‘Czar of Indian cuisine’ Jiggs Kalra dead at 72

‘Czar of Indian cuisine’ Jiggs Kalra dead at 72

Jiggs Kalra in Dubai in 2005. Image Credit: Gulf News Archives Celebrated chef Jiggs Kalra, who earned epithets like Czar of Indian Cuisine and Taste Maker to the Nation, died on June 4 at the age of 72.
He had been unwell for the past few weeks and passed away at a hospital in Gurugram, said a source.
Kalra was instrumental in taking Indian fine dining mainstream, with popular restaurant concepts such as Farzi Cafe and Masala Library by Jiggs Kalra, both of which have outlets in Dubai; the latter having opened in March at the JW Marriott Marquis.
Last month, his son Zorawar shared an update about his father’s health on Instagram.
“Today is my father Jiggs Kalra’s 72nd birthday. This is the first time unfortunately it has been celebrated in hospital, as he isn’t well. Last year we celebrated it together as a family. Nothing matters more than time spent with your parents as each and every single Birthday matters. He is a toughie. Has been battling his stroke for 19 years and will be back soon,” Zorawar posted on May 21.
The cremation will be held on June 6 in New Delhi.
Food pioneer Born on May 21, 1948, Kalra, born Jaspal Inder Singh Kalra, was a pioneering food columnist, author and food consultant. In a career spanning close to five decades, he was instrumental in introducing Indian cuisine to the international audience as well as setting standards of the same.
He is also credited with establishing some of the most critically acclaimed and best performing restaurants in the country. He represented India at various international food festivals and summits, apart from having served the likes of British royals Prince Charles and the late Princess Diana, and former US President Bill Clinton.
The senior Kalra authored more than 11 titles on Indian cuisine, including ‘Prashad’.
Filmmaker Hansal Mehta wrote a condolence message for Kalra on Twitter, saying: “Thank you for introducing me to Indian food and its treasure of recipes. All your books adorn my bookshelf and the masala and oil on each page is testimony to how your recipes have shaped my passion for cooking.”
Some of Kalra’s popular restaurant concepts also include Made in Punjab and Pa Pa Ya.
— With staff inputs
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1) Working from home most of the time
2) My hubby who never likes to eat anything besides Indian food (the one I make at home ) or even if we going out will go only to Indian restaurants has agreed to go eat Italian, Mexican etc and I ❤️❤️❤️ Italian cuisine
3) He has started helping me with housework as well which he did not do before 😬

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30+ Best Restaurant Flyer Templates & Design 2019

Home Collection 30+ Best Restaurant Flyer Templates & Design 2019 30+ Best Restaurant Flyer Templates & Design 2019 By – June 8, 2019
Restaurant business in world has grown considerably over the last few decades, and this has made eatery business a highly competitive one. New contenders enter your market routinely to take your customers. Hence, creating an effective marketing strategies is crucial in making a buzz or getting the word out. And one of the proficient approaches to drive more clients to your business is designing an attractive and effective restaurant flyer. Having a delicious flyer play an important role in promoting your restaurant business as well as give detail information about your offers.
Crafting a professional flyer design for restaurant business can open the doors of possibilities to reach out to your targeted clients. If you want to create unique flyer design for restaurant but you don’t have an idea how to craft a beautiful and effective flyer, you may consider using a ready-made restaurant flyer templates. Additionally, using a pre-made flyer template saves you a lot of time and effort. So, check out this list of the best restaurant flyer templates.
Here is a collection of 30+ best restaurant flyer templates available in PSD, EPS and AI format. These feature various types of restaurants and cafes such as fast food, Mexican cuisine, fine dining, japanese cuisine, Indian cuisine and more. Some of these flyer designs are fun and quirky, while others are minimalist and high class. Fast Food Restaurant Flyer
Designing a professional flyer doesn’t need to be time-consuming and tedious. You can pick amazing templates that will serve the purpose with desired results. If you want to craft a restaurant flyer for your fast foods, grill, jerk, Italian restaurants, you should download this fully layered restaurant flyer PSD template. This template features a one designs layout in two different color combination. As it comes with the separately layered object, customizing your own design into the template is very easier task. Moreover, you can also use this template for bakery business, cafe shop, catering business, coffee shop and any other related business. 10 Restaurant Flyers Bundle
When it came to craft out-of-the-box flyer designs in order promote your restaurant brand, creatively designed ready to go flyer template is perfect solution to get job done. If you wish to design your own flyer, you can grab this bundle of restaurant flyers templates available in ten different design with PSD, AI and EPS file format. You can likewise promote any food related company, Hotel, coffee shop, fast food relate business and many more. Apparently, this flyers has all of modern features and design that every restaurant business needed.

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Openings and Closings: Ouzo Bay and Loch Bar, Original Ninfa’s Uptown

