Disappointing

Disappointing

We booked Shinagawa Prince because it was across the street from the Shinagawa Train Station. Their advertising neglected to say that you had to go through a large shopping centre to get to reception. When we eventually got across the street, through the shopping centre and were looking for reception, we were also surprised to find three towers, each with its own reception desk. When we got to our reception desk there was only one staff member checking people in. A long line quickly formed behind us because the person being checked in ahead of us was obviously having some trouble. Eventually we hailed a staff member who was walking around with a laptop and asked if we could use the on-line check in terminal. He helped us do so. Suffice to say this is not the ideal greeting to receive when trying to check-in after 24 hours travel. Then we attempted to find our room. Our key card had the room number: 33-nnnn. 33rd floor? Of course not! 16th floor. And how were we to know? I think there were 6 different elevators going to different levels of the main tower, and no one directing traffic. And when we got to the room we found it to be a bit shabby and with no space at all to open our cases. Oh well, we expected to have smaller rooms in Japanese hotels but by the end of our 3 week trip, we could look back and say that this was definitely the smallest and by no means the cheapest. We were disappointed with the Shinagawa Prince Hotel and would not stay there again. We did, however, like the breakfast.
On a positive note, we did like the buffet breakfast. It was served in a massive dining hall and had a multitude of dishes from Western, Japanese, Chinese and Indian cuisines. No shortage of choice. But seriously you could easily get lost if you did not take care to remember where your table was. We saw a few people wandering around with trays of food and puzzled faces …
Stayed in March 2019

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Whipped Cream – Cake Topping – Indian Recipes – Andhra Telugu Vegetarian Food Cuisine Vantalu

Whipped Cream – Cake Topping – Indian Recipes – Andhra Telugu Vegetarian Food Cuisine Vantalu
Link “Home Made Cream” Recipe http://youtu.be/ZweK7NA8oHo Exhaustive recipe text in English available on http://bit.ly/2V1TNsM Ingredients: Chilled Homemade Cream (Malai) — 1/2Cup (125gms) Chilled Milk — 1/4Cup (50gms) Icing Sugar — 2Tbsps (30gms) – See Below Vanilla Essence — 1/8tsp

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Guide to the famous foods of Delhi

