and 80s except one Mr. Watanabe, affectionately called Watanabe Kun, who was only 26 years old. Watanabe Kun was born and brought up in a large and world famous city of Kawasaki which is a part of greater Tokyo described above. His presence in the small and remote Daigo Town for Lacquer plantation was a very interesting phenomenon which deserves some deeper analysis. The generation of Millennials across the world are known for their special and independent nature. The accelerated changes in the global economy which are now so fast that a single generation can face 3 or 4 different economic paradigms. At the same time the great access of latest and world wide access of information makes it a very different world where the younger generations have a huge reasons to think very independently of their earlier generations. While the economic efficiency of the new world makes their lives very comfortable in the moment the serious concerns of the climate change makes the younger generation question the very values systems of the older system. Watanabe Kun chose to leave the comforts and economic benefits of the bigger city and live in Daigo Town just with an impulse as he liked the idea. He is not worried about his economic future because the modern economy of Japan offers him enough opportunities for a good life style anytime he wishes to choose and change. This brings the core intellectual and aesthetic luxury of arts, culture and nature to the forefront as a major driving force. Watanabe Kun, not worried about his own economic wellbeing, just chose to live in nature and tradition in defiance to the economic common sense of the earlier generations. *Vertical integration of arts and culture* While Daigo Town has had the tradition of Lacquer plantation for hundreds of years, the town has not been known much because of the background nature of the work. In the foreground is the lacquerware itself which is well appreciated as an art work across the world. Hence not surprisingly, the town has attracted an art expert Mr. Tsuji from the top arts university of Japan, Tokyo University of Arts, to make it a base for his lacquerware studio. Mr. Tsuji is producing world class lacquer art in Daigo Town and gave a demonstration and educational session to Sanjeev and visitors group. He also uses latest technology for temperature and humidity control in his process creating a fine balance and coexistence between tradition and technology. The arts and culture survive on a sense of pride by the community, hence the lacquerware artwork in the town also enhances the sense of pride of the lacquer plantation community and the whole town can expect a boost. This was seen in move of youth moving to Daigo to work with Mr. Tsuji, and this time it was two young ladies in their 20s from central Tokyo. Lacquerware also has symbolism in India Japan relations as many of the Buddhist artwork exchanged between the two countries historically and contemporarily. Both countries and rest of Asia also place a huge symbolism on Lacquerware, brining Asia together in one of the ways of culture. *Hardship of tradition and need for society* Symbolically so too, hard stone of Daigo has led to a new artwork in the town with Mr. Sato, in his 70s, to chose the town for his hard work of inkstones making. Inkstone making goes back hand in hand to the early history of calligraphy to thousands of years back. It requires special types of stones which lend themselves for the delicate shapes and finish required for Inkstones called Suzuri in Japanese. Mr. Sato found a river basis in Daigo which has the right kind of stone for the purpose. As a one-man project to begin with Mr. Sato started digging these stone, acquiring the tools for the Suzuri making and created his workshop on the way to a shrine in the mountains. Mr. Sato, having lost his first wife and now battling with the illness of his second partner in the hospital, is spending a rather solitary life in the mountains and couldn’t stop his tears when spoken on the matter. Over the time Mr. Sato, has attracted a group of younger professionals, still in their 50s, to support him in his efforts and now is a proud owner of a Suzuri gallery hosting Suzuri work ranging from few hundred grams to 10s of kilograms and from 20,000 yen to few million Yens in