DIY Maldives with Kids – 10 Things To Know Before You Go

DIY Maldives with Kids – 10 Things To Know Before You Go

DIY Maldives with Kids – 10 Things To Know Before You Go July 2, 2019 by Angie. S Leave a Comment
Why Maldives?
Maldives, is one of the most remote yet beautiful places on earth. When people talk about the Maldives, they are referring to a collection of 1200 small islands, across 26 atolls (small clusters of sandy islets) set in the middle of the Indian Ocean. Each atoll has its own variety of vibrant coral reefs teeming with lush underwater life, with more than 1,000 fish species, 40 species of sharks, dolphins, turtles, tropical fish, manta rays, sting rays, sea turtles and even whale sharks.
Approximately 200 of these islands in the Maldives are inhabited, by a population of slightly only over 400,000. (think remote and sparse!). These geographical attributes make Maldives synonymous with beaches, blue lagoons and extensive reefs that offer a view and experience like no other. The Capital, Malé, sits on an islet of its own. Travels between the Capital, Malé and the islands are done via seaplanes, domestic airplanes or speedboats.
The Maldives is ideal for a family DIY trip. Families can design their stay to fully take advantage of the different resort’s services, facilities and scenery. We love Maldives primarily for the chance to see the colourful marine creatures in their natural habitat (the Indian Ocean!) and to enjoy some undistracted family time doing water-based activities together.
Both our kids fell in love with snorkelling in the Maldives as we swam among beautiful reef fishes everyday. Seeing these marine creatures in their natural habitat has really strengthened our resolve as a family to conserve and preserve the oceans.
Why Maldives? Tell me more!
Here are some FAQs to help plan your Maldives vacation. How long is the flight to the Maldives? Which Airline flies there?
Flight time from Singapore to Malé is 4 hours 35 minutes. You will arrive into Malé at the Velana International Airport (MLE). There are currently 3 airlines that fly direct from Singapore to Malé – Air Asia, Silkair and Singapore Airlines. The Maldives is 3 hours ahead (GMT +5) of Singapore time.
2. How is the weather like in Maldives? When is a good time to visit Maldives?
The Maldives is a tropical country much like Singapore. Weather there can be hot and humid. The Maldives have two dominating seasons: a dry season (with little rain and lower humidity) lasts from December-April. The wet season is (you guessed it) is wetter, characterized by stronger winds and rain, lasts from May-November.
For snorkellers and divers, both seasons have their advantages: During the dry season, visibility is superb. During the wet season, the water temperatures are colder, and this seems to inspire larger numbers of hammerhead sharks and reef sharks to congregate in shallower waters than in the dry season. Visibility isn’t as good during the wet season hence the peak tourism season is from early December to March.
We travelled to the Maldives during the June school holidays (low peak, wet season). It rained for the 1 st two days of our trip (passing monsoon showers) which made the currents very strong and choppy.
3. How long are the transfers from Airport to resorts? Are they safe?
In order not to bust our budget, we only shortlisted resorts that are accessible via speedboat transfers from Malé (as a sea plane transfer would easily set us back by USD350-500 per pax or USD1400-2000 per family!).
Moreover, the last seaplane transfer leaves the resort each day at 3pm (as opposed to the last speed boat transfer at 8pm). Our international flight out of Malé (via Singapore Airline) is scheduled at 11pm. If we had opted for seaplane transfers, we would have to spend at least 6 hours idling at the airport.
The duration of speedboat transfers depend on how far the resorts are located from Malé. For our trip, the speedboat transfers averaged 45 minutes each way. The more remote your resort is, the longer the ride. Do remember to confirm your transfer arrangements with your hotel upon booking. As far as we know, all resorts in Maldives charge for airport to resort transfers.
The safety on all our speedboat rides was good and some were in fact, impressive. Everyone, including our preschooler, Buddy, was given a life vest prior to departure, with proper explanation of safety procedures.
4. Can I snorkel if I can’t swim or if I’m a beginner swimmer?
It’s best that you CAN swim when you come to the Maldives as it’s entirely surrounded by water. If you can swim, it opens up a whole new world of experience and wonder!
Our experience at the Holiday Inn Kandooma was excellent as the hotel provided free daily snorkeling lessons conducted by their in-residence water sports instructors. We benefitted a lot from the free snorkeling lessons and gained confidence under the coaches.
5. Do I need to bring / buy my own snorkeling gear?
For hygiene purposes, and also for better fit, we bought our own snorkeling gear in Singapore and brought them with us to the Maldives (sans the fins).
Adult snorkeling gears are easily available in most resort retail shops in the Maldives but be prepared to pay more, and in USD. Children’s snorkeling gear is a bit trickier due to their limited sizes. Our kids’ snorkeling gear is purchased from Ocean Paradise , Singapore’s premier swim wear specialist, located at Paragon Mall. Their kids snorkeling gear proved to be one of our best investment as it fitted our kids so well, like a glove. Both our kids were able to snorkel with it every day without any difficulties or complaints
