DISNEY TOP 5: WAYNE’S TOP 5 STANDARD TABLE SERVICE MEALS IN WALT DISNEY WORLD

DISNEY TOP 5: WAYNE’S TOP 5 STANDARD TABLE SERVICE MEALS IN WALT DISNEY WORLD

by waynegoodreau
So, I am sorry for the little hiatus from posting but my job IRL is sort of at its worst in April. My fun/work balance has been unreasonably off.
But I am back. And I figured I would continue telling you what I enjoy eating.
Those of you…
…Erm, that of ME….
…That read this blog…
….may remember my last Top 5 post focusing on my top 5 signature (2-credit) meals at Walt Disney World.
Next in line are what I refer to as “standard table-service” restaurants. To refresh your memory, I define “standard table-service” as: Standard table-service – This covers all the 1 credit sit-down restaurants. To be honest, there are multiple categories even within this larger group of restaurants (casual, theme, buffet, etc.) but I will be sort of lumping all of them together into one post. The only category I am not including here are character meals, which will also get their own post.
WAYNE’S TOP 5 1-CREDIT (NON-CHARACTER) STANDARD TABLE-SERVICE RESTAURANTS
5 – Liberty Tree Tavern, Magic Kingdom (Dinner)
Liberty Tree Tavern is located in the Magic Kingdom. And to be honest, the phrase “located in the Magic Kingdom” doesn’t really conjure up any idea of fine dining. But Liberty Tree Tavern is – in this blogger’s opinion – the best sit-down restaurant in the Magic Kingdom. Which still makes it #5 on my list.
While you can order a la carte, the most popular thing to order at Liberty Tree is the Patriots’ Platter – an all-you-care-to-eat family style feast of awesome. And being that it’s located in Liberty Square, the cuisine is erm…American? Thanksgiving? Gluttony?
The food is substantial. And continuous. And pretty delicious. There is some sort of salad to start things out. But meh…
After that though, its insane amounts of turkey, pot roast, pork, mashed potatoes, stuffing mac and cheese, et cetera, et cetera. You get to be thankful every day. For indigestion.
And you can have wine. In the Magic Kingdom. Which you kids today don’t know is a very huge deal.
And dessert. Oh dessert. The dessert here is the stuff of legend. I present the Ooey Gooey Toffee Cake – vanilla toffee cake, chocolate sauce, and vanilla ice cream. Erm, yeah. It’s awesometown.
One drawback to this place? The insanely small bathroom located upstairs. I once changed an infant in that bathroom and it may have been the singularly worst parenting moment I have ever had.
4 – Yak and Yeti, Animal Kingdom (Lunch)
Yak and Yeti poses an interesting dilemma. I love the place, yet I am lacking in the picture department. I have looked back over my past posts and while I do mention Yak and Yeti here and there, I haven’t taken very many pictures of the place or the food. I must have been too busy eating, I guess. Which speaks to how much I love it. But I do have a couple, so let’s try and make the best of things.
The inside of Yak and Yeti is incredibly themed. Lots of little details around every corner.
And despite having an unfortunately unappetizing sounding name, the food here is excellent. Our favorite appetizer is the Pork Pot Stickers. They are a MUST every time we visit. Note: stickers do not actually contain pot.
For an entrée, I used to get the steak and shrimp. Every time. But for some reason, they took that greatness off the menu a while back and it shows no sign of returning any time soon. That doesn’t mean there aren’t still great options available. I have gone back a couple times to the Chicken Tikka Masala, but when you have another to share it with, the Dim Sum Basket for Two is def the way to go. This basket be like, “Easter who?”
The basket contains the aforementioned pot stickers (which is good because you will always want more after the appetizer), shrimp siu mai, cha su bao, and pork siu mai. Everything is steamed on a banana lead and it comes with a soy lime dipping sauce.
I’ll wait while you book a trip.
3 – Chef Art Smith’s Homecomin’, Disney Springs (Dinner)
Homecomin’ is the newest restaurant on this list, but it nonetheless deserves a spot. We tried Homecomin’ back in our November 2018 trip for the first time and I fell in love with the place. Located in Disney Springs, Homecomin’ is based on Florida cuisine.
And no, that doesn’t mean terrible pizza and sub-par Chinese food.
The interior is all light and airy. All wood and what not. Very welcoming.
Their drink list is phenom, loaded with whiskey and moonshine. And their appetizers stand as works of art on their own. When we visited in November we got the Bunch of Puppies and the Church Lady Deviled Eggs. The hush puppies were delicious and I loved the jalapeno jelly they were served with, a perfect mix of spicy and sweet. But the deviled eggs. Oh, those deviled eggs.
Seriously the best deviled eggs I have ever eaten. I mean, look at ALL THAT BACON.
Their standout entrée is, of course, fried chicken and donuts. Because frikkin fried chicken and donuts. The whole dish is delicious and does that whole savory and sweet thing quite well.
As for dessert, I have heard great things about the Hummingbird cake but when we were there, around the holidays, there was a seasonal pumpkin bread pudding we couldn’t pass up. It was incredible but it being seasonal, probably not a big help talking about it here.
2 – Sanaa, Kidani Village (Dinner…early dinner)
Sanaa gets high points not only for its food, but also for its view. And that’s really why I have this place pegged for an early dinner. The food and interior lends itself well to dinner but the outside view requires some light to fully appreciate it. Place has floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking the savannah. Throughout the meal, it’s pretty common to see animals just walk up to the window. It’s pretty great.
The thing everyone talks about here when it comes to the food is the Indian-Style Bread Service. You get a choice of five different types of bread – traditional naan, garlic-ginger naan, spiced naan, onion kulcha, and paneer paratha – and like all these different sauces and accompaniments like roasted red pepper hummus, spicy jalapeno lime-pickle, and tamarind chutney. It’s a fun, shareable food adventure-type way to start your meal.
They also make a mean scallop there, when its on the menu.
Everything I have had here has been good, but last time we visited I went for the Potjie-Inspired with Butter Chicken, Short Ribs, and Aloo Masala over rice. Delicious. And an insane amount of food.
1 – Chefs de France, EPCOT (Lunch)
People may think it weird I would designate Chefs de France as a lunch spot, given that meals here seem to take hours. But that’s precisely why I am suggesting it for lunch. I have been here for both lunch and dinner and I have really enjoyed the lunches more. We once had a lunch here with like 11 other people and the whole affair took probably close to three hours.
And it was one of the best lunches I have ever had at Disney. Yeah, the food was good (which I will get to in a second), but the measured pace, the wine, the ambiance…it all led to so much great conversation and so many laughs. I don’t know, there is just something special about this place for us. And while I wouldn’t recommend a 3-hour lunch every day at Walt Disney World, maybe setting aside one day to just sit, relax, and enjoy those you’re vacationing with is worth considering.
And I really do love the food here. Portions aren’t huge (another reason why it’s good for a lunch) but everything I have had I have enjoyed. My favorite starter is for sure the escargot. Actually, the escargot may be my favorite thing on the menu.
That being said, the French Onion Soup is also nothing to sneeze at. Well, unless you’re allergic to onions.
The entrée menu does rotate so not everything is available all the time but I have really enjoyed the short ribs when they’ve been on the menu.
But they aren’t always there. In the absence of short ribs, I have gone with the Steak Aux Echalottes (grilled flat iron steak and pommes frites.)
But I have had other good meals there. The Boeuf Bourguignon is stellar as well.
Point being, go there. à présent Share this:

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The ten best curry houses in Preston

The ten best curry houses in Preston Everyone loves an Indian – don’t deny it. Share Award-winning take-aways at the Ali Raj restaurant (Image: TripAdvisor)
There’s nothing better than tucking into a curry, with a slab of naan and extra poppadoms.
Luckily, Preston has lots of great curry houses to choose from. We’ve selected restaurants to suite everyone’s needs to fine diners with succulent seafood dishes to cheap and cheerful Korma conniseurs.
There’s a great selection for vegetarians and vegans too – enough to turn the even the strictest of carnivores.
The lucky ten on this list have been carefully selected by Indian lovers on the LancsLive team but if we’ve missed off any gems make sure you leave them in the comments below.
But for now, let’s get down to business – who serves the best curries in Preston? Read More 1. The Silk Route
Strand Road
This one is cheating a little bit as the Silk Route is inspired by Chinese food as well as Indian but it does a a really impressive array of curries so we couldn’t resist.
Named after the ancient trading road that connected China with Europe, carrying spices and silk into the west, the Silk Route is known for its Sunday ‘all you can eat’ buffet for £11 a head. Read More
They also have some decent veggie options with an aubergine Pakora being their specialty meat-free option.
Reserve a table online. 2. East Z East
Unit 1, 19 Church Street
Much like the name suggests, this Indian restaurant is full of those eastern flavours we all crave.
East Z East has branches across the north including Manchester, Liverpool and Bury, with the brand winning a multitude of curry-related awards. Read More The ridiculous one star reviews of iconic Lancashire landmarks
They also do a decent takeaway service when you want to enjoy your Indian in front of the telly, you can order from them online now.
Oh and they do giant naans. Gordon Ramsey would be livid. Look at that thing, it’s a monster (Image: TripAdvisor) 3. Ali Raj
Blackpool Road
Ali Raj has also featured on our list of the best restaurants in Preston and for good reason.
Awarded a Certificate of Excellence by Trip Advisor for 2017-2018, Ali Raj is another Indian restaurant specialising in Balti dishes. Read More Preston North End issues statement after large group of Sheffield United fans buy tickets in corporate area
Whilst the other curry houses on this list are known for their in-house cooking, Ali Raj has been lauded for its impressive takeaways.
It also boasts a beautiful wine list and extensive set menus, with a couple’s two-course meal starting at £34.95. 4. Sangam Balti House
Lostock Hall
After enjoying a day surveying the gorgeous sites at Cuerden Valley Park, take yourself back to Lostock Hall and treat yourself at this authentic curry house. Read More Preston’s top judge slams delays in bringing criminals to justice
Bursting with original dishes and a host of specials, Sangam Balti House is certainly not one to miss.
They also do a Sunday banquet and are widely lauded as having the best curry in the city.
Grab yourself a table online. What could be better than Indian buffet? (Image: Sangum Balti House) 5. Maharani Restaurant
Watery Lane
This lot pride themselves on using only the freshest ingredients to make some of the finest curries in Preston.
They also claim to have a star-studded cast of chefs who have been trained in five-star restaurants from around the world so its likely that what ever you are served at Maharani is going to be delicious. Read More ‘Nobody expected me to graduate with a first’ – Former troubled pupil on the threat of exclusion in schools
It’s also the only restaurant on this list to concentrate on providing South Indian cuisine, with the restaurant owners using their homeland of Kerela to inspire their menu. A taste of succulent Indian food made with the finest ingredients (Image: Maharani Restaurant) 6. Bangla Fusion
Much Hoole
Another fresh-ingredient enthusiast, Bangla Fusion was actually voted as one of the top 100 Indian restaurants in the UK and has won numerous British curry awards since 2008.
As well as beautiful curry dishes Bangla reportedly has the best Onion Bhajis in the entire country and they boast a luxurious drinks menu which is sure to satisfy anyone’s thirst. Read More Slug and Lettuce restaurant set to open in Blackpool following 400k investment
They recently designed a new set two course menu available from Sunday to Thursday at £11.95 each so make sure you get on down there for something that is sure to tickle your taste buds. Bangla Fusion were named as one of the top 100 Indian restaurants in the UK (Image: Bangla Fusion) 7. Naaz Indian Cuisine
Hesketh Bank
Seafood is hard to get right with any kind of cuisine but it seems that this place has absolutely nailed it.
Set into the beautiful rural village of Hesketh Bank, Naaz specialises in prawn dishes with searing King Prawns on Puri plus a gorgeous King Prawn Dupiaza dish. Read More Two restaurants on Friargate in Preston are up for sale
It’s fairly new to the Preston curry scene (yes, there used to be a Naaz in Bamber Bridge) having only opened last year but already Naaz is turning heads and exciting foodies from across the county.
They also do a slap up takeaway. Naaz may be the new kids on the block but they are already attracting a lot of positivity (Image: TripAdvisor) 8. Barton Bangla Brasserie
Garstang Road
Fine dining and Indian food can definitely go hand-in-hand and this place is testament to that.
Barton Bangla is a staple of the Preston food scene, with many regulars from across the city visiting this curry house year upon year. Read More The Lancashire pies that won big at the National Pie Awards
With a large menu bursting with any dish you could wish to have from vegan and vegetarian friendly offerings to carnivorous curries, this is the place to go for a seriously good Indian feast.
They have been known to have some of the beast lamb dishes too with their Rogan Josh and Ampasha coming highly rated. Fine dining Indian style at the Barton Bangla Brasserie (Image: Barton Bangla Brasserie) 9. Bukhara Samlesbury
Samlesbury
We can guarantee you haven’t had Indian food quite like this (unless you’ve been here, then you probably have).
Chilman Biryani, mango salad and sweet Lassi, it’s all authentic, cooked with fresh ingredients and done better than any other place could. Read More Burnley pub up for sale as Wetherspoons to close 16 sites
Situated in Samlesbury village since 2004, Bukhara has been serving some truly fantastic Indian dishes for more than ten years.
The only downer is it is an alcohol-free establishment but who needs alcohol when the food is this good? The famous Mango Salad (Image: TripAdvisor) 10. Titash Tandoori
Station Road
Every list needs a cheap and cheerful option and here we have one of the best when it comes to value for money.
Admittedly, you’re not going to be sitting in Titash and eating. This is a takeaway.
It provides more than generous portions of all your favourite Indian dishes, with customers lauding their Chicken Tikka and Balti Chicken.
However, it’s the chilli chicken starter that really needs your attention. Just order three of them. Thank us later.
You won’t regret it.