valuation. *Omotenashi: the mantra of Prime Minister Abe to secure 2020 Olympics and Paralympics* Japan is known for Ometanashi, which is a level of hospitality and service from heart and culture going beyond any economic reasons. And it goes beyond age too as was proven by the four sisters all around 80 years old running a 108 years old inn called Tamaya Ryokan. The four sisters symbolizing the longer lifespan of women then men have all lost their husbands to natural reasons. They decided to come together to renew their 80 years old bonding from childhood to live together and run the 2 storied inn inherited by them in this small town of Daigo. Running the Ryokan requires taking care of all the errands from procurement, cooking, cleaning and bed making and they do it all with their heart into it. Their deep knowledge of the society, human relations and culture makes any conversation with them very lively and enlightening. Even in the age of 80s the third eldest sister makes an annual trip of couple of weeks with around 40 other friends from the Daigo town to different parts of Japan. Showing how the passion for life, community bonding and active lifestyle can help one live longer naturally and happily. The reason for their good health also lies in the healthy traditional food of the town as the town takes the credit for invention of famous health food of Japan called Konjak (pronounced in Japanese as Konnyaku) made from the Asian plant Amorphophallus konjac and has great health benefits with negligible calories in the various forms of processed Konjac. As Japanese tea has become very popular in India in recent years for its health benefits, Sanjeev is also exploring promoting Konjac in India for its dieting benefits. Japan with its excellence in food processing has a wide range of Konjac based health supplements which can be preserved, transported and consumed under various conditions. Daigo town hosts a historical factory of Konjac and offers a wide variety of Konjac cuisines. Daigo also has a beautiful municipality run hot water spring, known as Onsen in Japanese, in the mountains with open air baths called Rotenburo. It’s a delight to soak in the natural hot water in a very comfortable and clean environment surrounded by hills and trees. The town is also attracting modern style guest houses like Lahar run by a young couple *Mr. and Mrs. Komatsuzaki.* Coming from the bigger capital city of Ibaraki Prefecture called Mito, the couple is providing the much-needed outbound marketing insights to the town that Sanjeev and other foreigners as longtime resident of Japan in the visiting group could closely associate with. Japan having been a very homogenous country lacks the global marketing acumen which is much needed to promote the awareness of Japanese virtues to the rest of the world and India is widely recognized as a trusted potential partner for the same. *Smaller towns as a guidelight for modern solitude* The modern world especially in big well managed cities like Tokyo have gone beyond their economic necessities. With good lifestyle infrastructure of restaurants, 24 hour convenience stores and trustworthy health care with ambulances reaching within few minutes of calling, every individual is extremely self-sufficient. The self-sufficiency has led to people living alone and has taken its toll on human and family bonding leading to serious issues of loneliness. The lifestyle of the four sisters in the small town of Daigo comes as a great inspiration and a living example to solve that problem of solitude as the people in Japan can afford to focus more on culture and lifestyle than economy. Smaller towns can serve as the hubs for community rebuilding and in parts the big cities can also emulate to implement similar lifestyle models in the big cities. With modern economic and urban development advantages, Tokyo is already seeing new development of smaller self-sustainable residential hubs in the so-called Society 5.0 or Post Industrial Society model which will underline the new Reiwa period. Japan with its long term and well-balanced socio-economic planning leads the world in post-industrial society issues and solutions and can offer a significant amount of experience and know how in the domain, including the example of Daigo. (Sanjeev Sinha, Daigo Town, April 2019).

