Edible Archives Project Aims To Revive Hundreds Of Vanishing Indian Rice Strains

Edible Archives Project Aims To Revive Hundreds Of Vanishing Indian Rice Strains

Edible Archives Project Aims To Revive Hundreds Of Vanishing Indian Rice Strains By Charukesi Ramadurai • 6 hours ago Some of the 20 different types of rice used during the three-month festival Kochi-Muziris Biennale in India. Chefs served two varieties of rice every day, along with multiple dishes of vegetables and meat or seafood. Salam Olattayil / for NPR
Chef Anumitra Ghosh Dastidar fondly remembers her father’s love for rice — and his insistence on having specific kinds of rice — with each special meat or fish dish cooked in their kitchen.
She even has memories of him making long road trips from their home in Kolkata, India, to other parts of the state of West Bengal to buy local rice. What motivated him, she says, was not just his interest in food but also nostalgia for his childhood.
Edible Archives was born partly from this recollection, with chef Anurima Ghosh Dastidar as curator, along with chef Prima Kurien and two food writers who were also invited to cook.
India is known to have cultivated thousands of varieties of rice, and references to rice — also combined with vegetables and meat, an ancient precursor to biryani, which came from Persia — have been found in Sangam literature from the 5th century B.C. Even a century ago, communities across India grew their own strains of rice, and consumed them according to the needs of the season or the cuisine.
During the Green Revolution in the 1960s, when machinery replaced manual work and “high-yield variety” seeds were promoted, agricultural output increased dramatically, but a few hybrid rice strains took over from hundreds of indigenous ones.
The Edible Archives Project aims to showcase the sheer range of rice varieties grown in India, and throw the spotlight specifically on those which have almost vanished from the country’s foodscape or are grown only in small communities. Chef Anumitra Ghosh Dastidar scoops Kattuyanam (a red rice from Tamil Nadu), into bowls at the Kochi-Muziris Biennale. She is instrumental in both rice research and cooking for the Edible Archives project. Courtesy of Edible Archives
“We don’t document anything in India, so most of the old rice strains are gone, and the expert knowledge about them too,” says Jayanthi Somasundaram, whose Spirit of the Earth collective sources and sells several varieties of organic heritage rice, including a few for this project.
Edible Archives formally opened at the Kochi-Muziris Biennale , an art festival that ran from Dec. 12 through March 29 in the south Indian city of Kochi, currently in its fourth edition. At the event, the chefs served two varieties of rice every day, along with multiple dishes of vegetables and meat or seafood. All of this was in what Dastidar calls “homestyle cooking” (as opposed to what is passed off in restaurants, especially outside India, as classic Indian cuisine, like butter chicken), using local vegetables such as drumstick ( moringa in vegetable form) and gourds. Writer-chef Priya Bala adds that the idea was also to present not just rice in all its glory, but preserve the dwindling knowledge about cooking methods, as well as revive lost recipes.
To spice things up, the chefs also played with fusion presentations, such as a Korean marinated egg over the aromatic Tulaipanji rice from West Bengal (a hit combination, as it turned out) and the Chicken Pepian, a Guatemalan Maya dish paired with the white, sweetish Chini Atap rice, also from the same Indian state, to complement the robust smokiness of the meat. “Most importantly, the chefs also explained how pairing works, so as to balance all flavors and fragrances,” Somasundaram says.
In three months, the team cooked with nearly 40 rice varieties from all over India, many of them not familiar to anyone outside the region of cultivation — like the Bahurupi from the state of Odisha or the Kattuyanam from Tamil Nadu. The rice of the day was described on a board at the venue, and on the social media pages of Edible Archives.
Drawing from her own nostalgia, Dastidar says that most Indians have “an archive of rice memories, which we wanted to bring together.” In the midst of all the cooking and eating, there was also a two-day workshop called “Recipes of Rice and Remembrance” that included talks, cooking demonstrations, reminiscences and even songs related to rice.
Speaking of the latter, Bala points out that rice has found a place in Indian culture and literature over the ages, from a Bengali lullaby asking the angel aunties to come and put the baby to sleep, promising them delicious food in return — including three types of rice — to devotional songs from the state of Tamil Nadu that equate rice with prosperity.
Indeed, rice has been an important, exceptional part of Indian rituals — from the ceremony during which a baby is first fed mashed rice as solid food , to the turmeric-infused yellow rice showered as blessing at weddings, to the final journey, where rice is an offering to the departed soul. Even the sick are fed kanji or khichuri (loose rice porridge, with or without lentils) as comfort food.
Dastidar has trained in Italian, Japanese and Thai cuisines, and learned how chefs in those countries tend to focus on grains from their own microregions. Much before the Edible Archives idea took shape, Dastidar was experimenting with rice varieties; think Manipuri Black Rice Risotto (a grain with starch content similar to Arborio) at New Delhi’s popular restaurant Diva, where she was sous chef for many years.
With this experience, she traveled across the country to source the rice for Edible Archives — all of it was bought directly from small farmers or through agriculture collectives and non-governmental organizations who worked with cultivators. The exploratory phase included inputs from experts such as Dr. Debal Deb, who has researched and grown 1,300 varieties of rice at his farm Basudha in Odisha, and organic farmer Syed Ghani Khan, who established a rice museum in Karnataka that is home to more than 850 varieties. One of the rice bowls served at the festival, this dish contains Kattuyanam, along with roasted pumpkin, cauliflower, ridge gourd, mango, dal, and cucumber salad and mustard microgreens. Courtesy of Edible Archives
Along with creating a record of cultural connotations and memories, Edible Archives also shared nutritional information about the rice of the day, trying to dispel the myth that rice is just a “bad carb.” Case in point are two varieties from Tamil Nadu, where rice is the staple: Kattuyanam and Seeraga Samba, the former with a low glycemic index that makes it ideal for diabetics, and the latter highly fibrous and rich in selenium to fight colon and intestinal cancers. The chefs gleaned this information from scientific articles and agricultural journals, as well as from Basudha’s in-house magazine.
In the future, Edible Archives plans to hold pop-up events across the country and eventually abroad. There have already been a few in Indian cities, and one in Paris coming up in June that will focus on cuisine from India’s seven northeast states, which are still largely under-explored in terms of tourism, culture and cuisine. The chefs say they mean to keep the dialogue going with talks and lectures “wherever food and culture meet.”
As Bala puts it, “we need to continue the celebration of a grain that is sustenance, comfort, nutrition and auspiciousness all at once.”
Charukesi Ramadurai is a freelance journalist from India, writing about travel, food, art and culture for BBC Travel, The Guardian, Forbes and National Geographic Traveller (India), among others. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram: @charukesi Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org. © 2019 WESM

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The Liverpool ‘Must-Do’ List 2019