Take out / take-away A guide to the most famous foods of Delhi, plus best restaurants, street food, and food tours
DELHI IS KNOWN as the food capital of India. The city is famous for a variety of foods, dishes, and restaurants. You can’t miss trying the famous Delhi foods when you’re visiting. This guide covers restaurants in New Delhi, street foods, sweet foods, and some recommended Delhi food walks.
I’ve lived in Delhi on-and-off for 13 years, and spent several winters in the city, which was recently named “Best Destination For Food/Drink in India” by Lonely Planet India magazine. I concur. Food all over India is great of course, but Delhi is a one-stop destination for famous local dishes and much much more. You can read a lot more about what to do in Delhi in my Delhi Travel Guide .
Here are some of my favourite dishes, street food, sweets, restaurants, best places to eat in Delhi — plus suggestions for getting all of this yummy food delivered to your door. This guide also indicates if there is a vegetarian version (V) and whether it’s gluten-free (GF). Enjoy. (Warning: do not read while hungry.) Top 5 favourite famous Delhi foods Top 5 favourite street foods of Delhi Top 5 favourite sweet foods of Delhi Top 10 favourite restaurants in Delhi Top 5 favourite food tours of Delhi How to get takeaway in Delhi If you are planning to travel in India, let us help you! We offer itinerary planning, India for Beginners custom tours , and much more to make sure your trip to India is filled with more magic … and less madness.
The South Indian thali at Naivedyam in Hauz Khas Top 5 favourite famous Delhi foods Butter Chicken. I don’t eat meat so I cannot attest to the awesomeness of Butter Chicken in Delhi, but everyone talks about it, so it must be true. Called Murgh Makhani in Hindi. Kebabs. Kebabs come in many flavours, some meat and some vegetarian. They are sold all over Delhi in fine restaurants and on street corners. The kebab stalls in Khan Market are inexpensive and well-loved. The best kebabs I’ve had were at Dum Pukht, a very high-end dining room at the gorgeous ITC Maurya Hotel . V Parathas. Alas, as someone who has to eat gluten-free, I can no longer enjoy thick, stuffed-bread Parathas. But I used to eat them, on my first few trips to India, so the memory lingers. Paranthe Wali Gali in Chandni Chowk, Old Delhi, is the place to go. V Sarson ka Saag and Mukki ki Roti. There are a lot of Punjabis in Delhi, and the rich, filling and delicious food from this culture is one of the main reasons Delhi’s cuisine is world famous. Sarson Ka Saag (made from mustard leaves) is probably the signature dish of Punjabi cuisine. Even if you have to eat gluten-free diet, like me, you can enjoy Missi Roti, which is made from gram flour (though wheat flour is sometimes mixed in, so you must ask) and Mukki ki Roti, which is made from corn flour (but ask about wheat flour in the batter). V, GF
TIP: When you see Bollywood stars running through fields of yellow flowers, that’s the mustard fields of Punjab. Shah Rukh Khan and Kajol in the mustard fields of Punjab Dal Makhani. There are many types of dal (lentils), but somehow Delhiites seem to prefer Dal Makhani, made from red kidney beans and whole black lentils. You can get Dal Makhani in dhabas, restaurants, homes and fine restaurants. Well, everywhere. At Bukhara , often cited as India’s best restaurant, they make a dish called Dal Bukhara, which is a lot like Dal Makahni, but only with black (urad) lentils. It’s considered by many to be the best dal in the world, and I can tell you, it is melt-in-the-mouth amazing.
TIP: Here’s a recipe for Dal Bukhara . Good luck. The secret is in the very, very long cooking time. Chole Bhatura, a favourite Delhi dish
Dilli ki Sardi
Winter in Delhi is sometimes affectionately called Dilli ki Sardi (after a very popular Bollywood song ). Locals love the cooler temperatures and the excuse to get out the sweaters and indulge in rich, warming foods. Dishes like sarson ka saag, masala chai, and gajar ka halwa. The street vendors sell warm peanuts, and foggy mornings bathe the city in a romantic hue. It’s worth spending a few days to get to know this aspect of Delhi. Top 5 favourite street foods of Delhi Chole Bhatura. Spicy chole (chickpeas) and deep fried bread. This is Delhi food at its most calorific, filling, and sensation-exploding … not suitable for gluten-free diets, alas, unless you eat the chole with something else, like rice. V Dahi Papdi Chaat. One of my absolute favourite street foods, it’s sweet, tangy, light, filling … all good things. Wheat wafers, moong beans, potatoes, yogurt, chutney, spices and sauce are all layered together in a gooey mess. For those who avoid gluten, have it made without the papdi (wheat wafers). V, GF Gol Gappas. These are called Pani Puri in Mumbai, where these treats are equally popular. Little crisp, fried flour balls are filled with a mixture of flavoured water, tamarind chutney, chili, chaat masala, potato, onion and chickpeas. No gluten-free option that I’m aware of. V Aloo Tikki. Another one of my favourites, very good for eating when the temperature drops in winter in Delhi. Spicy, pan-friend potato patties, served with chutney. V, GF Samosas. Everyone knows samosas, the stand-by Indian snack enjoyed all over Delhi and just about everywhere else on the planet. You can get meat or vegetarian versions, spicy or mild. V