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Ouzo Bay , 4444 Westheimer, opens June 17 along with its sister concept, Loch Bar. Brothers and owners Alex and Eric Smith of Atlas Restaurant Group operate 18 restaurants from Baltimore to Washington D.C. and down to South Florida. Ouzo Bay and Loch Bar were both opened in Baltimore in 2012, with a second location for each in Boca Raton in 2017. Now, the brothers are bringing the upscale Mediterranean Ouzo Bay and the seafood tavern, Loch Bar, to the River Oaks District, a pedestrian-friendly and upscale area primed for these two concepts.
Ouzo Bay is “elevated Mediterranean” with much of that Mediterranean cuisine inspired by Greece, particularly Santorini. For those who have yet to experience the blue and white serenity of that Greek isle, the Smith brothers want to transport patrons there with the decor, fresh seafood and traditional Greek dishes with a modern touch. Ouzo Bay has beautiful colors of the sea. Photo by Joe Sweeny
There are appetizers such as hummus, tzatziki, and goat cheese dip with pita. The catch of the day is a colorful and sumptuous display over ice and its Fish Market offers delights such as Aegean Bronzino and Hawaiian Kona Kampachi.
Evan Turner has curated an adventurous wine list and the glass-encased floor to ceiling wine room showcases the bottles. An ivy-covered trellis leads to the patio and a massive indoor-outdoor fireplace makes a dramatic statement.
The restaurant seats 275 guests and there will be a live DJ in the bar and lounge Thursday, Friday and Saturday night. Sit back with an infused whiskey and pretend you’re enjoying some Greek nightlife. In River Oaks. Oysters on ice and everything nice. That’s what Loch Bar is made of. Photo by Joe Sweeny
Loch Bar , 4444 Westheimer, is a seafood tavern with a speakeasy feel featuring live music every evening. Boasting one of the largest raw bars in Houston, there will be iced towers of oysters and caviar plus New England lobster rolls and Maryland-style crab cakes. And in keeping with its entry into the Houston restaurant scene, there will be a Viet-Cajun crawfish boil as well.
Designer Patrick Sutton has brought a feel of The Cape to the Bayou City with white-washed wood accents contrasted with brass fixtures. Antique mirrors and custom clocks line the walls and deep-tufted red leather banquettes offer comfortable luxury for relaxing with a cocktail or glass of sparkling wine. The bar program offers over 400 labels of whiskey from Europe, Japan, Canada, and of course, the good ole U.S. of A.
Loch Bar has seating for 175 guests and a private dining room for 30. There’s an elevated lounge overlooking the central dining area and an expansive patio features black and white pin-striped canopies to keep out the Texas sun. The Original Ninfa’s is going uptown. Photo by Kirsten Gilliam
The Original Ninfa’s Uptown Houston , 1700 Post Oak Boulevard, opens June 10. The menu and pricing will be the same as The Original Ninfa’s on Navigation, but new cocktails and a happy hour bar menu will be featured. A weekday breakfast will be launched later in the year.
The space at BLVD Place was originally occupied by Peska, which closed in November 2017. There is seating for 280 guests, with the three covered patios accommodating 100 of them. The interior design is by Michael Hsu out of Austin and Houston’s Studio Red Architects. The renovations were done by Construction Concepts. Photos of “Mama” Ninfa Laurenzo decorate the walls, including black and white photos of the young beauty. The kitchen has a wood-burning oven and grill, signatures of the Original Ninfa’s. Jason Gould and Alex Padilla are heating up the wood-burning grills at The Original Ninfa’s locations. Photo by Kirsten Gilliam
Jason Gould will serve as Executive Chef. The Australian native has a multitude of experience from restaurants around the world, with Cyclone Anaya’s and Gravitas part of his Houston portfolio. He will oversee operations with Legacy Restaurants’ Corporate Executive Chef, Alex Padilla, and General Manager Ashley Clark. Beverage Consultant Linda Salinas will help to launch the bar program with its new cocktails. Happy hour in the bar will run from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday.
Indika , 516 Westheimer, will close June 30, as reported by t he Houston Chronicle . The modern Indian restaurant was helmed by Chef Anita Jaisinghani for more than 15 years. The James Beard Award-nominated chef sold her share in 2017 to concentrate on her new venture, Pondicheri, which has locations in Houston and New York City. It was bought by Mickey Kapoor, owner of Khyber North Indian Grill. No word yet as to what Kapoor’s plans are, but the restaurateur has been a character in the Houston restaurant scene for decades, so it should be interesting.
Candente , 4306 Yoakum, is expected to open mid-July. The new Tex-Mex concept from Sambrooks Management comes hot on the heels of the recent opening of another concept from Michael Sambrooks, 1751 Sea and Bar. The new restaurant will feature a custom built wood-burning grill which will remind diners of The Pit Room’s smoky flavors.
Mex Taco House , 14030 Telge, opened May 19. The fast-casual Mexican restaurant serves breakfast and lunch tacos from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily. There are also treats like churro pancakes, tortas and on the weekends, menudo .
Bonjour Cafe , 20829 Kingsland Boulevard, began its soft opening June 3 in Katy. Chef Arnaud Acaries, formerly executive pastry chef at La Villa Saint-Tropez, has opened his own pastry shop and cafe in Katy. The French-born Acaries came to Houston in 2015. On the advice of his family, he enrolled in Le Notre, earning a degree in Baking and Pastry. The cafe is open for breakfast and lunch, Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. It is closed on Sunday.
The menu leans heavily French with croquet madame or monsieur , quiche, sweet and savory crepes and salade vinaigrette . There are tempting artisanal pastries including eclairs and macarons , plus coffee drinks, organic teas, sodas, sparkling water and bottled juice. The chef also creates special desserts and special occasion cakes. Black’s Market Table is closing in Cypress. Photo by Lorretta Ruggiero
Black’s Market Table , 11550 Louetta, will serve its last dinner service July 13, according to Houston Food Finder . The restaurant’s farm to table, upscale cuisine impressed critics and local residents, but the owners cite Hurricane Harvey, the move of Hewlett Packard Enterprise from the nearby Cypress Creek campus and the preponderance of nearby chain restaurants (especially in the Vintage Park area) as contributing factors to the decision to close its doors. Chef Bart Black and wife Rachele opened the restaurant five years ago serving homestyle fare like fried chicken, deviled eggs, shrimp and grits and steaks with a contemporary and chef-driven flair.