The Liverpool ‘Must-Do’ List 2019 30 things you absolutely must do if you’re visiting the city this year.
Visiting Liverpool has never been more exciting. As 2019 gets into full swing we’re lining up days at the beach, in the parks, riding the tour buses, tucking in world cuisine, stepping back in time, learning about scouse history and preparing for some epic nights out.
Whether you’re here for a day, a weekend or a little longer, to fully immerse yourself in all things scouse, we’ve compiled a list of the top must-do attractions to make some memories on Merseyside. With lots of free to attend museums, galleries and workshops, there’s something for everyone, (especially the Beatles fans). The only question is, what will you do first? Here’s 30 things you must-do on a visit to Liverpool in 2019…. 1 – RLB360
The Royal Liver Building is an internationally recognised landmark and now you can find out all about its history and take in the breath-taking views at RLB360. From both the 10th and 15th floors you can get unparalleled views of the city and leave spellbound by the light projection show that charts this iconic building and its standing in the city. An absolute must for all visitors and locals alike. Find out more here. MORE: For more foodies news for Liverpool head to our Food & Drink pages here. 2 – Magical Mystery Tour
The Magical Mystery Tour charts the meteoric rise of Liverpool’s most famous sons The Beatles, by taking visitors to the homes, schools and venues that shaped their legendary careers. Jump on the rainbow MMT bus for a two hour journey back in time with the most incredible soundtrack and see the likes of Penny Lane and Strawberry Fields. Book your spot here. 3 – Ferry ‘Cross the Mersey
It’s got to be done! We were delighted to hear that Snowdrop, our stunning Dazzle Ferry remains with the Mersey Ferry fleet and what better way to get a perfect photo of the Liverpool skyline than from out on the Mersey itself? Book your next Ferry Cross the Mersey here. MORE: See what’s on for your Family on Merseyside in our dedicated section here. 4 – Eat at Mowgli
While Scouse is our city’s treasured dish, absolutely anything on the menu at Mowgli is a close second. Liverpool is on love with Mowgli. Indian street food made with traditional recipes by chef Nisha Katona MBE has revolutionised how and what we eat. Prepare to taste the rainbow at Mowgli – order the Bunny Chow, chat bombs and Mowgli chip butty, you wont regret it. Mowgli menus here. 5 – Explore Hope Street Hope Street
A city with two Cathedrals – the crowning jewels of the Georgian Quarter boasting cobbled streets, poignant public art, legendary theatres and the most famous pub toilets in the UK (The Philharmonic Pub). Hope Street is a melting pot of some of the city’s best indie bars and restaurants. Climb to the Anglican Cathedral bell tower roof and see the sun stream through the stained glass of the Metropolitan Cathedral for instant Instagram envy. More here. More: This is your Liverpool 2019 event calendar. 6 – Museum of Liverpool
The most visited museum outside of London, Liverpool Museum charts the myriad of exhibitions and artefacts that have made this city what it is. The free to enter, waterfront museum has made learning about our history, identity and legacy fun and accessible to all. Double Fantasy – John & Yoko an exhibition that details the union of two icons is a must-see. Take the kids on the LiverBird trail, take a seat on the overhead railway and check out Lily Savage’s costumes and rarely seen photos of the city over the decades. Opening times and more here. 7 – Foodie Heaven at Royal Albert Dock
Sticking with the waterfront, why not choose one of the many Royal Albert Dock restaurants and cafes for a bite to eat, whatever you fancy. Latest additions to the beautiful dock area includes Rosa’s Thai Café – bringing traditional Thai dishes and cooking to the city (try the handmade spring rolls). Peaberry Coffee House serves up chunky sandwiches, brunch dishes and rich tasting coffee, while The Smugglers Cove offers hearty burgers, hanging kebabs and all the rum, with a stunning view! Full dining listings here. MORE: 10 ‘Hidden Gem’ bars in Liverpool you need to discover 8 – The Beatles Story
The world’s largest permanent exhibition dedicated to the life and times of The Beatles, this Albert Dock museum is a must for all fans. Find out how the Fab Four met, see original clothing, instruments and song lyrics, plus travel to Hamburg, The Cavern, Abbey Road and other key locations that were instrumental in the making of one incredible story. Pre book your ticket to ride here. 9 – Eat at Wreckfish Bistro
Renowned chef and restaurateur Gary Usher and his team turned a derelict building on Seel Street into Wreckfish Bistro and threw open the doors to simple bistro food using the best quality ingredients. And everyone raves about it. Whether you book in for lunch, dinner, Sunday dinner or a private dining event, expect a taste sensation. We recommend feather blade beef, halibut loin and most definitely the Tonka bean crem brulee! Menus and more here. 10 – Radio City Tower Radio City Tower
You can see the city from over 400ft with a trip up to the viewing gallery of St John’s Beacon or the Radio City Tower as its known. Home to our local Radio City stations, this alien spaceship looking structure towers over the city and gives stunning views right across the Mersey, to Wirral and beyond. Tickets here. MORE: Watch all of our coverage from Randox Health Grand National 2019 here. 11 – The Anfield Experience Tour
This is Anfield and for any LFC fan, an official tour of the reds beloved stadium is a real bucket list item. Go behind the scenes and view the state-of-the-art Home Team dressing room, Away Team dressing room, Press Room, Player’s tunnel and This is Anfield Sign, as well as seeing the pitch and city beyond from the main stand. Check out all the tour options here. 12 – Shiverpool
One for the history and drama lovers, a Shiverpool tour takes you to parts of the city that guarantees goosebumps. Street theatre doesn’t get more thrilling than this. Book in for a 90 minute walking tour and learn more about the Liverpool streets and its shadowy figures than you ever imagined. From Hope St to the Auld City and Dead house, packed with strange but true facts, experience Liverpool down the ages and into the next life. Book here. 13 – City Sights Liverpool
Take a City Sights bus tour of the city to check out our incredible architecture, landmarks and sense of humour. City sights tour guides are easily some of the most knowledgeable, friendly and funny scousers who love nothing more than showcasing the very best of our city. With two routes, multilingual tours bursting with facts and more about our beloved Beatles, this is the perfect way to see the city while someone else does the driving. Book here. 14 – Reel Movie Tour
Liverpool has provided the perfect backdrop for adverts, tv shows and Hollywood blockbusters for many years. On any given day you’ll find a film crew utilising our buildings, streets, tunnels and skyline as their own and now you can take a walking tour to all the most famous spots. Fantastic Beasts, 51st State, Peaky Blinders and many more have made Liverpool their home. Check them out on a Reel Tour here. 15 – The BME
Did you know Liverpool is the home of The British Music Experience? Housed at Cunard on the Pier Head this huge exhibition of British Music boasts some amazing artefacts including Brit Award Spice Girls costumes! There’s loads of interactive exhibits, instruments to try out and dedicated dance studio, all under one roof. Walk back through musical history from the 40’s to now. Tickets here. 16 – Western Approaches Western Approaches
Deep beneath the Liverpool streets lies a war time command centre that has been lovingly restored. Western Approaches was instrumental in winning the battle of the Atlantic and allows visitors to step back in time to view items such as the red war phone (linking to the Churchill war rooms in London), amazing technology of the day, uniforms, the breath-taking map room and lots more. Booking here. 17 – Cain’s Brewery Village (and Baltic Market)
Cain’s Brewery Village has undergone a huge transformation and now boasts some of the best city bars, vintage shops and eateries. Wander the antique stalls, pick up a bargain or two, stop in for a pint at Punch Tarmey’s Irish Bar or cocktails at Birdies and head across the Baltic Market to fall in love with scouse street food. Halloumi fries are a must! More here. 18 – Visit Tate Liverpool
Tate Liverpool is at the forefront of British and international contemporary art and a real gem in the city’s cultural offering. Alongside permanent collections such as Constellations – highlights from the national collection of modern art, Tate Liverpool has a busy 2019 lined up playing host to Op Art and artist and activist Keith Haring in the coming months. See what’s on here. 19 – Shop at Liverpool ONE
From high street to high end, Liverpool ONE invites you to shop at more than 170 stores across its huge city centre site. From John Lewis to Disney, Apple to Footlocker, Flannels, Michael Korrs, Accesorise and Waterstones. There’s something for everyone, plus plenty of bars, restaurants and cafes to pit stop and refuel too. Check out the full list of stores here. 20 -Visit St George’s Hall
This Victorian masterpiece has hosted grand celebrations, vigils, spontaneous yet monumental gatherings and even sleeping giants in its 165 year history. If it’s stone pillars could speak they would tell you that Liverpool’s history has played out on the steps, plateau, Great hall, the Minton tiles and concert rooms at St George’s Hall. The emotional heart of the region, the first thing you see from Lime St Station steps, St George’s Hall has to be seen and felt to be believed. More info here. 21 – Explore Sefton Park
Sefton Park is a joy all year round. Snowy pictures across the frozen lake, the pathways trees coming into blossom, a million autumn leaves changing colour and the fields of daffodils signalling a new beginning. Playparks packed with kids, the Palm House alive with the sound of music or peacefully quiet for yoga, music festivals, mass sporting events and hundreds of benches for a little bit of r&r, Sefton Park has got it all. More here. 22 – Selfies with Antony Gormley Status, Crosby Beach
A trip out to Crosby Beach to get a selfie with an Antony Gormley statue is a definite must-do on any visit to the region. Easily accessible with Merseyrail, grab a return ticket to Waterloo and wander around the marine lake until you hit the sand dunes and the site of 100 cast iron men, gazing out to sea. ‘Another Place’ the name for this collection of art, should be on your Instagram in 2019. More here. 23 – Explore Wirral
Miles of beautiful coastline, war time history, its very own observatory, mysterious Hilbre Island, marine life, beautiful parks, a shipping legacy, farms, the phenomenal Port Sunlight village and the best ice-cream in the north west! Visit Wirral in 2019 and learn something about this north west peninsula you never knew. Walk or cycle the Wirral Way, enjoy an ice-cream on New Brighton prom and get the best views of the Liverpool skyline from Seacombe. More here. 24 – Silent Adventures
Love music? Love exploring new cities? Love accidentally burning calories while dancing round with your mates? Then get yourselves booked onto the brilliant Silent Disco Adventure Tour with Alan Cross. Simply don your headphones and set off on a course around the city centre dancing like no one is watching! Find out more here. 25 – Walker Art Gallery & World Museum World Museum
William Brown Street is home to Liverpool’s World Museum and Walker Art Gallery. Both free to enter, prepare to get lost in ancient, under water worlds and galaxies. Let your mind wander as you take in priceless art from the greats, Monet, Manet, Da Vinci, Rennie Mackintosh and more. Travel back to ancient Egypt with a state of the art exhibition showcasing 11 mummies, live bugs and replica spaceshuttles. Something for everyone. More here. 26 – Drinks at The Philharmonic Pub
We mentioned the most famous pub toilets in the UK earlier and any visit to Hope Street should definitely involve a drink at the ornate and unique, Philharmonic Dining Rooms. This Grade II listed building – known as The Phil has hosted impromptu gigs by Sir Paul McCartney, seen many a famous actor and musician stop by for a pint and offers a comfy and quirky place to grab a bite. Find out more here. 27 – Learn about Titanic at Merseyside Maritime Museum
Merseyside Maritime Museum, Royal Albert Dock invites you to learn more about Liverpool’s central role in the Titanic story. 107 years since her ill-fated voyage to New York, Titanic, registered in Liverpool, has a new exhibition which details the local stories and connections with free talks, events and craft sessions. There’s even a chance to walk the Titanic cabins with VR sessions. Find out more here. 28 – Fab 4 Taxi Ride
The multi-award winning Fab 4 Taxi Ride finishes off the ultimate visit to Liverpool for all Beatles fans. Tour the band members homes, see the Eleanor Rigby tombstone, visit Strawberry Fields and take in the Penny Lane experience all in your very own black cab. There’s nothing like a Liverpool cabbie. Book your personalised tour here. 29 – Drinks at Oh Me Oh My
Bar views don’t get much higher or spectacular than this. For an unrivalled view of the magnificent Three Graces, it has to be drinks at Oh Me Oh My. Based on The Strand, its rooftop bar, Goodness Gracious is open from March to October and is the perfect city oasis to relax and unwind after an amazing day sight seeing. Look at that view! More here. 30 – Bongo’s Bingo at Camp & Furnace
Liverpool is famous for its nightlife and you’ll find the like of Mathew St, Concert Square and the Baltic, busy on any night of the week. If you’re only here for a short time though we recommend one very particular club event that you wont forget. A night at Bongo’s Bingo at Camp & Furnace has to be seen, covered in Coco Pops and ridden home on a giant unicorn – to be believed. Bingo, pop and club anthems, dance offs, cash prizes, karaoke, special guests, up on the tables madness and we can’t get enough. Latest dates here. If you were visiting the city for a day, what attraction or event would be on your must-do list? Drop us a line on Twitter , Facebook or Instagram with your suggestions and we’ll share the best on our socials.

