Edinburgh curry house offers 10 per cent discount for Fringe-goers

Edinburgh curry house offers 10 per cent discount for Fringe-goers

Edinburgh Fringe-goers will be able to get 10 per cent off their food bill in a city curry house throughout August.
Bengali and Indian restaurant, Voujon, will give the discount to diners who have seen a Fringe show either before or after eating at the restaurant. Voujon is offering 10 per cent off food bills during the Fringe.
READ MORE: Wanderers Kneaded: The street food van serving up some of Edinburgh’s best pizzas All you’ll have to do is show your ticket to staff at the Newington Road restaurant as proof.
The restaurant is running the discount throughout August because the Festival can be a pricey time of year for Edinburgh residents, with performances and socialising resulting in higher costs.
The restaurant’s general manager said: “We all know the financial struggle of the Fringe, but it’s of course worth it for the entertainment, culture, buzz, and energy it brings to the city each year.
“We want to give a little back and offer show goers 10 per cent off their food bill, to help them enjoy their time and relax before or after a show – without fearing the dreaded bill at the end.” The food inside Voujon.
Visitors just need to book a table at the restaurant on the day of their show, and present their ticket as proof to enable the discount.
Voujon, which is located at 107 Newington Road, serves traditional Asian cuisine in a modern Scottish environment.
The menus is a fusion of traditional Bengali recipes with influences from both east and west. It features various meat, fish and vegetarian dishes including Rogan Josh, Madras and Pathia and special dishes such as Katmandu Chicken and Methi Ghost.
For more details visit www.voujonedinburgh.com or call 0131 667 5046. The restaurant interior. Trending 32 pictures of Edinburgh in the 00s that will make you want to go back in time These are the best pubs in Edinburgh and The Lothians according to the Good Beer Guide 2019 – which ones have you been to? 9 eerie underground tunnels and vaults in Edinburgh that have lain empty for years Edinburgh roadworks: scheduled road closures, temporary traffic lights and diversions Traffic delays in Edinburgh city centre after ‘serious’ accident closes busy road The Essentials

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The 16 Best New Restaurants in America