In a post to its Facebook page, the owners stated:
“Along the way, we’ve had good days and bad, but what stands out are the new friendships and memories that were created inside our doors. It has truly been an honor and a pleasure to serve our community, not only a good lunch or stand out dinner, but to have been a part of your celebrations. Creating a sense of connection through food is one of the things that drives us…seeing that happen time and again has given us a sense of purpose and value.”
Unfortunately, diners choosing Black’s for special occasions and celebrations weren’t enough to keep it going. The drop in sales, with many of the surrounding area residents pouring their financial resources into rebuilding after Harvey and the loss of thousands of HP employees means Cypress is losing another family-owned restaurant.
However, loyal patrons still have a month to show support. Check its Facebook page for specials and the return of some favorite menu items.
Base , 801 Congress, opened May 31. The speakeasy-style nightclub is located in the basement of the Henry Henke building in Market Square. In order to access the club, well-dressed influencers need to make their way through the lobby and take the elevator down to the basement, where sharp eyes will notice a pink neon “Ssshhh”. Push the wall and you’re in like Flynn. The weekend only party place comes from Concepts to Fruition (C2F), according to CultureMap Houston and is open Friday and Saturday only from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
There’s bottle service for high rollers and their entourage. A neon-lit dance floor offers plenty of space to dance and put out the vibes to potential mates. There are tables and couches for resting your high-heeled tootsies and cooling off with a glass of champagne. EXPAND Photo by Carla Gomez
Local Group Brewing , 1504 Chapman, is shooting to open in late 2019. at Hardy Yards in Near Northside. The 7,500 square foot brew pub will feature an air-conditioned tap room with over 20 taps, 8 of which will be connected directly to the ten barrel serving tanks. The pet-friendly, kid friendly brew pub will also have views of downtown Houston and an outdoor patio.
The team and co-founders are Todd Donewar, a native of New Orleans, Canadian Michael Steeves and James ” Huggy Bear” Wolfe, whose previous stints include No Label Brewing Company and Southern Star Brewing. Oh, and NASA. The team is currently searching for an executive chef to head the kitchen.
The Near Northside area is part of Mayor Sylvester Turner’s “Complete Communities” initiative and the team at Local Group are excited to be part of the neighborhood. The building housing the brew pub was built in 1948 and local firms like Method Architecture, GSD Construction and Field of Study Design will create and design the space.
Chef Holley at Davis Street , 5925 Almeda Road, is expected to open in August 2019, according to The Houston Chronicle . Chef Mark Holley brought his experience working at Brennan’s, Commander’s Palace in New Orleans and his 12 year stint as executive chef at Pesce to his own restaurant, Holley’s Seafood Restaurant and Oyster Bar which opened in 2014. The restaurant closed in October 2017 after Hurricane Harvey and Holley has continued in the hospitality industry as a restaurant consultant. Now, he’s taking over the Davis St. at Hermann Park spot, which closed in February 2017 for renovations and never reopened.
Holley is being tight-lipped about whether or not his famous fried chicken will be on the menu, but expect to see some of his signature dishes, seafood and prime steaks. Holley also plans to feature a few Davis St. menu items as an homage to the former restaurant.
La Torretta , 600 La Torretta Boulevard, is liquidating all its contents by “Public Sale” which began June 6 and continues Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday noon to 5 p.m. until everything is sold. This pre-renovation sale is to make way for the transformation of the Lake Conroe hotel, spa and restaurants into Jimmy Buffet’s Margaritaville Resort, which will include its two restaurants, Landshark Bar and Grill and 5 o’clock Somewhere Bar and Grill.
For bargain hunters, the tag sale will include the entire contents of the 307 guest suites, bed and bath linens, carpet, drapes, gift shop items and more. Tejas Chocolate & Barbecue is branching out again. Photo by Carlos Brandon
Tejas Burger Joint , 214 Main, will open in Tomball later this summer, according to Houston Business Journal . The owners of Tejas Chocolate & Barbecue saw huge increases in sales after it made Texas Monthly’s No. 6 spot on its Best Barbecue in Texas list. However, Wednesdays were sluggish and a burger was introduced to pick up sales. It has proven to be so popular that the owners have decided to open a burger joint not far away from the barbecue restaurant at 200 N. Elm. You can read Carlos Brandon’s recent review of Tejas Chocolate & Barbecue here in the Press .
The burger spot will sell burgers, shakes and fries and, after acquiring a liquor license, “adult” milkshakes. Fajita Pete’s will set you up with meats. Photo by Pedro Mora
Fajita Pete’s , 1214 W. 43rd, will open in the Garden Oaks/Oak Forest area June 10. The Houston-based fajita company does a brisk business in to-go orders and catering, but also has dine-in available. Beef or chicken fajitas can be ordered by the 1/2 pound and includes all the fixings like shredded cheese, pico de gallo and guacamole. There are other menu items, including enchiladas verde, quesadillas and flautas. Tres leches and sopapillas are on the dessert menu and Pete’s Ritas are available starting at 12 ounces up to a gallon for take-out. If you bring a gallon of ritas and a couple of pounds of fajitas to your posse, you will be everybody’s darlin’.
Weinerschnitzel , 20130 U.S. Highway 59, opened May 26, according to click2houston.com The hot dog franchise began in 1961 and is especially known for its chili sauce for topping its dogs, burgers or fries. Super fans can even purchase the chili by the can to take home and douse whatever is in the pantry without judgment.
The company, which is the world’s largest hot dog chain in the world, had locations in Houston in the 1970s and ’80s, but left the city. Now, it has returned as the “world’s most wanted weiner”. I thought that title belonged to Brad Pitt, but anyhoo. The dogs can be ordered with a variety of toppings like sauerkraut, green chiles and relish. If weiners aren’t your thing (sorry, Brad), there are burgers and chicken sandwiches. And chili cheese fries. Willet Feng is the man with a plan for a new burger-chan. Photo by Diane Wu Feng If you like this story, consider signing up for our email newsletters. SHOW ME HOW