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5 great Indian restaurants in Malta

Restaurants 5 great Indian restaurants in Malta
It may seem daunting to cook your favourite Indian dishes at home, with the cuisine’s unusual and complex spices. So head out to one of our favourite spots to satisfy all of your Indian food cravings 6 May 2019, 6:36pm TWEET SHARE
We don’t know about you, but we love a good curry; it’s warm, wholesome, and comforting, no matter where you are. Thankfully, in Malta, there is a wide variety of Indian eateries, bringing the aromas and flavours of South Asia to the island. Each Indian restaurant offers its own style and quirks so we’ve compiled a list of some of the greatest spots for Indian cuisine.
Gate of India
At Gate of India , the kitchen staff possess years of experience in all aspects of Indian cuisine.
The menu is focused on serving only traditional Indian recipes that require the use of high quality, seasonal and fresh produce to ensure fullness of flavour, enhanced by authentic, specially imported Indian curries and spices.
Katrina’s
Apart from the exceptional Indian Cuisine, Katrina’s also offer a selection of traditional Mediterranean and local dishes. The residential chef at Katrina’s work tirelessly to provide the freshest and best possible Indian menu to its customers.
Located in the Main Street of Mellieha, Katrina’s is also the perfect meeting place for a daytime coffee and perhaps a dessert.
Annapurna
Located in the heart of St.Julian’s , Annapurna Restaurant offers authentic Nepali, Indian and Asian cuisine. The chefs at Annapurna remain true to the flavours and techniques and offer a glimpse into traditional dishes with modern twist from right across the region.
The kitchen is professionally run by high class 5 star chefs who have experience in fine dining cuisine and have worked for more than10 years in most prestigious restaurants all over United Kingdom. They have finally collaborated and decided to open an outlet in Malta.
Kohinoor
Looking for a place that serves superb indian cuisine in the heart of Gozo? Look no further. Kohinoor , an Indian restaurant in Marsalforn, offers not just Indian dishes, but a whole new excotic experience from India.
All components of the Indian dishes are special – from the textured Basmatti rice all the way to the serving food and the attention it requires. A great find in Marsalforn.
Sharma Ethnic Cuisine
Sharma , located along the marina at Portomaso, offers a varied selection of Indian, Arabian and Mediterranean cuisine – ideal dishes to be shared by groups of people with different tastes.
The main concept behind the restaurant is that of sharing and combining cuisines, allowing patrons to discover varying foods and the magical ways in which they can be combined to create fusions you could only dream of.
The Indian cuiisine at Sharma is set to spark your taste buds by bringing together the exciting flavours of India as well as combination of differfent spices.
It may seem daunting to cook your favourite Indian dishes at home, with the cuisine’s unusual and complex spices. So why not head out to one of our favourite spots to satisfy all of your Indian food cravings?
Check out all these restaurants in Malta on Taaable and subscribe to keep yourself updated with any offers these restaurants might have.

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Celebrity Travel Addicts: Jon Barr of Here Be Barr