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An appreciation of Moro food can bring Pinoy Muslims and Christians closer, says this Muslim chef | ABS-CBN News

An appreciation of Moro food can bring Pinoy Muslims and Christians closer, says this Muslim chef (From left) Chef Datu Shariff Pendatun III; burning coconut over hot coals; Urang Piyaren An appreciation of Moro food can bring Pinoy Muslims and Christians closer, says this Muslim chef A Filipino Muslim chef promotes the cuisines of Muslim Mindanao to encourage peaceful culinary-connect with Filipinos nationwide Barbara Mae Naredo Dacanay | Apr 20 2019 Save
A Filipino Muslim chef and writer has been cooking and serving the “black” dishes of the Moros from Muslim-dominated parts of southern Philippines, hoping to stir a fascination for seemingly exotic viands that could possibly pave a harmonious “culinary-connect” with Filipinos nationwide, majority of whom are Catholics.
“Appreciating Moro food (outside of Mindanao) is a step closer to realizing that we aren’t very different from each other after all. By perceiving similarities in ingredients, flavors, and cooking techniques, one becomes conscious of things that connect,” claims Datu Shariff Pendatun III, a professionally trained chef and award-winning food writer, who has also been serving as a food ambassador of sorts for the cuisine of his home region. Hailing from Maguindanao, Pendatun was a social anthropology student at the University of the Philippines , before he finished culinary arts with honors at the Center for Asian Culinary Studies in 2005. What is Moro food?
“Moro” encompasses different ethnic groups in Mindanao that are connected not just culturally but politically as well. Pendatun expounds, “Calling the foods of various Islamised ethnolinguistic groups (in Mindanao) Moro dishes is a political act in itself since the Moros own the term and have identified themselves as such.”
The Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) is composed of Basilan, Lanao del Sur, Maguindanao, Sulu, and Tawi-Tawi, formed after a referendum for autonomy in 1989, with Basilan and Marawi joining in 2001 after a peace settlement between the Philippine government and the 47-year-old Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF). The signing of a third pro-autonomy peace settlement by the government and the 38-year-old Moro Islamic Liberation Front (it became an MNLF faction in 1981) in 2014, resulted in Congress approving the creation of the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region (BAR) in January 2019.
To further explore the cuisines of Bangsamoro, Pendatun cooked and discussed a menu of six Moro dishes to illustrate his point about this “culinary-connect” during a well-attended lunch and lecture at Chef Jessie’s Place on Pililia Street in Makati last April 13. Organized by the Culinary Historians of the Philippines, the event was held in celebration of the country’s national Filipino Food Month. Pendatun (in black) preparing dishes with the chefs of Chef Jessie’s Place The coconut connection
“I am introducing authentic Moro dishes with black and deep brown sauces made of burnt and roasted coconut meat, respectively. They are not yet popular in Manila, but done for ages by the Badjaos and Tausugs who live near Sulu Sea, the Maranaos on the shores of Lake Lanao, and the Maguindanaoans in Cotabato province,” explains Pendatun regarding the Moro dishes presented during the lunch. Roasting coconut in a pan Burning coconut over hot coals
Top on Pendatun’s list is Piyanggang Manuk or black chicken curry, a Tausug dish. Hours before the chicken is cooked, one first makes the special sauce called pamapa itum that renders the chicken black in color. Chunks of white coconut meat are grilled over hot coals until both sides turn black or ashen, without a trace of milk. Pamapa itum
The burnt coconut meat is ground by food processor until thick, together with red curry paste, cilantro stems, garlic, yellow ginger, lemongrass, red onion, virgin coconut or olive oil, salt, spring onion, and fresh turmeric. Half of it is set aside to marinate choice chicken parts. The other half is mixed with the chicken after it is initially sautéed with garlic, ginger, lemongrass, and red onions, and then simmered for several minutes in coconut milk ( gata ) and coconut cream ( kakang gata ). Piyanggang Manuk
Piyanggang Manuk is similar to another Tausug dish, Tiyula Itum or black tinola , although it was not part of the menu at Chef Jessie’s Place. According to recipe books, Tiyula Itum is also flavored with pamapa itum , but without (or just a hint of) red curry. It is used for marinating chosen parts of the meat, as well as added after the meat is lightly fried with garlic, ginger, lengkuas (galangal), onions, turmeric, and simmered with black pepper, lemongrass, shallots, and white coconut milk. Tiyula Itum is for picky royals during weddings and Hari Raya festivities, food historians claim. Tiyula Itim