TIP: Old Delhi’s street food is famously good, and sometimes famously unhygienic (have you see the film Delhi Belly?). You can get everything in many of the small, traditional restaurants and cafes of Delhi such as these places — which are just as delicious but much more hygienic: Natraj Dahi Wale Bhalla, Nathu Sweets, Anupama Sweets, Moti Mahal, Bengali Sweets, Haldirams, Evergreen.
I say this every time and I’ll say this again, Delhi is way better than Mumbai in terms of food. Be it street food or fine dining. It is a fact and it’s coming from a Mumbaikar. Except the Gujarati chaat, which is better in Mumbai, Delhi can definitely be called the food capital for me as of now. – Ashrita, Caramel Wings There’s nothing like a fresh, hot jalebi Top 5 favourite sweet foods of Delhi Gulab jamun. I always say these little milk dumplings are the reason I gained 15 pounds in India. V, GF Gajar ka halwa. Made from the red carrots of India, this dessert is best eaten fresh and warm. V, GF Kulfi . Punjabi ice cream. Need I say more? Yes, Pista Kulfi. The pistachio flavour, is a favourite of many. V, GF Jalebis. Many Delhiites would live and die for freshly made jalebis. Old Famous Jalebi Wala in Old Delhi is THE place to go. But as long as you are eating them right out of the hot oil, you’re good to go. V Rasmalai. Made from fresh cheese and sweet milky sauce, they are light and a little less sweet than many of India’s over-the-top desserts that give you an instant sugar high (and sometimes a headache). V, GF Tandoori Jhinga at Bukhara. Photo courtesy Andrew Dobson. Top 10 favourite restaurants in Delhi Bukhara. Often called India’s best restaurant. I’ve had the incredible privilege of eating there on several occasions, including the time I stayed at the ITC Maurya Hotel , where Bukhara is located. Most recently I enjoyed a feast with fellow Torontonian Andrew Dobson, which you can read about here .
TIP: Do not miss the Dal Bukara and Tandoori Jhinga (Shrimp). Sodabottleopenerwala. This is the new India — hip, fun, and creatively self-referencing. Located in trendy Khan Market, Sodabottleopenerwala is a post-modern take on Mumbai’s iconic Iranian cafes. Rajdhani. Going to Rajdhani is an experience. A small army of waiters swarm around your table, spooning never-ending servings of authentic vegetarian Gujarati and Rajasthani cuisine onto your thali (plate). V Andhra Bhavan. Eating lunch at this busy canteen in the heart of Delhi is an experience in well-ordered chaos. Political leaders jostle with civil servants and tourists to eat very affordable, very spicy traditional food from Andhra Pradesh. An insider favourite. Gulati Restaurant. Delhiites love to stop at a Pandara Road eatery on their way home from socializing, and Gulati’s is the top choice. Open since 1959, it is elegant in a non-fussy way, and serves consistently good north Indian cuisine including kebabs, biryanis and tandoori. Spice Route, at The Imperial Hotel, is one of the most beautiful restaurants in India Potbelly Rooftop Cafe. Like Sodabottleopenerwala, this place is a fresh, new concept in India, and is located in the newly trendy Shahpur Jat neighbourood of South Delhi. Not easy to find, but worth it. Small rooms with large views and a very good Bihari-inspired cuisine. Affordable, unique and fun. Naivedyam. My standby in Hauz Khas, it’s very affordable and will transport you to traditional South India. V Saravanna Bhavan. A chain of cheap ‘n cheerful South Indian eateries, there are several in Delhi (though I always eat at the one on Janpath). The food is consistently good, no matter how busy the restaurant is. V Spice Route. Voted one of the most beautiful restaurants in the world, this Imperial Hotel classic is also one of the most pricey in Delhi. I ate there once, and have never forgotten the food or the experience. Dakshin. It’s easy to get affordable South Indian food like dosas and idly’s, but just once, you should try gourmet South Indian food. That’s what this beautiful restaurant in the Sheraton New Delhi Hotel serves. It’s a journey through the cuisine of four South Indian states. Unlimited vegetarian thali at Rajdhani restaurant in Delhi Top 5 favourite food tours of Delhi
Taking a culinary, or food tour of Delhi, is by far the best way to get to know the local favourites, the insider secrets, and the best foods at the best prices. Here are some fun food tours you cannot miss!
Take out / take-away
Delhi is not only famous for food, it’s also famous for traffic. If you don’t feel like going out, Food Panda is a great service in Delhi (and 100 other cities in India) that will deliver food from many of the restaurants in Delhi for no extra charge. You can search the Food Panda website by neighbourhood, or cuisine and you can see the full menu for each restaurant listed, to make ordering easy.
Other take away options are Zomatio and Swiggy.
Gulab Jamun: The main reason I gained weight in India
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Best Hotel in Lucerne