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Câpres – Capers, the Flavor Bombs. Capers in French Cuisine.

from
Behind the French menu by Bryan G. Newman
behindthefrenchmenu@gmail.com A jar of capers Photograph courtesy of timlewisnm www.flickr.com/photos/gozalewis/3292119124/
Capers come as a flavor package and are mostly seen as pea-sized darkish green globes that are part of sauces and or salads. In French cuisine, it’s their salty, slightly sour, lemon tang marks for them to be used with cream and butter sauces where their flavor, often with added lemon juice cuts down richness. It’s their tart flavor that enhances the taste of mayonnaise, salads and cold sauces, such as and tartar sauce or a tapenade. (A tapenade is an anchoïade with added capers, and the word tapena means caper in Provençal).
Steak tartare , fried capers, quail egg yolk. N.B. You cannot make a real S teak Tatar without capers . Photograph courtesy of Trip Advisor. The capers are an important part of Mediterranean cuisine, and that’s where they probably originated though some in Southeast Asia may disagree. Capers were already part of Greek and Roman cooking and would have been introduced to France by the Greeks when they occupied southern France in the sixth century BCE. Dishes with capers are found in all parts of French cuisine but is most prominent in Provencal and other southern French cuisines. The caper is not a fruit they are a bud, which left alone become the attractive white and mauve flowers of the caper bush. When these buds are picked from the bush they are pickled in vinegar or salt brine; they are rarely dried before pickling as that process loses some of the taste and much of the scent.
The caper flower The caper flower, like the poppy flower wilts within a few hours. Photograph courtesy of Luc Coekaerts www.flickr.com/photos/luc_coekaerts/26583674552/ In French cuisine capers are graded according to size and the caper size relates to taste. The smallest caper usually seen is less than 7mm across and called nonpareil. Nonpareil means unequaled and they are the most expensive. The smaller a caper is, the more delicate its flavor and aroma. The next step up is the surfines, and that means superior quality, then come capucine and onwards and upwards for the largest sizes that are rarely seen in restaurants. The size of the caper is seldom mentioned on a menu listing but when it is it will be the nonpareil. Apart from their taste and texture chefs prefer the smallest because their flavor is more easily controlled.
The caper bush also has berries, and caper berries are different from capers. Caper berries are larger and usually eaten like olives. There is more on caper berries at the end of this post.
Capers on French Menus
Aile de Raie Façon Grenobloise, Pommes Vapeur – Skate wing prepared in a Sauce Grenobloise and served with steamed potatoes. Sauce Grenobloise is a clarified butter sauce made with lemon and capers and almost always used for fish; it originated in the city of Grenoble in South Eastern France. Grenoble is famous for many things, but in the food world it is this sauce and the Noix de Grenoble AOP, the Grenoble Walnuts AOP . Smoked salmon , cream cheese, bagel and capers, Photograph courtesy of Jeffrey Bary www.flickr.com/photos/70118259@N00/11140823483/ Carpaccio De Boeuf Viande Limousine , Mariné au Citron et à l’Huile d’Olive. Parmesan , Salade, Tomates, Câpres, Champignons – A Carpaccio of thinly sliced Label Rouge, red label, Limousine beef, marinated in lemon and olive oil served with shavings of Parmesan cheese . accompanied by a salad, with tomatoes , button mushrooms, and capers.
Lavaret, the Broad Whitefish , With parsley and capers, slow roasted tomatoes with fennel seeds. Photograph courtesy of Blue moon in her eyes www.flickr.com/photos/bluumwezi/4768822184/ Dos de Cabillaud Lardé à la Tapenade Maison – A thick cut of fresh cod wrapped in bacon prepared with the house’s take on a tapenade. The beloved spread of Provence called Anchoïade or Anchoyade is made with anchovies, olives, garlic and olive oil ; added crushed capers brings forth the tapenade, Tapenades will be offered as a spread or like this menu listing used in cooked dishes. Tapenade’s name comes from the Provençal word for capers, tapenas. Jarret d’Agneau Braisé Au Fenouil Et Céleri, Beignet De Câpres, Pommes Dauphine – A cut across a braised a shin or shank of lamb prepared with fennel and celery , deep fried capers and served with Dauphine potatoes . The meat on a lamb shank surrounds the bone and the same cut with veal is a jarret de veau, more than similar to the Italian Osso buco.
Potage de Trumeau de Bœuf. The recipe above comes from page 19 of France’s earliest printed cookbook. Le Cuisinier Francoise by La Varenne published in 1651. A trumeau de bœuf. is an early French name for jarret de bœuf. Photograph courtesy of the Gallica the BNF, the French National Library. Mi-Cuit De Thon Rouge De La Méditerranée En Croûte De Sésame, Huile De Câpres, Mijoté De Poivrons Et Menthe Poivrée – A steak from the Northern Bluefin tuna from the Mediterranean very very lightly braised on the outside and left raw in the inside, in a covering of sesame flavored with caper oil, lightly simmered bell peppers and spearmint . The two tastes and textures of tuna prepared in this manner match each other perfectly. Every French chef will have his or her own method of preparing caper oil though none squeeze the caper; most take pickled capers add them to olive oil, usually with added garlic and after some 30 days or so a caper infused oil should be ready to use,
Mi-Cuit, l ightly braised, tuna on a bed of tapenade. Photograph courtesy of Cornerstone Cellars www.flickr.com/photos/cornerstonecellars/7160178863/
Cornichon de câpres – Caper berries Pickled caper fruits mostly called caper berries may be part of some dishes, but their flavor is more like an olive.
Caper berries Photograph courtesy of Mercedes Blanco www.flickr.com/photos/merceblanco/8363885511/ The official caper sizes: Lilliput (3-5 mm.) non-pareil (5-7 mm), surfines (7-8 mm), capucines (8-9 mm), capotes (9–11 mm), fines (11–13 mm), and grusas (14+ mm). If the caper bud is not picked, it flowers and produces a caper berry. The difference is that capers are the early flower buds, while the berries are what forms after they have bloomed and been pollinated. The largest that may be the size of an olive hang from a cherry-like stem and they are pickled with the stem. The fruits have tiny seeds inside (the size of kiwi fruit seeds), the tiny seeds are soft and pop when chewed, and so their texture is very different to capers. Caper berries have a strong smell that comes from ingredients also found in mustard and wasabi, but they less acidic and have a milder flavor than capers, which makes them edible on their own much like olives and pickles.
Caper Plant, buds, fruit, and flower. Otto Wilhelm Thome (1840-1925)
Photograph courtesy of Revolvy. Public Domain.
In France, the most highly rated capers come from Provence, but the capers bought outside France will mainly come from Morocco, Turkey, Spain. India and Southeast Asia. Southeast Asia also competes for the origin of the plant and capers are included in their cuisines. The caper bush is a thorny shrub that can grow up to two meters tall though most are less than one meter, The shrubs branches have thons at the base of each leaf and so when the capers and caper berries are picked a great deal of care, and thick gloves are needed; capers are still picked by hand as caper picking machines are still a work in progress
Capucine, Cresson d’Inde – Nasturtium, Indian cress Nasturtium fruits can be pickled and used as a substitute for capers and sold at much lower prices under the name of “nasturtium capers.”
Capers in the languages of France’s neighbors:
(Catalan – taparera ), (Dutch – kapers), (German – kaper), (Italian – cappero), (Provencal – tapeno, tapero), (Spanish – alcaparra, caparra, tápana and the caper berry is alcaparrón), (Latin – capparis and the plant is capparis spinose).
Bryan G. Newman Behind The French Menu Copyright 2010, 2019. For information on the unpublished book behind this blog contact Bryan Newman at behindthefrenchmenu@gmail.com
Searching for the meaning of words, names or phrases on French menus? Just add the word, words, or phrase that you are searching for to the words “Behind the French Menu” and search with Google. Behind the French Menu’s links include hundreds of words, names, and phrases that are seen on French menus. There are over 450 articles that include over 4,000 French dishes with English translations and explanations.
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What are the AOCs and AOPs on France’s Foods and Wine labels?

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Marico extends its food portfolio with the launch of ‘Coco Soul’ range- India’s finest Vegan Gourmet Products made with superfood coconut

Advertise with Us You are here Home » press_release » Marico extends its food portfolio with the launch of ‘Coco Soul’ range- India’s finest Vegan Gourmet Products made with superfood coconut Marico extends its food portfolio with the launch of ‘Coco Soul’ range- India’s finest Vegan Gourmet Products made with superfood coconut 11 Apr Tweet Cold Pressed Virgin Coconut Oil along with three new infused variants- Cinnamon, Chilli Oregano, Curry Coriander, specially curated by Chef Kunal Kapur Coco Soul Foods to include Coconut Sugar, Coconut Spread, Peanut Coconut Butter, Almond Coconut Butter and Coconut Chips
Marico Limited, one of India’s leading FMCG majors has launched a range of Vegan Gourmet products under the brand name ‘Coco Soul’. The range includes 100% Organic virgin coconut oil, 100% Natural virgin coconut oil and 100% Natural Infused variants of cold pressed virgin coconut oil, and Coco Soul Foods which include Coconut Spreads, Coconut Chips and 100% Organic Coconut Sugar; all made using the Superfood coconut. The organic variants marks Marico’s first foray into the organic products space.
Coco Soul Infused Cold Pressed Virgin Coconut Oil is expertly extracted with a ‘No-Heat Process’ or ‘Cold-pressing process’ which helps preserve vital nutrients, rich aroma and flavor of real coconuts. Being a rich source of medium chain triglycerides (MCT’s), the oils are easy to digest, thus providing an instant boost of energy, aiding digestion and helping weight management and supporting cognition.
Chef Kunal Kapur has expertly curated three infused variants that bring natural flavor and aroma to many cuisines. The Coco Soul Infused Cold Pressed Virgin Coconut Oil – Chilli Oregano is naturally infused with the extract of hot chilli and delectable oregano, which acts as a perfect partner to salads and pastas. The Cinnamon variant is similarly infused with the extract of cinnamon and can be used in baking or as a top-up on shakes and smoothies. Infused with the natural extract of curry leaves and coriander, the Curry Coriander variant is best used to cook Indian dishes for an earthy aroma and palatable taste.
Coco Soul Foods offer a range of products made with simple formulation and without any preservatives or artificial flavors. This includes 100% Organic low Glycemic Index (GI) Coconut Sugar, Coconut Spreads made of 100% natural ingredients without added sugar, high-protein Peanut Coconut Butter and Almond Coconut Butter made in an unsweetened form with 100% natural ingredients and high-fibre Coco Soul Coconut Chips made by only roasting without any frying.
The foods offer a range of flavors or variants to choose from. Coconut Spreads offer Original, Sea Salt and Cacao flavours while Peanut Coconut and Almond Coconut Butters offer crunchy and creamy variants. These can be enjoyed with breads, paranthas, crackers or smoothies. The Coco Soul Coconut chips are made using 100% natural coconuts sourced from Thailand and are offered in four flavours- Thai Chilli Lime, Caramel, Original and Chocolate. These can be consumed directly as a snack as well as sprinkled on meals.
Speaking on the new launch, Sanjay Mishra, Chief Operating Officer (COO), India Sales & Bangladesh Business, Marico Ltd. said, “With Coco Soul, we have leveraged our heritage and experience with coconut as an ingredient to craft these truly inspiring products. We see an undercurrent of heavy demand for natural products that offer a focus on health. Coco Soul harnesses the benefits inherent in a coconut and brings it to a range of products that aid wellbeing in more ways than one. Given our expertise in the health and wellness domain, we believe coconut as a superfood offers numerous health benefits and is a smart choice of vegan gourmet products for our consumers.”
The Coco Soul Virgin Coconut Oil range is available in 250ml, 500ml, 1 litre bottles along with a 500ml jar. The range starts at Rs.230 and goes up to Rs.749. The range of infused oils is available in a bottle of 250ml and is priced at Rs. 349. Coco Soul Coconut Sugar will be available in the packaging of a 200g Carton priced at Rs. 249 and a 200g Jar priced at Rs. 399. Coco Soul Coconut Spreads are available in 265g Jars priced at Rs. 349, Coco Soul Coconut Chips will be introduced in 4 variants (Swiss Chocolate, Thai Chilli Lime, Caramel and Classic Salted) in 33g pouches at a price of Rs. 99 and the Coco soul Peanut Coconut butter and Coco soul Almond coconut butter spreads are priced at Rs 149 and Rs 549, for the 250g pack of the respectively
While the Coco Soul Food range will be gradually available in stores over the coming months, the Coco Soul Cold Pressed Virgin Coconut Oil and infused oils are available in modern trade stores such as D- Mart, Big Bazaar, Spencers, Godrej Nature’s Basket, Tesco and Foodhall across Mumbai, Pune, Delhi NCR, Bangalore, Hyderabad and Chennai and on major ecommerce platforms such as Amazon, Flipkart and Big Basket. Consumers can also purchase the product on www.cocosoul.in Contact Person:

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It’s time to feast on mushrooms

It’s time to feast on mushrooms April 12, 2019 | 5:28 PM by Oneza Tabish
Known for their unique and distinct flavours, mushrooms are considered as nature’s hidden treasure. This week let’s feast on mushrooms, from a simple bowl of soup and risotto to an easy and healthy Indian recipe. EASY MUSHROOM SOUP Comfort food in a bowl, mushroom soup is ideal as a light meal.Ingredients • 2 tbsp onions ( finely chopped)• 2 tsp all purpose flour• 1 1/2 cups milk• Salt and pepper to tastePreparation• Combine milk with 2 cups of water in a sauce pan and bring to a boil. Keep aside.• Melt butter in a another pan, add onions and sauté on a medium flame for 2 minutes.• Add mushrooms and sauté for few minutes. Add the flour. Mix well on low heat for about a minute.• Add the milk-water mixture gradually and continue to cook on low flame, till no lumps remain, while stirring continuously.• Season with salt and pepper and bring to a roaring boil. Switch off the flame.• Serve hot garnished with fresh parsley. STUFFED MUSHROOMS These cheesy delights make the best appetisers giving the humble mushroom a delectable makeover.Ingredients• 1/2 cup mozarella cheese (grated)• 1/4 cup finely chopped spring onion greens• 1 tsp garlic salt Preparation • Mix the stuffing ingredients till well combined and keep aside.• Remove the stems of the mushrooms so as to form a cavity in the mushroom caps.• Stuff each mushroom with a portion of the stuffing mix.• Arrange the stuffed mushrooms on a greased baking tray and bake in a pre-heated oven at 180°c for 10 minutes.• Serve hot. MUSHROOM RISOTTO A creamy Italian rice dish with Arborio rice and mushrooms makes a delicious, hassle free one-pot dish. Ingredients • 1 cup mushrooms( finely chopped)• 1 small onion, finely chopped• 2 cloves of garlic- minced• 1 tablespoon unsalted butter Preparation • Bring stock to a simmer in a saucepan over medium heat.• Melt butter and heat oil in a large pot. Add onion and saute till pink. Add garlic and saute till the rawness goes.Now add rice; stir to coat all the grains for a few seconds.• Add 1/2 cup of broth, stir, till all of it is absorbed.• Gradually add 1/2 cup of broth, and stir again. Cook until the broth is absorbed.• Repeat until about just 1/2 cup of broth remains.• The rice would take about 20 minutes to cook. Turn off heat.• Add salt as per taste, remaining broth, and cheese. Stir gently for 2 minutes.• Serve hot. MUSHROOM CHETTINAD CURRY Mushrooms cooked in coconut gravy with aromactic magic of curry leaves and spices is a new addition to the legendary Chettinad cuisine of India.Ingredients

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Top 6 dog-friendly patios for happy hour in Phoenix | Featured Articles | azfamily.com

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PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) — Temperatures are starting to rise, but it’s still nice enough outside to enjoy a tasty, cold beverage. And what’s better than relaxing outside on one of many outdoor patios in Phoenix with man’s best friend? Here are some of best dog-friendly patios in the Phoenix area.
4921 E. Ray Road #103, Phoenix, AZ
Uncle Bears Brewery
Not only does Uncle Bears Brewery have a dog-friendly patio, it’s a “dog-themed” brew pub located in Ahwatukee. Enjoy one of the pub’s many craft beers on the climate-controlled patio. Uncle Bears Brewery also offers standard brew pub food items, as well as many happy hour specials. Uncle Bears Brewery has teamed up with the Arizona Humane Society with its Pints for Paws program. The restaurant gets its name from the owner’s Labrador mix name, “Bear”.
810 N. Second Street, Phoenix, AZ
Angel’s Trumpet Ale House
Located in downtown Phoenix, Angel’s Trumpet Ale House offers over 30 draft beers and creative pub cuisine. Beer lovers will love the Direct Draw system, where there is no more than 6 feet of line between the keg and your glass. The star attraction for dog owners is the spacious patio that’s connected to the open-air main room. One of the most popular menu items? Homemade pop tarts.
2201 E. Camelback Road, Ste 106, Phoenix, AZ
The Gladly iamchanelle
The Gladly is the follow-up restaurant to the popular Citizen Public House and serves their signature The Original Chopped Salad , which has its own Facebook page. Situated in the Camelback Corridor, the Gladly is a whiskey connoisseur’s dream, with over 250 whiskeys. Happy hour is from 11 a.m. until 6 p.m. for drinks and from 3 p.m. until 6 p.m. for food. Servers will bring water bowls so your pooch won’t get thirsty.
7330 N. Dreamy Draw Drive, Phoenix, AZ
Aunt Chilada’s
Have a craving for some Mexican food and a cold margarita, but want to bring man’s best friend with you? Look no further than Aunt Chilada’s. Located in the Pointe Hilton Squaw Peak Resort, this restaurant offers a variety of food and drinks on a misted patio. “Happy Day” drink specials run Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. until 6:30 p.m. Aunt Chilada’s also offers a gluten-free menu.
2337 N. 7 th Street, Phoenix, AZ
The Main Ingredient Ale House & Cafe
The Main Ingredient Ale House & Café focuses on locally sourced ingredients, serving sandwiches, homemade stew and mac and cheese. The Main Ingredient Ale House & Café is a true neighborhood spot, located in renovated house turned into a restaurant. Enjoy a cold craft beer or cocktail on the dog-friendly patio that offers great views of the gorgeous Arizona sunsets.
4900 E. Indian School Road, Phoenix AZ
O.H.S.O.
The Arcadia location has been serving home brewed craft beer since 2011. The dog-friendly patio is shaded and fan-cooled. It even has a dog water fountain! Human custumers can enjoy any one of the O.H.S.O. brewed beers or try one of the guest brews. Servers provide your pooch with water and a free dog biscuit.

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In Bengaluru, beer is the new coffee