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21 Things To Do in Siem Reap: The Gateway to Angkor Wat

Contact Us 21 Things To Do in Siem Reap: The Gateway to Angkor Wat Posted in: Cambodia , Travel Blogs
One place that seems to be on everyone’s travel bucket list these days is Angkor Wat. This famous temple complex in Cambodia is one of the largest religious sites in the world and an incredibly awe-inspiring place to visit. To visit this UNESCO World Heritage Site, you’ll need to spend some time in the modern city of Siem Reap.
While the main draw here is obviously visiting the temples, there are lots of fun things to do in Siem Reap! Here you can visit floating villages, fly through the jungle on a zipline, see an incredible acrobatic performance, and much more.
Spending a week in Siem Reap is just the right amount of time to fully explore the temples of Angkor, while enjoying the many other Siem Reap attractions on your days off. If you’re ready to plan a trip to Cambodia’s gateway to Angkor Wat, then read on for a jam-packed guide to the area. 1. Visit the Angkor National Museum
If you’re wondering what to do in Siem Reap when you first arrive, this museum is it. While you’ll surely be chomping at the bit to get to the temples, it’s well worth making a trip to the Angkor National Museum first. Doing so will provide you with a better understanding of the temples and the civilization that built them.
Through a variety of interactive exhibits, the museum seeks to educate visitors about the customs, traditions, and beliefs of the ancient Khmer empire. They’ve got a seriously impressive collection of artifacts here and have done an excellent job of preserving and presenting them.
The museum is open from 8:30 to 6:00pm from May-September and until 6:30 from October to April. Tickets to the museum cost $12 for adults or $6 for children. There are also audio tours available in a variety of languages for an additional $5.
Visiting the Angkor National Museum will have you even more excited about your trip to the temples. In addition to giving tons of useful information, the air-conditioned museum also provides relief from the intense midday heat of Siem Reap! You can find the museum on the map here . 2. Explore the Temples of Angkor
Of all the great things to do in Siem Reap, exploring the temples of Angkor definitely tops the list. After getting a history lesson on the temples at the museum, it’s finally time to head out and see one of the most fascinating places in the world.
In addition to the world-famous Angkor Wat, other must-see temples include Bayon with its smiling faces, Bakheng for sunset, and Ta Phrom, which is also known as the “Tomb Raider temple” for its role in the movie.
To visit the Angkor National Park, you have the choice of buying a one day ($20), 3-day ($40), or 7-day ($60) pass. Unless you really want to dive deep and take your sweet time seeing all of the temples, the 3-day option should suffice. You can even spread out your visits a bit, as you have a full week to use it.
As far as getting around goes, you can join a tour, hire your own private driver (cab or tuk-tuk), or navigate it yourself on a bicycle or motorbike. If you go for the 3-day pass, you’ll probably want to do a mix – perhaps a tuk-tuk tour one day and then cycling there the next.
There are so many options for seeing the temples that planning a trip there can be a little intimidating. Be sure to check out this detailed guide to planning your visit to the Angkor temples before you go. 3. Enjoy A Boat Trip to Floating Villages (one of the most unique things to do in Siem Reap)
One of the top things to do in Siem Reap besides temples, is taking a boat trip to visit one of the area’s floating villages. Full of houses on stilts and locals who get around solely by boat, these floating villages are fascinating places to see up close.
There are a few floating villages within a short drive of Siem Reap. Chong Khneas is the closest one and is therefore the most touristy. A bit further away is Kompong Phluk, which is still easily visited on a half-day trip. This is the one we went to and we had a very enjoyable experience.
A boat tour of Kompong Phluk costs $20 per person and lasts a few hours. On our trip, we had a boat to ourselves and barely saw any other tourists. Instead, we got a kick out of local kids floating by in saucers and waving at us. You can also tack on a brief canoe trip through the mangroves and sit down to eat in a floating restaurant.
Kompong Khleang is located the furthest away from Siem Reap (about 50 km), so you’ll need to spend quite a bit more time and money to get here. 4. Get a Massage
After all that cycling, walking, and climbing at the temples, you might be just a little sore. Thankfully there are no shortage of places to get a nice, relaxing massage in Siem Reap.
Your options for a massage here vary greatly in terms of quality and price. These range from simple and very cheap to super nice and rather pricey. You can get an hour-long massage for as little as $10-12 here and it’ll still be pretty good! A great option to support an even greater cause, is to get a massage from a blind person. There are a few companies in Siem Reap that you can check out.
Even at the higher end, spa treatments are a great value in Siem Reap. At the #1 ranked Mudita Spa , a 3-hour spa package for two that includes a fruit platter and wine costs just $200 total.
With so many excellent options, getting a massage is definitely one of the top things to do in Siem Reap. SEE ALSO: Getting Off The Beaten Path in Phnom Penh 5. Visit The Landmine Museum
In between all the temple hopping, you can pay a visit to the Cambodian Landmine Museum . It was started by a former child soldier named Aki Ra who began removing mines he had once set and defusing them with his own handmade tools.
After establishing quite the collection of defused mines, he began charging tourists $1 each to view his collection. He then used the money to support children that he had found wounded or orphaned as a result of landmines.
Unfortunately, the museum was ordered to be closed in 2006. A Canadian NGO stepped in and raised money to buy the land to relocate the museum, and it continues to educate visitors on the horrors of landmines — and war in general. The children who were under the care of the center have recently moved closer to Siem Reap, where they have access to a better education.
The museum is open every day from 7:30-5:30pm. Entry is $5 for adults and free for children under 10. No temple pass is required to get to the museum, so you could visit on one of your off days if you’d like. It’s actually located inside the Angkor National Park, about 7km south of the Banteay Srey complex (check the map here ). 6. See Angkor From Above
While it’s pretty incredible seeing the temples of Angkor up close, it’s even more amazing seeing them from above. There are both helicopter and hot air balloon tours available that will give you an elevated perspective on the temples.
Helistar Cambodia offers a few options for helicopter tours above Angkor. You can choose between 8-minute ($99), 14-minute ($165) or 20-minute ($240) tours. The shorter tour takes in Angkor Wat and Bakheng, while the longer one includes a flight above a floating village and the lake.
If you’d prefer a more peaceful journey to the sky, you can take a hot air balloon tour instead. They run both sunrise and sunset tours from December to March, with tours costing $115 per person.
Whichever one you choose, getting a bird’s-eye view of the Angkor temples is easily one of the most amazing things to do in Siem Reap. 7. Visit Artisans Angkor
If you’re wondering what to do in Siem Reap that will help support an organization with a great cause, be sure to visit Artisans Angkor . Their goal is to keep ancient Khmer arts alive while bringing jobs to rural villages and improving the lives of locals.
There are several dozen workshops around the area that employ over 800 artisans who produce carvings, paintings, jewelry, clothing, and much more. The company provides a fair income as well as social and medical insurance and invests profits right back into opening new workshops.
Two of their locations are open to visitors — their oldest handicraft workshop in the city center and their Silk Farm, which is about a 20-minute drive away. The workshop in town is open daily from 8-6pm, and you can drop by anytime for a free guided tour. If you want to visit the farm, be sure to contact them in advance to book a spot on their shuttle.
Since you can pick up some handmade, traditional souvenirs and support a good cause at the same time, visiting Artisans Angkor should definitely be on your list of things to do in Siem Reap. You can find it on the map and get directions here . 8. Chill By The Pool
Exploring the temples of Angkor is an incredible experience. It’s also a very exhausting, dusty, and sweaty one. In between all that temple hopping, you’re going to want to carve out some time to just chill out by the pool!
Since it’s so hot pretty much all the time, many Siem Reap hotels have a swimming pool. Even if yours doesn’t, you can probably find one nearby that will let you use the pool for a small fee.
There are plenty of nice pools you can access for just $5-10 a day. Some of them even include use of a gym and sauna! For a pretty expansive list of all the pools you can visit in Siem Reap, click here . 9. Party On Pub Street
After you’ve made the trip to Angkor Wat, it’s time to celebrate and party it up at Angkor What? This backpacker favorite is one of many bars on Siem Reap’s infamous Pub Street .
Overall, the nightlife of Siem Reap is pretty subdued. That is, except for the Pub Street. Every night of the week, the party is raging with loud music, cheap drinks, and people dancing in the street.
My advice to you would be to not follow our lead. For some reason, we decided to try to stay out all night on Pub Street and then cycle to Angkor Wat for sunrise. It’s definitely better if you do those things in reverse order. Oh to be a young, clueless backpacker on a gap year again… 10. Go Ziplining
Adrenaline junkies will definitely want to add a bit of ziplining to their list of things to do in Siem Reap. Flying high through the Cambodian jungle and surrounded by wildlife, this is an experience you won’t soon forget.