Nothing …
Nice lake view from the room, world class facilities & helpful stuff. If you want to relax, have a visit to lobby and enjoy your coffee with the best view of Lucerne Lake. The hotel offers a free boat shuttle to Lucerne town. Its really nice to take it and see the view from the boat. Very nice breakfast with the best view ever! The resort have few restaurants, i ate at two of them. Spices (Indian, Thailand, Chinese menus) & Sharq (Lebanese Cuisine), both of them have nice food with good lake view. Try to book your table before arriving to the resort so you can have the best table with the view. You will also enjoy the Sap and don’t miss the view while you swimming in the pool. You will thank me later :)! The hotel really worth the money you will pay! I enjoyed my stay and for sure will come back again. Thank you Bürgenstock Hotels for making this stay worth it! الفندق حاطين اتجاه القبله في الادراج + الحمام فيه رشاش 🙂
Stayed in April 2019

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ARTS: Spring fever brings corridor to life (Spring 2019)

April 23rd, 2019· No Comments Annex cultural communities bring their best to the table
By Meribeth Deen
The Bloor St. Arts Corridor offers some of the richest and most diverse cultural opportunities anywhere in Toronto, all within a subway-accessible 1.5 kilometre strip. Each year, more than three million members of the public go to Bloor St. Culture Corridor exhibitions, performances, and events. Each month, the Bloor St. Arts Corridor offers readers of the Annex Gleaner a taste of what we’ve got to offer in upcoming events. This spring brings a plethora of offerings, so get out and make the most of your neighbourhood.
MUSIC
The sounds of the 1930s are bound to get spring swinging in the Arts Corridor, starting at the Bata Shoe Museum on April 10. The museum is welcoming students from some of the city’s most prestigious music programs to play works from the 1930s. This free event (if you register, by emailing rsvp@batashoemuseum.ca or calling 416-979-7799) will provide the perfect mental soundtrack for your viewing of the exhibition Want: Desire, Design and Depression Era Footwear. You may want to continue enjoying the spirit of the age by hopping over to the the Alliance Française for the film Django, on April 11. This film serves as a warm up to the Stephen Wremble Band’s April 13 concert, performing The Django Experiment, celebrating the 109th anniversary of Django Reinhardt’s birth.
On the weekend of April 12, step out onto your experimental edge at the Music Gallery. In co-operation with Arraymusic and Native Women in the Arts, the Music Gallery is hosting the Raven Chacon Mini-Festival. Born on the land of the Navajo Nation, Raven Chacon is acclaimed as a composer of chamber music, performer of experimental noise music, and as an installation artist. The festival will feature the world premiere of For Zitkála-Šá, dedicated to the first American Indian librettist with the Array Ensemble (Allison Cameron, Nicole Rampersaud, and Germaine Liu) and others. Go to www.musicgallery.org for more information.
If you want to keep mixing up musical melodies, head to the Royal Conservatory of Music’s Koerner Hall on April 14 to experience DakhaBrakha’s “ethnic chaos”. DakhaBrakha was created at the Kyiv Center of Contemporary Art by avant-garde theatre director Vladyslav Troitskyi. Accompanied by Indian, Arabic, African, Russian, and Australian traditional instrumentation, the quartet’s astonishingly powerful and uncompromising vocal range creates a trans-national sound rooted in Ukrainian culture.
FOOD & FILM
Hungry for the taste of spring? Be sure to make your way to the Japan Foundation for a free screening of the Hunt for Matsutake, on April 4. This documentary features the Japanese-Canadian history of Matsutake hunting. The mushrooms are prized for their distinctly spicy and aromatic flavour in Japanese cuisine, and can only be found in the wild.
Speaking of mushrooms, try pairing them with vodka on April 12 at the Museum of Estonians Abroad. Estonia has a long history of producing and enjoying vodka. Sada ja seened (100g with mushrooms) refers to the tradition of having a bite of salted mushrooms or mushroom salad with 100g of vodka. At this event led by Paul Lillakas and vodka specialist Wes Galloway, participants will have a chance to taste different vodkas and learn how to make tasty bites to go along with them. Tickets: $35/$20 (students). 19+ event. Please register by April 8 to vemu@tartucollege.ca.
If you’re still craving a story with flavour, put April 16 in your calendar. Hot Docs is featuring the world premiere of Red Chef Revival, a docu-series showcasing the work of three indigenous chefs from across Canada who bring traditional ingredients to the modern table. The premiere includes dinner, a cocktail, and a post-film Q&A, all for under $50.
LEARNING
Ever wonder What happened to Yiddish Theatre in Toronto? Well head to the Miles Nadal JCC to find out on April 4 at 1 pm. Ralph Wintrop, founding member and chair of the Jewish Theatre Committee of Toronto, will be offering this entertaining presentation which includes dramatic readings from plays that once graced local stages.
To zoom out and see humanity from a completely different perspective, head over to the ROM on April 11 at 11 am to discover the museum’s newest permanent project dedicated to the story of the dawn of life. This new space will take visitors on a journey from the origin of life itself, close to 4 billion years ago, to the dawn of dinosaurs, roughly 200 million years ago. Speaker Dr. Jean-Bernard Caron, the Senior Curator of Invertebrate Paleontology at the ROM, will show spectacular fossils never before exhibited to the public.
Finally, delve into the history of Toronto’s hip hop scene by checking out For the Record: An Idea of North, an interactive mixed-media exhibition at the Toronto Reference Library, which illuminates the emergence of Toronto’s hip hop culture, and includes a panel discussion on Tuesday, April 16, 6:30-7:30 pm, and free guided gallery tours on Tuesdays at 2 pm. www.tpl.ca .