Flipboard Los Angeles is spoiled for taco choices — there’s the sublime carne asada at Sonoratown, the unrivaled crispy shrimp tacos at Mariscos Jalisco, really too many others to name — but around midnight on a chilly January Saturday in Koreatown, there was only one that I cared about: an adobada taco from Tacos 1986, a stand that had been open for all of two months. I’d seen its fire-kissed charms splashed across my Instagram feed: the Tijuana al pastor taco showcasing spit-roasted pork, chopped onions, cilantro, and a daub of guacamole on a handmade corn tortilla. I apparently wasn’t the only one; the line that night stretched across half a block. The lead taquero, a magnetic performer who calls himself El Joy, smiled, flexed, and made kissy faces for cameras in front of a trompo stacked tall with glistening pork. As he waved his knife, slices of roasted pork rained down onto the flattop, each destined for a pliant tortilla made by a pair of women working just off to his right. I came with a crew of five, and after a 25-minute wait, we split some tacos — carne asada, adobada, and mushroom — along with a quesadilla and a mulita for good measure. It was a roller coaster of you-have-to-try-this excitement and how-dare-you-take-this-away-from-me resentment. We marveled over the char on the chile-and-citrus-marinated pork, the cooling avocado, and the toasted sweetness of the tortillas. The tacos were the best I’d had in ages — the smoldering trace of mesquite on the carne asada alone would be enough to demand a return visit. More than that, I was overwhelmed by a feeling: Standing on a K-Town sidewalk, huddled in a crowd with jackets zipped against the winter air, leaning over paper plates, our heads cocked to the side for just one more bite, was the only place to be that night. That feeling, more than any unifying trend or overarching theme, is what defines the best new restaurants for 2019. As Eater editors across the country dined at restaurants that opened between May 2018 and May of this year, what moved us wasn’t merely virtuoso cooking or totally of-the-moment interior design. It was the feeling that a restaurant, whether a noodle shop slinging Laotian specialties in East Dallas or a tasting menu championing the overlooked delights of the Oregon coast in Portland, was the right place at the right time — right now. — Hillary Dixler Canavan, Eater restaurant editor Eater’s Best New Restaurants of 2019 Adda, Long Island City, NY | Atomix, New York, NY | The Baker’s Table, Newport, KY | Call Your Mother, Washington, DC | Erizo, Portland, OR | Fox and the Knife, Boston, MA | Indigo, Houston, TX | The Jerk Shack, San Antonio, TX | Khao Noodle Shop, Dallas, TX | Kopitiam, New York, NY | Marrow, Detroit, MI | Musi, Philadelphia, PA | Nightshade, Los Angeles, CA | Tacos 1986, Los Angeles, CA | Verjus, San Francisco, CA | Virtue, Chicago, IL Adda Long Island City, NY What: A Queens restaurant that’s helping to abolish the long-running joke that the best Indian food in New York City is actually in New Jersey. Why: What makes Adda different from other high-profile new restaurants is owner Roni Mazumdar and chef Chintan Pandya’s dedication to simple homestyle cooking — they eschew the flash and fusion of Rahi, their formidable other Manhattan restaurant. Pandya, who previously worked in fine dining, breathes new life into classics that have become ubiquitous and, too often, mediocre in New York: Here, a goat curry called junglee maas comes with the bone left in and a fiery, uncompromising sauce. The greens in the saag paneer change seasonally, and paneer is made in-house, a rarity in the city. The menu also doesn’t shy away from ingredients that are less common in the Western palate. A goat brains snack, for instance, has become a standout. Mazumdar, an immigrant whose family runs restaurants in New York, pursued the project in hopes of making straightforward, regional Indian home cooking just as celebrated as the stuff with twists. It’s thrilling to see that their unapologetic commitment to tradition is being welcomed with such enthusiasm and with few of the caveats typically, and unnecessarily, shrouding restaurants serving South Asian fare. It’s a reception that deserves to be replicated everywhere. | AddaNYC.com — Serena Dai, Eater NY editor Atomix New York, NY What: A new pinnacle of Korean fine dining where food and design work together to deliver a whimsical lesson in the country’s cuisine. Why: At the end of a dinner at Atomix, the menu — composed of illustrated flashcards — is packed in a box for the diner to take home. In different hands, this could seem a bit overwrought, a presumption that the dining experience was special enough to merit a keepsake. But Atomix is that special. The structures of the meal are familiar: 10 courses, each beautifully arranged, served to 14 guests seated around a U-shaped counter. But in their followup to New York hit Atoboy, married couple JungHyun “JP” Park and JeongEun “Ellia” Park have taken the formal tasting menu and refashioned it as a playful education in Korean cooking. There’s the food itself, none of it strictly traditional, but much of it making reference to classic or even historic Korean techniques and flavors. All of it is elegant and playful: A dish on the restaurant’s opening menu, for example, paired golden osetra caviar, baby artichokes, and fresh curd — this last ingredient a direct reference to soo , a dairy product once enjoyed by Korean elites. And then there’s the carefully considered design, full of elements meant to showcase Korean artists and artisans, like handmade pottery, chopsticks displayed for the guests’ selection at the start of the meal, and that set of abstract cards, each with an explanation of a dish. Together, the Parks present a new vision of Korean cuisine, and a compelling take on the future of fine dining in New York City. | AtomixNYC.com — Monica Burton, Eater associate restaurant editor The Baker’s Table Newport, KY What: A homey daytime cafe from a husband-and-wife team offering rustic American dishes that capitalize on top-tier bread baking. Why: What makes a restaurant a tourist magnet and what makes it a standby? Many travelers long to find a gem tucked away on a small-town main street — the kind of place you want to linger in and then brag about to your Instagram followers. Locals, however, may find that what they actually need is a restaurant with a well-priced menu that outshines a home kitchen and rewards return visits. When a new restaurant like the Baker’s Table hits both marks, it has the makings of an essential. Visitors to (and from) Cincinnati should head over the Taylor Southgate Bridge to dunk fluffy ricotta doughnuts — made by chef, baker, and co-owner David Willocks — in bright strawberry-lemon curd, to carve into a fried chicken sandwich served on a textbook buttermilk biscuit, and to nurse an Amaro spritz from the bar. The cozily eclectic room, designed by co-owner Wendy Braun, invites the midday lazing that defines a vacation’s lunch. But if I lived nearby, I’d wander in for the easy comforts of a full-bodied tomato soup served alongside a grilled cheese on Willocks’s glorious sourdough, a kale Caesar studded with brioche croutons, and a chewy, salted chocolate chip cookie. Even a regular might feel like they’re on holiday — as long as there are still a few bites left on the table. | BakersTableNewport.com — Hillary Dixler Canavan, Eater restaurant editor Call Your Mother Washington, DC What: The self-described “Jew-ish” deli that ended D.C.’s much-kvetched-about bagel drought. Why: Call Your Mother isn’t the first D.C. restaurant to try to translate old-world deli culture, but based on the fanatical response and nearly hour-long weekend waits, it’s done it better than any before. With Eater Young Gun Daniela Moreira (’17) leading the kitchen and her partner, Andrew Dana, running the on-point branding, Call Your Mother nails the basics, then takes them a step further. There’s a za’atar-dusted bagel bursting with candied salmon schmear and piled with cucumbers, crispy shallots, and peppery greens sourced from local farmers. (It’s winkingly named the Amar’e, as in Amar’e Stoudemire, the fashionable former NBA star who’s taken to studying Torah.) There’s the city’s best latke, a bronzed disc of crunchy and creamy potato, that comes with a vinegary apple jam instead of Mott’s slop. Moreira, an ace baker from Argentina, makes black-and-white alfajores cookies and babka that appears as both a muffin and a mini loaf. Offbeat menu items, like challah “cheesesteaks,” each filled with pastrami and brisket, sometimes threaten to outshine the bagels, but even amid the tongue-in-cheek dishes and the Saved by the Bell color scheme, Dana and Moreira’s serious commitment to appetizing-store culture is unmistakable. | CallYourMotherDeli.com — Gabe Hiatt, Eater DC editor Erizo Portland, OR What: An eco-conscious seafood restaurant whose tasting menu reveals the potential of the abundant fish and shellfish we aren’t eating — yet. Why: Tasting menus generally exist to showcase rare and precious ingredients, often accompanied by an appealing story. The cloudberries are foraged from a Swedish island above the Arctic Circle. The wagyu is sustainably raised in the Australian outback by a Japanese cowboy. The bluefin is bluefin, but it’s caught sustainably using nets originally designed by the Phoenicians off the coast of Spain, okay? But these luxury ingredients’ backstories sometimes feel like attempts to justify a price — or to make you feel better about consuming an endangered product — rather than offering pleasure. In Portland, Oregon, Erizo makes the case for a new kind of tasting menu. From Eater Young Gun Jacob Harth (’19), business partners Nicholas Van Eck (the chef de cuisine) and Nate Tilden, and beverage director Treva Willis, the restaurant is the first to bring Portland’s DIY approach to fishing in a meaningful way. The meal consists almost entirely of different bites of seafood — aged, sauced, occasionally cooked — focused on bycatch and other sustainable (Harth calls them “oddball”) species. A dish of chopped-up local horse clam is fresh and sweet; the clam is abundant, but there is no commercial market for it, so the restaurant harvests its portion itself. The geoduck is supplied by the Quinault tribe, who have the right to forage this luxury ingredient in the Pacific Northwest. Both arrived as part of the meal’s showstopper, a massive shellfish tray, which puts all others to shame for both beauty and inventiveness. By the time the final savory course — a colossal halibut collar with a soft pillow of Parker House rolls — arrives, sustainability doesn’t just sound like a worthwhile compromise. Erizo’s approach recalls the kaiseki tradition more meaningfully than most Western tasting menus , by embracing supposedly imperfect ingredients to give diners a new understanding of a specific season and place. It’s also a persuasive argument that we’ve been done a disservice by flying all that luxury fish across the ocean when there are so many riches just off our shores. | ErizoPDX.com — Meghan McCarron, Eater special correspondent Fox and the Knife Boston, MA What: A bustling enoteca in South Boston that draws inspiration from Italy’s Emilia-Romagna region. Why: Boston is awash in red sauce joints, especially in its traditionally Italian-American North End neighborhood, but regionally specific Italian restaurants are far rarer. So James Beard Award winner Karen Akunowicz cut her own path with her solo debut, a lovely ode to Emilia-Romagna. Fox and the Knife pays special attention to Modena, where Akunowicz took a year to study pasta making, including with her must-order tigelle — distinctively patterned, disc-shaped bread that is almost like an English muffin, served warm with butter. Instead of buying an electric tigelle maker, Akunowicz makes seven at a time on a tigelle iron she brought back from Italy a decade ago. The effort is worth it: Nearly every table opts for an order. For her pasta menu, Akunowicz roams further afield, offering a beautifully light tagliatelle Bolognese and an earthy parsnip tortelli — a pasta shape common in Emilia-Romagna — with Gorgonzola cheese, which originates just northwest of the region in Milan. Loud, busy, and fun, Fox and the Knife feels like a party. Boston didn’t know it needed another Italian restaurant, but it’s so lucky it got this one. | FoxAndTheKnife.com — Rachel Leah Blumenthal, Eater Boston editor Indigo Houston, TX What: A tasting-menu destination in Houston that explicitly tackles themes of racism and oppression. Why: Chef Jonny Rhodes started making preserves and fermentations for the restaurant years before it opened, so every course at Indigo tastes like it’s rooted in time, layered with deep flavors that tell a story. At a dinner in April, that meant a potato grown in the restaurant’s neighboring garden patch and aged in ash; dry-aged duck delicately dressed with mustard-tinged barbecue sauce and edible flowers; and a long-simmered stew of oxtail, collard greens, and Carolina Gold rice. The 13-seat restaurant relies on a wood-fired hearth instead of a standard oven, and its smoky signature creates a captivating throughline. Rhodes and his wife and co-owner, Chana Rhodes, aim to challenge systemic racism and oppression in America with their restaurant. Rhodes delivers monologues between courses on weighty topics ranging from mass incarceration to the Great Migration, but even without them, Indigo’s very existence is part of the work: a fine dining restaurant in a historically underserved neighborhood, serving food that unabashedly claims its purpose. In a more equitable dining culture, none of this would be revolutionary, but today it is; diners simply don’t see restaurants like this very often. | HTXIndigo.com — Hillary Dixler Canavan, Eater restaurant editor The Jerk Shack San Antonio, TX What: A walk-up window serving Jamaican favorites, best enjoyed at the communal picnic tables on the shady patio. Why: A row of perfectly crispy jerk fried chicken wings and an array of equally fiery jerk sauces for dipping sit on a tray lined with fake newspaper. On another tray are the sturdy Jamaican patties, which can be sandwiched between torn pieces of buttery coco bread. But this is Texas, so there are tacos too, a worthy vehicle for piquant jerk-seasoned jackfruit. On the speakers, Bob