It’s Sunday evening at the Byg Brewski Brewing Company on Hennur Road in north-east Bengaluru. Till recently a long stretch of road meandering through farmlands and acting as an alternate route to the airport, it has seen hectic construction over the past five years. As you head towards Byg Brewski, you see signs of this everywhere: half-finished buildings, new fast food and takeaway joints, and even, surprisingly, a Fabindia showroom.
Entering the microbrewery for the first time, even seasoned travellers and pubbers are likely to be a bit gobsmacked: It is a massive, largely open-air space with a fort-like feel, the effect enhanced by burning torches fixed from sconces along the walls and a large water body at the centre of the courtyard. At 65,000 sq. ft, it is among the largest brewpubs in Asia.
The open kitchen is spread over 5,000 sq. ft, with over 70 kitchen staff. It employs 90 servers in shifts, along with around 40 bar attendants. Four bars located at various corners of the property serve seven varieties of craft beer on tap, brewed in-house and piped to the bars via 3-4km of piping. The microbrewery churns out around 20,000 litres of beer every month. It also has a thriving cocktail scene run by award-winning mixologist Rohan Matmary, whose pride and joy is the ice vault at Byg Brewski—it churns out, on average, 600 kg of ice every day. The property is almost completely zero-plastic, with biodegradable takeaway and home-delivery containers, no plastic garbage bags, and soda fountains and glass bottles instead of plastic bottles.
Byg Brewski beer I am shown around the property by Pravesh Pandey, partner-owner at the Byg Brewski Brewing Company, which runs this mega pub along with a slightly smaller one on Sarjapur Road, as well as a chain of homey, old-fashioned bars called Bob’s Bar. Things fall into place when Pandey says he has a cruise ship background, having worked with P&O Cruises. Byg Brewski is built on a similar scale, and it is built to impress.
“Our whole business model is based on the extra-large concept. If you look around us, everything is getting smaller: homes, restaurants, offices. For most people, big is 10,000 sq. ft. We want people coming in here to feel transported, to feel like they are at a resort, to go away with memories,” says Pandey.
He affirms that brewpubs (pubs with microbreweries on their premises which make craft beer in-house) are mushrooming in Bengaluru and everyone seems to want in on the business. Apart from the fact that there is a ready customer base that has been primed on craft beer, making your own beer is cheaper, in the long term, than buying spirits. While you do spend a fair amount on the setup, equipment and licences, manufacturing your own alcohol at scale is profitable, says Pandey.
The Byg Brewski Brewing Company in Hennur, north Bengaluru. Photo: Jithendra M/ Mint Brewers are betting that the demand for craft beer is only going to grow, as it has in hipsterish American states like Oregon and California. “Per capita consumption of beer in India is about 5 litres per year. In Asian countries, this is about 20 litres, and is even higher in markets like the US,” says Pandey. While most of the beer consumption in India is still of the bottled variety, especially “strong beer” in rural and semi-urban areas, once people get a taste of good craft beer, it is difficult to go back to drinking “horse piss”, as one microbrewery owner puts it.
Thejaswi Udupa, quizzer, columnist and director of product at a real-estate listing site (also a bit of a beer nerd), welcomes the “obvious explosion” of microbreweries—from a dozen a couple of years ago to around 55 today (with a confirmed six-eight in various stages of development). In his view, the proliferation in numbers has not impacted quality. “On the contrary, it has improved and the variety is more diverse,” he says. “A personal heuristic I use is how many of them are brave enough to put one or two proper IPAs (India Pale Ales) on the menu. For a long time, only a couple made competent IPAs, but in the last year, some of the newer ones have been ‘hopping’ their beers up,” he says, referring to the amount of hops added to the brew, which gives it a more full-bodied and flavourful, albeit stronger and more bitter, taste.
The availability of beers with higher IBUs—international bittering units, the measure of the concentration of hop compounds in beer—is used worldwide as a sign of a market with maturing tastes. In the past few months, Udupa, who calls the lighter Hefeweizen (wheat beer) “the paneer of the beer world”, has been impressed by the DIPAs (Double IPAs) he tried at two new brewpubs, Biergarten and The Bier Library, both of which have opened within the last six months.
What’s brewing, Bengaluru?
A couple of months ago, a list started doing the rounds of Bengaluru WhatsApp and Facebook groups that obsessively discuss food, drinks and the F&B industry in India. It was a list of 52 microbreweries/brewpubs currently operational in Bengaluru. The figure came as a surprise to many, even those who go out often and are usually well-informed about new pubs and restaurants, the go-to places, what’s shutting down and what’s coming up in a city where the contours of commerce are as dynamic as the weather. Even though most of them had noticed the proliferation of brewpubs, with new clusters coming up practically in every neighbourhood, they didn’t have the exact number, nor did they anticipate it to be quite this high.
That number is around 55 now (independently verified by Lounge ). Another 70 or so are “tap-rooms” that serve beer on tap from craft beer made locally (but not on the premises). Even as I was researching this article, a new brewpub, Aurum Brew Works, opened up in my neighbourhood of Sarjapur Road, a tech hub with special economic zones, corporate campuses (including Wipro’s headquarters) and vast residential complexes. Many of the new brewpubs seek locations in the peripheral areas of the city where large tracts of land are available for establishments that by rule have to be large (it is a government-mandated rule that microbreweries have to be located within premises spanning a minimum of 10,000 sq. ft).
So many pubs and microbreweries have opened in the past couple of years within a 5 km radius of Sarjapur Road that the area’s new name is “Brewpur”, says Gaurav Sikka, partner and managing director at Arbor Brewing Company, with a laugh.
We are sitting in Arbor’s spacious balcony area. It is late afternoon on a Wednesday, and the place is already starting to fill up. Sikka is drinking a glass of Beteljuice Pale Ale, a new beer created in-house as a collaboration between the pub’s brew team headed by master brewer Hollis Coates and home brewer Karthik Singh. “We first brewed this in March 2016 and we’ve brewed this every year since,” Sikka says. The beer begins with an aroma of citrus and lemongrass, and then you get hit by that lingering, unmistakably Indian paan taste that comes from the addition of fresh betel leaves to the beer when it’s almost ready. It is unlike any beer you have had before—but once you taste it, you may suddenly realize that your understanding of what beer is has been pretty limited.
Gaurav Sikka (left) and master brewer Hollis Coates of the Arbor Brewing Company “There has been an explosion (of brewpubs). For a long time, there were just four-five of us (brewpub owners) and it was a close-knit group. While most of us are still connected via formal and informal groups, it’s getting hard to keep track of the new ones. And people are talking about this boom wherever I go. There’s a tinge of envy in other markets, and you get instant street cred if you run a successful craft brewery in Bengaluru,” says Sikka. “It has become a very sophisticated drinking market.”
What makes craft beer in Bengaluru unique and the scene distinctive from other craft beer centres in the country—primarily Pune and Gurugram—is not just the number of brewpubs. In sheer numbers, Gurugram isn’t too far behind, with approximately 45. But quality, innovation and a passion for craft brewing, along with a set of risk-taking, career-jumping individuals who take the craft seriously, set the Bengaluru scene apart.
That a pub scene is flourishing in Bengaluru at all is remarkable. The city’s F&B industry’s tussles with the excise department are legendary, and include the difficulty in procuring licences (especially the CL-9 bar and restaurant licence that the government stopped issuing in 1992; it needs to be bought off a previous holder), jumping through hoops to comply with ever-changing and arbitrarily enforced rules, and corruption and bribery at a Narcos level.
But Bengaluru’s enthusiasm for pubbing as a well-established cultural and social activity pushes things along. Everyone meets over a beer—it is the new coffee. Work meetings are held over beer. Older millennials organize and participate in beer tastings and beer-and-food pairings. Co-working spaces like WeWork offer beer on tap. And most craft-beer lovers drink it not to get drunk, but for the taste and a mild high, as well as the social aspect of hanging out over a beer.
The “going out for a drink” scene in the city is now active not just on weekends, but stretches from Wednesday-Sunday, with only 40% fewer customers in the early days of the week. Drinking patterns are also different from other metros—here, people take a longer time over their drinks. On a weekday, average peak business hours tend to be 7-8 hours, says Sibi Venkataraju, partner and founder at Toit, whereas in other cities it’s 3-4 hours. “In the other cities, beer is not the preferred beverage. People want to get drunk faster and head home. The scene in Bengaluru is more casual and laid-back, with people spending more time over their drinks, which is ideal for beer consumption,” says Venkataraju.
In 2010, the Karnataka excise department started to issue microbrewery licences after intense lobbying by players such as Arvind and Meenakshi Raju, founders of Bengaluru’s first brewpub, Biere Club, Venkataraju and Sikka. Along with Windmills Craftworks in Whitefield, which opened in 2012, they were the first batch of craft-beer makers in the city—and they started something special.
Their brews were world class and created an instant love for craft beer, says John John Eapen, aka “JJ the Keg”, a beer evangelist who has been helping newer brewpubs in the city set up their equipment and develop their beers. Eapen, an aeronautical engineering dropout who has done a little bit of everything in his professional life—from training as a pilot in Canada and being a BPO trainer to sales and marketing—runs a popular blog called Tales of Froth, where he assiduously tracks the beer, especially craft beer, business in India, and a Facebook group, Friends of Froth.
Business is good, says Eapen, and he is getting more offers to consult with upcoming breweries than he can handle. His calculations suggest that a brewery selling 15,000-20,000 litres of craft beer in a month can earn revenue of ₹ 1.25 crore- ₹ 2.5 crore per month. Most brewpub owners assume average consumption to be 1 litre per person per sitting in Karnataka, and 0.85 litres per person elsewhere.
The evening we meet, Eapen has just finished taking a team from an Australian craft-beer company on a scouting trip to Bengaluru to a few brewpubs around the city. “What is unique to Bangalore is that you don’t have to step out of your neighbourhood in search of craft beer,” he says. “Every neighbourhood, at least those that have a fair number of young people, has a cluster of microbreweries.”
Interestingly, well-established brewpubs like Toit and Arbor have chosen not to open new outlets in the city, instead moving to bottling and canning, along with expansion to other cities. While Toit already has Mumbai and Pune outposts, Windmills is coming up with one soon in Mumbai. All three companies are exploring the packaged craft-beer market, with Arbor being the first off the blocks with its Goa plant (started in August), which is already churning out three varieties sold exclusively in the state. The Karnataka factory will be up within the next couple of months, says Sikka, while Toit’s Venkataraju says the brand’s plant in Bengaluru will be up and running in the “next 12-18 months”. Windmills Craftworks is also setting up a plant in Goa.