Pendatun also presented Lininggil a Kambing, a goat dish by the Maguindanaoans of Cotabato, that is more deep brown than black thanks to the use of palapa sauce. Made of grated coconut meat roasted in a pan until brown and perfumed by a mouthwatering oily aroma, this sauce is macerated until thick, then generously poured over the goat meat while it simmers in white coconut milk, ginger, and other special spices. Lininggil a Kambing Palapa from Maguindanao
Pendatun concocted Agal-agal, a seaweed salad with strips of green mango and the Tausugs’ special bubuk sauce. “ Bubuk is the Tausugs’ name for palapa sauce. The Maranaos call the same sauce papar ,” explains Clang Garcia, president of the Culinary Historians of the Philippines who has been spending time in the south to conduct research for her upcoming book on indigenous Moro dishes. Agal Agal
From black to light brown, Pendatun presented two more Moro dishes that use white coconut sauce ( puting gata ) to give these dishes a lighter appearance. The Maranaos’ Inaluban a Haruan is grilled snakehead fish ( dalag ) simmered in white coconut milk together with ginger, leeks, turmeric, and sweet potato leaves ( kamote tops). Maranao palapa in its wet form
The Maranaos’ Urang Piyaren is crawfish flavored with a “dry” sauce made of white coconut meat, turmeric, and chili. It is similar to central Philippines’ binakol or chicken stewed with coconut meat. Urang Piyaren
“Sauces with burned and roasted coconut meat create extra strong or mild smoke flavors, respectively, in Moro dishes,” Pendatun shares, assessing responses to the Moro dishes he served at the lunch event. “Trying them for the first time is always a discovery and novelty for most. The reactions I’ve witnessed were those of surprise and delight.”
The making of dark coconut sauce is not a monopoly of the Moros of Mindanao. The Tagalogs and Bicolanos of southern Luzon also have their own version of burnt coconut, albeit made differently by burning grated coconut meat with live coal in a pan. The Tagalogs call it kulawo , while the Bicolanos call it tinutungan . Pendatun explains that the sauces are meant to create a “soft breath of smoke (on dishes).” He adds, “ Tinutungan taught me the wisdom of whispering on live coals whenever I use them to burn grated coconut meat.” Tinutungan and chili are now added to ice cream in Bicol, food historians say.
Spreading the knowledge
Regarding his role in promoting Moro dishes nationwide, Pendatun says, “I have roots there and I have a connection to its food and culture.” That connection is evident when Pendatun immortalized a dish called Pastil in his essay that won second prize in the Doreen Gamboa Fernandez Food Writing contest in 2010. Pastil is a rice dish folded over slivers of chicken or fish—cooked ahead with ground turmeric powder, ginger, salt, and coconut oil—and shaped like a cylindrical suman with banana leaf. The dish is grilled on coal, “imparting a muted smokiness to the delicacy. The hot rice inside the banana leaf lends a unique flavor that flirts with fermentation.” Pastil, duck’s egg, and sweet kapi is the breakfast of both datus and workers in Buluan, Maguindanao, shares Pendatun, adding that he wrote his essay a few kilometers away from his grandfather’s old rubber plantation. Pastil
Hinting that people, more than chefs, can spread wider his favorite table-talk, Pendatun suggests, “Anyone who’s interested ought to travel to Mindanao and its islands to ascertain and promote southern cuisine.” Last year, a visit to the Pakaradjaan Food Festival in Lanao del Sur’s Marawi City during ARMM’s 29 th anniversary was an overwhelming show of force of authentic Moro dishes from the provinces of Basilan, Lanao del Sur, Maguindanao, Sulu, Tawi-Tawi, and Marawi City, all ARMM members. Pakaradjaan Food Festival
Chef Myke “Tatung” Sarthou, who is as passionate as Pendatun about Moro dishes, suggests the need for research to show the connections with neighboring cuisines: “I like to go deeper into our indigenous and pre-Hispanic cuisines to really understand who the Filipino is. We are part of the Southeast Asian community. It is most evident in coastal communities of Mindanao that are close to Borneo, Malaysia, Indonesia. There are a lot of similarities (in their cuisines).” Sarthou’s version of Beef Kulma of Tausug origin, possibly derived from the Indian-Southeast Asian “korma” (Photo by Paul del Rosario for FOOD Magazine)
If one can’t travel south, Pendatun suggests visiting eateries around the Golden Mosque in Manila’s Quiapo district. After all, hotels and high-end restaurants have popularized less indigenous southern Philippine dishes such as grilled tuna jaw and tail, tuna sashimi, curacha (spanner crab or red frog crab found in coastal Zamboanga and Sulu) steamed or with Alavar sauce, fresh oysters, pomelo-prawn salad, plus durian cakes, candies, and ice cream. Why not Moro dishes next?
With the enlargement of ARMM, after the legislated creation of the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region (BAR) last January 2019, a “deeper cuisine” of Moro dishes can be expected to be unearthed, Sarthou concludes with excitement.
Photos courtesy of Clang Garcia of the Culinary Historians of the Philippines and Nana Ozaeta /ancx/food-drink/features/04/17/19/soba-schooldays