Marley covers play to the crowd, some in fatigues, maybe on a break from Joint Base San Antonio or Camp Bullis, digging into braised oxtails or mac and cheese as fans blow toward the patio. This is the Jerk Shack, and it’s chef Lattoia Massey’s love letter to Jamaica. Known by her professional name, Nicola Blaque, Massey, a U.S. Army veteran, opened the Jerk Shack with her husband, and fellow vet, Cornelius Massey. It’s her first brick-and-mortar restaurant, which she started only three years after graduating from culinary school and a short stint cooking as a private chef. The restaurant doesn’t take up too much real estate along the quiet Matyear Street, but it’s enough to leave a lasting impression. | Instagram.com/TheJerkShackSATX — Nadia Chaudhury, Eater Austin editor Khao Noodle Shop Dallas, TX What: A detail-oriented, modern Laotian restaurant steeped in tradition. Why: In recent years, Dallas has become home to one of the world’s largest Lao populations of outside of Laos. As a result, the city has seen a small explosion of exciting new restaurants serving khao poon and larb salad. One of the brightest stars among them is Khao Noodle Shop, where chef Donny Sirisavath builds on the success of his ad hoc Southeast Asian pop-up dinners and delivers modern iterations of Laotian dishes like tripe chicharrones and Laotian sukiyaki in a tiny, casual space. No order here is complete without Sirisavath’s savory boat noodles, which he makes over the course of 24 hours by charring and simmering beef bones with garlic, anise, and other aromatics, before finishing the rich broth with pork blood. The tall stacks of empty bowls on Khao Noodle Shop’s tables offer proof that Houston isn’t the only city in Texas with a multifaceted, diverse dining scene. Sirisavath’s electrifying fare should finally show the rest of the country that there’s more to Dallas’s culinary identity than steakhouses — and there always has been. | KhaoNoodleShop.com — Amy McCarthy, Eater Dallas editor Kopitiam New York, NY What: An energetic yet personal Malaysian all-day cafe that’s an antidote to the boring, scalable restaurants proliferating across New York (and other high-cost cities). Why: Chef Kyo Pang and partner Moonlynn Tsai give a master class in how to combine counter service and homestyle hospitality. Kopitiam fits New Yorkers’ lives, providing a quirky, colorful place for a breakfast meeting, a quick lunch, or a catch-up dinner with a friend, all while challenging the repetitive nature of too many fast-casual menus. Instead of staid tossed salads or more roasted chicken plates, Kopitiam serves pungent anchovy noodle soup, thrillingly flavorful shrimp-paste chicken wings, and understated milk toast sandwiches. That anchovy noodle soup, or pan mee , is representative of what goes into Pang’s food. It’s a labor-intensive, umami-packed dish that she learned from her grandmother, who learned it from her mother, consisting of handmade chewy, flat flour noodles with wood ear mushrooms, spinach, minced pork, and crispy fried anchovies in an anchovy broth. All of Pang’s meticulously rendered food stands on its own as some of the city’s best — which is why the restaurant has become a go-to for both local and visiting Eater editors. That she and Tsai can make it work with no dish topping $16 is a welcome revelation. | KopitiamNYC.com — Stefanie Tuder, Eater NY senior editor Marrow Detroit, MI What: A neighborhood butcher shop by day and a vibrant restaurant by night. Why: While diners are more accustomed to whole-animal butchery and offal now, there are still relatively few cities where a butcher can generate enough business to sustain itself. Marrow stands firmly between these dueling forces, at once embracing the opportunity to offer residents of Detroit’s West Village a place to buy impeccably sourced meat and also recognizing that not every customer wants to cook it themselves. Beneath red-and-white vintage posters hawking bologna and steak, Marrow’s dinner tables beckon guests to commune over plates of seared corned-beef tongue, bowls of crunchy pork skin “popcorn,” and glutinous rice dumplings stuffed with juicy ground beef and topped with slivered radishes and either whitefish or salmon roe. Each meal nimbly challenges notions of what butcher-style fare can be by largely ignoring steak in favor of tart jars of pickled shrimp and yakitori skewers. Owner Ping Ho and chef Sarah Welch are committed to establishing a more sustainable work environment for kitchen staff that includes competitive salaries with access to health insurance, paid vacation, and maternity leave. Consider it of a piece with their mission of transparency: At Marrow, you can learn the provenance of the pork on your plate while also appreciating that the person who cooked it for you makes a living wage. Diners of today are more invested than ever in animal welfare and local farms — it’s a pleasure to support a business that extends the same concern to its people. | MarrowDetroit.com — Brenna Houck, Eater Detroit editor Musi Philadelphia, PA What: A BYOB dinner spot in Philly that doesn’t take itself too seriously. Why: When a devilishly clever rendition of kids’ menu buttered noodles hits the table at a buzzy new restaurant, it’s clear that at least one hot spot has an allergy to pretension. Musi prioritizes the things that diners ought to demand — a menu informed by local product and a kitchen connected to the region’s best purveyors — but the restaurant doesn’t beat you over the head with it. It’s just the baseline upon which former pop-up chef Ari Miller builds a dinner, and the meal can wend its way through an expert country pate, an earthy beef-heart tartare, and, since it’s BYOB, wines and beers as trendily weird or tried-and-true as you like. Even when every seat is filled with a hip, age-spanning crowd, the space itself remains a pretense-free zone. Musi presents a bare-bones vision of what a ground-floor space on a city block needs to become a restaurant, a show mounted in a black-box studio rather than a grand auditorium. There is an open kitchen, but it’s a mere 250 square feet. There are tables, chairs, and photos on the walls, but to call the room decorated is a stretch. As a setting for ambitious, playful cooking, that simplicity — just like those buttered noodles — is utterly charming. | MusiPhilly.com — Hillary Dixler Canavan, Eater restaurant editor Nightshade Los Angeles, CA What: A chic ode to the craveable flavors of Asian and American mashups. Why: For her long-awaited debut restaurant, Eater Young Gun Mei Lin (’14) proudly declared her place in a new wave of young, Asian-American chefs who want to rewrite the script of their childhood flavors, recognizing that it’s their turn to employ Chinese, Filipino, Korean, Thai, and Japanese techniques and ingredients as they see fit. Lin does it with big, impressive swings, putting out plates that have Angelenos dissecting and debating like no other restaurant has this year. I’ve enjoyed her instantly famous mapo tofu lasagna — a stellar creation where Lin lets the meaty part of the Sichuan dish stand in for Bolognese. One dining companion of mine loved the dish enough to order another helping right after polishing off the first plate. I know there are others, including other Eater editors, who find it underwhelming. Yet everyone would tell you to order it and decide for yourself. What separates Nightshade is Lin’s uncanny ability to mine the intersection of American comfort food and Asian ingredients, as in a tom yum-seasoned fried onion that delivers the lowbrow satisfaction of a chain-restaurant Bloomin’ Onion and the creative punch of a light-as-air coconut dip. She’s no less adept at working with Asian starting points, as with her golden-brown prawn toast, which pays homage to a dim sum cart classic, but comes atop a substantial, curry-tinted sauce that takes it to the next level. Lin’s beef tartare refashions the slightly obscure Korean yookhwe with neat dabs of egg-yolk jam and thickened soy sauce. Even with the most surreal-looking of desserts from chef de cuisine Max Boonthanakit (another Eater Young Gun, from the class of 2019), the palate stays relatable, like coconut and lime, cherries and cola, or guava and cream cheese. Plenty of chefs have tried this balancing act before, but few have made the case for modern Asian-American cooking with as much style as Lin and Boonthanakit. | NightshadeLA.com — Matthew Kang, Eater LA editor Tacos 1986 Los Angeles, CA What: The taco stand that took LA by storm, combining Tijuana-style carne asada and more than a touch of LA branding and bravado. Why: There are thousands of taco stands in Los Angeles, but there is only one Tacos 1986. The instantly cult-status spot for carne asada and adobada, a regional interpretation of al pastor, emerged in 2018 as a firebrand capable of uniting street, food, and club culture with late-night stands that shuffled between Hollywood, Santa Monica, and Koreatown. Not since Roy Choi’s Kogi BBQ has a taco so thoroughly galvanized this city. Owner Victor Delgado and the affable evening maestro, Jorge “El Joy” Alvarez-Tostado, don bright red shirts emblazoned with the company’s wavy logo, pulling in customers right off the street with their smiles and, well, a whole lot of mugging for the many iPhone cameras and first-time line-waiters eager for a taste of Tijuana. El Joy — hype man, taquero , and customer service lead all in one — plays the part to perfection, rolling up his sleeves to flex as he proclaims himself the besttaqueroin the world. A flick of the wrist for a fresh swipe of adobada pork, pounded thin and marinated in citrus before being vertically roasted and dropped onto a wide handmade tortilla, and it can be hard to argue in the moment. For even more bliss, opt for the off-menu perrón , a broad taco offered with any meat of choice (or, if you prefer, some killer mushrooms) and laced with beans, meat, and cheese and served on a flour tortilla as an homage to the oceanside stands of Baja. Add salsa, take a few bites (there are never enough), and then get back into the queue to watch the taco show unfold all over again. Find Joy, Victor, and the crew at one of the team’s roving stands outside of nightclubs, near the beach, or at their only-just-opened standing-room-only (literally) taco shop right in the heart of Downtown. | Tacos1986.com — Farley Elliott, Eater LA senior editor Verjus San Francisco, CA What: A dreamy approximation of a European wine bar that brings together natural wine, tinned fish, and a menu of well-executed staple dishes. Why: Many chefs’ travels inspire them to open restaurants, but it’s all too rare for that inspiration to yield a worthy result. Chef Michael Tusk and restaurateur Lindsay Tusk, the husband-and-wife team behind San Francisco’s three-Michelin-starred Quince and its more casual offshoot, Cotogna, avoided that trap when they opened Verjus in the shadow of the Transamerica pyramid, on a storied street long known for its Gold Rush-era brothels and gambling dens. Here, highlights from the couple’s extensive travels through France, Italy, and Spain have merged to create a wine bar for the ages, immune to the city’s fast-casual craze. It’s a place to drink and dine, without the pressure of whatever else is happening next on the horizon; dinner will be eaten, but luxuriously, and with one of the city’s most accomplished chefs in charge. Beverage director Matt Cirne’s list of natural wines is on trend for 2019, but features longtime producers from storied regions in addition to California’s up-and-comers. Pet nats, orange wines, and high-acid wines made with less-common varietals like mondeuse and charbono pair well with Tusk’s tightly curated menu that dips into the European canon of wine bar greatest hits. Cheese, charcuterie, and an array of conservas make for exemplary companions to an afternoon drink, but it’s easy to make a hearty meal from the classic bistro-cut steak, served slathered in herby butter and topped with a stack of crispy onion rings, or the perfectly blonde omelet, cradling a puddle of boursin and sprinkled with chives, or a delightfully plump manchego sausage resting atop a crunchy nest of sauerkraut. For dessert, pain perdu is a required order: crack the bruleed crust to reveal a custardy slice of brioche, swimming in melting vanilla ice cream. It’s not that any of these dishes, nor the black-and-white-tiled dining room, don’t transport; even better, they make it clear that you are somewhere , and that there’s no better place to be than right where you are. | VerjusCave.com — Ellen Fort, Eater SF editor Virtue Chicago, IL What: A thoroughly Chicago restaurant with a multicultural approach to Southern cuisine. Why: There’s plenty of new construction in Hyde Park, Chicago’s South Side neighborhood that’s home to the University of Chicago. Locals are protective of this traditionally progressive and diverse neighborhood. They worry that out-of-town chains and cookie-cutter restaurants will decimate the area’s unique character. Virtue is not one of their concerns. At Virtue, veteran chef Erick Williams honors his family’s Southern roots, drawing as much from his experiences as a born-and-bred Chicagoan as from his grandmother’s recipes, which come by way of Mississippi. Diners looking for Southern classics will find much to love on Virtue’s menu, whether in cornmeal-covered fried chicken gizzards or blackened catfish with Carolina Gold rice. But Virtue’s most potent dish is the cauliflower, its seemingly humble meat-free option. It reveals Williams’s layered approach to cooking, which combines culinary inspiration from the South, Chicago, his fine dining background, his family history, and the world. The braised cauliflower steak is finished on the grill, creating a crisp crust over the vegetable’s fork-tender innards. Williams plates it with cashew dukkah (an Egyptian spice blend) and “root cellar vegetables” presented as giardiniera — the pickle blend Chicagoans enjoy most on Italian beef sandwiches. There’s a welcoming energy inside the dining room, with locals celebrating the arrival of a top-notch restaurant, one that represents them. And at the end of the day, these are the customers who make Hyde Park one of Chicago’s quirkiest neighborhoods, and Virtue one of the country’s best new restaurants. | VirtueRestaurant.com — Ashok Selvam, Eater Chicago senior editor Credits