But first, a visit to Karnataka’s first production craft brewery, which is setting the trend of supplying locally brewed craft beer to pubs and restaurants.
The craft of beer-making
Vidya Kubher runs up the steep metal steps nimbly to check on the current batch brewing in the Geist beer factory in its initial stages of preparation—the “hot” stage. The petite Kubher looks dwarfed by the massive metal vats that surround her, but she is in her element as she opens the vats, takes a sniff here, adjusts a dial there, and oversees the staff working at this factory redolent of the unique, warm, sweet, moist smell of malting barley.
“I like working in a factory kind of environment,” says Kubher, who is among a handful of female brewmasters in the country. She studied brewing techniques in Chicago and Munich after a career in mutual fund asset management. She was drinking Geist beer before she joined the company as its chief brewer, she says—at a time when Geist was still manufacturing its beer in Belgium and selling it in India. Around 2010, mounting loses forced it to temporarily halt operations.
Co-founder and CEO Narayan Manepally, whose obsession with craft beer started when he was working with Intel in Portland, Oregon (the undisputed mecca of craft beer in the world), started sketching out a plan for a beer factory that would keg freshly brewed varieties of craft beer. “When Brewsky in JP Nagar and the first Byg Brewski came up on Sarjapur Road, the first three months—till we got the microbrewery licence—were below break-even. Then, the licence came in and we started brewing, and, in a couple of months, we had tripled revenue. That’s when we knew that we were on to something,” says Narayan, who has been an investor in Brewsky in JP Nagar and the Byg Brewski Brewing company.
Narayan Manepally (left), Vidya Kubher and Mohan Alapatt at the Geist beer factory. Photo: Saina Jayapal Narayan and chief operating officer Mohan Alapatt found the perfect place for Geist’s factory on the outskirts of the city at Nimbekaipura (“village of lemons” in Kannada)—like many other areas of fast-mutating Bengaluru, a strange jumble of multi-storeyed office buildings and residential complexes, lakes and farmlands. It was an abandoned plywood factory with a grand old banyan tree in the middle of the property that immediately took hold of their imagination.
Today, Geist supplies beer to around 70 Bengaluru pubs and restaurants that want to serve fresh craft beer to customers without the hassles of setting up their own microbreweries. With the 10,000 sq. ft law, it’s not even possible for many of them to do so. Meanwhile, Geist is also setting up a beer garden on its premises, and once a month, Kubher conducts a “brew tour” of the factory, familiarizing people with the brewing process.
There is growing interest in learning more about this process, in keeping with the artisanal food and beverage movement across the world. While the essential beer-making process is the same for both industrial and craft beers, the latter is produced in much smaller batches, ensuring quality control and the ability to tweak the process to create exciting variants, like adding seasonal ingredients (most of the breweries do seasonal beers, such as Toit’s famous jackfruit beer or Arbor’s Beteljuice). The other essential difference is temperature and sunlight control. Bottled beer is often transported and stored at suboptimal temperatures—at times, retail outlets charge a “cooling fee” from manufacturers to store their beers correctly. Keeping the beer cold and dark (the reason most bottles are dark in colour) prevents oxidation and a process called “skunking”, where light interacts with the hops in beer to produce a distinctly “off” smell.
Some of the Bengaluru breweries also stand out for their sustainable practices. At Geist, the RO plant produces a significant amount of run-off water, which is used for cleaning and watering plants. Rainwater is harvested and raw materials are recycled and reutilized as much as possible. When yeast produced in the brewery can no longer be reused for beer production, it is denatured and neutralized and given to nearby poultry farmers to mix with their poultry feed as a supplement—this helps in the hardening of egg shells. All the spent grain (barley and wheat malt) is sent to a local pig and dairy farm to be used as animal feed, while even the wooden containers in which they get their imported hops from Germany are broken down to make furniture for the factory.
From hobbyists to pro brewers
In any city that has discovered a passion for craft beer, there’s a simultaneous rise in interest in home-brewing. Since beer does not require distillation like spirits, the process is seen as relatively simple, and the rise of brewpubs assures an ecosystem where equipment and raw materials are easier to come by. Bangalore Brew Crew, a group of beer enthusiasts and hobbyists who found each other through their passion for home-brewing, runs a Facebook page for home-brewers that has over 500 members. While not all of them are brewing actively at home, all accounts indicate there are 150-200 active home-brewers in Bengaluru.
Karthik Singh and Manish M.K. are two well-known members of the group who have made the jump from brewing for pleasure to taking it up professionally. While Singh has worked with Brewsky, JP Nagar, and is currently a brewmaster at Yellow Submarine, Manish is part of the brewing team at Windmills.
Most home-brewers however, prefer to remain anonymous owing to legal grey areas. India’s notoriously complicated and often contradictory alcohol laws have created an atmosphere of ambiguity where, frankly, no one is sure whether making beer for personal consumption is legal or not, and backyard brewers would rather err on the side of caution.
Ankur Agarwal, an India Institute of Technology, Kanpur graduate who made his first batch of beer at home in 1999 and is passionate about fermentation, runs Arishtam, a Bengaluru-based start-up that sells home-brewing equipment, malts, hops and yeast and conducts brewing workshops once a month. According to him and his partner, a lawyer, home-brewing for personal consumption is not illegal, and he says he has filed RTIs with the state excise department to figure out the intricacies of the law. “I am yet to encounter any law that explicitly prohibits individuals from home-brewing for personal consumption in limited batch size,” says Agarwal.
There are three things that amateur brewers should keep in mind, he says: You cannot distil spirits/alcohol without holding a licence; you cannot engage in any kind of sale of your home brew liquor, including hosting paid events where home-brew is served or bartering alcohol for goods and services; and you cannot cross state boundaries with alcohol.
Karnataka excise department officials, however, say brewing any alcohol without a licence is illegal, and individuals doing so can be booked under laws pertaining to the illicit manufacture, sale and possession of alcohol.
“We are operating under a ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ policy. Most of us know that the excise department can make trouble for us, even though the legalities are complicated and might be overturned in a court of law as there are no laws explicitly banning brewing of beer for personal use—only distillation is explicitly banned. But who wants to get into a legal mess? The excise guys will find something or the other to book a case against you,” says home-brewer NS, who doesn’t want to be identified. “Someday a case will go to court, and finally there might be some clarity, but till then we would prefer to fly under the radar and get our brew on,” he adds. Some of the home-brewers I spoke to for this story even said “please don’t mention the legal aspect at all or it will alert ‘them’”.
In fact, these kinds of “don’t ask, don’t tell” policies are endemic to the F&B business in Bengaluru/Karnataka. Take, for instance, the official and unofficial costs of starting a microbrewery. While the “on-paper” cost of licences for setting up a microbrewery/brewpub is around ₹ 8.5 lakh ( ₹ 6 lakh for a CL-9 bar and restaurant licence, ₹ 2.5 lakh for a microbrewery licence), the actual cost can go up to ₹ 3.5 crore. Earlier this year, The Economic Times published a comprehensive report on how corruption is affecting the F&B industry here, describing Bengaluru as “the most challenging city in India for the restaurant industry”.
You need almost 40 approvals, no-objection certificates and licences to open a restaurant in the city—each one of which comes at a price steeper than what it costs on paper, say industry insiders. Plus, “peaceful running” costs have to be paid regularly. “Every few months, excise department cops find a reason to dig up something in the rulebook about the volume of music or smoking on the premises or whether you can serve alcohol on the rooftop or something like that. There’s panic among all pub and bar owners, hefty sums of money exchange hands, and then they are told to lie low for a while. After a month or so, the cycle repeats itself,” a pub owner who has been in Bengaluru for over 10 years told me on condition of anonymity. Another said a group of restaurant and bar owners from Indiranagar, a hot spot, were planning to pool in resources and create a “monthly kitty” to ensure “peaceful operations”.
As for the sudden microbrewery boom, Venkataraju believes that at least some of the growth can be put down to what he calls “irrational spending”. “It is a strange feature of the hospitality business that unlike, say, manufacturing or IT, perception of success plays a huge role in the amount of money people are willing to spend on setting up new businesses. It’s quite arbitrary and not really backed by hard numbers—perhaps they think it’s cool, or they are excited by the ‘buzz’ factor,” says Venkataraju. At the same time, Bengaluru, like in any thriving urban micro-economy, has seen the inflow of real-estate money, with folks who have made significant piles looking to invest in something trendier or willing to bank-roll a younger generation.
Did the brewpub kill fine-dine?
While some of the brewpubs do make an attempt to create a diverse and exciting food menu, featuring local and regional favourites like pandi curry, chicken ghee roast, and Kerala beef fry, along with dim sums, baos and even sushi, most restrict themselves to bar snacks and go with the ever-popular trio of fries-nachos-pizza.
With the microbrewery boom, the number of new risk-taking, food and specific cuisine-led places has definitely fallen in Bengaluru. This is also a factor of the younger demographic of the city’s diners, who are less likely to spend serious time and money on gourmet meals.
Though he doesn’t agree that “the microbrewery craze” has specifically hit the fine-dining scene in the city, Manu Chandra, chef-partner at the Olive Group, believes it has “marked a tectonic change in the going-out culture overall in Bangalore”. “The requirement of a minimum of 10,000 sq. ft means that these places are always large, and such large places cannot be microfocused on singular cuisine offerings alone. Some might try to make them cuisine-focused, but we will have to see how that pans out,” says Chandra cautiously, though he agrees brewpubs have “changed both the taste and the perception of going out for a generation of customers”.
Riyaaz Amlani, CEO of Mumbai-based Impresario Entertainment & Hospitality Pvt. Ltd, believes the microbrewery boom “is a craze at the moment, but, like all crazes, it will reach its peak”. “Yes, risk-taking is not very prominent right now, but people will reach a certain amount of fatigue and once their tastes have matured, will seek out exciting food experiences,” he says.
“We are at a crossroads now. The government has increased the duties on craft beer, there are so many compliance issues, and getting the right talent is becoming more difficult. But given a little bit of push from the government, we will see an even bigger boom in Bengaluru,” says Arbor’s Sikka, who believes that in a couple of years, the number of brewpubs here will touch 100.
San Diego, a city with a population of around 1.4 million, has over 200 craft breweries, tasting rooms and brewpubs—Bengaluru’s population is over 12 million, leaving a lot of room for growth.
For now, it’s summer, and the taps are churning out a lot of liquid gold. Keep calm and get your brew on.