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St. Lucia’s Jade Mountain Resort: What you need to know to visit

St. Lucia’s Jade Mountain Resort: What you need to know to visit Posted on by louisonurmark In 旅游/Travel/Pelancongan
JADE MOUNTAIN RESORT on the Caribbean island of Saint Lucia is one of the most romantic retreats in the world, but it’s not just for honeymooning couples. The resort was built to seamlessly incorporate its natural surroundings; so they built the rooms without a fourth wall. St. Lucia is a volcanic island (with a drive-in volcano) and is more mountainous than the majority of the Caribbean — it almost feels like it belongs in the South Pacific with scenery that Jade Mountain Resort capitalizes on brilliantly.
The resort has 29 luxury suites built into the mountain and terraced over 6 levels. Almost all the rooms have an infinity pool where the fourth wall would normally be — creating one of the most unique hotel experiences in the world.
A sovereign island country on the border of the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic ocean, St Lucia was originally colonized by the French, but gained full independence in 1979. And, although the cuisine is a blend of French, East Indian, and British, the official language is English.
Speaking of cuisine, the food at Jade Mountain (and the entire island) is impeccable, and we all know the Caribbean is famous for its rums, but each island has a unique twist. St. Lucia is known for its dark rum with full taste.
If you can manage to tear yourself away from your sanctuary, there’s a lot to do on this tiny island.
How to get there Jade Mountain Resort will arrange an airport pickup for you, or you can rent a car and drive from either Hewanorra International Airport (which receives flights from North America, UK, and Europe) or George FL Charles Airport (which receives regional flights on prop planes), located in Castries.
What to consider
The rooms have no televisions, telephones, or clocks.
The Jade Mountain and its sister resort, Anse Chastanet, are 600 acres (including a beach), and guests have full access to all of it.
Although you may never want to leave your room, if you do, you can rent mountain bikes, visit the Diamond Falls Botanical Gardens, dive the resort’s scuba center, or drive into a volcano.
Use all the mosquito repellent you can find; they’re vicious.
Snorkel gear is complimentary.

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Truely amazing

This is a luxury Hotel second to none, we stayed for two nights prior to getting onboard the Maharajas express.nIt is situated just opposite the Gateway to India in a prime location , on arrival w were lucky enough to get a room upgrade to a junior suite and what a suite . It is very difficult to do full justice to the Hotel , its décor is stupendous ( the Hotel is 115year old ) the service is fantastic and the food caters for all tastes .nWe were inundated ( in a nice way ) with the offer of help as soon as we entered the Hotel . Our room was checked at least four times every afternoon to make sure that we had everything that we wanted , I must say that I have never experienced service like this.nThere are several restaurants that provide everything from classic Indian cuisine to European food . We wanted a relaxed atmosphere so we went for the pool side restaurant which is only available for residents and I must say we had excellent food served speedily . nWorth noting that at 1830 every night there is a ceremony conducted by the pool side , this involves lighting of oil lamps – well worth seeing .nWe had complimentary afternoon tea but this is also available for a charge in the first floor restaurant .nBreakfast is comprehensive with a buffet style .nThere are also several shopping arcades where you can obtain men’s / women’s clothing / shoes / chocolates etc nI am not sure that I can add anything else except to say this must be one of the worlds great Hotels

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The 16th Annual Las Vegas Indian Food & Cultural Festival Brings Color, Rhythm and Authentic Cuisine to the Clark County Amphitheater May 4

The 16th Annual Las Vegas Indian Food & Cultural Festival Brings Color, Rhythm and Authentic Cuisine to the Clark County Amphitheater May 4
Spice things up at the Las Vegas Indian Food & Cultural Festival, presented by Clark County Parks & Recreation, on Saturday, May 4.
This food and cultural gathering takes place at the Clark County Amphitheater (500 Grand Central Pkwy.) from 11 a.m. – 9:30 p.m. Relish in an authentic Indian experience with food from the valley’s premier Indian establishments, music from famed Punjabi singer Kay V Singh, authentic clothing and jewelry vendors and more.
There will be an array of performances featuring traditional dance competitions, folk singers and fashion shows. The entire family is welcome to this open-air event with kids’ entertainment including magicians, face painters, characters and more. Admission to the festival is $7, children under 12 receive free admission.
Those interested in the Indian Food & Cultural Festival can contact 702-455-8200 or visit IndianFoodFestLV.com . For more information on Clark County Parks and Recreation, visit ClarkCountyNV.org/Parks . ©