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10 Asian Cities You’ve Never Heard of Before, But Will Soon

$type=carousel$sn=0$cols=4$va=0$count=12$show=home 10 Asian Cities You’ve Never Heard of Before, But Will Soon 0 0 Sunday, April 28, 2019 Edit this post By Sarah Ashley , PureWow Bangkok, Shanghai, Tokyo—they’re all on your bucket list, of course. But while you’re planning (or, er, just daydreaming about) your big Asian adventure, consider a few lesser-known cities before they become the next hot spots. Here, ten Asian cities you’ll want to know about now, before everyone else does. RELATED : 20 Cities Where Travelers Get the Best Value Chiang Rai, Thailand Nestled next to uber-popular Chiang Mai is Chiang Rai, a city brimming with stunning nature and architecture. Located in a mountainous region in north Thailand, Chiang Rai has lower temperatures than the rest of the country, but it’s still wet and tropical—ideal for travelers looking to hike lush jungle paths and meet locals (many treks into the mountains include visits to hill tribe villages, communities that have lived and farmed in the region for centuries). Be sure to check out Wat Rong Khun, also known as the white temple, for a truly mystical experience. And don’t forget to try some traditional northern-style Thai cuisine, which relies less on coconut milk and more on bitter spices and juicy pork than southern-style dishes. We recommend the kà-nŏm jeen nám ngée-o (rice noodles in pork- and tomato-based broth). Where to stay : Why not wake up to a jungle view from a mountaintop hotel and end the day hanging out with elephants at the Anantara Golden Triangle Elephant Camp & Resort? Shodoshima, Japan When a city is a go-to retreat for locals, you better believe they’re onto something. Shōdo Island is home to Shodoshima, a town full of olive groves that feels more like a Mediterranean village than what you’d probably expect. Aside from the olive trees growing throughout the city, Shodoshima is replete with rural rice fields and soothing hot springs. Hop in a gondola for a spectacular ride over the Kankakei Gorge (and be sure to have your camera ready and rolling), then visit Choshikei Monkey Park where wild macaques roam the hillside. Where to stay : The Bay Resort Hotel is a luxurious spot with large suites overlooking the surrounding blue sea and emerald mountains. It also happens to offer olive oil massages. Palembang, Indonesia Dutch travelers once referred to this port town on Indonesia’s Musi River as “The Venice of the East.” No offense to the Dutch, but Palembang’s 120 or so canals and streams make the city noteworthy all on its own. Shop the many floating markets and vendors along the Musi River, and visit the towering Kemaro Temple by boat during the day. At night, stroll along the Ampera Bridge, which was built in 1965 and is one of Palembang’s most iconic structures. For a wild history lesson, hit up the Sultan Mahmud Badaruddin II Museum and then nosh on some pempek, an ancient fishcake delicacy from the region’s Srivijayan Empire days. Where to stay : Sip fresh-squeezed juice at Hotel Santika Premiere Bandara’s infinity pool before trying traditional Indonesian cuisine at the four-star resort’s Belida Restaurant. Galle, Sri Lanka Galle seems like the best destination for the bohemian traveler—or, at the very least, a visitor hoping to stumble into cultural experiences and local art by simply meandering down narrow cobblestone streets. This city on the coast boasts tons of cute cafés and artisans selling unique wares. It’s also the home of Galle Fort, a current UNESCO World Heritage site that was built by the Portuguese in 1588. Unawatuna Beach is a must-visit, as the waters are bright blue and fishermen on stilts can be seen towering above the ocean hunting for grub. Like much of Galle’s history, the cuisine tends to be a hearty blend of Western and Asian dishes. If authentic Sri Lankan food is what you’re after, hit up Lucky Fort Restaurant for its infamous ten curries meal. Where to stay : The Amangalla has been hosting travelers for about 150 years and the colonial-style rooms are full of antiques. Have no fear—it’s definitely a modern luxury resort complete with spa services and a yoga pavilion. Vientiane, Laos You’d think the capital city of any Southeast Asian country would already be a hot spot for tourists, but Vientiane is an oft-overlooked vacation destination. Its high chill factor might make it a less go-to spot than Thailand or Vietnam, but if serenity is what you seek, you shall find it in Vientiane. Take a luxurious walk along the Mekong River bordering Thailand or hop in a tuk-tuk (a motorized pedi-cab) to Buddha Park, a stunning expanse of greenery full of Buddhist and Hindu sculptures. At night, local crafters set up shop in red tents along the river to sell handmade souvenirs. Where to stay : The Ansara Hotel is a boutique hotel in the heart of the city, full of traditional Laotian decor, complimentary breakfast and an upscale French restaurant, La Signature, on site. Pokhara, Nepal Located 120 miles west of Kathmandu and within roughly 15 miles of the Annapurna Mountain Range (home to three of the world’s ten highest peaks) is Pokhara. Considering its trade roots and the fact that visitors could only access it by foot until the 1960s, Pokhara is the adventure traveler’s ideal South Asian destination. To no one’s surprise, mountain climbing and hiking in the Annapurna range is a huge draw, but don’t overlook paddle boating on or paragliding over Phewa Lake. Check out Devi’s Falls (ideally just after monsoon season) and the World Peace Pagoda, which offers a stunning panoramic view of the city, lake and surrounding mountains. Pokhara is super laid-back, which is no surprise considering the many yoga retreats available to visitors. Where to stay : Staying in the mountains of Nepal calls for some serious glamping, which The Pavilion Villas offers, and then some. Natural spring pools, insane views and fireplaces, oh my! Rishikesh, India Calling all vegetarian yogis looking for their next meditation vacation. Rishikesh, also known as the Yoga Capital of the World, banned the consumption of eggs, fish and meat in 2004. Delicious vegetarian Indonesian, Israeli, Indian and Chinese cuisine abounds in this Himalayan town. Cross the Lakshman Jhula hanging bridge into Swarg Niwas to see the Shri Trayanbakshwar Temple, a giant orange-hued temple straight out of a Wes Anderson fairy tale. Nightlife isn’t huge in Rishikesh, which makes sense for a place revered for mindfulness and serene walks on the banks of the Ganges River. Where to stay : Head to Aloha on the Ganges for a truly otherworldly resort experience. Choose from suites with views of the mountains, Ganges River or extensive gardens on the grounds, and be sure to visit the spa for the region’s authentic Ayurvedic rituals. Koh Kood, Thailand Forget the pristine (and crowded) beaches of Phuket. If tropical seclusion is your goal, Koh Kood (also spelled Koh Kut) is your island. There are very few transportation options around the island beyond scooters, and many of its beaches are actually tricky to get to, which means you might have to earn your relaxation, but it won’t be interrupted by hordes of tourists. Don’t miss the enormous, 500-year-old Makka Tree in the city center or the incredible snorkeling opportunities along Koh Kood’s coastline. White sand, coconut groves, aquamarine waters and quaint fishing villages. Should we…keep going? Where to stay : Near Khlong Chao beach is High Season Pool Villas & Spa, a five-star hotel with a focus on environmentally-friendly practices and private sunbathing terraces. Kê Gà, Vietnam The village of Kê Gà sits on the west coast of Vietnam, about a four-hour drive from Ho Chi Minh City. If local seafood and bungalows along quiet beaches are your idea of a great vacation, look no further than this historic seaside town. Chow down on fresh scallops and oysters—and don’t be afraid to indulge in some of the region’s more traditional fare, like mực một nắng (sun dried squid) and bánh hỏi lòng heo (pig chitterlings with vegetables and rice vermicelli). Take a boat to the island of Hon Ba to climb the steps of the Kê Gà Lighthouse, built in 1889 and perfect for outstanding views of the ocean and rocky coastline. Where to stay : You don’t have to choose between private plunge pools or views of Kê Gà Bay at The Princess D’Ân Nam Resort and Spa. Rent a villa for a romantic getaway, and be sure to splurge on a couple’s massage. Kranji, Singapore Kranji is your South Asian ecotourism destination. It’s a rural suburb 14 miles from Singapore’s bustling city center but a world of difference away. Named after a fruit-bearing tree, Kranji is home to tons of farms, fisheries and wildlife. Bollywood Veggies, one of the most popular farms, is run by a husband-and-wife team and includes cooking classes and a food museum (yes, please). There are orchid farms and a wetlands reserve right on the water separating Singapore from Malaysia. Be sure to visit during the farmers market, which is only held four times each year. Where to stay : Try to stay on a farm (when in…Kranji). The Gallop Kranji Farm Resort offers villas and suites, not to mention tours of bee farms, aquaponic fish farms and herb plantations. 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Highest rated food within 5 minute walk of each Skytrain station