Angkor Zipline offers a few different options for adventure tours that include ziplines, sky bridges, abseiling, and more. Their silver tour lasts about 1.5 hours and costs $65 per person, while the gold tour includes a few more activities and goes for $99.
If that’s not enough excitement for you, try one of their combo tours that also include either mountain biking or ATV riding. 11. See The Phare Circus (Acrobatics)
On at least one of your evenings in Siem Reap, I highly recommend attending a performance of the Phare Circus . Not only is it an incredibly entertaining show, but it’s also for a very good cause.
The performers in Phare are graduates of a program started by ex-refugees from the Khmer Rouge days. The program offers formal art education to disadvantaged youth, who all attend for free.
All profits from the sale of tickets, merchandise, and refreshments go back into supporting the program. There are three different options for tickets, which are priced at $18, $28, and $38 respectively. Shows go on at 8PM every night, with an additional 5PM showing from November-March on Monday, Thursday, and Saturday.
There are different shows every night, so you could even catch a few different performances while you’re in town. An evening at the Phare Circus is definitely one of the most entertaining things to do in Siem Reap. 12. Wander Around the Old Market
For those who love a good local market, you’ll want to add a trip to the Old Market of Siem Reap to your itinerary. Known locally as Psar Chas, this is where locals come to buy and sell just about everything under the sun.
Take a stroll around this bustling market and you’ll see fresh produce, clothing, household appliances, bootleg DVDs, jewelry, stinky fish paste, and much more. It’s definitely an assault on all your senses, especially if you come early in the morning when the market is most active.
This is one of the best place to visit in Siem Reap if you’re looking for authentic and cheap Cambodian food. You can find the Old Market on the map and get directions here . SEE ALSO: The Ultimate Guide to Travelling Cambodia’s Coastal Region 13. Sip On Classy Cocktails at Miss Wong
If the bucket-schwilling, backpacker debauchery of Pub Street is too much for you, head to Miss Wong for a classy cocktail instead. Reminiscent of a 1930s bar in old Shanghai, this is definitely one of the coolest places to grab a drink in Siem Reap.
Under the glow of red Chinese lanterns, you can sip on craft cocktails with an Asian influence. Their signature Indochine Martini is made of vodka, ginger cognac and pineapple juice and is absolutely delightful.
In addition to their great cocktails, they’re also cooking up homestyle Chinese dishes. Best of all, the music isn’t overbearing and you can actually carry on a conversation with the person sitting next to you! Miss Wong is open every night from 6PM-1AM. You can get directions and find it on the map here . 14. Dine On Khmer Cuisine
In a place as international as Siem Reap, you’re spoiled for choices when it comes to dining out. Here you can find Italian, Chinese, Mexican, Indian — all the great cuisines of the world. But, you didn’t come all the way to Cambodia to eat a pizza!
Although it’s often overshadowed by its more famous neighbors from Thailand and Vietnam , there’s plenty of delicious Cambodian cuisine. The signature dish of Cambodia is fish amok — a creamy curry made with coconut milk and a tasty mix of spices.
Another popular choice here is kuy teav — a noodle soup that’s eaten for breakfast. Whatever you decide to eat, sampling the local cuisine is certainly one of the tastiest things to do in Siem Reap.
A great way to get to know Khmer cuisine is by taking a street food tour in Siem Reap. Probably the coolest tour is the one offered by Vespa Adventures. On their Siem Reap After Dark tour , you get to ride on the back of a Vespa around town to sample a bunch of different local dishes.
Oh yeah, and free flow booze is included, too. Hence why you have your own personal designated driver for the outing! Tours run every night at 6PM and cost $72 per person. 15. Take a Cooking Class
Speaking of Cambodian cuisine, why not learn how to cook it yourself while in Siem Reap? There are plenty of places in town that offer cooking classes where you get to try your hand at Khmer cuisine.
In a typical class, you’ll visit a local market first to shop for fresh ingredients. You’ll then hit the kitchen to whip up a few local dishes before sitting down to enjoy the fruits of your labor.
A few cooking schools that come recommended include Lily’s Secret Garden and Champey . Both have classes in the morning and afternoon, each lasting 4 hours. Current prices are $24 per person at Lily’s and $27.50 at Champey. 16. Hit the Night Markets
Anyone who has traveled around Southeast Asia will already be familiar with the night market scene. Countless vendors of street food, handicrafts, artwork, clothing, and random knick-knacks vie for your attention (and your dollars).
There are actually several different night markets in Siem Reap, as more and more keep springing up. The original is the Angkor Night Market, which is home to over 200 shops. If you’re looking for some cool souvenirs and gifts to bring home, this is the place to go. Just be sure to bring your a-game when it comes to negotiating a price if you’re buying a lot!
Here you’ll also find the lively Island Bar , which is a great place to grab a drink after perusing the many stalls. The Angkor Night Market opens up at 5PM every night and goes until around midnight. You can get directions to the market and find it on the map here . 17. Do Yoga
In the past few years, yoga has quickly become one of the top things to do in Siem Reap. There are plenty of options for doing yoga here, which is a great thing to do after all that walking, peddling, and climbing at the temples.
Of all the choices for yoga classes in Siem Reap, it’s hard to top the Navutu Dreams Resort. This eco-chic resort offers yoga classes of many different styles twice a day (check their schedule here ) in a comfortable, air-conditioned setting.
Classes here cost $9 per person, or you can get a pack of ten for $80 to save a few bucks if you’ll be around for a while. Best of all, you can access the resort’s pools and gyms if you’re coming there for yoga.
Other popular places to get your downward facing dog on include Angkor Bodhi Tree, the Peace Cafe, and the Siem Reap Hostel. 18. See The Smile Of Angkor
If you’re into the performing arts, you’ll definitely want to catch the Smile of Angkor. This grand production tells the story of the Khmer Empire through six chapters, featuring a huge cast and a very impressive stage set-up.
A mix of traditional aspara dancing, acrobatics, martial arts, and more, the show takes place on an ever-changing stage with some amazing backdrops. While I must say it was a bit cheesy at times, it’s one of the top Siem Reap attractions, and was an entertaining way to spend an evening.
The show goes on nightly at 7:15PM and lasts for a little over an hour. There’s also a buffet dinner prior to the show that you can add to your ticket price. Prices range from about $25-40 depending on your seat and whether or not you opt for the buffet. Personally, I would give it a miss and grab dinner in town before the show instead. 19. Explore Kandal Village
One of the hippest things to do in Siem Reap these days is strolling around the area known as Kandal Village. The once sleepy Hap Guan Street has been transforming into the city’s trendiest place to shop and hang out.
It’s a small, compact street, so take your dear sweet time checking out all that it has to offer. Grab a coffee at Little Red Fox Espresso, peruse the eclectic range of goods at Trunkh, enjoy some delicious vegan food at Vibe, get a massage at Frangipani Spa, and more all on this one street.
For a closer look at Kandal Village and the many shops there, check out this interesting article . You can find Kandal Village on the map here .
https://www.instagram.com/p/Buab1oBl7qv/ 20. Learn How to Make Pottery
There are plenty of beautiful ceramics for sale in the many markets of Siem Reap, but did you know you can even try to make your own? The Khmer Ceramics & Fine Art Centre offers classes in both pottery and ceramics painting.
Each class costs $25, and you might as well combine them both so you can make your own Angkorian bowl and then paint it yourself. They have classes at 8, 10, 2, and 4 every day and include free pick up and drop off as well.
Of course, you’re always welcome to drop in and browse their collection of locally made pieces for sale. They’re open daily from 8AM-8PM and you can find them on the map here . 21. Listen To Live Music at X Bar
I don’t know about you, but I always look for places to catch some live music when I travel. And no, I’m not talking about that guy in your hostel who just learned how to play “Wonderwall” or the other dude who thinks he’s a DJ with his dope Spotify mix. I’m talking actual live music played by local bands!
In Siem Reap, the best place to rock out at night is X Bar . They’ve got an awesome rooftop location where they regularly have bands playing. Oh yeah, and there’s also a half-pipe here with skateboards for rent and a tattoo parlor. Rock on!
This is also the place to party if you’re looking to stay out real late, as they stay open until 5AM. Be sure to check their Facebook page to see what’s going on while you’re in town.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BwmD_WTBC1V/ Ready for Siem Reap?
As you can see, there’s far more to Siem Reap than the temples of Angkor. There’s plenty to see and do here to warrant sticking around for a few days in between all the temple hopping.
Personally, I thoroughly enjoyed spending an entire week in Siem Reap and spacing out the trips to Angkor. It’s even on my short-list of cities in Southeast Asia to return to for a longer digital nomad stint.
If you’re planning to spend more time in the country (and you should be), then make sure to check out this Goats on the Road guide to traveling in Cambodia .
*Images in this post courtesy of Shutterstock.com .
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Maya Kaimal’s Easy Indian Line Grows with Seasoned Rice Offerings