If you find it a hassle to bring your own snorkeling gear, find out in advance if your resort loans snorkeling gears to guests complimentary. Shopping for our Snorkelling Gear at Ocean Paradise Paragon
6. Is it safe for kids to snorkel in the ocean?
It’s generally safe to snorkel in the Maldvies but a lot depends on the weather of the day and your water confidence. Some resorts like Club Med Kani require guests to pass a swimming test before you are allowed to join their snorkelling trips. The Holiday Inn Kandooma offers free daily snorkeling trips for the whole family (Buddy loved it!) accompanied by the water sports instructors.
It’s best that at least 1 adult in the family is a confident swimmer. Even if the waters are clear and current seems tame, it’s wise to snorkel somewhere closer to shore before venturing any further. Never swim or engage in water-based activities when the winds are strong! Watch 4 yr old Buddy Snorkel!
7. What else can I do when I can’t snorkel or go out to sea?
Choose a resort that offers good alternative activities for kids and families. Most hotels have their own pools where guests can relax while kids have some form of kids’ club activities to occupy them.
Club Med Kani offers their signature Kids’ Club Programme which occupy kids for large part of the day for kids of various ages (from preschooler to teens!). At the Holiday Inn Kandooma, our kids enjoyed art and craft and movie time at the Kids Club. At Grand Park Kodhipparu, the Kids Club is small but very clean. The staff was super patient and creative. They engaged our kids in some native leaf crafts and recreational games.
8. Where do I get food in the Maldives? What is their cuisine like?
Unless you are staying in the Capital Malé, your food options would be limited to what the resort offers. Choose a resort with half-board or full board plans to save some costs. We find ala-carte dining in resorts rather pricey (E.g USD10 for a glass of freshly apple juice).
We like the food in the Maldives. It’s a lot of seafood (fresh from the oceans!) and due to its geographical location (only 1 hour away from Sri Lanka); we find traditional Maldivian cuisines very similar to Sri Lankan and Indian cuisines.
9. Do they speak English? What is their official religion?
Tourism is the Maldives’ main source of GDP. All Maldivians speak good English. Do note that the Maldives is a muslim country so you are not allowed to bring alcohol into the country. Depending how near your resort is to the Capital, you may occasionally hear the prayer calls blasting from neighbouring mosques.
10. What are some essentials I must bring for my Maldives vacation? Good Quality Swimwear
Not all swimwear are created equal. For a trip to the Maldives where we would be in and out of the sea or pool most part of the day, and constantly under the hot tropical sun, we dress our kids in really good quality quick dry swim suits with SPF protection.
These proved to be very handy as we found ourselves dressed in our swim wear for most part of the day. Since the sun is unrelenting, it pays to have extra sun protection.
We got our kids’ swimming and snorkeling gears from Ocean Paradise at Paragon Mall. The staff is knowledgeable, professional and patient. They recommended these quality swimwear and snorkeling gear for our trip. Sunblock
It goes without saying that in a tropical resort paradise like the Maldives, you would need tons of sunblock to protect your skin against the harsh sunlight. Ocean Paradise carries a wide range of quality sunblock for all ages and skin types. Water Shoes and Flip-Flops
Do not go into the waters without your water shoes (or a pair of fins). They protect your feet from the sharp sea corals and prevent cuts and abrasions from stepping on corals and sharp pebbles. These are essential for everyone in the family and are easily available at most swim wear stores or sports shop like Decathlon. Forget about your nice shoes, we trotted everywhere in our flip flops all day long. A Sun Hat
What’s a beach vacation without wearing a hat? This and a smile, complete your obligatory holiday portraits in the Maldives. Sea-sick Pills
If you are prone to sea sicknesses, it’s advisable to pack these pills along. The mode of transport is mainly either by speedboat or by seaplane, either way, it may trigger motion sickness. It will also come in extra handy if there’s a storm and your speedboat has to ride through the choppy waves. Credit Card
Everything in the Maldives is priced in USD. We charge our food bills to the room and paid in USD using our credit cards upon check out. Go-Pro Camera
To capture all your precious underwater snorkelling videos, we recommend using the Go-Pro Hero 7 action cam. It’s very user-friendly and easy to handle. Family-Friendly Accommodations
One of the toughest decision during our trip planning is deciding where to stay. There are plenty of accommodation options and some can cost as much as USD1000-2000 a night. Unfortunately, as there are so many atolls (all with hard-to-pronounce names that don’t really indicate their geographical location), it can be hard to select a resort.
Which atoll should you stay in? Do you opt for Beach villa or Overwater villa?? Do you book a resort that’s accessible by speedboat or do you choose one that’s only reachable by seaplane? So many options.
For us, in the end, it all boils down to what we can afford. We stayed in 3 resorts for this trip, each with its own merits. Do note that not all resorts offer water-villa rooms to families with young children (below 8 years old). For those that did, we had to sign an indemnity form.