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Belmont COA news

Jul 10, 2019 at 1:21 PM
Ongoing programs
Social Resources: Do you have a smart phone? Are you interested in getting a smart phone? Not sure where to begin? Sarah, our social work intern, is here to help! Currently offering meeting times to talk about smart phone service options, qualifying for the lifeline federal program*, and how to use Uber and Lyft. You can schedule a meeting with her from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays and Fridays. For information, call 857-342-2411 and leave a voicemail with your name, number. *strictly low-income or public assistance qualification.
Snapshot of Wisdom: Interviews to be set individually by appointment at the front desk. Come spend quality time sharing your life experiences with Belmont High School students! You will be interviewed and photographed, and have the opportunity to give your words of wisdom to the youth in our community. We invite you to join us in our Snapshot of Wisdom project where these students will transform your portrait and your words into an artistic masterpiece. The outcome will be a visual that captures the essence of your story and your image (hand-drawn or photographed). We hope to present this artistic collection in a later exhibition in Belmont.
Artistic Expression with Sarah G.: 1-2 p.m. Mondays beginning March 4. We invite you to come join us for a weekly expressive arts group. Within a guided setting, you will explore and strengthen your creative skills, and express your unique self! Supplies are provided by the Beech Street Center. Artistic skills are not required. This is an open group for people of varying skills and ability. Sarah G. received expressive art training from Lesley University. She has her BSC in Human Services, MHRT/C, and is an MSW candidate 2019.
Programs
A Cultural and Historical Reflection of the 1960’s Through the Music of the Beatles: 1:15 p.m. July 12. A Multimedia Presentation with Live Music Presented by Fran Hart Founding Member of 4EverFab. The Beatles are the most influential band in history. In 1964, their breakout moment was on The Ed Sullivan Show, where an estimated 73 million viewers tuned in to see the “Lads from Liverpool” in their first live American television performance. On April 4, 1964, they became the only artists to ever occupy the top five spots of the Billboard Hot 100 chart simultaneously. With landmark albums like Revolver and Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, they consistently broke musical barriers. They have sold more than one billion records. As a testament to their longevity and popularity, their album titled 1, containing all their No. 1 hits, was the best-selling album of the 2000s. Their music is timeless and appeals to fans in every generation. This performance combines live music with a multi-media presentation to explore, not only the music of The Beatles, but the influence they exerted in every area of the cultural landscape. Cost: Free. This event was generously sponsored by Amada Senior Care.
Book Discussion Group —“Howards End” by E.M. Forster: 11 a.m. July 12. First published in 1910, “Howards End” is the novel that earned E. M. Forster recognition as a major writer. At its heart lie two families–the wealthy and business-minded Wilcoxes and the cultured and idealistic Schlegels. When Helen Schlegel begins a relationship with Paul Wilcox, a series of events is sparked that results in a dispute over who will inherit Howards End, the Wilcoxes’ country home. Cost: Free.
Coffee and Conversation with the Assistant Town Administrator: 10:30 a.m. July 16. Spend the morning enjoying coffee, pastries, and chatting with Belmont’s new assistant town Administrator Jon Marshall. Jon officially started in January and has previously worked as the recreation director for the Town of Arlington, and program manager for the Town of Natick. Jon is eager to learn more about the Beech Street Center and hear from members what it’s like living in Belmont. This is an opportunity to share some of your thoughts and ideas with him. Cost: Free.
Cooking Demonstration with The Residence at Watertown Square: 1:15 p.m. July 16. Join Laurie Gaines, senior director of business development, and Chris Ellis, culinary director from The Residence at Watertown Square for a fun afternoon cooking demo! We’ll be cooking up summer vegetable pasta primavera with grilled shrimp: penne pasta tossed with roasted garlic oil, summer squash, zucchini, peppers, onion, and asparagus topped with grilled marinated shrimp. Chris has cooked all over the world from the Caribbean, Spain, England, and the United States. Chris says “ I like to cook with fresh herbs and vegetables. My style of food I would say is classic with a modern twist. I love doing what I do because it makes people happy.” Cost: Free.
Multicultural Dinner by FISCO: 5-6:30 p.m. July 16. Friends of the Indian Senior Citizens Organization (FISCO) partners with the Belmont Council on Aging to provide low-cost, delicious vegetarian meals for seniors from nearby Indian restaurants. This month’s dinner will be catered by Zaika in Woburn. RSVP required by July 9th at 617-993-2970. Cost: $5 cash or check payable to FISCO in advance.
“Cooking from the Market — fresh foods taste better!”: 11 a.m. July 19. The Beech Street Center is excited to welcome Mireia Carpio, marketing manager for the Belmont Farmers Market, and Suzanne Johannet MD, and president of the Belmont Food Collaborative for a fun cooking demonstration! Mireia and Suzanne will show us how to utilize fresh seasonal fruits, vegetables, and other products accessible through the market. Everyone will get to try a sample of what they make plus take home the recipes! Arianny Medina from Springwell will also stop by with a limited number of Senior FMNP Farmers’ Market coupons for eligible seniors who receive Section 8 Housing, Energy Assistance, Medicaid or Commodity Food Assistance. Please make sure you sign-up at the front desk. Cost: Free. The Belmont Farmers Market is a project of the Belmont Food Collaborative. Thank you to the Belmont Food Collaborative, Belmont Farmers Market, and Springwell for making this event possible.
Maintaining Brain Health Without Drugs — The Science Behind New Approaches to Keeping Your Mind Sharp as you Age: July 19, 26 and Aug. 2, 9, 23 and 30. Six week series. Join Yuval Malinsky for a six-part lecture series covering eight components of a comprehensive non-pharmacological approach to maintaining brain wellness. We will look at the advancement in understanding the brain in the last 30 years and discuss those life-styles that research has shown that can reduce the risk of dementia. Cost: Free. Thank you to the Council on Aging for sponsoring this series. Yuval Malinsky is co-founder and CEO of Newton-based Vigorous Mind that develops and sells a scientifically-based engagement and brain wellness platform for seniors. Dr. Malinsky taught a graduate course on Emerging Technologies in Healthcare as an adjunct professor at Northeastern University SPCS and developed Northeastern’s Healthcare IT Masters’ program. He was a mentor at the M.I.T. Venture Mentoring Service for five years.
Revere Beach International Sand Sculpting Festival: 9:30 a.m. July 30. The Beech Street Center is going back to Revere Beach! The Revere Beach International Sand Sculpting Festival has grown into one of the largest sand sculpting festivals in the country. Each year sculptors from all over the world come to compete for one of the largest grand prizes in the world. Spend a perfect summer day admiring the work of these talented sculptors. After marveling their work, we’ll walk down the boardwalk for lunch at Kelly’s or one of the many other delicious restaurants. Cost: Free, but meal, drink, tax and tip are on your own. The bus will department from Revere Beach at approximately 1:30 p.m. Thank you to the Council on Aging for generously sponsoring the needed transportation for this special event.
Meet Your Public Officals
Professional Services
Podiatry Clinic: 11 a.m. July 18 with Dr. David Alper. Care for toenails. Register in person the day of clinic. Cost: $25 (no insurance is accepted). Next month — No clinic in August.
Reiki Sessions: July 11 by appointment. 30 minutes for $15.
Trips with the Belmont Council on Aging
BelderBus trips are limited to 16 passengers, all of whom must be registered members of the Beech Street Center with emergency contacts on file. Call 617-993-2970 to reserve your seat early.
2019 Trips with the Belmont Travel Club
Volunteers now pick up messages at 617-993-2976.
Insurance is available for all these day trips, it is highly recommended. All trips are subject to change. Belmont Travel Club- 2976
Lobster Bash: July 25. Quidnessett Country Club is located in N Kingstown, RI overlooking beautiful Narragansett Bay. The property features breathtaking views, beautifully manicured grounds and tranquil gardens. The luxurious newly designed interior features spacious ballrooms with golden chandeliers. Attached to our ballroom is a beautiful deck with great views of the Bay and golf course. The food is expertly prepared and offered with the finest service – this is a perfect setting for Landmark’s Lobster Bash lunch and show. Landmark Tours cost: $96 includes driver’s gratuity
‘Mamma Mia:’ Aug. 8. Lakes Region Theatre and lunch at Hart’s Turkey Farm. Fox Tours $102 includes driver’s gratuity. 9 a.m. Depart from the Belmont Senior Center and join your friends for a fantastic day in New Hampshire enjoying one of the finest luncheon and show programs in 2019. You’ll initially travel to Meredith, New Hampshire, where a full course luncheon will be served at the famous Hart’s Turkey Farm (please choose entrée at sign-up). After this meal, you’ll then attend the Lakes Region Theatre’s production of “Mamma Mia.” You’ll arrive home at 7:30 p.m. after a delightful day of great cuisine and theater! One of the funniest musical comedies ever. Great satire and fun!
Diamonds and Pearls: Aug. 27. Lake Pearl Wrentham. Cost: $95 includes driver’s gratuity. 9:30 a.m. departure from the Belmont Senior Center and experience some of the greatest hits from some of the greatest entertainers of all time. Diamond and Pearls/Cash and Kings will have you dancing and singing your day away. These performers have amassed almost 300 million records sold worldwide, over 40 Top 10 Songs, Dozens of No. 1 Hits, Grammy Awards, induction into the Rock N Roll Hall of Fame and more. The renowned shipboard duo Jose and Patti have been wowing audiences worldwide with their vibrant performances, garnering acclaim that’s transcended the trans-oceanic crowd. Jose and Patti’s show is a Neil Diamond Tribute with some Janis Joplin, Carole King and Johnny Cash mixed in. Their original spin on these classic tunes is evident from the moment the accomplished guitarist and sultry vocalist hit the stage. It’s no small wonder that they were voted Musicians of the Year by Norwegian Cruise Line. This multi-faceted show is big, dynamic and thoroughly entertaining. In fact, at the conclusion of their show, you’ll still be clamoring for more. We will return approximately 5 p.m.
Taste of Providence/Taste of Italy: Sept. 11. 9 a.m. departure to Providence a city that enjoyed a resurgence of attention following the lengthy run of the hit TV show of the same name. This little city has come a long way with a newly designed waterfront area, downtown district which is on the National Register of Historic Places, the new Providence Place Mall and award-winning restaurants. USA Today named it “one of the Top Ten Little Italy’s in America.” We’ll visit Scialo Brothers Italian Bakery and take a mini tour of the bakery where the smell of fresh baked bread permeates the air. Then we may select a piece of pastry to enjoy with coffee or tea. Our luncheon today will be at Andino’s Restaurant in Federal Hill/Little Italy. Serving up Italian favorites since 1988, Andino’s has received numerous awards including Best Italian in Rhode Island in 2017 and Diners’ Choice just last year. Our menu today will include a choice of: Chicken Marsala, Baked Scrod or Linguini with Clam Sauce Also included: Salad, Dessert Coffee, Tea or Decaf. Following luncheon, we’ll meet our Professional Guide who will step aboard our coach for a 90-minute tour. Our guide will take us through the Little Italy section and explain how that population came directly to Providence instead of going through Ellis Island as so many immigrants did. We’ll travel through the Federal Hill section, downtown and the Historic East Side and more. Enjoy extraordinary 18th and 19th century architecture along Benefit Street — a ‘Mile of History.’ Before returning home, we’ll have time to shop at Venda Ravioli’s Italian Food Emporium where we will find gourmet pastas, fine Italian foods, olive oil, cheese, espresso, gift baskets, cook books and much more. We will return approximately 5 p.m. Landmark Tours $78 includes driver’s gratuity.
Overnight Trips
Maine Escapes, Bar Harbor, Boothbay Harbor, & Arcadia National Park: Spet. 23-25. Three days, two nights. Enjoy our accommodations at the Fisherman’s Wharf Inn located over the water in the center of the village of Boothbay Harbor the “Boating Capitol of New England”. Every room at the Fisherman’s Wharf Inn looks out over the harbor for some spectacular views. Absorb the sights and sounds of the forest, fill your lungs with the aroma of evergreen and salt air, revel in the panoramic views from atop Cadillac Mountain, and renew your spirit and appreciation of the world around us as we visit Acadia National Park. Enjoy some time browsing and shopping in the downtown waterfronts of Portland, Boothbay Harbor, and Bar Harbor. Evening entertainment is a bound with our included evening entertainment both nights at the Fisherman’s Wharf Inn. Of course no trip would be complete to Maine without a traditional downeast lobsterbake featuring chowder, mussels, clams, corn on the cob, and of course Lobster. With more extra surprises, twists, and turns than we can mention this trip has everything you could hope for and more. Don’t miss out, come join us on our Maine Escapes adventure!!
Price Including Motorcoach from Most New England Locations: $459 per person Double Occ. / $559 Single.
White Mountains Resorts: Dec. 13-15. Celebrate the magic of Christmas at the beautiful White Mountain Hotel & Resort and enjoy the splendor of the White Mountains at Christmastime.This special holiday tour offers spectacular entertainment, festive activities, gourmet dining, and all the finest amenities of the White Mountain Hotel and Resort, including first rate service and luxury accommodations. The hotel will be completely decorated in the Colonial style Christmas reminiscent of the famous decor of Colonial Williamsburg. This tour is the perfect opportunity for you to do some Christmas shopping and avoid the crowds! With over 150 tax-free specialty shops and outlet stores in town, your choices are limitless. Enjoy your tour and unwind with us before the busy holiday rush in this majestic Winter Wonderland!
Trip includes Yuletide welcome reception, two nights deluxe accommodations at the white mountain hotel and resort; five meals including one breakfast, one grand Sunday brunch, one luncheon, two dinners; three different entertainment show; a visit to the new living shores aquarium in Glen, New Hampshire; shopping at tax-free outlets and in-town shops; all room and meal taxes and gratuities; special cocktail pricing; round trip baggage handling; Christmas gift; deluxe round-trip motorcoach transportation; and driver and tour guide tips included!
Double: $489. Triple: $459. Single: $629
For information, contact Belmont Travel Club 617-993-2976.
New classes and programs
Improving Your Technology Skills with Dan Siagel: 10 a.m.-noon Thursdays. With over 20 years of working experience in the information and technology field Dan comes to us with a wealth of knowledge. If you are interested in learning or improving your computer skills for either Windows, Apple or Android operating systems then you should stop by to make an appointment with Dan. Some skills and knowledge you will walk away with include: learning the internet, Microsoft Office, Adobe, e-mail, and social media applications. Sessions are one-on-one for 30 minutes. Free.
50 plus Job Seekers Regional Networking Group: 1:30–3:30 p.m. first and third Tuesday of every month Jan. 15 through May 7, Beech Street Center, Art Room. Join our Career Coach, Mark Censky, for a free job networking group designed for those 50+ seeking employment. If you are unemployed, underemployed, unhappily employed, returning to the workforce after a gap or retired, this group may be for you! Each week will focus on a new topic such as assessing skills, developing job search plans, revising resumes, creating a LinkedIn profile, practicing interviewing skills, refining your elevator pitch, how to use social media in your job search and networking. Issues of ageism experienced in the job search will be discussed. Materials, strategies, techniques and resources to accelerate the search will be offered. Spring dates will be Mar. 5 and 19, Apr. 2 and 16 and May 7. Preregistration is required. Call 617-993-2983 to sign up or online at http://mcoaonline.com/50plus.
Drawing and Painting with Charlotte Kaplan: 1-3 p.m. July 26-Aug. 30. $70 for 8 sessions. Learning to draw is learning to see, and learning to paint is learning to see in color. We’ll start out with basic drawing — shapes, shading, and perspective—and then use what we have learned to create paintings with watercolor pencils. All levels are welcome. Your art can start anywhere and go as far as you like. The instructors will bring a sampling of materials for you to
Classes seeking new members
Classes are open to residents of Belmont and surrounding towns, and targeted especially for participants age 50 and older. Scholarships funded by the Council on Aging are available for Belmont residents with financial hardship; contact Nava Niv-Vogel to apply.
Duplicate Bridge: 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Wednesdays. $10/day.
Bingo: 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays. Play several rounds of BINGO and 2 “cover-all” games, with a weekly raffle as well. Coffee and snacks are provided. This group welcomes new members to try it out! Cost: Varies based on number of cards played, approx. $3 per week.
Intermediate and Advanced French Fridays: 10–11 a.m. Formal meeting 1st and 3rd Friday. Informal meeting 2nd and 4th Friday. Free.
Ciao Bella! Ciao Bello! Italian Conversation Group: 10–11 a.m. every other Thursday. Based on enough interest we will be starting our Italian conversation group which will meet in the café every other Thursday. This group is good for Italian language beginners or anyone who wants to improve basic conversation skills.
Morning Gentle Yoga: 11:15 a.m. Fridays, starting when 6 sign up! We’ll learn about traditional postures (lying, sitting, standing) and stretching, with much emphasis on balance. Plan to work through your own limitations to achieve greater flexibility and strength each week. Even as a beginner, you’ll gain from the strengthening and stretching as you learn the formal postures … This can be easy…. if you bring your sense of humor along with the mat! Cost: $48.
Social Bridge: Monday’s 1–4 p.m. call 617-993-2970 to sign-up
Free Folk Dance at the Beech Street Center: 11:45 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Cost: Free. Instructor Susan Lind-Sinanian teaches folk dances from a variety of traditions including Greek and Armenian cultures. Beech Street line dancers and new participants welcome! Cost: Free.
“Chess with Jason” is Back!: 1:45 p.m. Wednesdays. Learn this classic brain sharpening strategy game with our beloved Belmont High School student, Jason Tang. Stop in to join this ongoing group. Cost: Free.
Zumba Gold: 9:15 a.m. Mondays and 10 a.m. Thursdays. Meet our new instructor Chrsitine Anisworth!! Eight sessions for $40
Evening Yoga with John: Gentle Movement and Restorative Stretch. We are so excited to Welcome John Hunt as our new evening yoga instructor. Spend a relaxing evening with John while gaining strength, flexibility, balance, and relaxation. Tuesdays starting April 2nd at 5:30 p.m. six-week session for $48.
Absolute Beginners Computer Workshop: 10-11 a.m. Thursdays beginning July 9. Intimidated by computer classes because you think your questions will be considered silly? This class is specifically for the person who knows nothing about computers but wants to be knowledgeable. Learn what makes up a computer, how it works and what you can do with it. When the class is finished, you will be given your computer TO KEEP! This course takes place at the Town Hall Training Lab (455 Concord Ave.) Course ends July 16. Limit 10 per class. Pre-registration required by calling 617-993-2970. Cost is $50 for 12 sessions.
Solo Ballroom Line Dance Classes: Dancing is the perfect combination of physical activity, social interaction and mental stimulation. It’s a full body workout for the mind, body, and spirit. Dance to popular songs with ballroom and Latin steps with no partner needed! Get into the groove and learn routines with sequences of steps to several songs that can be used with any Ballroom, Latin or Swing Rhythm (ie: Waltz, Foxtrot, Tango, Swing, Rumba, Cha Cha, Samba, Salsa, Merengue, Bachata etc.) Thursdays, 11:00 a.m. to noon. Instructor: Paul Hughes. Six-week session $48. First class starts April 11.