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Recreating forgotten tastes

Bindu Gopal Rao
April 18, World Heritage Day, passed by without making much noise. But, of late, a lot of noise has been made about lost recipes and heritage food. Thanks to food experts and authors, serious efforts are going into preserving it.
Caught in the tide of time
Many of our recipes have been lost for lack of documentation. Ummi Abdulla, an expert in Mappila cuisine, took up the challenge and came out with a book titled A Kitchen Full of Stories. Conceptualised by Nazaneen Jalaludheen, her granddaughter, it has been brought out as a limited edition coffee table book. “Not much is known about how kitchens operated in the earlier times. But when my grandmother started telling me stories around the kitchen, they brought to my mind vivid images about how a regular day in a household must have been like quite unlike what it is today. I thought stories were a great way to document heritage recipes and beliefs around food and food types,” says Nazaneen. In the hope of creating a reference book for the future, Kasiviswanathan M, director, Food & Beverage, Radisson Blu Atria Bengaluru, is working on Chettinad cuisine. He says he wants to ensure that the next generation is aware of the food and equipment used by the community. “Many recipes differ from family to family and I am trying to document what I have learnt from my grandmother and mother.”
Back to roots
Food forms a big part of any culture and plays a major role in defining one. Sujit Chakraborty, executive chef at Novotel Guwahati, says, “In the modern age of fast food, one-pot and frozen meals, traditional cooking methods have lost their charm. All our focus is on presentation.”
There is special thrust on reviving cooking method because of the quality the process lends to the food. “One of the recipes that we have documented in detail is the panchara paata (sugared honeycomb). It requires a lot of time and technique and was usually prepared during weddings. Many, including my grandmother, believed that complete secrecy when preparing the dish was key to the success of the dish,” says Nazaneen.
Chef Regi Mathew, mentor/ partner Kappa Chakka Kandhari, a Chennai-based gourmet restaurant, says it is imperative to save the heritage because of the pace at which it is fading. “I have recreated the recipes which we used to have it in our childhood.” Among the recipes he has revived are pazham kanji (overnight soaked rice porridge, which is regarded as the healthiest meal), Asthram (tempered yogurt curry with arbi) and paani (a syrup made from toddy sap of palm trees).”
Unheard of dishes are making their way to the Indian plate. Are you game to taste?
TV tales
Television shows like Lost Recipes on Epic are doing their bit. “We are doing two recipes from North Karnataka, one is an extremely ancient Indian sweet and I think people are going to find it very interesting. The one is a very old egg dish that we cooked with one of the leading families of that region. We have done a tribal recipe from Seemandhra and also a coastal Andhra recipe that is totally spectacular. We are going to show some unheard of recipes from the city of Puri,” says host Aditya Bal.
Anglo-Indian heritage
Cookery book author and food consultant Bridget Kumar has published six recipe books exclusively on Anglo-Indian cuisine. She says the cuisine was perhaps one of the first examples of fusion food in India. Well, certainly, with names like Railway Lamb or Mutton Curry, The Dak Bungalow Curry, Grandma’s Country Captain Chicken, Colonel Standhurst’s Beef Curry, Veal Country Captain, Bengal Lancer’s Shrimp Curry, Fish and Boiled Egg Kedgeree, Double Onions Meat Curry (Do Piaza), Meat Glazzie/Glassey (fruity meat curry), Mulligatawny Soup or Meat Jalfrezi… “Sadly, many of these old colonial dishes are not cooked in Anglo-Indian homes these days. However, I have been bringing out these old recipes in my books. I also conduct workshops and training sessions for anyone interested in the forgotten recipes,” says Kumar.
Lau Chingri Ghonto
Ingredients
Lau or bottle gourd (whole, about 750 gm to 1 kg) 1 cup Prawns (shelled and deveined) 2 bay leaves ½ tsp panch phoron 1 tsp jeera powder 1 tsp dhania powder ½ tsp freshly crushed black peppercorn or kali mirch ½ tsp red chilli powder 1 tsp turmeric powder ½ tsp sugar Salt to taste 1 tbsp desi ghee 1 tbsp cooking oil Method
Scrap the skin and cut the lau into diamonds. Cut length wise six times and then slice horizontally. Wash and dry; sprinkle with a little turmeric and salt. Heat oil in a pan. When the oil smokes, add the panch phoron and bay leaf, immediately add the lau, not allowing the panch phoron to get charred. Fold well and cook the lau for 4-5 minutes, allow the water to be released. Now make a paste of jeera, dhania, kali mirch, laal mirch and haldi powder by mixing them with a little water. Add this paste to the lau and fold well. Add sugar also. Now mix these well with the lau and sprinkle a little water, if required. Cover and cook on medium heat till the lau is tender. Now add the prawns and cook for another 2-3 minutes. Sprinkle little water if required and fold well. Add desi ghee and mix well. Serve hot with steamed rice. Courtesy Sujit Chakraborty, executive chef, Novotel, Guwahati

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A Fresh Spring Cocktail Celebration and More Local Food Events