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Take a tour around India’s culinary gems here in Dubai

The spice is right, come on down and join us as we take a grand culinary tour around India, without having to set foot inside a single airport.
From the mountains of Jammu in the north to the southern backwaters of Kerala ; from the west Goan coast to the rainforests of Assam in the East; India’s food heritage is a beautiful blend of its rich history and diverse geography. Much of it is well-represented here in the UAE, and what more enjoyable way to navigate it, than with your taste buds. North India
Yes yes, we know you love butter chicken , that glorious golden comfort food made with lashings of rich butter. But North India has so much more to offer. Try for instance – Amritsari kulcha , chole bhature, Kashmiri rogan josh, Rajasthani dal-bati churma, or old Delhi’s version of the mughlai kabab . For North Indians dairy is often equal to, or greater than, life – so no traditional meal is served without milk-based desserts like kheer, kulfi.
Kulcha King
Go to this affordable Punjabi restaurant to try some authentic Amritsari kulcha. Though many struggle to differentiate between Amritsari kulcha and stuffed naan, for us – there are subtle differences that mean the former always wins over the latter. Kulcha King, located at multiple locations in Dubai serves kulchas with a bowl of chickpea masala and chutney. The combination is a stone-cold classic, and with dishes priced from AED 15 we are fully onboard. There’s a variety of stuffings available, with the most famous ones being gobhi (cauliflower), aloo (potato), onion or ‘all of the above’. If you can’t live without carbs, this could be your new home.
Locations across Dubai. 800 585 242.
Mughal e Azam
Mughal e Azam is an authentic mughlai restaurant which takes you on a flavour safari round Old Delhi. The fine-dining restaurant offers a balance of authentic flavours and techniques with origins that stretch back two centuries to the royal mughlai kitchens. This hidden gem in Discovery Gardens is home to arguably the best mutton seekh kebabs (AED 35) in Dubai. Also check out the Lucknowi galauti kebabs (AED 26), and chicken kali mirch tikka (AED 28).
Discovery Gardens. 11.30am-1am. 04 368 4280.
Khyber – DUKES Dubai
Khyber in British hotel Dukes Dubai hosts a perfect round up of North Indian dishes. The menu highlights include kebab platters (from AED 60); butter chicken (AED 95); murg methi (shredded chicken cooked with fenugreek leaves) (AED 85), rogan josh (slow cooked lamb with spices and special Kashmiri red chili) (AED 90), and an array of vegetarian dishes – bhindi masala (ladyfingers) (AED 60), shahi kofta (cottage cheese dumplings with creamy gravy) (AED 75), dal makhni (black lentils) (AED 55). There’s a big dessert selection too, including gulab jamun (golden dumplings) (AED 40) and matka kulfi (AED 40). All in all, it’s a good effort at a comprehensive North Indian menu .
Palm Jumeirah. 5pm-11pm. 04 455 1625.
West India
The western region of India includes the states of Gujarat, Maharashtra, and Goa. Gujarat’s cuisine is famous for its big vegetarian thaalis (platters) which consist of different dishes like farsan (snacks), rice, chapati and sweets.
In Maharashtra, the coastal areas are famous for malvani and saoji cuisine (fresh coconut-based hot and sour curries with fish and seafood), while the inland areas are famous for vidharba cuisine cooked with a lot of dry coconuts. Goa is a haven for fresh fish and seafood. Famous dishes include vindaloo and xacuti.
Eric’s
This hidden gem in Karama is without question one of the finest purveyors of Goan cuisine in Dubai. The food comes in at incredible value and is cooked with authentic local Goan spices and menu highlights include tawa prawns (AED 30), crispy baby corn (AED 28), the chicken xacuti (AED 26), the Goan prawn curry (AED 28), pan-fried fish (from AED 20). The restaurant has capitalised on its popularity and now has a branch in Al Safa.
11.30am-3.30pm, 6.30pm-midnight. Karama. 04 396 5080.
Rasoi Ghar
Also located in Karama, this popular Indian restaurant serves authentic flavours of Gujarat, Kathiyawad and Rajasthan. As mentioned above, this region is famous for its thaali culture, and Rasoi Ghar serves different thali seven days a week . The restaurant offers a deal where diners get access to unlimited top-ups from around AED 45.
12pm-3pm, 7pm-11.30pm. Karama. 04 388 5722.
Peshwa
Peshwa is ALL ABOUT the wholesome Maharashtrian food . The restaurant even goes so far as to claim that it is the only restaurant in Dubai serving authentic Maharashtrian cuisine. Menu highlights include sabudana khichdi (shallow fried sago with freshly ground roasted peanuts) (AED 18), wada pav (potato dumplings) (AED 7) , misal pav (dish of spicy gravy and sprouts, topped with gram flour crisps) (AED 20), malvani tikka (AED 32), prawn tikka (AED 35), matki usal (AED 20), daal methi (lentils with fenugreek leaves) (AED 22), and chicken saoji (AED 32).