May 5, 2019 0
In this edition of Celebrity Travel Addicts, we speak with Jon Barr of Here Be Barr , a former sportscaster turned world traveler. We chat with him about what inspires him to travel, how a health crisis impacted his career and priorities, travel tips, and some of his favorite places to visit. Check out his favorite destinations and find out where he’s going next! How did your passion for travel get started?
I actually didn’t really catch the travel bug til my mid 20’s when I started to decide that living a full time 9-5 existence wasn’t for me. I worked many seasonal positions due to my broadcasting career, which left me ample time to travel between jobs. And I haven’t looked back. You are a former sportscaster. What was the transition from that to travel vlogger like, and how has being a journalist impacted your travels?
The transition was both easy and difficult, depending on what aspect of travel vlogging we look at. I actually had a lot of experience, speaking in front of a camera, so that transition was rather seamless. However, my background in editing and shooting was pretty minimal. Those were two skills I had to pick up on the fly. Having a degree in Journalism has impacted me a lot, as I now know how to tell a story and always weave the most important elements and facts into it. It’s like I’m chatting with my viewers/listeners on a sports broadcast only the content is travel related. How many days/weeks are you traveling in any given year? What are the types of places you like to visit?
The last 6-9 months I’ve been “traveling” in my home base of New York City. I’ve focused a ton of my efforts on showcasing my home, and its paid dividends with a lot of new subscribers. In the past, I used to travel a lot more frequently, perhaps 4-6 months of the year. I am gradually, upping my volume of travel and the second half of 2019 should see some more content outside of New York City. You are currently 2 years cancer-free. First off, congratulations! How did your diagnosis affect your travels? What advice would you give to travelers who have health-related issues?
Thanks for the kind words. I think the diagnosis, actually made me take a step back from my YouTube career, and my life priorities. I was at one point, overly obsessed with trying to grow my channel. After I got sick, I realized that if people don’t watch my videos, or the vlog isn’t perfect.. there are far worse things that can happen to me. That being said, I appreciate things more, and I want to travel as much as I can because I know that I can’t take my good health for granted anymore. What do you want audiences to gain and learn from your work?
I want to teach people to travel the same way that I do. Avoid tourist traps as much as possible, really to get know a city and appreciate it like a local. I’m also a big fan of quirky/off-beat activities. Visiting a museum in Las Vegas dedicated to old billboards/glowing neon signs from casinos is a prime example. You live in New York City. What is the best tip you can give to someone who wants to have a good experience there?
Too many to list in one interview. If we had to break it down into a short answer… Don’t just base your trip on Manhattan, explore this crazy place which has some of the most diverse offerings on planet earth. And don’t try to do much on one trip. I’ve lived here almost a decade and I have so much to learn and see. What are the top three destinations you’ve visited?
In no particular order : Mexico, Thailand, and Malta. Give us your ‘Top 5’ list for one of your top 3 destinations. Like a mini-guide or a to-do list of sorts. It can be anything from your favorite hotel, best place to have lunch, best sightseeing, etc.
Top 5 Mexico:
1) Visit the Mayan ruins/cenotes of the Yucatan Peninsula
2) Eat the incredible Street Food of Mexico City
3) Spend the night in a Puebla Magico.. any Puebla Magico . (Bonus for Mazamitla)
4) Go to just one Mexican Soccer Game
5) Explore the incredible jungles/rivers of Huasteca Potosina. How many countries have you visited so far?
33, according to my Instagram profile. What are your top 3 favorite cuisines? 1) Mexican food 2) Indian Food 3) American BBQ What is your favorite restaurant in the world? What dish do you recommend there?
I’m going to have to go with something in NYC. Let’s say the Nonna Maria Slice at Bleecker Street Pizza. The Tacos at San Taco in Mexico City are a close second. What is your favorite travel movie?
Not Hostel, hahaa.. I’ll go with the Hangover since it’s a comedy and they did travel to Vegas. What is your favorite international airport?
I’ll answer Mexico City’s only because I have access to so many different lounges inside of there and when you land seeing the huge cityscape from far away is incredible. Which city had the friendliest people?
Merida, Mexico. Who is your favorite travel companion?
My wife ! What is the best way to kill time while traveling?
Answering YouTube/Instagram comments. What is the most exotic place your career has taken you?
Wow, great question.. The most exotic place I ever vlogged was probably in the jungles of Huasteca Potosina, Mexico. What is your best bit of travel advice for someone who wants to, or is about to, embark on a life of travel?
Don’t plan every little step. Leave some things open to chance. What are 4 things you could never travel without?
My vlogging camera, a small carry-on suitcase, my Brevite backpack, and my wife (unless it’s a hiking trip). What is your ultimate dream destination?
India What is your favorite travel quote?
“Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail” -Ralph Waldo Emerson Where are you headed next?
New Orleans, LA for my friends bachelor party.. but going to create at least 1 Vlog out there ! Bio
I’m Jon Barr, an ex-sportscaster turned travel vlogger. If you’re looking for waste no-time, incredibly informative videos loaded with useful travel tips, you’ve come to the right place! My vlogs are made for the savvy traveler. Follow along to learn all of my travel tips, tricks, and secrets. Connect with Jon on his Here Be Barr website , Instagram , Facebook , and Twitter . Related

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Not all of SE Asia has its rains season at the same time. There are big regional differences within each country let alone between countries. In Vietnam especially, there are huge differences. In Central Vietnam, Hoi An sees its driest, sunniest weather in August. In Bali it is similarly fine weather, dry with blue skies. Despite what has been suggested above , it is the wettest time of the year for the Andaman (west coast ) of Thailand ( Phuket ) and Malaysia ( Langkawi ) – The East Coast of the peninsula will see much better weather. Borneo will also be good. That said, even in the rainy season, it rarely rains all day. It could however be grey and overcast much of the time
In terms of safety, there is little to worry about in most of these places. Just take the usual precautions you would anywhere. Keep and eye on your possessions and don’t flash jewellery around. There are scams around with taxis etc. But these are rare.
As far as trying the local food is concerned, you are spoilt for choice. Vietnamese, Indonesian, Malaysian – all are wonderful and cheap. Malaysian food, being a mix of Malay, Chinese, Indian etc. Is perhaps the most varied but my personal favourite cuisine will always be Vietnamese. The very best food is to be had outside of the hotels.