(According to Google Maps, with at least 10 reviews each)
They vary from restaurants to nondescript hole-in-the-walls. I didn’t include downtown food trucks because some are a bit transient. WCE stations and Lonsdale Quay are here, too.
Station Name Type Rating Aberdeen Sushi @ Tea-Mo Japanese 4.6 Braid N/A N/A N/A Brentwood Town Centre Roasty Jack American 4.8 Bridgeport Asaka Ramen Japanese 4.1 Broadway-City Hall CafeTica Cafe 4.8 Burquitlam Donair Town Turkish 4.4 Burrard Kari Kitchen Thai 4.6 Columbia Columbia Street Sandwich Company Sandwiches 4.8 Commercial-Broadway The Sweet Greek Greek 4.7 Coquitlam Central N/A N/A N/A Edmonds N/A N/A N/A Gateway Curry Bistro Indian 4.5 Gilmore Suzette’s Deli Deli 4.6 Granville Did’s Pizza Pizza 4.7 Holdom White Lotus Cafe Vietnamese 4.6 Inlet Centre JJ Bean Coffee Roasters Cafe 4.4 Joyce-Collingwood Sushi Taku Japanese 4.5 King Edward Sushi TonTon Japanese 4.3 King George Surrey Central Pizza Point Pizza 4.2 Lafarge Lake-Douglas TiTi Home Made Food Persian 4.4 Lake City Way N/A N/A N/A Langara 49th Avenue N/A N/A N/A Lansdowne Freshslice Pizza Pizza 4.4 Lincoln Steve’s Poké Bar Hawaiian 4.9 Lonsdale Quay Poke & Co Hawaiian 4.8 Lougheed Town Centre Steve’s Poké Bar Hawaiian 5.0 Main Street-Science World Pizzaria Farina Pizza 4.4 Maple Meadows N/A N/A N/A Marine Drive A&W American 4.0 Metrotown Shanghai Fortune Cuisine Chinese 4.6 Mission Bee Thai Cuisine Thai 4.7 Moody Centre Pizza Station Pizza 4.9 Nanaimo N/A N/A N/A New Westminster Banh Mi Bar Vietnamese 4.8 Oakridge 41st Avenue Mimibuloveme Japanese 4.2 Olympic Village Sweetery Cafe + Dessert Cafe 4.2 Patterson Gokudo Shabu Shabu Hot Pot Hot Pot 4.6 Pitt Meadows Foamers’ Folly Brewing Co Pub 4.5 Port Coquitlam Pho T&T Vietnamese 4.4 Port Haney Billy Miner Pub Pub 4.3 Production Way-University The Caterer Café Cafe 4.5 Renfrew Riz Sushi Bar Japanese 4.6 Richmond-Brighouse HaiDiLao Hot Pot Hot Pot 4.3 Royal Oak Tiny Kitchen Chinese 3.9 Rupert Pho Herbs Vietnamese 4.4 Sapperton N/A N/A N/A Scott Road N/A N/A N/A Sea Island Centre N/A N/A N/A Sperling-Burnaby Lake N/A N/A N/A Stadium-Chinatown Caveman Cafe Cafe 4.7 Surrey Central Potemia Poutine 4.5 Templeton N/A N/A N/A Vancouver City Centre Did’s Pizza Pizza 4.7 VCC-Clark Blenz Coffee Cafe 4.0 Waterfront Pholicious Vietnamese 4.7 Yaletown-Roundhouse Manoush’eh Lebanese 4.8 YVR-Airport Jetside Bar Pub 4.4 22nd Street N/A N/A N/A 29th Avenue N/A N/A N/A

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Win Dinner for Four at Trishna