click to enlarge Franco Vogt Not so long ago Indian cuisine in the US was typecast: buffet fare with a particular range of flavors. In the last few years, talented chefs have been bringing the real thing. You can even quick-prep the real thing in your own kitchen thanks to Maya Kaimal Foods , about to expand their selection of sauces and dal by adding rice dishes with signature South Indian flair. Maya Kaimal grew up savoring the bright, fresh cuisine of her father’s home state of Kerala on the tropical Malabar Coast. “Kerala has the perfect climate for growing spices,” she says. “The food is coconut- and seafood-based, very different from the flatbreads and chicken Tandoori of northern India. We’d get home and Dad would get excited about recreating the dishes—he was an atmospheric physicist who loved cracking recipe codes on weekends.” click to enlarge Friends tasting her father’s well-developed recipes were typically amazed. “People would say, ‘Wow! I didn’t know this was Indian food!’ So I decided there was a cookbook in it.” In 1996, the book, cleverly named Curried Favors , won the Julia Child Award. “She gave the award to me in person, this woman who was a force of nature for every type of delicious. That boosted my confidence that people were ready for a wider conversation,” Kaimal says. The first three simmer sauces Kaimal produced for the retail grocery market in 2003 were an immediate hit in a friend’s chain of Manhattan food stores. Production needed to ramp up. “I clicked with an amazing Austrian chef who was making pestos and things in Saugerties, Wolfgang Brandl, and he helped me scale up to his 500-gallon pots, and the stores he sold to started carrying us too.” Life was a tad hectic for a bit, as Kaimal commuted between Brooklyn and Saugerties while expecting twins. The couple relocated their twin girls and growing enterprise from Brooklyn to Woodstock a few months into parenting and ultimately to Rhinebeck (read our profile on Kaimal’s remodeled Rhinebeck Victorian ). The twins are now happy teens. And Kaimal’s brainchildren—the sauces—are now available in shelf-stable format and produced on the West Coast “with small-batch sensibilities,” says Kaimal. The line of fine Indian foods have become widely loved by home chefs— you’ll find them at Costco, Hannaford, ShopRite, Adams Fairacre Farms, Sunflower, and many more. click to enlarge “The sauces make a base for so many dishes,” Kaimal says. “Open the jar, add any main ingredient, simmer 15 minutes, and have a meal that tastes like you spent hours in the kitchen.” The selection has grown from three varieties to 10, and now includes the Everyday Dal line of lentil and bean dishes, soon to be accompanied by South Indian style rice. “This is an ancient cuisine with spices that are both flavorful and functional,” she says. “It exists outside of trends. The recipes and techniques are delicious and thoughtful, made for people who relish food . And behind the dishes, there’s still the mission of helping people appreciate these amazing flavors and changing the way the rest of the world thinks about Indian food.” click to enlarge Franco Vogt This content is made possible by our sponsor. It does not necessarily reflect the attitude, views, or opinions of the Chronogram editorial staff.