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JointFuel360 Analyzes 10 Scientifically Proven Health Benefits of Turmeric

Turmeric has been touted as a superfood, offering up several health benefits with every serving. But does it live up to the hype, or is it just another passing health food fad like flat-tummy gummies and tea-toxes?
A cousin of the ginger root, this bright orange spice is a mainstay in Indian, South Pacific, and Asian cuisine for a good reason. Science has proven that turmeric’s components produce multiple health benefits and may be the most powerful nutritional supplement in existence.
As with any supplement, turmeric isn’t a cure-all for all your health issues, so it’s important to have realistic expectations of what it can — and can’t — do. Today, the team at Joint Fuel 360 explains the benefits that research and studies have discovered about turmeric’s impact on your health: 1. Combats Inflammation
Short-term inflammation can be a good thing, as it blocks invaders in your body and can help repair damage. But chronic inflammation can lead to a whole set of health problems, including cancer, metabolic syndrome, pain, and degenerative diseases.
The JointFuel360 team explains that curcumin is a powerful, natural anti-inflammatory that’s every bit as effective as many anti-inflammatory drugs (without the side effects). 2. Increase Antioxidant Capacity
Antioxidants are powerful components that fight off disease, and turmeric could be the key to boosting your body’s antioxidant capacity. Antioxidants protect the body from free radicals that could become cancerous or wreak havoc on your body’s system. 3. Improve Brain Function
Many brain disorders like Alzheimer’s and depression have been linked to a decline of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a growth hormone that helps your brain function. Curcumin has been shown to increase BDNF, which results in an improvement in memory and logic. It may also slow or reverse brain-related diseases and age-related decline in brain function. 4. Lower Risk of Heart Disease
Heart disease is the number one cause of death and is largely preventable. Turmeric’s anti-inflammatory properties and high level of curcumin are effective in improving endothelial function, or the lining of your blood vessels.
Endothelium dysfunction is a major factor in heart and liver disease. When the blood vessel lining is unable to regulate blood clotting and blood pressure, you could be at risk for heart disease. 5. Fight Depression
Recent research has identified a link between depression and chronic inflammation. As a known anti-inflammatory, curcumin in turmeric may also be effective in combating depression.
The team at Joint Fuel 360 explains that curcumin reduces symptoms of depression, both on its own and combined with saffron. Scientists have also tested curcumin’s ability to boost the effectiveness of antidepressants. Though it’s still unclear whether curcumin is more effective on its own or combined with medication, the results are still powerful testimony to turmeric’s health benefits. 6. Prevent or Treat Type 2 Diabetes
Curcumin is the main ingredient in turmeric, which has been proven to maintain steady blood sugar levels and fight inflammation. Because of this, turmeric is often looked at to treat or prevent Type 2 Diabetes. One study followed 240 people with prediabetes and found that those who took a curcumin supplement for nine months lowered their odds for developing the disease. 7. Fight Off Viral Infections
The team at Joint Fuel 360 knows that it’s not uncommon for someone to drink a steaming hot cup of turmeric tea when you’re sick, and there’s a good reason for this. Turmeric is known to combat viral infections, thanks to a high level of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. It’s not a guaranteed cure-all for every cold, but it can help relieve symptoms so you can get back on your feet. 8. Potentially Lower Bad Cholesterol
Turmeric offers several heart health benefits, including potentially reducing LDL cholesterol. There have been a few studies on animals that concluded turmeric lowers triglycerides and prevents LDL from being oxidized. More studies on humans are necessary to support these findings further, but research so far has delivered relatively consistent results. 9. Ease Arthritis Symptoms
Arthritis and joint pain are among the most common reasons to use turmeric. Because of the anti-inflammatory properties like curcumin, turmeric helps to reduce pressure and pain in joints, along with relieving stiffness.
The JointFuel360 team highlights that ancient Asian cultures have been using turmeric for generations for this very reason. It offers a safe, natural alternative to pain medication and provides long-term benefits since users don’t build up a tolerance. 10. Improve IBS Symptoms
Irritable Bowel Syndrome, or IBS, has recently been added to the list of potential benefits for turmeric users. A pilot study in 2004 found that participants with IBS that took two tablets of turmeric for eight weeks experienced less abdominal discomfort and noticeable improvement in their bowel movement patterns. More research is needed, but studies so far show promise for treating IBS symptoms. JointFuel360
If you suffer from any of the above health issues, it’s worth adding turmeric to your daily routine to get natural relief and improvement. One option is to add turmeric to your food. Many people put it in egg dishes, tofu, smoothies, greens, rice, and curry. The taste is a little bitter, though not overly strong, which is why most people mix it in with other foods.
However, many people avoid adding too much of it to food because it tends to stain your teeth an orange-yellow color. This spice is what gives curry its vivid color, and getting rid of teeth stains can be difficult. Also, most of the turmeric powders you buy at the store aren’t pure turmeric, but rather mixed with ginger root or other ingredients, so you aren’t getting the full effects.
The easiest way to add turmeric to your diet is to take a daily supplement, like JointFuel360. Our formula includes turmeric in every serving to give you your daily value without the guesswork.
Learn more about JointFuel360 and start feeling the health benefits of turmeric for yourself! Share This

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And there’s really no substitute for the unique flavor of a particular spice (at least in the days before chemically synthesized flavors). Also, if you live in a region with a completely different climate then it’s not feasible to grow the desired spices locally in sufficient quantities. Result: the overseas spice market has you by the short ‘n’ curlies.
Quote: : (As a person of Indian origin, I have found Europeans to use very little spices in their dishes !!) Nowadays, yeah, but it didn’t used to be that way .
Quote: : How Snobbery Helped Take The Spice Out Of European Cooking
[…] this notion of layering many contrasting flavors and spices isn’t unique to Indian cooking.
In fact, most of the world’s cuisines tend to follow that principle, says Tulasi Srinivas, an anthropologist at Emerson University who studies food and globalization. And up until the mid-1600s, European cuisine was the same way.
In medieval Europe, those who could afford to do so would generously season their stews with saffron, cinnamon, cloves and ginger. Sugar was ubiquitous in savory dishes. And haute European cuisine, until the mid-1600s, was defined by its use of complex, contrasting flavors.
“The real question, then, is why the wealthy, powerful West — with unprecedented access to spices from its colonies — became so fixated on this singular understanding of flavor,” Srinivas says.
The answer, it turns out, has just as much to do with economics, politics and religion as it does taste.
Back in the Middle Ages, spices were really expensive, which meant that only the upper class could afford them. But things started to change as Europeans began colonizing parts of India and the Americas. […]
Serving richly spiced stews was no longer a status symbol for Europe’s wealthiest families — even the middle classes could afford to spice up their grub. “So the elite recoiled from the increasing popularity of spices,” Ray says. “They moved on to an aesthetic theory of taste. Rather than infusing food with spice, they said things should taste like themselves. Meat should taste like meat, and anything you add only serves to intensify the existing flavors.”
The shift began in France, in the mid-1600s, adds Paul Freedman, a professor of history at Yale University. “It was a way to also show off the wealth of the French provinces,” Freedman says.
The rest of Europe soon adopted this new style. “It’s a redefinition of what elegant is,” Freedman says. “It’s sort of like — in fashion — for a while having more frills, more jewelry was fashionable. But then someone said that a basic black dress with some pearls is much better.” Of course, by the time European trendsetters started considering spice use a bit declassee, they had found out about other commodities like Indian muslins and Chinese porcelain, so trade with the East continued to thrive. 5