9am-11.30pm. Karama. 04 379 5520.
East India
The region of East India includes the states of Sikkim, Manipur, Nagaland, Mizoram, West Bengal, Assam, Arunachal Pradesh, Meghalaya, Tripura and Orissa. The vast region comprises awesome topography – beautiful beaches and dizzying mountain ranges . Beating London at it’s own game, Chirranpunji in the East of India, has the highest rainfall of any city in the world. Locals eat lots of rice, fruit and vegetables as the weather allows for bountiful harvests .
Popular dishes include momos (steamed, meat- or vegetable-filled wontons); machcher jhol (fish curry); and jhaal-muri (a spicy snack made with puffed rice and mustard oil); and kathi rolls. It’s also famous for its sweet treats , the most popular of which are sandesh (made of paneer and sugar) and rasgolla (dumplings in syrup).
Yalla Momos
Yalla Momos has multiple outlets across Dubai, but our favourite is the one in Karama. Here you’ll find massive quantities of moreish momos (dumplings). The pockets of flavour were inspired by their Chinese counterparts, but are filled with a kaleidoscopic range of Indian flavours. Dig into this desi dim sum – packed with chicken, mushroom, spinach and more (priced from AED 15).
8.30am-midnight. Karama. 04 385 2233.
South India
Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Kerala are the South Indian states offering some of the spiciest food . Coconut oil is used in much of the cooking and curry leaves, mustard, asafoetida, pepper and peppercorns, tamarind, fiery chillies and fenugreek seeds feature are amongst the most popular spices.
Tamil Nadu is famous for its very spicy chettinad cuisine and is globally known for dosas, uthapam and vada . Kerala is renowned for malabari cuisine with a variety of seafood; whilst Hyderabad (Andhra Pradesh) is known for its biryani and nizami cuisine with nuts, dried fruits and exotic spices like saffron and Karnataka for bisi bele bhaat (lentil rice) and vangibath (fried aubergine rice).
Golconda Paradise
If you are looking for an authentic Hyderabadi biryani taste, hunt no further than Golconda Paradise restaurant and its homage to the humble Hyderabadi biryani . Their Kachchi Aqni ki Dum ki Biryani (AED 23) is one of the finest examples you’ll find in this region. The set business lunches are great value too, at AED 22 for two courses, plus dal and bread.
12pm-11pm. Al Nahda and Oud Mehta. 04 397 9597.
Sangeetha Vegetarian restaurant
Stuff yourself with generous Chennai thali (AED 19.50), made up of least 10 delightful mini dishes. Or how about a ‘quick meal’ with lemon rice, sambhar rice or curd rice (AED 18.50)? For those who need a post-work boost, the best of the massive menu is Chettinad mini tiffin (AED 18.50), an evening dish of special vadas, idlis and sweets. The place is strictly vegetarian and is one of the most popular Tamil restaurants among expats.
7.30am-3.30pm, 5pm-11pm. Karama. 04 336 7111.
Calicut Paragon
Malabari cuisine cooks seafood in local spices and serves it all on a banana leaf. Win. Among Calicut Paragon’s tasty takes from the region is a delicious squid dry fry (AED 31.50). Other highlights when we visit include pearl fish cooked with traditional spices, chicken varattiyathu, malabar chicken curry and fish mango curry – prices vary, but happily not much is over AED 30. Order a few appams (hoppers) on the side to mop it all up, but leave room for the dessert menu, which includes tender coconut pudding (AED 15.75).
7am-12.30am daily. Karama. Also in Al Nadha. 04 335 8700.
MTR 1924
MTR (Mavalli Tiffin Rooms) has been serving authentic Karnataka and South Indian cuisine since 1924. When it arrived in Dubai, it made happy rumblings amongst Indian expats, representing a true taste of home. There is now a branch in both Mankhool and Karama. The menu highlights include vada (from AED 6.50), idly sambar (AED 10.50), poori sagu (AED 10), bisibelle bhath (lentil rice) (AED 12.50), chow chow bhath (AED 16.50), lunch and dinner platters and a variety of dosas (from AED 12).
7.30am-4pm, 6.30pm-11.30pm. Mankhool and Karama. 04 327 5909. Related Posted in Food | Tagged assam dubai , best bengali cuisine dubai , best biryani dubai , best biryani in uae , best butter chicken dubai , best curry in Dubai , best dosas in dubai , best east indian food dubai , best goan food dubai , best indian cuisine dubai , Best Indian food in dubai , best indian sweets in dubai , best indian take away food dubai , best kebabs dubai , best kebabs in dubai , best kerala food dubai , best mughali food dubai , best north indian food dubai , best restaurants in karama , best south indian food dubai , best value food in dubai , best west indian food dubai , cheapest restaurants in dubai , dubai hidden gem restaurants , most authentic indian food dubai , most delicious curry in dubai , where is the best indian cuisine dubai , where to find the best curry dubai , where to find the most authentic curry in dubai | Comments Off on Take a tour around India’s culinary gems here in Dubai Discover more…