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Great hospitality, fantastic accommodation, and authentic Indian food

I am a regular visitor to the hotel when I visit Delhi for business. I am always impressed by the level of hospitality I receive, right from the exiting the car, to the check-in experience at the reception, to being helped up to the room. Would specifically like to mention about Rohan from the front desk, fantastic hospitality! They have an amazing selection of restaurants covering a large part of the diverse Indian cuisine. The quality of the accommodation and the guest services is impressive!

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Trend Kitchen at Indian Harbor Beach Review

Trend Kitchen at Indian Harbor Beach Review June 6,
It’s been over a month since my birthday, but I have still want to share a review of my wonderful birthday dinner. Andrew and I celebrated at Trend Kitchen, a cozy upscale restaurant in Indian Harbor beach. We have heard about their unique creations and delicious food for a while, so this was the perfect opportunity to go.
If you are looking to have a celebratory meal, this is just the place! The prices are higher than most restaurants in Brevard County, but it’s worth the splurge. Trend Kitchen specializes in contemporary cuisine and offers a mix of classic and exotic menu items. Location and Atmosphere
You would never know such a fine dining experience is located in this strip mall if it weren’t for the reputation of Trend Kitchen. This restaurant is in Indian Harbor Beach across from Lowe’s. A simple sign notes the restaurant on the outside, but other than that, it’s hard to know what to expect.
Inside, you will find less than twenty tables and a small bar. The decor is simple and everything is black and white. We had a reservation, which is recommended to have, and sat in a comfy booth by the window. Everything about Trend Kitchen is very intimate so it’s ideal for a romantic meal. However, they can accommodate large parties with a reservation. Drink Options at Trend Kitchen
One things that separates this spot from other local fine dining like Crush Eleven , is the lack of a cocktail menu. Trend Kitchen only serves wine and beer. If you do want a mixed drink, there is a champagne cocktail menu to make up for this.
I was debating getting a champagne cocktail, but when I saw they were $16 a piece, I opted not to. Though the beer list was intriguing with brewery options like Bear Republic Brewing, we settled on a bottle of wine. We got the bottle of Whispering Angel Rose for $40. The Menu at Trend Kitchen
This restaurant has a small menu, but it was not hard for me to find something I like. There’s nine different appetizers and seven different entrees. Of the entrees, four feature seafood, in addition to one beef, one lamb, and one duck.
Most of the menu items have some spin on a classic. You won’t find many Seafood Cassolette’s that include diced cobia and a truffle cheddar gratinee! This is also probably the only place on the Space Coast where you can find braised Spanish Octopus! Don’t worry if you are a picky eater though. The steak, rack of lamb, and the fish of the day are pretty standard options, with the sides that come with them being more unique.
The appetizers are pretty varied as well, with a soup, a salad, and then some French cuisine like Foie Gras and Escargot. One of the standouts is the charcuterie and cheese platter, which looked like a masterpiece. I’m hoping to go back there soon to order that!
I have to mention that there aren’t any vegetarian entrees and only one vegetarian appetizer (a corn soup) on the menu. Trend Kitchen may be able to make modifications, but a lot of items don’t really lend themselves to that. The menu changes regularly though and a couple of the items we ate are already no longer on it. If you are going post-June 2019, it might be worth it to check the menu and see if the selection has improved! What We Ordered
Sine it was my birthday, we went all out food wise even though I was extremely full by the end. We started with the Brie Salad as an appetizer. I had read that the Truffle Mac and Cheese was amazing and this was listed as a starter. To us, it seemed too heavy of a way to start the meal, so we ordered it as a side.
Before our salad came, they brought us a complimentary crustless, quiche each. We though this was a nice touch and it had some peppery and smoky flavors. Our salad was even better though as it was a nice selection of greens and roasted papaya, which is something I have never had before! There was a sort of brie toast on the side, and it went well with the salad. We found this appetizer perfect for sharing between two people.
Andrew and I each got something different for dinner. I got the Surf & Turf, which was diver scallops paired with sous vide pork tenderloin. This was on top of polenta and finished with a truffle sauce and asparagus. I am always a sucker for Surf & Turf, and this different combination was amazing! It was a birthday meal I’ll remember for a long time!
Andrew got the 8 oz Black Beef Filet with a green peppercorn sauce. His meal was also excellently prepared and with a variety of vegetables on the side including brussel sprouts, heirloom carrots, cherry tomatoes and cauliflower, as well as the potato gratin. Both meals were very large, and bigger than I expected for how high quality they are. For $38 and $42 a piece respectively, this was a splurge, but satisfying on every level.
We also had that side of Truffle Mac and Cheese, which made the meal officially too much food. I loved this though and would probably order it again regardless. You can see from the blurry picture that I was dying to devour this thing. The truffle flavor is subtle and the addition of mushrooms and ham makes it sooo savory. I could probably eat just this as a meal, as it is some of the best mac and cheese I have had!
Our waiter somehow convinced us to get dessert for my birthday, even though I was already full! It’s hard to turn down their signature dessert though. Trend Kitchen is known for its house made chocolate peanut butter bar. This is a combination of chocolate and peanut butter cake with caramel gelato and marshmallows toasted right in front of you! It’s basically the fanciest candy bar you will ever eat. I had a few bites and was in heaven. Next time I will have to choose either the mac and cheese or the cake because it’s too hard to find room for both! Know Before You Go
If you want fine dining in Brevard County, there’s nowhere like Trend Kitchen! It may be an unassuming location, but you are in for a memorable dinner here. Before you go, keep these tips in mind. Trend Kitchen is open for dinner 5-9:30 PM Tuesday through Saturday. Reservations are recommended, although there is a bar to sit at as well. Seating is inside only and pets cannot be brought in. Most of the patrons wore casual attire, although given the atmosphere, you probably don’t want to be dressed like you just left the beach. There is no kids menu and barely any vegetarian options. I recommend calling ahead if you want to inquire about dietary requests.
Have you ever been to Trend Kitchen before? It definitely is one of my top Space Coast restaurants now! I am really hoping to see them back at the Melbourne Food and Wine Festival this year!

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“JEEMAN” ….Eating your meal together