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El Camino Real

By Eli Siegel May 06, 2019
Many of Philadelphia’s Latino restaurants specialize in a certain country’s cuisine, such as Mexican, Venezuelan or Peruvian. At El Camino Real in Northern Liberties, the focus is instead on the intersection of where two countries meet. More specifically, they center their menu on the Mexican-American border region of El Paso and Ciudad Juarez.
“We chose our name ‘El Camino Real,’ because it is the road that connects Juarez with El Paso,” explained Joshua Zameska, the El Camino’s Director of Operations.
The restaurant’s interior is outfitted to reflect that area, with dusty desert-like colors and warm wood furniture throughout. Many of the tables and chairs were built by owner Owen Kamihira who by trade is a designer and has helped develop other businesses in the Philadelphia area.
El Camino Real’s menu is divided into two halves. One side is dedicated to Texas BBQ classics, such as Brisket, Ribs and Texas Brats. The other is authentic Mexican and Tex Mex choices, like tacos, burritos and quesadillas.
Among the most popular options are the Texas Brats (house made pork and beef bratwurst), and shrimp, steak and chicken tacos. They also offer innovative specials that change based on the season and what produce is currently available. This past fall they offered pumpkin mole.
The menu will be tweaked early 2019 for the first time in 3 years to add a few new dishes, such as braised barbacoa and churry queso tacos. The goal is to provide fresh popular options that are made in house.
“If we can make, why buy it?” said Zameska.
Accompanying the diverse food menu is a large offering of drinks. The main feature are the Margaritas that come in seven different flavors, such as El Camino (silver tequila, fresh lime juice, orange liqueur and simple syrup) and Jalapeño (cazadores reposado tequila, fresh jalapeno, lime juice, simple syrup and orange liqueur).
They often have daily drink specials. This past December they had an advent calendar entitled “El Camino Gives A Sh*t,” offering different cocktails. Half the proceeds from these cocktail went to Toys for Tots.
The restaurant holds fundraisers for many different groups, such as the ACLU and the local library. They participate every year in the 2nd Street Festival on the first Sunday in August where different restaurants and businesses in Northern Liberties come together to promote the neighborhood. More recently, they held a Taco Challenge competition where 14 different restaurants offered a sampling of their tacos. The tacos were then judged by a panel that determined El Camino Real’s Executive Chef Michael Thomas’ mole tacos the winner.
“We like to have a good time at work. We enjoy what we do,” explained Thomas.
Thomas’ passion for food goes back to his early days growing up in an Ecuadorian family in the diverse neighborhood of Jackson Heights, Queens.
“Growing up I had amazing vegetarian Indian food that I took for granted,” said Thomas. “There also was fantastic Columbian, Ecuadorian. When I came to Philly it was a culture shock.”
Since coming here, he’s spent over a decade working in the food industry at places such as Buddakan, Lolita and Bar Ferdinand. He has held roles as everything from front of house, to dishwasher, to running the entire kitchen. For him, it’s about working together as a team to give the customers the best experience possible.
“We put in a lot of work, effort, care and love into what we do,” said Thomas. “Our current team is one of the best staffs we’ve had since we opened.”
For more information about El Camino Real check out their website www.elcaminophilly.com or their Facebook page @ElCaminoPhilly. Address: 1040 North Second Street Philadelphia, PA 19123. Hours: Monday – Friday 11am to 2am. Saturday and Sunday 10am to 2am. Prices: $8 – $20. TAGS

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Some Indian cuisine items would have included in the food exchange of Novotel . The same would have done in the room menu also . The items in the mini bar are bit overpriced . The swimming pool timings would have kept open till late night . Separate floor / room for early check in or late check in would have been facilitated or would have provided at discounted rates . The discounted price is very high .Door knobs / latch for the restrooms on 7th floor shall be given .sitting facility shall be provided in the rest room also because many people who are not able to early check in can use the rest rooms little bit comfortable manner .
Although the location is far away from the main road , the Tuk -Tuk facility was very convenient . The staff are very friendly and supportive all the time . The attitude towards their guests are very welcoming , attentive and helpful . The hotel had paid attention to every detail in all its facilities and needs of the guests . Awesome rooms . My self and my wife were very happy and satisfied staying in the hotel . It was short vacation but great vacation . The roof top Sky on 20 bar was really awesome and price is wise and feel very relaxed in the lounge .Overall experience staying in Novotel was 4.9/5.
Stayed in April 2019

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