Flipboard Eater SF’s events roundup provides a weekly curated rundown of the most interesting and engaging local dining and drinking festivals, classes, workshops, dinners, and more. Published every week, this is your stop for all the happenings that are actually worthy of your time in San Francisco, the East Bay, the Peninsula, the North Bay, Napa Valley, and beyond. Every week, Eater SF editors weed through tips, emails, and listings to bring you the most essential food-related happenings — each and every event listed here is a personal recommendation from an Eater editor, hand-selected because of its intriguing menu, above-the-bar cuisine or drink, or exceptional chef and restaurant involvement. The focus is on events taking place in the next three months, as well as upcoming affairs you’ll want to make reservations or buy tickets for stat (before they sell out). Food and drink events are listed in chronological order. Have an event you’d like listed here? Send it our way at . April April 20 Le Dix-Sept Pastry Pop-up at Harmonic Brewing What : Get some sweets ahead of Easter and timed to other annual traditions — “It’s 4/20 so I think people will be coming hungry,” says Michelle Hernandez. It’s also her first big Saturday sale of the season. Come for nougat, vanilla bean canelés, rose raspberry knots, and more pastry — not to mention beer from the host, Harmonic Brewing. Details: 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Harmonic’s Dogpatch taproom and brewery April 24 Spring Cocktails of the Farmers Market What: First Bloom, as the CUESA folks are calling their annual Spring Cocktails of the Farmers Market gathering, will showcase drinks from local bartenders incorporating the latest ingredients of the season: Think edible flowers, bright herbs, and first-of-the-year berries. Try drinks from Dzu Nguyen of Horsefeather, Cindy Liu of Cold Drinks, Maritza Rocha-Alvarez of Pagan Idol & Zombie Village, and 10 more. Details: Held at the SF Ferry Building $60-$65 general admission , 5:30 p.m. April 27 Harbor House Inn and Avery Collaboration Dinner What: Following two dinners at Avery in February, chefs Rodney Wages (Avery) and Matthew Kammerer (Harbor House Inn) join forces again — this time along the coast in Elk. They’ll prepare at 10-course meal with optional wine pairings highlighting Mendocino wineries. Make it an overnight trip with breakfast and a morning foraging trip led by Kammerer to the Inn’s private beach. Details: Held at 6 p.m. at The Harbor House Inn, 5600 South Highway 1 in Elk. Meal costs $180, plus $100 for wine pairings or $75 for non-alcoholic pairings. Reservations on Tock . Italian Dinner at Tank18 Winery What: An Italian-themed BYOB event, in which guests are encouraged to bring an empty, clean wine bottle to the winery, which they’ll fill with their newly released Sangiovese for $8.99. For $2, guests can buy a fresh bottle; there’s no limit to the amount of bottles that can be filled. A special menu of snacks like smoked brisket arancini, meatballs, and burgers will be available. Details : Don’t forget a bottle! Bottle fills and food will be available form 11 a.m.- 4 p.m. at 1345 Howard Street April 28 Greek Easter and Five Year Celebration at Souvla What: The casualGreek restaurant is celebrating two things: five years in business, and Greek Easter. That means there’ll be whole lambs roasting on spits, live Greek music, an open bar with Greek wine and beer, and tons of other Greek Easter foods. Details : All of the above can be yours for $75, all of which will go to La Cocina, the local non-profit helping women, immigrants, and people of color start businesses. The party is happening at Souvla’s NoPa location (531 Divisadero Street) from 2 p.m.- 7 p.m.; tickets are available here . May May 1 Rich Table Dinner With Stag Dining What : A collaborative dinner with Evan and Sarah Rich and Stag Dining chefs Jordan Grosser and Ted Fleury, serving recipes from the Rich Table cookbook. Rich Table cookbook co-author Carolyn Alburger Warsham and photographer Alanna Hale will be on hand for a Q&A about the process. [Disclosure: Carolyn Alburger Warsham is Eater Cities Director] Details : A seven-course, family-style dinner with a welcome cocktail and three wine pairings, and a low-ABV cocktail pairing. Signed Rich Table will be available for purchase. Dinner is 6:30 p.m.- 9 p.m. at Cerf Club (925 O’Farrell St.); tickets are $180 and available here . May 9-11 6th Annual Calistoga Food & Wine Event What: A three-day event started by Solbar at the Solage, featuring special receptions, dinners, and a grand tasting, all of which feature wines from the Calistoga AVA. Details : Tickets to individual events, including the grand tasting are available here ; check out the full lineup with more information here . May 13 An Indian-Ish Dinner at Dyafa What: Reem Assil and author Priya Krishna are teaming up for a five-course dinner inspired by both recipes from Krishna’s recipes and Assil’s Syrian-Palestinian-Lebanese background. Details : Tickets are $82 (excluding tax and gratuity) and include a signed copy of Indian-Ish; cocktail pairings will be available. Doors at 6:30 p.m., dinner at 7 p.m. 44 Webster Street, Oakland May 24-26 BottleRock 2019 What: A three-day music and food festival in downtown Napa. Musical headliners are Imagine Dragons, Mumford and Sons, and others, while the Williams-Sonoma culinary stage will feature celebrity chef demos, musical performances, and more. (Lineup to be announced soon.) Details : Tickets are available for single day or three-day, starting at $159. Check out all the options here . The festival takes place on the Napa fair grounds. Eater SF Sign up for our newsletter. Enter your email address Subscribe By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy and European users agree to the data transfer policy. Korean Theater Chain With Short Rib Wraps Taking Over AMC Van Ness Space The Oakland Restaurant Giving Zacatecan Immigrants a Taste of Their Home Luxe FiDi Restaurant From Trestle Team Arrives Next Week Loading comments…

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This Famous San Francisco Restaurant Has Now Opened In Delhi To Excite Your ‘Rooh’

Shatarupa Ganguly Events , Food , New in Town
For the ones living outside India in San Francisco, ‘Rooh’ became their haven for authentic Indian cuisine. Bringing ethnic flavours back to their homeland, ‘Rooh’ is now open in Delhi and all set to offer their soulful food.
Image Source What To Expect?
This Indian-inspired restaurant and cocktail bar, Rooh is a communal space for relaxed social dining. The decor has the vibrancy of Indian culture, art and music, as well as the innovative spirit of modern India. What You’ll Love?
The picturesque view of Qutub Minar is breatakingly beautiful! The menu at Rooh has been curated to offer an eclectic choice of vegetarian and non-vegetarian options with each dish being a piece of culinary art in both taste and presentation. The eleven-course tasting menu includes some of the best Indian delicacies. They have a carefully and thoughtfully curated the wine library too!