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Amaretto Cheesecake #SummerDessertWeek

By: The Food Hunter
“This post and recipe was created for #SummerDessertWeek ! I was sent samples by the sponsor companies but as always opinions are 100% mine.”
I don’t typically make a lot of cheesecakes, but when Anolon sent me their amazing spring-form pan I couldn’t resist. This particular pan is made of a durable nonstick surface making food release and clean-up super easy.
If I get to choose I prefer an Italian style cheesecake since they tend to be very light & creamy due to the types of cheese used. The recipe below, which I got from Ciao Italia , called for a combination of ricotta and mascarpone giving it the silkiest finish I’ve ever had in a cheesecake.
SCROLL DOWN FOR GIVEAWAY!!!
Amaretto Cheesecake
For the Crust
30 small (1-inch) imported amaretti cookies 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and cooled
Preheat the oven to 350°F.
Whirl the cookies to a powder in a food processor or use a rolling pin. Transfer the crumbs to a small bowl and stir in the butter to evenly coat them. Pat the crumb mixture in the bottom of a 9 1/2 x 2 1/2 inch springform pan. Wrap a large sheet of aluminum foil around the outside of the pan.
Refrigerate until needed. Can be made two days ahead of time.
For the Filling 2 3/4 cup whole milk ricotta cheese 1 1/4 cups mascarpone cheese 1/2 cup sour cream 1 cup Dixie Crystals sugar 3 large eggs 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons unbleached all purpose flour 1/2 teaspoon almond extract 1/4 cup Amaretto liqueur
In a stand mixer or by hand with a hand held mixer, beat the ricotta cheese with the mascarpone and sour cream. Beat in the sugar and eggs one at a time. Beat in the salt and flour. Beat in the extract and the liqueur.
Pour the batter carefully into the prepared pan. Place the pan in a larger pan and carefully pour boiling water into the larger pan until it is about 1-inch up the sides of the springform pan.
Bake on the middle oven shelf for 45 minutes. Turn off the oven and allow the cake to sit in the oven 45 minutes longer.
Remove the cake from the larger pan. Carefully remove and discard the aluminum foil. Allow the cake to cool for 30 minutes. Cover the top of the cake loosely with wax paper and refrigerate several hours or overnight.
When ready to serve, allow the cake to come to room temperature. Unlatch the springform pan rim and carefully remove it. Place the cake on its base on a serving platter. Cut into wedges.
Check out the amazing #SummerDessertWeek recipes from our bloggers today!
Ice Cream Recipes:
Strawberry Siren Shake from A Blender Mom No-Churn Chocolate Peanut Butter Ice Cream from Rants From My Crazy Kitchen Funfetti Ice Cream Sandwiches from Family Around the Table Ice Cream Waffle Sandwiches from A Kitchen Hoor’s Adventures Red, White & Blue Funfetti Ice Cream from Books n’ Cooks Summertime Pies:
Mississippi Mud Pie from For the Love of Food Sweet Summertime Cakes and Cupcakes:
Strawberry Limeade Popsicle Cupcakes from Southern from Scratch No-Bake Mermaid Cake from Nik Snacks Mermaid Ice Cream Cone Cakes from Eat Move Make Lemon Cupcakes from The Bitter Side of Sweet Peach Upside Down Cake from Home Sweet Homestead Strawberry Buttercream Cake with Blueberry Lemonade Ganache from 4 Sons R Us Blackberry Lemon Yogurt Cake from Sweet Beginnings Beach Cupcakes from Everyday Eileen No Bake Treats:
Frozen Chocolate Chip Dessert from Who Needs A Cape? Sprinkle Filled Birthday Cookie Dough Dip from Cooking With Carlee Candy Dipped Fruit Cones from Blogghetti Baked Desserts:
Mermaid Cakesicles from Big Bear’s Wife Strawberry Lemonade Bars from Jen Around the World Amaretto Cheesecake from The Food Hunter’s Guide to Cuisine Lemon Blueberry Scones from The Beard and The Baker Key Lime Pie Donuts from Daily Dish Recipes Lemon Bar Cheesecake from Fake Ginger Blueberry Pretzel Bars from Kudos Kitchen by Renee New York Style Cheesecake from Back To My Southern Roots Chocolate Coconut Congo Squares from Love and Confections Blueberry Buckle from Our Good Life Indian Rice Pudding from Palatable Pastime Cookies:
Key Lime Thumbprint Cookies from The Domestic Kitchen Brown Butter Chocolate Chunk Cookies from Doughmesstic Chocolate Swirl Meringues from My Sweet Zepol Sweet Corn Cookies from The Spiffy Cookie Candies:
Peach Pie Fudge from Sweet ReciPEAs Summer Drinks:
Blackberry Spritzer from My Baking Heart
Welcome to the 3rd Annual #SummerDessertWeek event hosted by Angie from Big Bear’s Wife . This week-long summer time event is filled with some down right amazing sweet recipes from fantastic bloggers and we’ve got some great giveaways from our generous sponsors for y’all too!! We can’t wait to share all of these summer-themed desserts with you and celebrate sweet, sweet summertime all week long!
There are 45 incredible bloggers participating in this year’s #SummerDessertWeek event! Thanks to those bloggers, we have over 168 summer time sweet treat recipes being shared this week! Grab a few recipes to try out and don’t forget to enter the giveaway below!
Scroll down to take a look! PRIZE #1
Dixie Crystals is giving away one (1)Keurig® K-Select® Coffee Maker
PRIZE #2
Prize #2 — Adam’s Extract is giving away – 1 Gift Pack – including Adams Poundcake Kit, Adams Best, Adams Lemon Extract, Adams Natural Food Color, and Adams Cinnamon Sugar
PRIZE #3
Prize #3 — Wilton is giving away a Wilton Gift Pack – including – Bake and Bring Geometric Print Non-Stick 13 x 9 -inch Oblong Pan, Bake and Bring Geometric Print Non-Stick 8-inch Square Cake Pan, Bake and Bring Geometric Print Non-Stick 8-inch Round Cake Pan, Peach Cobbler Candy Melts Candy, Blueberry Lemonade Candy Melts Candy, Orange Crème Candy Melts Candy, Key Lime Pie Decorating Icing Pouch with Tips, Orange Crème Decorating Icing Pouch with Tips, Pop Art Triangle and Solid Cupcake Liners, Geometric Print and Solid Green Cupcake Liners, Balloon Dog Icing Decorations, Assorted Brights and Pastels Sprinkles, Blue Sprinkles Tackle Box, Coral Sprinkles Tackle Box, DIY-Lish Mermaid Kit, DIY-Lish Candy Lollipop Kit and Disposable Decorating Bags with 1M Tips
PRIZE #4
Prize #4 — Sweets & Treats Boutique is giving away 1 (one) baking supply box including an assortment of sprinkles and cupcake liners as well as one of Love From The Oven’s recent cookbooks! PRIZE #5
Prize #5 — Anolon is giving one (1) winner an Anolon Advanced Graphite 9″ Round Springform Pan & an Anolon Advanced Graphite 9″ Square Springform Pan
a Rafflecopter giveaway
Giveaway open to US Residents 18 years or older. All entries will be verified. No PO Boxes Please. Prizes will be sent directly from sponsors to winners, bloggers are not responsible for prizes. This giveaway runs from July 7th – July 14th at 12AMEST. Winners will be selected soon afterward and contacted by e-mail. Winners will have 48 hours to respond or a new winner will be chosen. There are a total of 5 (five) prizes and therefore we will have a total of 5 (five) winners. No purchase necessary. Void where prohibited by law.
Disclaimer: These posts and recipes are part of the week-long event, #SummerDessertWeek but all opinions are 100% mine! We would like to Thank our amazing sponsors: Dixie Crystals , Adam’s Extract , Wilton , Sweets and Treats Shop and Anolon ! These wonderful sponsors provided the prize packs for our giveaways and also sent samples and products to the #SummerDessertWeek bloggers to use in their recipes.

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Delhi Escort Girl are very educated as well as pleasant habits they treat

by Shona Hastings on 14 minutes ago 2 views After you have located the very best kinds, you can deal with them in potential also. So, these are prime 4 suggestions for finding the very best escort female in your town and once you find a very good agency make certain to save their contact information for foreseeable future use. You can also try to locate a excellent unbiased provider. There are plenty of excellent agencies working these times, hence you must be genuinely keen on finding the ideal a single. While choosing a hotel, escort service in delhi few factors to be considered such as amenities and facilities, the quality of service, location of the hotel, shopping and entertainment areas, restaurant facility and cost of the room. You can book the room in advance through hotel websites. You can visit the official websites of various hotels. Search engine lists the hotel booking websites. Now you do not have to travel long distance to find the hotel. Nowadays many people are preferred air travels. You can find accommodation in Delhi airport. Delhi Airport Hotels provide world class facilities to its customers such as laundry, Internet facility, 24 hrs money exchange, escort service in delhi multi-cuisine restaurants, etc. There are several budget hotels available in Delhi. Delhi Hotels are well known for their great hospitality and services. You can find this cheap accommodation in Delhi airport. These hotels have well designed rooms that can be categorized under deluxe, semi-deluxe, superior and family room. This will provide comfortable accommodation at cheap rate. Budget Hotels also provide all facilities to the customers such as conference hall, AC room, WiFi internet connectivity, parking space, etc. Irrespective of the fact whether you are an Indian tourist or a foreigner, a Delhi trip will be a revelation. And then there are those sheer monuments which will always take your breath away and draw gasps from young and old alike! Delhi is not just a good place but a great one that has never failed to appeal to a tourist. The presence of temples and mosques is always soothing and also an indication of the city’s religious tolerance and multi-ethnic persona. The city with its quirky food, traditional bazaars and flashy Delhi hotels, will help you rediscover life and rediscover India. Delhi, being the capital of the country, houses eminent buildings like the Sansad Bhavan (Parliament House) and the Rashtrapati Bhavan (President’s House). While both the buildings have their political significance, they are also eye-catching in their architecture. Catching a cheap flight to Delhi will be your foray into India’s political hub. The former is circular in shape while the latter defines excellent engineering! You never pay anything to find the love and the romance with the free Russian site of dating. It there forever of the fees for the use of the completely free Russian service of dating. The Russian service of dating is the bridge which connects all Moscow singles together for the relationship and the marriage. Thus, the research of the thousands of Russian singles on line with the service of dating of Moscow is simple and easy. If you loved this article and you would certainly such as to obtain more facts regarding escort service in delhi kindly browse through the web-page.