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Dining Out as Cultural Trade — by Joel Waldfogel – NBER (National Bureau of Economic Research)

Dining Out as Cultural Trade — by Joel Waldfogel 02 июля, 15:09 11 NBER (National Bureau of Economic Research) Выбор редакции Perceptions of Anglo-American dominance in movie and music trade motivate restrictions on cultural trade. Yet, the market for another cultural good, food at restaurants, is roughly ten times larger than the markets for music and film. Using TripAdvisor data on restaurant cuisines, along with Euromonitor data on overall and fast food expenditure, this paper calculates implicit trade patterns in global cuisines for 52 destination countries. We obtain three major results. First, the pattern of cuisine trade resembles the “gravity” patterns in physically traded products. Second, after accounting gravity factors, the most popular cuisines are Italian, Japanese, Chinese, Indian, and American. Third, excluding fast food, the largest net exporters of their cuisines are the Italians and the Japanese, while the largest net importers are the US – with a 2017 deficit of over $130 billion – followed by Brazil, China, and the UK. With fast food included, the US deficit shrinks to $55 billion but remains the largest net importer along with China and, to a lesser extent, the UK and Brazil. Cuisine trade patterns appear to run starkly counter to the audiovisual patterns that have motivated concern about Anglo-American cultural dominance.

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Rising Popularity of Indian Cuisines Across the globe (Saint Martin)

Rising Popularity of Indian Cuisines Across the globe (Saint Martin, Australia, 11:10 11:13 15:10 Reply to : (Use contact form below)
Few decade ago, most of foreigner did not know about the Indian foods. But now, Indian cuisines having an own identity of unique flavor across the globe. And also Indian cuisine is better known for its hot spicy taste at present. There was a time, when Europeans had much reservation about this range of cuisine. But, those times are now gone forever, as new generations of Europeans just find Indian cuisine lip-smacking tasty.
If you are looking for Indian cuisine in Saint Martin’s » , New Zealand, Visit Magic Masala Indian Restaurant. Magic Masala is an Indian restaurant & bar near me » with a full commitment to serving the best dining experience and best food every time. It is NOT ok to contact this poster with commercial interests.