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Eating Places – Eat & Drink

Dim sum treats
Zuan Yuan Chinese Restaurant at One World Hotel, Petaling Jaya, will be showcasing a dim sum menu that is all about freshness, premium ingredients and arresting flavours. Three different set menus are available at RM88 nett, RM108 nett and RM128 nett. The seven-course menu ranges from pan- and deep-fried items to steamed dishes, noodles and desserts. Highlights include Steamed Siew Mai with Black Truffle, Braised Seafood Soup with Shredded Lobster, Deep-Fried Spring Onion Dumpling with Chicken Floss, Oven-Baked Cheese Tart with Salmon and Steamed Egg Custard Bun with Salted Egg Yolk. The dim sum is served on weekdays from noon to 2.30pm, and on weekdays and public holidays from 10am to 2.30pm. For reservations, call 03-7681 1159.
Dining deal
DoubleTree by Hilton Kuala Lumpur will be presenting guests a special ‘RM1.90 nett’ deal to dine at their restaurants, only on the 19th of every month. This deal will take place at three of the hotel’s participating restaurants: Makan Kitchen, Tosca and Cellar Door. Makan Kitchen’s dinner offers a RM1.90 nett promotion for the second person, for every full paying guest (RM135 nett per person). Over at Tosca, diners will be able to enjoy a dessert at only RM1.90 nett for every order of a main course. Meanwhile, Cellar Door is offering a RM1.90 nett deal for the second glass, for every order of a glass of house-pouring wine at RM48 nett. For reservations, call 03-2172 7272.
CHINESE
SOUTH SEA SEAFOOD RESTAURANT, 229, Jalan Dua A, Kampung Baru Subang, Selangor. (Tel: 03-7846 1401, 7846 5813). Business hours: 11.30am-11pm, daily. The restaurant boasts exotic seafood like geoduck, Australian lobster, estuary tiger garoupa, Sri Lankan crab, Japanese escargot, fresh abalone, mantis prawn and Empurau fish.
DRAGON-i RESTAURANT, GF.43, Ground Floor, Sunway Pyramid, Bandar Sunway. (Tel: 03-7492 3688 – Sunway Pyramid, 03-7725 8822 – 1 Utama, 03-2282 0155 – Mid Valley Megamall, 03-9130 0688 – Cheras Leisure Mall/ www.dragon-i.com.my). Business hours: 11am-10pm (Mon-Fri), 10.30am-10pm (Sat & Sun). Non-halal. Customers can feast on a variety of Chinese dishes here. On the menu are some traditional favourites and dim sum delights.
INDIAN
MEAT THE PORKERS, Block D1, Floor G3, Publika, Jalan Dutamas 1, Kuala Lumpur. (Tel: 03-6211 4040, 019-987 1945) Business hours: Noon-3pm, 6pm-10pm (Wed-Mon). Closed on Tuesdays. Non-halal. Dubbed the Asian porky Indian restaurant, it serves pork in classic Indian favourites. Specialities include Siew Yoke Briyani, Pork Sheekh Kebab, Tandoori Pork Ribs, Bacon Cheese Naan with Pork Varuval and Butter Pork, Pork 65 Masala and Pork Vindaloo.
VIETNAMESE
PHO STREET, LG 02-03, Paradigm Mall, Jalan SS7/26A, Kelana Jaya, Petaling Jaya. (Tel: 03-7887 6136). Business hours: 10am-10pm (Sun-Thurs); 10am-10.30pm (Fri, Sat and eve of public holidays). Non-halal. The flagship dish is the pho beef combination – rice noodles swimming in a rich stock alongside beef balls, tendon, tripe as well as meat slices and shank portions. There is also a chicken combination or single ingredient version. Banh mi sandwiches, fresh summer rolls and mango salad are available.
JAPANESE
KIMI-YA, G-2, Avantas Residences, 162, Jalan Kelang Lama, Taman Shanghai, Kuala Lumpur. (Tel: 03-7986 0732). Business hours: Noon-3pm, 6pm-10.30pm (Mon-Thurs), 11.30am-3pm, 6pm-11pm (Fri-Sun). Pork-free. The philosophy of the place is semi-fine dining, serving quality cuisine that emphasises freshness. Sushi options include the signature Ume Sashimi Moriawase and 14-piece Sushi Moriawase sets. Also available is the kaiseki meal, featuring seasonal ingredients from Japan.
WASHOKU KINRARA, 11, Jalan BK5A/ 3A, Bandar Kinrara, Puchong, Selangor. (Tel: 03-8074 7848). Business hours: Noon-10pm (Mon-Fri), 11.30am-10pm (Sat, Sun and public holidays). Pork-free. Formerly known as Sushi Sakura Kinrara, the restaurant promises affordable Japanese food in a comfortable setting. Those who love picking sushi from the conveyor belt can look forward to daily specials. Menu includes unique options, such as Washoku Sushi Platter and festive-inspired dishes.
SPANISH
SENTIDOS GASTROBAR, Feast Village, Starhill Gallery, 181 Jalan Bukit Bintang, KL. (Tel: 03-2145 3385). Business hours: 5pm to 10.30pm (Mon-Sat). Closed on Sunday. Pork-free. Offers a relaxed atmosphere with a tantalising selection of hot and cold tapas. There is an extensive wine list and a range of imported beers.
VEGETARIAN
SIMPLE LIFE HEALTHY VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT, LG-232A, Lower Ground Floor, The Gardens Mall, Mid Valley City, KL. (Tel : 03-2202 1328 – The Gardens, 03-2110 5201 – Lot 10, Bukit Bintang, 03-5611 8596 – Sunway Pyramid/ www.simplelife.com.my). Business hours: 10am-10pm, daily. Serves vegetarian meals that are organic, natural and nutritious. Popular dishes include Lei Cha with Brown Rice, Ginger Extract with Brown Rice Mee Sua, vegetarian nasi lemak, curry laksa and popiah.
INTERNATIONAL
MADELEINE BISTRO, D-G-3A, Block D, No 2, Jalan PJU 1A/ 7A, Oasis Square, Oasis Ara Damansara, PJ. (Tel: 03-7859 9316/ www.madeleine.com.my). Business hours: 8.30am-5.30pm (Mon-Sat). Closed on Sundays. Pork-free. Serves French cuisine with an Italian and Asian twist. Signature dishes include Canard A L’Orange, Chef’s Special Beef Cheek and Braised Lamb Shank with Gremolata. For desserts, there is the award-winning Chocolat Royale, as well as other cakes like Carrot Walnut, Chocolate Gateau, Lemon Poppyseed and Marble Cheesecake.
TAPPERS CAFE, 5-G, Block D, Palm Square, Jaya One, 72A, Jalan Universiti, PJ. (Tel: 03-7958 3198 – Jaya One, 03-2241 2963 – Bangsar South, 03-5888 6755 – Setia Alam/ www.tappers.com.my). Business hours: 8am-10pm (Mon-Fri), 10am-10pm (weekends & public holidays). Pork-free. Dishes here are affordably priced. Chicken Parmigiana, Spaghetti Carbonara with Chicken Bacon and Mushrooms, Hainanese Chicken Chop, Sweet and Sour Fish Rice and Tappers Baked Soya Chicken Rice are some of the favourites.
HUCKLEBERRY AFTER DARK, 2G & 4G, Jalan Medan Setia 2, Plaza Damansara, Damansara Heights, Kuala Lumpur. (Tel: 03-2098 7833) Business hours: 5.30pm-midnight (weekdays), and 5.30pm-1am (weekends). Closed on Mondays. Depicts an American-style diner with street food commonly found in the US, styled up to add some pizzazz to the dishes. The pizza offers topping options such as Margarita, Missed Steak, Another One Bites The Crust, Bolognese, Rocky Balboa and Italian Stallion.
WESTERN
THE SHIP JALAN SULTAN ISMAIL, 40-1 & 40-2 Jalan Sultan Ismail, KL (Tel: 03-2141 8805 – Jalan Sultan Ismail, 03-2144 3605 – Jalan Bukit Bintang, 03-7728 8020 – Damansara Utama, 03-7931 0078 – PJ Centrestage/ www.theship.com.my). Business hours: Noon-midnight (Sun-Fri), noon-1am (Sat). Pork-free. Serves escargots, Chinatown Shark’s Fin with Crabmeat and steaks in 18 different styles. Wait staff dress according to rank of sailors on a ship.
TONY ROMA’S, LL 1.43, Lower Level One, Sunway Pyramid, Jalan PJS 11/15, Bandar Sunway, PJ. (Tel: 03-7492 1188 – Sunway Pyramid, 03-7728 7833 – eCurve, 03-2143 3278 – Pavilion KL, 03-2282 8243 – The Gardens Mall/ www.tonyromas.com.my). Business hours: 11am-10.30pm, daily. Expect hefty portions and enjoy the selection of refreshing mocktails and beverages. The restaurant is known for its signature ribs and onion loaf.
ITALIAN
STOKED RESTAURANT AND BAR, 120-122, Jalan Kasah, Medan Damansara, Kuala Lumpur. (Tel: 03-2096 1645). Business hours: Noon-3pm (Thurs-Sun), 6pm-11pm (Wed-Mon). Closed on Tuesdays. Non-halal. Central to the cooking of many of Stoked’s dishes is the Bertha charcoal oven, which is fuelled by a combination of charcoal and firewood. Grilled meats take centre stage in its menu offerings with chilled prime cuts of steaks, as well as off-cuts. A selection of pork ribs are also offered.
ARIA ITALIAN DINING & WHISKY BAR, 44, Plaza Damansara, Jalan Medan Setia 2, Bukit Damansara, KL. (Tel: 03-2011 1384). Business hours: 11am-2.45pm, 6pm-11pm (Mon-Fri), 6pm-11pm (Sat). Closed on Sundays. A charming restaurant, known for its pizza and pasta. Linguine Alio Olio with Smoked Duck, Cod Fish with Asparagus and Nere Sauce, Pasta Alla Aria and Diavola Pizza are some of the house recommendations.
PIETRO, Ground Floor, Bangunan ECM Libra, 8 Jalan Damansara Endah, Damansara Heights, KL. (Tel: 03-2093 6433). Business hours: 11am-3pm, 6pm-11pm, daily. Pork-free. Pietro now caters to groups of people who want both Italian and Asian dishes. Some of the recommended dishes are Mushroom Ravioli Stuffed with Duck, Bouillabaisse Sauce Risotto topped with Spinach and Jumbo King Prawns and Pistachio Crusted Lamb Rack marinated with Rosemary and Shiraz Reduction.
To submit food listings and food-related queries, please email metrocfood@gmail.com or call 03-7967 1388 ext 1322.
Dining deal
DoubleTree by Hilton Kuala Lumpur will be presenting guests a special ‘RM1.90 nett’ deal to dine at their restaurants, only on the 19th of every month. This deal will take place at three of the hotel’s participating restaurants: Makan Kitchen, Tosca and Cellar Door. Makan Kitchen’s dinner offers a RM1.90 nett promotion for the second person, for every full paying guest (RM135 nett per person). Over at Tosca, diners will be able to enjoy a dessert at only RM1.90 nett for every order of a main course. Meanwhile, Cellar Door is offering a RM1.90 nett deal for the second glass, for every order of a glass of house-pouring wine at RM48 nett. For reservations, call 03-2172 7272.
CHINESE
SOUTH SEA SEAFOOD RESTAURANT, 229, Jalan Dua A, Kampung Baru Subang, Selangor. (Tel: 03-7846 1401, 7846 5813). Business hours: 11.30am-11pm, daily. The restaurant boasts exotic seafood like geoduck, Australian lobster, estuary tiger garoupa, Sri Lankan crab, Japanese escargot, fresh abalone, mantis prawn and Empurau fish.
DRAGON-i RESTAURANT, GF.43, Ground Floor, Sunway Pyramid, Bandar Sunway. (Tel: 03-7492 3688 – Sunway Pyramid, 03-7725 8822 – 1 Utama, 03-2282 0155 – Mid Valley Megamall, 03-9130 0688 – Cheras Leisure Mall/ www.dragon-i.com.my). Business hours: 11am-10pm (Mon-Fri), 10.30am-10pm (Sat & Sun). Non-halal. Customers can feast on a variety of Chinese dishes here. On the menu are some traditional favourites and dim sum delights.
INDIAN
MEAT THE PORKERS, Block D1, Floor G3, Publika, Jalan Dutamas 1, Kuala Lumpur. (Tel: 03-6211 4040, 019-987 1945) Business hours: Noon-3pm, 6pm-10pm (Wed-Mon). Closed on Tuesdays. Non-halal. Dubbed the Asian porky Indian restaurant, it serves pork in classic Indian favourites. Specialities include Siew Yoke Briyani, Pork Sheekh Kebab, Tandoori Pork Ribs, Bacon Cheese Naan with Pork Varuval and Butter Pork, Pork 65 Masala and Pork Vindaloo.
VIETNAMESE
PHO STREET, LG 02-03, Paradigm Mall, Jalan SS7/26A, Kelana Jaya, Petaling Jaya. (Tel: 03-7887 6136). Business hours: 10am-10pm (Sun-Thurs); 10am-10.30pm (Fri, Sat and eve of public holidays). Non-halal. The flagship dish is the pho beef combination – rice noodles swimming in a rich stock alongside beef balls, tendon, tripe as well as meat slices and shank portions. There is also a chicken combination or single ingredient version. Banh mi sandwiches, fresh summer rolls and mango salad are available.
JAPANESE
KIMI-YA, G-2, Avantas Residences, 162, Jalan Kelang Lama, Taman Shanghai, Kuala Lumpur. (Tel: 03-7986 0732). Business hours: Noon-3pm, 6pm-10.30pm (Mon-Thurs), 11.30am-3pm, 6pm-11pm (Fri-Sun). Pork-free. The philosophy of the place is semi-fine dining, serving quality cuisine that emphasises freshness. Sushi options include the signature Ume Sashimi Moriawase and 14-piece Sushi Moriawase sets. Also available is the kaiseki meal, featuring seasonal ingredients from Japan.
WASHOKU KINRARA, 11, Jalan BK5A/ 3A, Bandar Kinrara, Puchong, Selangor. (Tel: 03-8074 7848). Business hours: Noon-10pm (Mon-Fri), 11.30am-10pm (Sat, Sun and public holidays). Pork-free. Formerly known as Sushi Sakura Kinrara, the restaurant promises affordable Japanese food in a comfortable setting. Those who love picking sushi from the conveyor belt can look forward to daily specials. Menu includes unique options, such as Washoku Sushi Platter and festive-inspired dishes.
SPANISH
SENTIDOS GASTROBAR, Feast Village, Starhill Gallery, 181 Jalan Bukit Bintang, KL. (Tel: 03-2145 3385). Business hours: 5pm to 10.30pm (Mon-Sat). Closed on Sunday. Pork-free. Offers a relaxed atmosphere with a tantalising selection of hot and cold tapas. There is an extensive wine list and a range of imported beers.
VEGETARIAN
SIMPLE LIFE HEALTHY VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT, LG-232A, Lower Ground Floor, The Gardens Mall, Mid Valley City, KL. (Tel : 03-2202 1328 – The Gardens, 03-2110 5201 – Lot 10, Bukit Bintang, 03-5611 8596 – Sunway Pyramid/ www.simplelife.com.my). Business hours: 10am-10pm, daily. Serves vegetarian meals that are organic, natural and nutritious. Popular dishes include Lei Cha with Brown Rice, Ginger Extract with Brown Rice Mee Sua, vegetarian nasi lemak, curry laksa and popiah.
INTERNATIONAL
MADELEINE BISTRO, D-G-3A, Block D, No 2, Jalan PJU 1A/ 7A, Oasis Square, Oasis Ara Damansara, PJ. (Tel: 03-7859 9316/ www.madeleine.com.my). Business hours: 8.30am-5.30pm (Mon-Sat). Closed on Sundays. Pork-free. Serves French cuisine with an Italian and Asian twist. Signature dishes include Canard A L’Orange, Chef’s Special Beef Cheek and Braised Lamb Shank with Gremolata. For desserts, there is the award-winning Chocolat Royale, as well as other cakes like Carrot Walnut, Chocolate Gateau, Lemon Poppyseed and Marble Cheesecake.
TAPPERS CAFE, 5-G, Block D, Palm Square, Jaya One, 72A, Jalan Universiti, PJ. (Tel: 03-7958 3198 – Jaya One, 03-2241 2963 – Bangsar South, 03-5888 6755 – Setia Alam/ www.tappers.com.my). Business hours: 8am-10pm (Mon-Fri), 10am-10pm (weekends & public holidays). Pork-free. Dishes here are affordably priced. Chicken Parmigiana, Spaghetti Carbonara with Chicken Bacon and Mushrooms, Hainanese Chicken Chop, Sweet and Sour Fish Rice and Tappers Baked Soya Chicken Rice are some of the favourites.
HUCKLEBERRY AFTER DARK, 2G & 4G, Jalan Medan Setia 2, Plaza Damansara, Damansara Heights, Kuala Lumpur. (Tel: 03-2098 7833) Business hours: 5.30pm-midnight (weekdays), and 5.30pm-1am (weekends). Closed on Mondays. Depicts an American-style diner with street food commonly found in the US, styled up to add some pizzazz to the dishes. The pizza offers topping options such as Margarita, Missed Steak, Another One Bites The Crust, Bolognese, Rocky Balboa and Italian Stallion.
WESTERN
THE SHIP JALAN SULTAN ISMAIL, 40-1 & 40-2 Jalan Sultan Ismail, KL (Tel: 03-2141 8805 – Jalan Sultan Ismail, 03-2144 3605 – Jalan Bukit Bintang, 03-7728 8020 – Damansara Utama, 03-7931 0078 – PJ Centrestage/ www.theship.com.my). Business hours: Noon-midnight (Sun-Fri), noon-1am (Sat). Pork-free. Serves escargots, Chinatown Shark’s Fin with Crabmeat and steaks in 18 different styles. Wait staff dress according to rank of sailors on a ship.
TONY ROMA’S, LL 1.43, Lower Level One, Sunway Pyramid, Jalan PJS 11/15, Bandar Sunway, PJ. (Tel: 03-7492 1188 – Sunway Pyramid, 03-7728 7833 – eCurve, 03-2143 3278 – Pavilion KL, 03-2282 8243 – The Gardens Mall/ www.tonyromas.com.my). Business hours: 11am-10.30pm, daily. Expect hefty portions and enjoy the selection of refreshing mocktails and beverages. The restaurant is known for its signature ribs and onion loaf.
ITALIAN
STOKED RESTAURANT AND BAR, 120-122, Jalan Kasah, Medan Damansara, Kuala Lumpur. (Tel: 03-2096 1645). Business hours: Noon-3pm (Thurs-Sun), 6pm-11pm (Wed-Mon). Closed on Tuesdays. Non-halal. Central to the cooking of many of Stoked’s dishes is the Bertha charcoal oven, which is fuelled by a combination of charcoal and firewood. Grilled meats take centre stage in its menu offerings with chilled prime cuts of steaks, as well as off-cuts. A selection of pork ribs are also offered.
ARIA ITALIAN DINING & WHISKY BAR, 44, Plaza Damansara, Jalan Medan Setia 2, Bukit Damansara, KL. (Tel: 03-2011 1384). Business hours: 11am-2.45pm, 6pm-11pm (Mon-Fri), 6pm-11pm (Sat). Closed on Sundays. A charming restaurant, known for its pizza and pasta. Linguine Alio Olio with Smoked Duck, Cod Fish with Asparagus and Nere Sauce, Pasta Alla Aria and Diavola Pizza are some of the house recommendations.
PIETRO, Ground Floor, Bangunan ECM Libra, 8 Jalan Damansara Endah, Damansara Heights, KL. (Tel: 03-2093 6433). Business hours: 11am-3pm, 6pm-11pm, daily. Pork-free. Pietro now caters to groups of people who want both Italian and Asian dishes. Some of the recommended dishes are Mushroom Ravioli Stuffed with Duck, Bouillabaisse Sauce Risotto topped with Spinach and Jumbo King Prawns and Pistachio Crusted Lamb Rack marinated with Rosemary and Shiraz Reduction.
To submit food listings and food-related queries, please email metrocfood@gmail.com or call 03-7967 1388 ext 1322.