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Thomas Henry…

President of The American Automobile Association and Freemason.
“Thomas P. Henry (1877-1945) President of American Automobile Association, 1923-45. b. Dec. 28, 1877, at Brookhaven, Miss. As a newspaperman he worked on papers in Miss., New Orleans, and on the Chicago Tribune, New York Times, and Detroit Free Press. In 1906 he founded the Thomas P. Henry Co. at Detroit. Raised Oct. 15, 1913 in Zion Lodge No. 1, Detroit, Mich. d. Sept. 7, 1945.”
In my mind I can see the slaves gossiping about all that was going on at that time after they got done with a long day of work in the cotton fields being whipped everyday…
“Well…I heard Mastuh and Plantation Overseer talkin’ ‘bout what as goin’ on up there in Philadelphia and in Virginia…they be talkin’ ‘bout liberty and freedom…”
“Liberty and freedom? We still slaves…dragged us up out of Africa…put chains on us…brought us to America and sold us and broke us apart from our families…”
“They talk about Moses when they have us worship their religion on Sundays too…The Bible…teaching that that’s the way it was in Africa years ago with Pharaoh in Egypt…how Moses and Jesus freed the people and we’re supposed to be free as well once we get to heaven…”
“In other parts of Africa…the people don’t believe in that Moses and Pharaoh…they say something else about the people in Egypt a long time ago…”
I can see the slaves back then having conversations in their black communities on the plantation after the sun went down…after they had something to eat and then would go to sleep to wake up the next day to work in the fields again…being forced into Christian worship and forced to read The Old Testament…learning about Moses and the slavery of Egypt and how Moses freed the people…you wonder if those slaves actually really believed it…or they were just forced to accept it…they didn’t have a choice anyway…
Then they’d talk about cornbread…
“Ya know where we got this recipe for cornbread from?”
“Where?”
“From those Indians (Native Americans). Cornbread is a part of their heritage…they say that they been making cornbread for thousands upon thousands of years…but after the whites landed here in this land…they took the Indian land…”
And that’s true…Cornbread is a Southern food…usually paired with meats and fish and other seafood for dinner…but it originally came from The Native Americans of especially the South…
Cornbread: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornbread
Native American Cuisine: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_cuisine
“Native American cuisine includes all food practices of the indigenous peoples of the Americas.
Modern-day native peoples retain a varied culture of traditional foods, some of which have become iconic of present-day Native American social gatherings (for example, frybread). Foods like cornbread, turkey, cranberry, blueberry, hominy and mush are known to have been adopted into the cuisine of the United States from Native American groups . In other cases, documents from the early periods of contact with European, African, and Asian peoples allow the recovery of food practices which passed out of popularity. The most important native American crops include corn, beans, squash, pumpkins, sunflowers, wild rice, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, peanuts, avocados, papayas, potatoes and chocolate .[1]
Modern-day Native American cuisine is varied.[2][3] The use of indigenous domesticated and wild food ingredients can represent Native American food and cuisine.[4] North American native cuisine can differ somewhat from Southwestern and Mexican cuisine in its simplicity and directness of flavor. The use of ramps, wild ginger, miners’ lettuce, and juniper berry can impart subtle flavours to various dishes .[5]”
I’ve had frybread I think once…when our family went to the Southwest (Arizona) I think I had it for dinner…that’s supposed to be really delicious https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frybread
“ According to Navajo tradition, frybread was created in 1864 using the flour, sugar, salt and lard that was given to them by the United States government when the Navajo, who were living in Arizona, were forced to make the 300-mile journey known as the “Long Walk” and relocate to Bosque Redondo, New Mexico , onto land that could not easily support their traditional staples of vegetables and beans.[1]”
Again discussing the Old Testament and what historians and archaeologists state about Ancient Egyptian History…
Slavery in Egypt: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_ancient_Egypt
“Slavery in ancient Egypt existed at least since the New Kingdom (1550-1175 BC). Discussions of slavery in Pharaonic Egypt are complicated by terminology used by the Egyptians to refer to different classes of servitude over the course of dynastic history. Interpretation of the textual evidence of classes of slaves in ancient Egypt has been difficult to differentiate by word usage alone.[1] There were three types of enslavement in Ancient Egypt: chattel slavery, bonded labor, and forced labor .[2][3][4] But even these types of slavery are susceptible to individual interpretation based on evidence and research. Egypt’s labor culture is represented by many men and women, and it is difficult to claim their social status into one category.
The word “slave” or even the existence therefore, has been translated from Egyptian language into modern terms with consideration of the time period and traditional labor laws. The distinction between servant, peasant, and slave describe different roles in different contexts. Egyptian texts refer to words ‘bAk’ and ‘Hm’ that mean laborer or servant. Some Egyptian language refer to slave-like people as ‘sqrw-anx’, meaning “bound for life”[5] Forms of forced labor and servitude are seen throughout all of ancient Egypt even though it wasn’t specifically declared as the well known term we have today, slavery. Egyptians wanted dominion over their kingdoms and would alter political and social ideas to benefit their economic state. The existence of a slavery not only was profitable for ancient Egypt, but made it easier to keep power and stability of the Kingdoms.[5][6]”
Chattel Slavery: “Chattel slaves were mostly captives of war”
Bonded Labor: “ Ancient Egyptians were able to sell themselves and children into slavery in a form of bonded labor . Self-sale into servitude was not always a choice made by the individuals’ free will, but rather a result of individuals who were unable to pay off their debts .[8] The creditor would wipe the debt by acquiring the individual who was in debt as a slave, along with his children and wife. The debtor would also have to give up all that was owned . Peasants were also able to sell themselves into slavery for food or shelter.[3][4]”
Forced Labor: “Several departments in the Ancient Egyptian government were able to draft workers from the general population to work for the state with a corvée labor system. The laborers were conscripted for projects such as military expeditions, mining and quarrying, and construction projects for the state. These slaves were paid a wage, depending on their skill level and social status for their work . Conscripted workers were not owned by individuals, like other slaves, but rather required to perform labor as a duty to the state. Conscripted labor was a form of taxation by government officials and usually happened at the local level when high officials called upon small village leaders.[7][12]”
Exodus Chapter 1…
https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=exodus%201&version=NIV
“These are the names of the sons of Israel who went to Egypt with Jacob, each with his family: 2 Reuben, Simeon, Levi and Judah; 3 Issachar, Zebulun and Benjamin; 4 Dan and Naphtali; Gad and Asher. 5 The descendants of Jacob numbered seventy[a] in all; Joseph was already in Egypt.
6 Now Joseph and all his brothers and all that generation died, 7 but the Israelites were exceedingly fruitful; they multiplied greatly, increased in numbers and became so numerous that the land was filled with them .
8 Then a new king, to whom Joseph meant nothing, came to power in Egypt. 9 “Look,” he said to his people, “ the Israelites have become far too numerous for us. 10 Come, we must deal shrewdly with them or they will become even more numerous and, if war breaks out, will join our enemies, fight against us and leave the country.”
11 So they put slave masters over them to oppress them with forced labor , and they built Pithom and Rameses as store cities for Pharaoh . 12 But the more they were oppressed, the more they multiplied and spread; so the Egyptians came to dread the Israelites 13 and worked them ruthlessly. 14 They made their lives bitter with harsh labor in brick and mortar and with all kinds of work in the fields ; in all their harsh labor the Egyptians worked them ruthlessly.”
Who was the New Pharaoh to whom “Joseph” meant nothing and who used his power to oppress all of the Israelites in Egypt?
Joseph was the son of Jacob and due to his ability to interpret dreams for the Pharaoh and to assist Egypt in surviving a famine…he was given the Vizier title and was known as second in command to Pharaoh in Egypt…but no such Vizier exists in Egyptian History at all…not by the name of Joseph or by his Egyptian name Zaphnath-Paaneah…
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_(Genesis)#Joseph_in_prison
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_(Genesis)#Vizier_of_Egypt
Due to Joseph’s powers of “prediction” for the Pharaoh…taught in my religion of birth as coming from the Holy Spirit of the God Jehovah (Joseph would never have been referred to as medium or psychic…those are devilish and demonic terms…)…he was appointed Vizier…but there is no Egyptian record…perhaps Watchtower would say that once the New Pharaoh started to reign…he removed all of Joseph’s accomplishments from all of Egypt…but then what was the New Pharaoh’s name anyway?
And what about the slavery? Was it really forced labor as defined by Wikipedia (historians and archaeologists of Egypt)?
That doesn’t seem to fit what Exodus states…slave masters rose up for the New Pharaoh to control the Israelites because they had become too numerous in Egypt and the New Pharaoh thought that they would take over Egypt…so they were forced into labor…
I guess if there was a conflict then between the Ancient Israelites in Egypt and the Ancient Egyptians the Israelites could have been considered Chattel slaves…but many historians and archaeologists state that there is a lack of evidence that the Israelites were ever slaves in Egypt…or were actually in Egypt at all…
Which leads to what I think is an important religious question: “when and where did monotheism begin?”
The Bible states Abraham in Ur…or after Abraham left Ur of the Chaldees…Abraham spoke with God…The God of The Old Testament…and God said that He and His descendants would become numerous and a great nation…etc.
And archaeology and history state that forms of monotheism had a beginning in Egypt with Pharaoh Akhenaten and probably portions of the religious upper classes at that time (priests and others) but not a lot of that is mentioned in Ancient Egyptian history I think…after the religious conflicts of Akhenaten’s day…Egypt returned to its original form of worship and what happened during the reign of Akhenaten was labeled heretical…
Heresy: “belief or opinion contrary to orthodox religious (especially Christian) doctrine”
“ Akhenaten tried to shift his culture from Egypt’s traditional religion, but the shifts were not widely accepted . After his death, his monuments were dismantled and hidden, his statues were destroyed, and his name excluded from the king lists .[12] Traditional religious practice was gradually restored, and when some dozen years later rulers without clear rights of succession from the 18th Dynasty founded a new dynasty, they discredited Akhenaten and his immediate successors,
referring to Akhenaten himself as “the enemy” or “that criminal” in archival records .[13]”
The beginning of monotheism has connections to Judaism, Christianity, and Islam…in fact…the majority of the world’s worshippers (not just the Western World) but the majority of the world’s religious people on earth…revere Abraham as Patriarch of the three largest forms of religion on planet earth…monotheistic…
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham
“Abraham is called by God to leave the house of his father Terah and settle in the land originally given to Canaan but which God now promises to Abraham and his progeny .”
“The Abraham story cannot be definitively related to any specific time, and it is widely agreed that the patriarchal age, along with the exodus and the period of the judges, is a late literary construct that does not relate to any period in actual history.[4] A common hypothesis among scholars is that it was composed in the early Persian period (late 6th century BCE) as a result of tensions between Jewish landowners who had stayed in Judah during the Babylonian captivity and traced their right to the land through their “father Abraham”, and the returning exiles who based their counter-claim on Moses and the Exodus tradition.[5]”
Akhenaten: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akhenaten 1300’s BC…
“Akhenaten (/ˌækəˈnɑːtən/;[1] also spelled Echnaton,[7] Akhenaton,[8] Ikhnaton,[9] and Khuenaten;[10][11] meaning “Effective for Aten”), known before the fifth year of his reign as Amenhotep IV (sometimes given its Greek form, Amenophis IV, and meaning “Amun Is Satisfied”), was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh of the 18th Dynasty who ruled for 17 years and died perhaps in 1336 BC or 1334 BC. He is noted for abandoning traditional Egyptian polytheism and introducing worship centered on the Aten, which is sometimes described as monolatristic, henotheistic, or even quasi-monotheistic . An early inscription likens the Aten to the sun as compared to stars, and later official language avoids calling the Aten a god, giving the solar deity a status above mere gods.”
Where, when, how, why did monotheism develop in the world and what happened after that to develop it into the numerous denominations or groups that we see in the world today as monotheistic?
I was told to never doubt anything that The Bible states…but…historians and archaeologists cannot find exact evidence of Abraham’s existence…archaeology and history state that Akhenaten was a real Pharaoh and ruled during a time when there was this sort of monotheistic religion in Egypt and worship of the sun…solar deity…and a lot of the people’s of the world including some of the empires of The Americas worshiped the sun or a solar deity…but…
The Bible is everywhere…and different denominations use it…all usually teach that Abraham was a real person that existed…my religion of birth teaches that…
I think that it is interesting that archaeologists and historians could study or research or try to determine “power” and “religion” in Ancient Egypt…because religion is an authority (authority of the Gods and Goddesses or a singular God in the hands of the religious leaders) and that authority could have influenced or even controlled the throne of Egypt and definitely the people as state religion as well…but I don’t know how much of that is discussed or known about Ancient Egypt…the religious power over the people and the throne…
What were the religious leaders doing back then? Did they force the people into worship of a certain God or Goddess in a certain area? Did they require an amount of agricultural goods or currency from each person (a tithe perhaps) for religious worship? Where did the religious leaders live back then besides serving in temples? Did they have upper-middle class homes? Did they have other occupations connected to politics and the supervision (government) of the people or did they make their living by serving at temples as priests and leaders? Did they own land themselves so that they could make agricultural profit?
I don’t know…not an expert on Ancient Egyptian History…but religion has always been an important authority in civilization…my religion of birth states all the time that it does not and will not ever under any circumstances meddle in the politics of this country or the world…but allegedly based on my research I have concluded that it could be connected to Freemasonry…and Freemasonry seems to always have had power in politics and government from the beginning of The United States of America…so I don’t really believe or trust the organization when it states that it does not and will not get involved in the politics and government of this country…
It also states that the reason it will not ever get involved in that is because the country’s government and the nations of this world are a part of “Satan’s World” or the world of evil in the hands of The Devil…Satan’s World sort of sounds like some twisted amusement park where thrill seekers can ride on Beelzebub’s Roller Coaster…
But I said one day in 2006…I went with some of Jehovah’s Witnesses to see The da Vinci Code…and a Jehovah’s Witness had suggested reading the book and I read the book after it was published in 2003…and then I think it was Stacy Pagnano asked how I felt about the content of the film and book…it suggests a conspiracy theory about the writing of The Bible…
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bible_conspiracy_theory
And I thought that that was strange…because…in my mind she shouldn’t have been asking that question in the first place…raised as one of Jehovah’s Witnesses herself…one is always supposed to agree with whatever The Bible states…the organization teaches and will always teach in my opinion that The Bible is infallible…God is infallible…God never lies…The Bible never lies…it is taught at the meetings of Jehovah’s Witnesses…
Infallible: “incapable of making mistakes or being wrong”
Which would also suggest that The Bible would never “cover up” something about the past…cover up is usually what someone begins to discuss when the term “conspiracy” is used…
Cover Up: “an attempt to prevent people’s discovering the truth about a serious mistake or crime”
Conspiracy: “a secret plan by a group to do something unlawful or harmful”
Each time monotheism has grown in the world…from Ancient Israel into Christianity and then centuries pass and Islam develops…the faiths seem to replace Pagan-polytheistic faiths and tribal religions and cultures (most of the time very violently in wars and conflicts) and those polytheistic/tribal cultures and religions seem to almost disappear…no one ever seems to care that they disappear and learn about them…that’s what happened I would argue in The Americas…the many forms of Christianity that really came from Europe and Catholicism and The Protestant Reformation have come to dominate The Americas…
There are over 500 recognized tribes in North America…recognized by the federal government ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_federally_recognized_tribes_in_the_United_States ) …and not a thing is taught about their culture or spirituality I would argue in this nation…yet one can find a Church on practically every street corner in town using The Bible…the national anthem includes the God of The Bible…so does the pledge of allegiance…and The God of The Bible is on the money…sometimes patriotic songs or Americanized forms of popular music include references to Scriptures in The Bible as well…
The Pagan tribes of Europe started to disappear from European lands…some…even before the Christian Kingdoms were formed…some of that happened in France and where The United Kingdom stands in the name of God and The Bible today…The Monarch is protector and defender of The Faith and that faith is Christian and a Church and a part of English and British Culture…where did that monotheism and way of doing things originate in the world and what power does it still have over and within various nations? Religion it seems has always had power over people…even power over very private aspects of certain people’s lives…
That’s how I view my religion of birth…it has power over people and what they cannot do in private (especially in the bedroom) …in the name of God…religion is an authority…a divine/absolute/never to be questioned or criticized authority and how did that authority develop and evolve in various places in the ancient world and is its evolution of authority connected from empire to empire over time?
Christian Kingdom Royal Families are known for their conservatism and well behaved manners…not just the Royal Family of The United Kingdom…but all of the Christian Kingdoms…
The way that Christian Royal Families behave and are expected to behave…very conservatively…I would say is obviously based on the proper moral conduct expected of those that worship The God of The Bible…today’s constitutional monarchs…it might be written in stone somewhere…that the monarchs have to attend Church on Sunday…even if in their hearts and minds somewhere they read about ancient history and archaeology and might think a certain way about The Bible and Moses, Abraham, Joseph of Egypt…etc.