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India’s water policy is leaking – Policy Forum

With water becoming an increasingly scarce resource in India, girls and women are at a greater risk of experiencing health and social issues, Kaveri Mishra writes.
The world’s water crisis is quickly worsening – and at an extremely worrying pace. Worldwide, around four billion people live in water-scarce areas with about 844 million people without access to clean water.
India has been worst hit and is experiencing the most severe case of water scarcity in its history. Some one billion people live in areas with extremely limited access for at least part of the year, and around another 600 million live in areas suffering from high to extreme water stress .
More than 40 per cent of the country is in drought. And things will only be going downhill from here with a steady increase in the country’s groundwater depletion rate, which has increased by 23 per cent between 2000 and 2010.
With a population of over 1.3 billion, the country is the world’s biggest consumer of groundwater, accounting for almost one-fourth of global demand – more than that of China and the US combined. Its usage of groundwater accounts for 24 per cent of the global total.
Globally, water consumption has increased six-fold in the last 100 years. The surge in demand has been driven largely by population growth, a change in diets, and consumer habits.
Moreover, agricultural intensification, urbanisation, mega-city projects, and climate change have boosted competition over water resources as well.
Rice and wheat are staple foods in Indian cuisine, but are also a prominent water-guzzling crop in the agricultural sector. There is, therefore, an urgent need for society to shift to eating more sustainable and water-based crops.
Water scarcity also occurs in urban areas . With globalisation has come a massive increase in infrastructure and construction projects that have greatened the demand for water. Internal migration to cities amongst those in search of jobs and an improved quality of life has also contributed to strained resources in urban areas. Vietnam’s challenges to go with the flow
Estimates have shown that 21 cities in India are likely to run out of groundwater by 2020. Signs of a water crisis are already apparent in New Delhi and India’s Silicon Valley.
This, however, may occur even before 2020. In New Delhi, bathtubs, sprinklers, and washing machines in homes are already things of the distant past. Residents are restricted to a few buckets of water during summer.
The situation is much worse in India’s Silicon Valley. Apartment complexes in the area no longer have direct access to water. All year round, residents are now dependent on water tankers that source water from lakes and wells, all lined up next to each other in residential areas.
These tankers are quite costly as well, and prices go up as temperatures rise. Some people are having to move out of their hometowns as a result.
Should current trends continue, the Institute for Social and Economic change predicts that India might incur a 6 per cent loss in its GDP by 2020 – with the agricultural sector expected to be the most affected.
The government, however, continues to fail to implement stringent laws against the use of groundwater. This has resulted in a severe exploitation of resources in commercial, domestic, and industrial use.
The water crisis is also linked to biodiversity, food security, and health matters. Rapid water depletion will lead to major food shortages. The country’s most disadvantaged communities will face disease and death. Is Singapore treading water?
Moreover, the sociocultural implications of the crisis are far less noticed. India’s patriarchal society puts the burden of household chores on girls and women. To complete their daily tasks, they are made to travel miles each day to collect water. In rural areas of India, households have designated days on which they make the trip for water, which is then used for cleaning, cooking, taking care of animals – the list continues.
To understand how this might affect India, one must only look to Africa . A similar shortage in water has caused a great change in the lives of girls and women across the continent. In the face of health and hygiene issues – mainly to do with menstruation, pregnancy, and childbirth – a lack of clean water can make them vulnerable to disease, malnutrition, and even death.
But the implications of a lack of water go beyond immediate health issues. The crisis has also resulted in higher rates of school dropouts in Africa, with girls having to spend their days travelling to collect water.
The situation has also widened the inequality gap in India, with the poorest and most marginalised people bearing the brunt of the shortage with no access to clean water.
To tackle this issue, a serious policy framework needs to be put in place to encourage partnerships between all government bodies, as well as private and public participation. Managing groundwater resources and wastewater management is vital. Sewage treatment plants that recycle water must be made compulsory, while rainwater harvesting should be made mandatory at every stage too.
Issues have no doubt snowballed into a concoction of social and economic challenges. Groundwater has been exploited beyond imagination, also presenting problems for both the waste management and aviation industries. Until stringent water policy is actually put in place, India’s future is not set to change.