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Getting to Know the Sunflower State on the “Big Kansas Road Trip”

There is much to love about the great state of Kansas—the art and architecture, local cuisine, fun events, and the awe-inspiring landscape that tells the story of the past, present, and future of our state. The Kansas Sampler Foundation has designed a program that encourages Kansans to get out and explore the hidden gems found in the Sunflower State. It’s called the Big Kansas Road Trip , and it’s bringing people from across Kansas right through Trego County to visit three of our Northwest Kansas neighbors.
The Land and Sky Scenic Byway
The Big Kansas Road Trip (BKRT) is an annual event that puts a spotlight on a three neighboring counties. The 2019 event is focusing on the Land and Sky Byway, taking travelers through the communities and rural areas of Cheyenne, Sherman, and Wallace counties on May 2 nd to 5 th .
What You’ll See on the Big Kansas Road Trip
The four-day adventure explores the historical sites, shops, attractions, and scenic roads of Northwest Kansas at your own pace. The red carpet is awaiting you at the many lodging options and restaurants you’ll find along the way, and the BKRT Program Guide will make sure you don’t miss a thing!
Sherman County (Goodland, Kanorado, Edison) is famous for its celebration of our state flower with its Giant Van Gogh painting, but did you know it’s also the home of America’s first patented helicopter? You’ll find it at the Goodland’s High Plains Museum .
You’ll also find the historic 1928 White Eagle gas station , John Deere Grasshopper sculpture, and the Kidder Battle Site where the 1867 massacre of the same name occurred within the county’s borders.
When you get hungry make a stop at Crazy R’s Bar & Grill for their delicious burgers and steaks or King’s Cafe , which is a great place for home cooking and pastries.
Cheyenne County (St. Francis, Bird City, Wheeler) offers visitors a chance to experience the amazing beauty of the Western Kansas prairie. Travel to the Arikaree Breaks to see a pint-sized Kansas version of the Grand Canyon, or stand tall at “Three Corners,” where Colorado, Nebraska, and Kansas meet. At Cherry Creek Encampment and the Ancient Indian Traders Trail take a moment to reflect on our difficult history with the original people who claimed this prairie their own.
When your day of exploring comes to an end, stop by the Fresh Seven Coffee at Union Square for a refreshing treat or Big Ed’s Steakhouse for a thick, hand-cut steak dinner.
Wallace County (Sharon Springs, Weskan, Wallace) is home to Mt. Sunflower , the highest point in Kansas at 4,039-feet. The mechanically-minded people will enjoy visiting the Radiel Wrench Museum , where they’ll find a collection of 10,000 wrenches, and hobbyists of domestic crafts should visit the General Store for bulk food, fabric and sewing supplies, and gifts.
Take a peek into Kansas’s prehistoric story at the Fort Wallace Museum —home to a 40-foot long replica of a plesiosaur fossil discovered in 1867 by the fort’s surgeon. The museum also contains Old West memorabilia and art work that will take you back to the days when legendary Western men, like General Custer, Wild Bill Hickock, and Buffalo Bill Cody, called the fort “The Fightin’est Fort in the West.” And, don’t miss touring the Kansas Pacific Railway’s Superintendent’s Residence . Built in 1879, it is considered to be the finest example of its kind in the West.
Much, Much More!
There are many more fascinating things you’ll find along the 2019 BKRT route, like Erin’s Food Truck that will be featuring a special menu for the tour. Special events, such as a concert series by Michael Martin Murphey that will occur on May 2 nd , 3 rd , and 4 th . Check out the Big Kansas Road Trip website for more information.
NOTE: Sherman and Wallace counties observe Mountain Time. Once you’ve entered these counties you are in a time warp , reversing time one hour!
The “Stump”
You can find out more about the BKRT from program organizers Marci Penner and WenDee Rowe at one of the Kansas Sampler Festival’s “Stump “ events . During the 15-minute question/answer games they will provide more insight into the many things to see and do in the three featured counties. The Stump events are scheduled in seven different communities located in the featured counties and the winner will receive a prize from a Stump sponsor!
Don’t Forget to Stop by Trego County on Your Trip West!
The Smoky Valley Scenic Byway has its own adventure waiting for you! Take a break during your adventure at the many great restaurants, shops, and attractions located in Trego County.
Our Restaurants
We have many notable restaurants serving local delicacies, like bierocks and catfish. Take a seat in the Western Kansas Saloon & Grill, Tropical Mexican Restaurant, Brazen Bull, Mike’s Place, or Jake and Chet’s.
Pick up a treat from our local Pizza Hut, Subway, McDonald’s, or Dairy Queen for an on-the-go treat.
Satisfy your sweet tooth with a soda or shake at Gibson’s Healthmart’s old-fashioned soda fountain or a cookie at Hometown Bakery.
And you’ll want to explore the aisles of Main Street Giftery & Floral, Gibson Health Mart Pharmacy, and Cleland Pharmacy, where you’ll find Kansas-themed gifts and locally made gifts. You can even memorialize your trip through our county with a turn at the artist’s table at Studio 128 and a bottle of wine from Shiloh Vineyards!
Explore our state on the Big Kansas Road Trip this May 2 nd -5 th ! You’ll find surprises, thrills, and great people along the way.

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