“JEEMAN”….Eating your meal together Posted by cookwithreena on June 8, 2019 The complete spread
“JEEMAN”, which actually means eating together with your family and friends, captures the essence of having meals in the traditional Indian manner. Everybody sits together on the floor (on mats), and eating with hands adds a warm touch to the environment.
“BacktoRoots”, an initiative of Babeetta Sakxena, came up with the idea of get-togethers over traditional lunches, and it was aptly named “JEEMAN”. It is a paid event organized at the residence of a chosen home chef, each time a different one. The overarching theme of the event is revival of lost Indian recipes, through which awareness is spread among new generations, about goodness of local cuisines which typiaclly don’t show up in most restaurant menus. The Traditional metal utensils Kansa Thala and Bati and terracotta utensils I used
Last month, I was fortunate to be chosen by Back to Roots to organize this lunch, where I was able to introduce several traditional Bengali dishes to the group. About ten guests including Babeetta Sakxena, had attended “Jeeman”. A virtual flyer of the event with the menu was shared on social media, with interested parties having to book their seats with an advance payment. Bengali food is generally identified with Fish and Rice, with very few vegetarian dishes known in northern India. So this was an opportunity for me to showcase few of the vegetarian delicacies of Bangla. And the overwhelmingly positive feedback I received reinforced the belief that I could continue to cook such dishes going forward. The guests left fully satisfied with the quality of the with food and overall arrangements. Hope to continue with similar popup lunches in near future.
STORY Behind
In a home Chef cooking contest “Kahin Gum Na Ho Jayein” by “Back to Roots”I came in contact with a dynamic personality Babeetta Sakxena who is the initiator of the whole concept. Back to Roots is a mission with a vision to revive our tradition. Purpose of this contest was not only finding the best home chefs but to bring back the traditional lost recipes of India. The title of the contest says about it. This contest was open for all ages from 18+.
As we know and it is not only in India but it’s a common issue in world that new generations are loosing contacts with their tradition, culture and specially their food. Which were simple but healthier more nutritious. So this contests made the contestants to research, talk to their elders for finding traditional recipes with traditional ingredients. Trust me, she was successful in bringing so many dishes which we had never heard before. ” Stalwarts of culinary Industry of India had judged the contest. Fortunately I was chosen by the Juries as Regional (Delhi/NCR) and also The National winner. My dish Mochar Chop as the stater
Other than the contests, back to roots organizes various events whole year round with this vision of reviving Indian tradition. One of the initiative was organizing paid get together on regional food. This is named “Jeeman” a Rajasthani word which means eating meal together. This is a monthly event wherein the interested member shall announce a date of this get together with Menu and cost per person. The menu should consists traditional dishes, home cooked using traditional Indian ingredients and spices. The ingredients like refined flour, sugar processed sauces should not be used in cooking. Food is eaten sitting on floor and no cutleries, use your fingers to eat food. Babeetta and myself
Traditionally in Indian household had very large kitchen which was divided in two parts one for cooking and another for eating. Before eating the space was moped and aasan or mats were spread on the floor for sitting. In 1st batch Children and men of the family shall sit in a row and food was served by the females of the household. Every region had different format of serving and eating food. The sitting posture with crossed legs and bending while eating is an exercise itself and have several health benefits. It helps in the process of digestion and helps abdominal muscles to move back and forth. This posture relaxes the mind and calms the nerve. The knees remain healthier. Most importantly it improves family bonding. Even the rich people, like Maharajas or Jamindars used to have their meals sitting on floors. But unfortunately our modern age lifestyle has made it difficult to follow this tradition. Many of the Japanese restaurents in India have come up with option of havin your meal sitting on floor and people are readily doing it. So why shy at home? Why to follow this only for fashion and spending money to eat your meal outside ? Why not to revive it at home.
Back to roots is trying to do this. Jeeman is an initiative towards this. Sharing the dishes I prepared on this occasion.
Bengali meal follows course wise meal. It has a format to follow while eating your meal. Starts with Teto means bitter and going though spicy tangy ends to mishti means sweet.
Shall come up the meal format of bengal and my preparations on this occasion in my next post. Advertisements

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Anjum Anand’s secrets to perfect home cooked Indian food

Mushroom and bean caldine (Supplied)
9Honey: You often cook with Ayurvedic principles, could you tell us what this means?
AA: Ayurveda is the ancient Indian science of how to be healthy and believes food can be medicine or poison depending on what and how you eat. Ayurvedic tries to explain how to obtain optimal health through making the right choices everyday. When it comes to food, there are two main principles. The first is that we are not all created equal and each of us come to life with our own ‘health DNA’. What might suit one of us will not necessarily suit the other. We are broadly grouped into three main body types (air, fire and earth). Each body type is healthiest when eating a certain way. We are encouraged to understand our body type and then take control of our habits and take responsibility for our health. An easy example is that if you are a fire body type, you already have too much heat in you and you should avoid too much spicy or acidic foods as this will increase that element (this includes generally doing things that keep you cool in both food and lifestyle). The second principle is that digestion is the root of health and if you are not digesting your food properly over a period of time, that will affect your health. Unfortunately, it is easy for many of us to fall into the bad digestion trap, years of yo-yo dieting or erratic eating will put you there. Over-eating (even on healthy food), eating when angry, stressed or even too busy will all hamper digestion. Also, eating too many different ingredients at any one meal will also burden the digestive system.
So, Ayurveda believe that paying attention to what you cook, how you cook it and how you digest it is paramount to health.
9Honey: How does that influence the flavour of the food?
AA: Ayurveda believes the best meals should be lightly cooked using natural ingredients, be balanced, not too spicy, not too oily and not too salty. Food might be simpler in flavour but can be equally delicious as you are not restricted from using any natural ingredients; spices, ginger, garlic, onion, tomatoes, ghee, coconut, herbs are all flavour-giving but healthy ingredients to use. Maharashtra’s ultimate potato burger (Supplied)
9Honey: What’s you most essential piece of kitchen equipment?
AA: My small nutri-blender. I blend small quantities of spices in there as well as fine pastes from simple ginger and garlic pastes to tandoori marinades and coriander and coconut chutneys to serve. The key is a really fine blend.
9Honey: For people who want to experiment with making spice pastes at home, what are your biggest pieces of advice?
AA: While making flavourful spice blends, I suggest using whole spices which you lightly dry roast, not to make them nuttier but to toast them so they grind easier and finer as spices will not break down in a sauce and if the blend goes in a bit gritty, it will remain gritty in the end sauce. Make small batches and store them in air-tight containers away from light.
The other thing to remember is cooking your blend or paste properly (I distinguish these two by assuming a paste has other wet ingredients added to the spices such as ginger and garlic pastes). As already mentioned, spice blends are best cooked gently and in a pot which already has some liquid in it. Spice pastes should be cooked in some oil, stirring often until the oil forms little droplets on the surface of the paste. Anjum Anand’s Delhi papri chaat (Supplied)
9Honey: Do you have any tips for introducing kids to spices?
AA: There are many gentle spices which add flavour without the heat. The first one I introduced my children to was cumin cooked in a rice and lentil porridge known as Khicheri, a really nutritious and easy to digest meal that Indians feed their children. My children don’t eat ‘spicy’ food and I don’t add chilli to their food as such. However, they will always taste dishes we are eating at home or in a restaurant and I can see how, slowly and without forcing the issue, they have slowly gotten used to new flavours as well as spicier profiles. Also, adding subtle spicing to family favourites helps.
9Honey: What’s your favourite guilty pleasure meal?
AA: My lazy meal is definitely eggs but I don’t feel guilty about that as such. My guilty, lazy meals that I cook for the kids (they are vegetarian) that I do feel bad about would probably be pasta as it is a refined carbohydrate without too much nutrition and they probably get enough in school and when we are travelling.
9Honey: What is your favourite thing to cook for guests?
AA: I love experimenting with new dishes when I have friends around which is probably the worst time to do it. I often get inspired my travels and then make a note to cook new dishes when I am back home but then get too busy to take time to think the dish through (with no actual recipe) but then use friends coming around as the catalyst … but I always regret not having made it a few times first! There are many exciting, healthy dishes I ate in Sydney and Melbourne recently which I really want to try to recreate when I have some time. My easy go-to is of course Indian food and I love making a table of sharing platters, often inspired by different regional street-foods.
Anjum Anand is a highly accliamed cook, TV presenter and cookbook author and the flavour sensation behind the Space Tailor range to cook at home. She is an expert in Indian cuisine. Anjum Anand, TV presenter and cookbook author (Supplied)

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