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Awesome Holiday at an Awesome place

Dear Villa No 32, you will be missed badly.nnI stayed at Jumeirah Zabeel Saray – Royal Residence in Lagoon Villa. I must say that it was my lifetime best holiday so far. I recently stayed for 4 nights starting 14 June, Yes, the weather was hot, yes is was unbearable and yes it was humid, but the Hospitality, care and facilities didn’t let us suffer from the climate. nnWe were greeted with a smiling face at Dubai Airport by Jumeirah staff and our driver who very professionally dropped us to our Villa. Again, we were greeted with enthusiasm by the Villa’s Supervisor (a Philippine lady) I forgot her name, we were welcomed by flower bouquet, cold pineapple juice and wet lime towels.nThe Lagoon villa had each and every comfort one would want in a house. A private gym, private pool, fully furnished 4 bedrooms, a very nicely decorated TV lounge, fully equipped kitchen, a perfect minibar, security, comfort and a very nice calm and quite environment. nnThe restaurants are amazing and serve very delicious food, we were on half board and my favorite places for the dine in were n1.tImperial Restaurant – Its breakfast is awesome and the staff can do anything for you, my wife use to order strawberries (not available in the buffet) and these were fresh served separately with whipped cream. For dinner they have a daily theme cuisine like, French, American, International, Greek, Hot & Spicy n2.tLalezar – Restaurant serve authentic Turkish cuisine and is not to be missed placen3.tAmala – North Indian restaurant serving scrumptious Indian food and their chicken tandoori love. nnThe staff starting from first person we met at airport, the driver, supervisor, Assistant Managers, Butlers, Reception, waiters, restaurant staff and every on work was, smiling, enthusiastic, caring and helping. The residence never had a feel of a hotel and within the first day it was home for us. My daughter had a little swelling on her arm due to a mosquito bite, upon informing the staff the paramedic rushed within no time and gave us a treatment. nnThe hotel itself and the beach club has lots of fun for children to enjoy and is a perfect place for families. The Sinbad fun area and the hotel cinema (screening room) are the greatest attraction and places to be for children.nThe grownups can enjoy the Telise SPA, the infinity pool, the cinema, the beach club the night views and much more. nnThe private butlers are so very helpful that they treat you as your own family member, they did their job with perfect in every aspect. Specially the Paksitani guy named Nawab and there was one more gentleman from Philipine who use to wear glasses and his name began with K I forgot his fill name. The hotel respects your privacy and can do anything for your comfort. n nWhenever me or my children will get a chance we will come back and stay in the royal residence. nnMy suggestions to the hoteln1.tPlease put prayer rugs in the rooms for Muslim guests to prayn2.tImperium restaurant must a few side dishes other than the daily theme cuisine for the people who don’t have a developed taste.

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Lemony Mixed Dal

One can never have enough quick and easy Indian dal dishes to turn to when there is little time to fuss in the kitchen. Apart from being highly nourishing, loaded with easily digestible protein, sometimes a simple and warming soupy dal curry is just what I crave, especially after heavier meals have been on the menu for a while before. They’re also a great way to play around with your favorite spices too.
Dals are simply split lentils or beans, and each variety brings its own different texture and flavor to a dish. This creamy and gently spiced curry features three different varieties of dal, and is finished off with a refreshing burst of lemon juice. Keep it simple by serving with hot fresh cooked white rice or Indian flatbreads, or if you are planning an Indian meal, a classic dal dish is pretty much a staple of any spread.
Lemony Mixed Dal
Cuisine: Indian
Published on June 28, 2019
Simple, creamy and gently spiced three dal curry finished with lemon juice
Preparation: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 60 minutes
1/2 cup dried red lentils 1/2 cup dried split mung beans 1/2 cup dried split hulled ural dal 1 teaspoon ground turmeric 1/2 tablespoon ghee or oil 1 small onion, finely choppped small handful of dried curry leaves, crumbled 1/2 teaspoon paprika 1/2 teaspoon garam masala 1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt or rock salt, or to taste juice from 1 lemon (3 tablespoons) finely chopped fresh cilantro, for garnish (optional) Paste:
1 tablespoon coriander seeds 1 tablespoon coriander seeds 2 green chilies, seeded and chopped 2 to 3 dried whole red chilies 2-inch cinnamon stick 1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns 4 whole cloves 1 clove garlic, chopped 1-inch fresh ginger, chopped Instructions:
Rinse the lentils, split mung beans and urad dal in a strainer and transfer to a medium saucepan. Pour in 4 cups water and add the turmeric. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer for 45 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the dal is soft and breaking apart. Remove from the heat and set aside.
While the dal is cooking, make the paste. Combine all of the ingredients in a small blender or food processor and add a few tablespoons of water. Blend until you have a fairly thick paste, adding more water as necessary. Set aside.
In a medium saucepan,, heat the ghee or oil over medium heat. When hot, add the onion and sauté for a few minutes. Stir in the curry leaves and paprika, and then add the paste to the pan. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes, adding a few tablespoons of water as needed to prevent the paste from sticking to the pan.
Stir in the cooked dal and pour in 1/2 to 1 cup water, depending on how thick you want the dal to be. Simmer for 5 to 7 minutes, then stir in the garam masala, salt, and lemon juice. Remove from the heat, cover, and let sit for about 5 minutes to let the flavors blend.
Serve hot with fresh cooked white rice and garnished with cilantro if desired.
Makes 4 to 6 servings
Other easy dal recipes from Lisa’s Vegetarian Kitchen:
Gujarati Dal (Khatti Meethi Dal)
Mixed Lentil Dal
Indian Yellow Split Pea Curry with Tomatoes and Spices (Matar Dal)
Marawadi Mixed Dal
Audio Accompaniment: Nothing Is Objective by Suso Saiz
This is my submission to My Legume Love Affair , a monthly vegetarian event celebrating the goodness of legumes. Administered my me, and co-hosted each month by a different blogger, PJ of Seduce Your Tastebuds is hosting this month .