Competitions Win Dinner for Four at Trishna Michelin-starred Trishna delivers contemporary Indian coastal cuisine; we’ve teamed up with them to offer one reader the chance to win a meal for four.
Located in the heart of London’s Marylebone Village, Trishna delivers a contemporary taste of Indian coastal cuisine and an extensive wine list that focuses on emerging regions and boutique wineries from all over the world. In 2012 the restaurant was awarded a Michelin star and today, the restaurant continues to delight with its Taste of Trishna menus. We’ve teamed up with them to offer one lucky reader the chance to win a meal for four. The winner will be able to choose between the Koliwada five-course menu or the vegetarian Koliwada menu paired with cocktails from the new Tea Garden collection range. Additional food, beverage and service are not included. The prize will be valid to book Monday – Thursday for lunch or dinner until the end of June.
The prize:
Either the Koliwada five-course menu or the vegetarian Koliwada menu for four people, paired with cocktails from the new Tea Garden collection range.
How to enter:
The prize draw opens on 26th April and closes at 23:59 on 26th May 2019. The winner will be contacted shortly after and given instructions on how to claim their prize.
So, what are you waiting for? Enter below to be in with a chance of winning. Terms and conditions (T&Cs): 1. The promoter is: Zest Media Publications Ltd (company no.07222273) whose registered office is at First Floor, 197 City Road, London, EC1V 1JN. 2. The competition is open to residents of the United Kingdom aged 18 years or over except employees of Trishna, Zest Media, their close relatives and anyone otherwise connected with the organisation or judging of the competition. 3. There is no entry fee and no purchase necessary to enter this competition. 4. By entering this competition, an entrant is indicating his/her agreement to be bound by these terms and conditions 5. Only one entry will be accepted per person. Multiple entries from the same person will be disqualified. 6. Closing date for entry will be 23:59 on the 26th May 2019. After this date, no further entries to the competition will be permitted. 7. The promoter reserves the right to cancel or amend the competition and these terms and conditions without notice in the event of a catastrophe, war, civil or military disturbance, act of God or any actual or anticipated breach of any applicable law or regulation or any other event outside of the promoter’s control. Any changes to the competition will be notified to entrants as soon as possible by the promoter. 8. The promoter is not responsible for inaccurate prize details supplied to any entrant by any third party connected with this competition. 9. The prize is as follows: Dinner and drinks for four people at Trishna. 10. The prize is as stated and no cash or other alternatives will be offered. The prizes are not transferable. Prizes are subject to availability and we reserve the right to substitute any prize with another of equivalent value without giving notice. 11. Winners will be chosen at random, from all entries received and verified by Promoter and or its agents. 12. The winner will be notified by email within 7 days of the closing date. If the winner cannot be contacted or do not claim the prize within 3 days of notification, we reserve the right to withdraw the prize from the winner and pick a replacement winner. 13. The promoter will notify the winner when and where the prize can be collected/is delivered. 14. The promoter’s decision in respect of all matters to do with the competition will be final and no correspondence will be entered into 15. The competition and these terms and conditions will be governed by English law and any disputes will be subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of England.
For more information about Trishna, visit trishnalondon.com

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Day 2 at New Orleans Jazz Fest: Sunshine and Santana

Ralph Johnson, from left, Verdine White, B. David Whitworth, and Philip Bailey of Earth, Wind & Fire perform at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival on Thursday, April 25, 2019, in New Orleans. (Photo by Amy Harris/Invision/AP) less Ralph Johnson, from left, Verdine White, B. David Whitworth, and Philip Bailey of Earth, Wind & Fire perform at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival on Thursday, April 25, 2019, in New Orleans. (Photo by … more Photo: Amy Harris, Amy Harris/Invision/AP Photo: Amy Harris, Amy Harris/Invision/AP Image 1 of / 9 Caption
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Image 1 of 9 Ralph Johnson, from left, Verdine White, B. David Whitworth, and Philip Bailey of Earth, Wind & Fire perform at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival on Thursday, April 25, 2019, in New Orleans. (Photo by Amy Harris/Invision/AP) less Ralph Johnson, from left, Verdine White, B. David Whitworth, and Philip Bailey of Earth, Wind & Fire perform at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival on Thursday, April 25, 2019, in New Orleans. (Photo by … more Photo: Amy Harris, Amy Harris/Invision/AP Day 2 at New Orleans Jazz Fest: Sunshine and Santana 1 / 9 Back to Gallery NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The prospect of Sunshine and Santana were welcome on the second day of the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival.
There had been some disappointments in the run-up to the 50th annual Jazz Fest. Both the Rolling Stones and Fleetwood Mac had to cancel for health reasons. Storms then delayed Thursday’s opening, though not for long: By closing time, fans were two-stepping in the mud and a huge crowd was on hand for Earth, Wind & Fire.
The muddy dancing resumed Friday — intense sunshine couldn’t bake away the water that had drenched the site a day earlier. No matter, people in boots and flip flops couldn’t resist as Zydeco wailed from the Fais-do-do stage. Meanwhile, stirring gospel rang out from one tent, traditional jazz from another and rock from other stages while people lined up at food booths to feast on Louisiana favorites like gumbo and crawfish or a variety of international cuisines.
This has been, in part, a festival for reminiscing. George Porter Jr., a bassist and founding member of the celebrated New Orleans funk band The Meters, remembered playing at the first Jazz Fest in 1970. Instead of the infield at the sprawling Fair Grounds Race Course it took place at a park near the French Quarter. Instead of hundreds of thousands, it drew an estimated 300-350.
“That’s all they had room for,” Porter joked during a wide ranging discussion of his life, music and technique on a stage in the race course’s grand stand. He was to take another stage later for more music and less talk with Foundations of Funk, a project that teams him with fellow The Meters founder Zigaboo Modeliste and members of New Orleans’ musical Neville family.
Friday’s forecast called for warm, dry weather for the dozens of acts playing on 10 stages, with Santana closing out a main stage in the evening.
Other highlights included Grammy winner Terence Blanchard at the WWNO Jazz Tent and home-grown R&B artist P.J. Morton, known for his solo work and his keyboarding with Maroon 5.
NOT JUST MUSIC
Gumbo. It’s a signature Louisiana dish and the version served up every year at Jazz Fest by Prejean’s Restaurant of Lafayette — savory, tender pieces of quail and pheasant with bits of andouille sausage, all drenched in a rich brown roux — draws long lines every day. So do booths featuring other Louisiana cuisine — including oyster rockefeller bisque, red beans and rice and any number of dishes featuring crawfish, which are in season these days.
But just as Jazz Fest isn’t only about jazz, the food offerings are international in scope: Cuban, Mexican, Middle-Eastern, Asian.
For the non-adventurousness, there are old fashioned hot dogs available from vendors pushing Lucky Dog carts. And, at the Kids Tent, a vendor who knows her market features peanut butter and jelly sandwiches.
NOT JUST FOOD AND MUSIC
Remnants of an 1850s-era wooden boat that craftsman Tom Colvin salvaged from a Louisiana river sat just outside a pavilion where Colvin was displaying boat-building techniques. Nearby Charles Robin was trimming a shrimp net.
Tradition is baked into his life. He’s an eighth-generation fisherman. And he’s been attending Jazz Fest for close to 25 years, since he was a child, showing off the tools of his trade and his Spanish heritage.
“It’s about arts and crafts, peoples’ livelihood,” he said. “There’s a lot of good information to be learned here.”
At another arts booth, Demond Melancon was selling art derived from his life as Big Chief of the Young Seminole Hunters — part of the generations old Mardi Gras Indian tradition — a blending of African American and Native American artistry said to date back to the days of slavery. “It’s a gumbo of cultures,” he said.
His most prominent display: the intricately beaded, richly colored “apron” that was part of his 2016 costume — a wearable mosaic displaying the image of an African prince.