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City Centre Rotana collects two awards

Tribune News Network
Doha
In recognition of its pioneering position in Qatar’s hospitality landscape, City Centre Rotana Doha (CCRD) received two reputable awards during the 2019 Fact Awards ceremony.
The first award of the ‘Favourite International Restaurant in Doha 2019’ went to CCRD’s highly-acclaimed Teatro restaurant, while Olive Oil was dominated for the ‘Best All Day Dining Restaurant in Doha 2019’ category. Post rounds of shortlisting and strict judging process by the experts in the hospitality industry, City Centre Rotana Doha took home the glorious trophies.
Commenting on the award, Sena Catak, director of Marketing & Communications at City Centre Rotana Doha, said: “Today, we are pleased to add two prestigious awards from Fact Magazine to our awards’ portfolio. We take pride in this success and are very thankful to each judge, food critic and of course our loyal guests for their continued support.
“Our team’s passion to hospitality and dedication to provide world-class services lead us to this one-of-a-kind recognition. We also promise our guests with more innovative offerings soon.”
Teatro, the renowned international restaurant where eastern cooking meets western cuisine, which bagged the ‘The Favourite International Restaurant in Doha 2019’ award, adopts a unique concept where people can dine in a theatrical ambiance due to its unique design, taking its guests into an unmatched culinary experience, covering five of the most famous cuisines – Thai, Chinese, Japanese, Indian and Italian.
Olive Oil, City Centre Rotana’s famous restaurant and winner of ‘Best All Day Dining Restaurant in Doha 2019’ award, offers all guests and residents the opportunity to indulge in an exceptional dining experience throughout the day amidst elegant ambience and first-class hospitality services, featuring a variety of Arabic and Western cuisines and many choices of cold and hot appetisers.

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4 Vegan Food & Jain Food You Must Try in an Indian Restaurant

4 Vegan Food & Jain Food You Must Try in an Indian Restaurant woodland shk Apr 13 When we think about Indian food, the first thing come in our mind is spices and Paneer dishes. However, Indian Cuisines have so much more to offer. Indian foods are not only good for lacto-vegetarians, but even vegans, Jains, Buddhist can also enjoy the Indian delicacies. Regardless of where your geographical locations, you will always find an Indian restaurant nearby you serving freshly prepared foods.
Some special Indian Vegan Foods you must try:
Chana Masala
Chana Masala is a popular vegan curry specialized in Spongy chickpeas cooked with a dash of exotic spices, ample of tomatoes, ginger, onion, garlic, coriander, and many more secret ingredients. Although it’s a staple dish of North India, the spicy, tangy and nostril-filling aroma of Chana Masala has captivated the soul of every Indian. Although it’s a completely vegan product, you can customize the dish if you are a follower of Jainism and doesn’t like consuming garlic/ onion, etc.
Dal Fry or Dal Tadka
Dal Tadka is a combination of arhar or yellow lentils and aromatic spices. The lentils are soaked and boiled to perfection, followed by the legendary ‘Tadka’ or tempering. Most restaurants use clarified butter for tempering but if you a vegan then it’s better to visit a restaurant who are specialized in vegan food and Jain Food . Also, don’t forget to order some steamed pulao or rice as it tastes like heaven when you combine dal tadka with rice.
Rajma Masala
It is one of the tastiest and healthiest vegan dishes you will ever found in an Indian Restaurant . Rajma also known as Red Kidney Beans are packed with proteins and fibers which is a perfect food for maintaining a healthy body and gut. Rajma Masala comprised of boiled rajma beans soaked in a thick gravy of spices. When you dip an Indian flatbread in the gravy, you might transport into some other place.
Masala Dosa
Masala Dosa is an ultrathin crispy pancake filled with a healthy dose of spices, potatoes, herbs, and vegetables. Even though its origin is rooted in South India, Masala Dosa has made its way to every nooks and corner of every part of India.
This amazing dish is served with chutney and sambar, and ideal for breakfast, brunch, lunch or as an evening snack. Some chef adds yogurt while preparing the batter for Dosa for the fermentation process. However, if you go to special vegan places like Woodlands HK , then you can enjoy

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