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Breaking in My Boots for the Top 5

Program: Public Health and Healthcare Systems in South Africa Headed to South Africa
Living in America and especially in Kalamazoo with such easy access to two great hospitals, I have never even put a thought into not receiving healthcare if I were to need it. I am looking forward to seeing the different types of healthcare that are offered in South Africa. One thing listed on our itinerary, is the opportunity to see a traditional healer. I am excited to see exactly what this looks like. Since my parents are both nurses, and I am a student of WMU’s Health and Human Services College, I put a heavy emphasis on the science aspect of healthcare. I am excited to be able to see how other places take care of their sick. Another thing I was really excited about, while looking at the itinerary, was our chance to take an overnight safari. I really hope to see all of the big five animals while we are on our trip! I think the giraffes and elephants are the two that I am looking forward to seeing the most. As I am typing this, it still doesn’t feel real that I am going to be on a whole different continent in just a few short weeks. In addition to the safaris and visiting the different healthcare settings, I am excited to experience the overall culture of South Africa! I can’t wait to try the classic dishes and the amazing wine grown in the region. I love trying new foods and am excited to be able to experience such a different cuisine than what we typically eat back home.
Another thing I am excited about, is the chance to go hiking while we are there. I have been looking up photos of all the places we are going to visit, which made me so excited to break out my trusty hiking boots and put them to the test. I cannot wait to see the Indian Ocean with my own eyes and to experience the climate and landscape of South Africa.
Overall, I cannot wait to embark on this trip to South Africa. I know that if I didn’t take this opportunity now, then I may never have another chance to take such an amazing trip. I can’t wait to go on a safari, experience the local culture and cuisine, and to really just immerse myself in South African life. I have the countdown set on my phone and I cannot wait to take off from O’Hare airport in just a few short weeks! Share this:

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I’m going to answer this question in terms of food. Crown Heights for great West Indian food. In Brighton Beach and Sheepshead Bay you can find food from several former Soviet republics (the big ones being: Russian, Ukrainian, Georgian, and Uzbek). Flushing and Sunset Park have large Chinese populations, and you can find authentic Chinese food there (read: what they actually eat in China, not the Americanized stuff you’re familiar with). Bushwick/Ridgewood has a lot of Latin-Caribbean food (think Venezuelan, Puerto Rican, and Dominican). Washington Heights has West African food, but it’s not super common and you’ll have to do your research to find those restaurants. Astoria has lots of Greek and Albanian food (note: those two ethnicities don’t get along super well, so don’t compare the cuisines while in a restaurant). You’ll find good Italian food in Bensonhurst.

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I’m pretty low carb already – I wouldn’t eat any of those Monday-Friday. But that was really tough, and I kinda screwed up my answer.
I already frequently substitute out rice in favour of homemade flat breads with indian food, as my wife isn’t fussed about rice, but then I chose pasta as my keeper – which kinda screws up my flatbread thing.
But I don’t eat sandwiches anymore, and I just love pasta so much – it would really spoil a major cuisine for me if I couldn’t have it. 16

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