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Weekend Planner: April 26th

War Memorial Opera House, San Francisco 10 AM, All Ages Free
Join for an up-close look at the dancers’ daily ritual , Company Class, on stage at the War Memorial Opera House .
Plus, grab a bite to eat and visit the interactive booths outside the Opera House at Fan Fest to try on a tutu , learn about pointe shoes, and explore the season.
Fan Fest is open from 10 am – 2 pm. Company Class viewing is from noon – 1 pm. Doors will open at 11:45 am. No food, drink or photography and recording is allowed during the Company Class Viewing. How does the Behind-the-scenes class work?
Observe the dancers of SF Ballet in action in a Company Class, led by one of the Company’s Ballet Masters, on stage at the War Memorial Opera House. Guests will enjoy open seating in the Opera House auditorium . Sunday, April 28th Main Post Lawn, San Francisco 11 AM, All Ages Free
San Francisco’s favorite family picnic is back for 2019. Presidio Picnic brings together the best of the Bay Area food scene with the beauty of this national park site and views of the bay and the Golden Gate Bridge.
Held on the seven acre Main Parade Ground lawn, this weekly community event features food and drink from more than 30+ international mobile food creators representing the best of San Francisco ’s multicultural food scene curated by Off the Grid .
But it’s not just about the grub; visitors can enjoy an ever-changing array of free activities including yoga classes, lawn games, a Presidio photo booth , free kids bike-riding lessons from the Presidio YMCA, and nature-based arts and crafts for kids in the Presidio Adventure Zone tent.
Grab a blanket and head to your national park for Presidio Picnic. This great family event takes place on the Presidio’s beautiful Main Parade Ground, a seven-acre lawn with views of the park, the city, and the San Francisco Bay.
Every Sunday | March 31-October 20, 2019 | 11 am to 4 pm Main Parade Ground, The Presidio, SF FREE A rotating lineup of 30+ international mobile food creators representing the best of San Francisco’s multicultural food scene curated by Off the Grid Free Yoga class from LubbDubb every Sunday from 11 am to 12 noon Free Presidio Y Bike learn-to-ride lessons for kids every 1st Sunday of the month. Bicycles and helmets provided Cultural Dance Performance every 3rd Sunday of the month at noon to 2 pm. Food Trucks & Pop-Ups
The rotating lineup of 30 of the Bay Area’s best mobile food concepts at this year’s Presidio Picnic includes: (New to Presidio Picnic this year are Off the Grid mobile food creators)
Beans N Barbells: mobile pop café serving specialty coffee beverages Bowl’d Acai : made-to-order juices, smoothies and acai bowls Estas Manos: just-launched artisan coffee roaster proudly based in San Francisco Fruity Moto: organic, all-natural, fruit-centric craft beverages Gio Gelati: traditional Italian gelato made with impeccable California ingredients Horn Barbecue: much-lauded authentic Texas barbecue with a cult following The Base Co: LA-based natural sweetener company serving guilty-free, plant-based beverages in refillable “happiness jars” that feature designs by local artists La Santa Torta: Tacos, tortas, elotes and more that showcase the gastronomy of the Jalisco region of Mexico Lobsterdamus: Southern-California shellfish favorite serving up Maine lobsters on a mesquite grill Mi Morena: La Cocina entrepreneur offering fresh Tacos de Guisado on housemade tortillas Milk & Waffles: authentic Liège waffles topped with imported pearl sugar MOMO Noodle: high octane sauces and toppings on traditional Asian noodles On a Roll – Calcutta Style: Indian kathi rolls fusing traditional and modern flavors Pye: savory meat and veggie pies made in small batches with honest ingredients Spunbyss: classic, made-from-scratch sliders, fries and sides with vegetarian options that include a plant-based burger patty from Impossible Foods Turontastic: crunchy and irresistible Filipino desserts with inventive fillings like ube mochi, and strawberry-Nutella
Participating alums from Off the Grid’s 24-month mobile food incubator in partnership with Google, Instrucktional, include:
Bollocks: Globe-spanning spherical delights from meatball master Greg Spangler. Manjé: Haitian Caribbean cuisine from entrepreneur Dimitri Lilavois.

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