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Spice Village Indian Restaurant | Best Indian Restaurant in Belmont

Submitted by spice_village .
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About Spice village indian restaurant
Spice Village Indian Restaurant In Belmont, offering Dine-in, Take-away and Deliveries with the finest quality, healthy and traditional Modern Indian Cuisine.

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8 best microbreweries in Bengaluru to watch the World Cup semi-final

Toit Image: Courtesy Toit Since opening its doors in 2010, this has become not just a city institution, but a cult. Among the six tap beers of offer, the Basmati Blonde, a light malty craft beer, and Tintin, a fruity wheat beer, are the most popular. TOit also does seasonal beers that are a huge hit – think Jamun Gose, Pumpkin Ale, and Santa Ale with hints of Christmas spices and many more. The food pairing for each beer is mentioned on the menu but favourites remain the beef burger and the wood-fire oven pizzas made from sourdough bread. You can order half and half options here. If you want something local, go for ghee roast prawns or Kerala beef fry. And if you’ve really liked what you’ve drunk, then sign up for their brewery tours, done on the first Saturday of every month. Where: 298, 100 Feet Road, Namma Metro Pillar 62, Indiranagar BYG Brewski Brewing Company Image: Courtesy Byg Brewski Brewing Company (Facebook) This is Asia’s largest brewery, offering 16 types of beers on tap and about 200 dishes, so we won’t be surprised if get confused about what to order. Spread over different levels, it has five experience zones – a high energy pub, a party zone, a quiet, chill zone, a high point for gorgeous sunsets, and an area over nine steps with a large screen. When it comes to the brews, our favourite is Kokum, a sour tasting variety. Despite its size, it’s best to reserve a table here. Where: 22/123, Byrathi Village, Bidarahalli Hobli, Hennur Spice Terrace Image: Courtesy Spice Terrace Bengaluru’s first microbrewery in a five-star hotel, JW Marriott, has a gorgeous pool-side location. Having tied up with a brewery in Belgium – St Martin’s – on offer here are four beers on tap – Abbey Bond, Abbey Dark, Belgian Wheat, and Abbey Tipple. It is certainly the best venue to enjoy Bengaluru’s gorgeous weather and enjoy your drink with Indian food options like Rajmah Aur Dhingri Ki Galawat, Papad Paneer Masala, and Nimbu Tulsi Jhinga. Munchies such as muruku and makhana are on the table to accompany the beer. Where: 24/1, Vittal Mallya Road, Lavelle Road The Druid Garden Image: Courtesy The Druid Garden True to its name, this resembles a German beer garden, with benches and wooden tables, and has a lovely al fresco terrace. One of the most popular breweries in north Bangalore, there are six beers on tap here – Hefeweizen, Czech Pilsner Lager, Dunkelweizen, Stout, Indian Pale Ale, Rauchbier, and Bohemian Dunkel – out of which Hefeweizen, which has hints of banana, is the most popular. The food menu spans 15 global cuisines, so order anything from Vietnamese summer rolls and tacos, to tenderloin burgers and grills. Where: 0/1 Century Corbel – Commercial, Sahakara Nagar Main Road Xoox Brewmill Image: Courtesy Xoox Brewmill Apple Cider, Japanese Dry Blonde, or Red Velvet Ale – if you are in the mood to try something different, head to this swanky brewery. Spread over three levels in what was once a mill, it has an outdoor area and a Japanese eatery on the terrace with a sushi bar. There are unusual dishes on the menu, including masala papdi nachos topped with dal makhni and cheese sauce, and a dish called Mexican Kachori served with jalapenos and garlic chutney. For those who want to play it safe, opt for Thai fish cakes, kulcha platters and the burgers. Where: 8, 20, Main Rd, KHB Colony, Koramangala Industrial Layout, Koramangala

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