Culinary Connects Culture: Go globetrotting on a West End BIZ tour

Culinary Connects Culture: Go globetrotting on a West End BIZ tour

The West End Biz’s Joe Kornelsen leading a tour of the West End (photo by Mike Peters) Culinary Connects Culture: Go globetrotting on a West End BIZ tour By: Carly Peters // June 27, 2019
A classic Sesame Street song asks, “Who are the people in your neighbourhood?” before listing off the baker, the grocer, “the people you meet each day.” In this celebration of connection to community, they could be singing about Winnipeg’s West End, an area rich in diverse culture, people, stories, businesses, and of course food.
“This neighbourhood works the way it should be,” says Joe Kornelsen, promotion and development coordinator and executive assistant at the West End BIZ. “You’ve got your barber shop, grocery store, flower shop, and restaurants, all within blocks of each other. This warm community has it all; you can live your entire life in this area.”
Even though the West End encompasses 200 blocks, wherever you are you’re only about five minutes away from what you need. And what everyone needs is the food. The neighbourhood boasts over 110 restaurants with worldly flavours ranging from authentic Mexican, to Ethiopian, to Vietnamese and more.
Equally as enticing are the people behind the plates; each with a unique story about their culture and the food they present.
Both are served up during the West End BIZ’s Around the World in a Few Blocks food tours, which run all summer long and showcase four restaurants per trip. Pop on a good pair of shoes, come with an empty stomach, as well as a readiness for new flavours, and meet the people of the West End neighbourhood.
New Tour Stops for 2019
Feast Café and Bistro: Nourish your body and soul with Feast’s modern dishes rooted in First Nations food. Chef-owner Christa Bruneau-Guenther’s vision for the West End eatery was to make Indigenous cuisine accessible in the community, while serving up healthy, homegrown options. Eat together with friends and share stories alongside a delicious and contemporary menu, with hearty comforts like home-style bison chili and seared lemon pepper Manitoba pickerel sliders. Or try the trendy twist on traditional bannock as it becomes the base for elevated pizzas and “tipi” tacos – authentic fry bread piled high with bison chili or a shredded maple-chipotle chicken, shredded lettuce, cheese, homemade salsa, and chipotle-sour cream.
Eadha Bread: “Eadha” means endurance. And that is certainly needed when making 500-600 loaves of fermented sourdough bread a week. It takes owner Cora Wiens, and her team, three days to get the bread ready for the oven because the hand-powered bakery works with local wild yeast and ferments the dough for 24 hours. And, man, it’s worth it. Made from organic local ingredients, Eadha’s sourdough – which comes in basic, whole wheat, and prairie sun, along with daily specialties – features the perfect structure of a crunchy crust and soft inside. No butter even required.
Make sure to bring a reusable tote in order to stock up not only on sourdough, but the bakery’s sweet and savoury cakes, pies, and twists (vegan options are also available).
Taj East Indian Cuisine: This family owned and operated Indo-Canadian restaurant flavours their variety of traditional and modern dishes with spices coming straight from India: garam masala for the thick butter chicken, cardamom and coriander for the aromatic desi chicken, and a special house blend for the rich Taj Karahi goat. Or, try a host of flavours with one of the restaurant’s ample vegetarian or chicken thalis while you tuck into a basket of extra fluffy naan or a crisp stack of pappadums.
To learn more about some of the other tour highlights (Tacos! Pho! Sticky buns!) check out Peg City Grub’s previous posts here and here . West End BIZ’s Around the World in a Few Blocks food tours run weekly from June until August 28.
Visit westendbiz.ca/tours for dates and restaurants.

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Look I found a cool hangout place that serves yummy food

As you all must be knowing that I have this large Singapore Moms community on my Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp. We all regularly bond with each other on these platforms and we all love to meet in real life too that’s why there are meetups, photoshoots and events that I organize with my moms. Venue is one of the biggest hurdle and we are always on the lookout for something cool, something that serves awesome food. Today, let me write about one of the newest and happening place that I found – It’s 79 After Dark ! Its name is quite intriguing and the food is delicious. Read on. What is 79 After Dark and where is it
It’s located on 79 Circular Road and a part of its name comes from it. Secondly, it’s open till 3am daily and the name represents Boat Quay’s vibrant ambience which comes alive after dark. So 79 After Dark. Interesting, isn’t it?
79 After Dark serves a rich blend of Indian-Chinese Cuisines paired with refreshing cocktails. It’s a brand new restaurant sitting in Boat Quay’s most iconic building.
The cuisine at 79 After Dark is also known as Indo-Chinese or Indian Chinese or Chindian is an Indian adaptation of Chinese cooking techniques and seasonings.
It’s location is very convenient and in the heart of Singapore’s CBD. That makes it an attractive place for all – working professionals, tourists and people who visit that area for shopping and other purposes. It’s open till 3 AM and serves fresh food based on your order. According to me, this makes 79 After Dark very tempting. Now, we don’t have to curb our hunger for yummy Indian and Indochinese cuisines, you see! This restaurant and bar is ideal for a date night, business meetings, special occasions, private parties or a regular weekend hangout. Ambiance:
Urban and vibrant – 79 After Dark is an airy and fun place. The sitting arrangement puts you at ease and it’s conducive to enjoy food while bonding with friends and family. I liked that hot red color. There is an outdoor sitting area too for people who would like to soak in the hustle bustle of Boat Quay. The interior is focused around a combination of sensual red and deep blue with gold, wooden and artsy accents in an ambient lighting. Let’s eat:
The menu is really really extensive. You get huge variety of choices in vegetarian and non-veg dishes. Should I say, you name the dish and they have it?! Their choice of drinks and spirits is also quite exclusive. Let me make you drool with pics of what we had. Starters:
I am quite particular about the taste of the starters. It sets the tone of the entire lunch or dinner. Starters at 79 After Dark make big impression and loved the taste of Veg Manchurian Dry and Veg Platter that we had. The quantity is good and you can heartily enjoy them. Veg Platter Veg Manchurian Dry Non-Veg Platter
Veg Manchurian tastes perfect with that Indian-Chinese flavors. It brought back memories of my home town Mumbai’s Veg Manchurian. Veg platter is something worth to go for too especially those soft and fluffy Dahi Kabaab taste heavenly. Meat lovers should give justice to their non-veg platter definitely that consist of Chicken Tikka, Ajwaini Fish Tikka, Seekh Kebab and Galauti Kebab. Mains:
We took time to go through the menu and choose what we wanted to eat. You will be spoilt for choices here. Want to find what we ate? Here is the list. Quite long…We ordered North Indian and Chinese both types of mains. Veg Jalfrezi

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The 15 best island holidays: find the perfect one for you

Mykonos, Greece; Pag, Croatia; Ilha de Santa Catarina, Brazil; Ko Pha Ngan, Thailand.
AND THE WINNER IS …
Ibiza, the Spanish jet-set getaway famed for its summer party scene, tolerance and bohemianism. Don’t forget to pack your rapper bling for the nightclubs and your itsy-bitsy bikini for the suave beach clubs by day.
WHY GO
Party, party, party to the sounds of the world’s best DJs in one of the world’s clubbing capitals. Mind you, the island also has a World Heritage old town, masterpiece gothic cathedral, fine art museums, rugged coastline and picturesque inland draped in olive trees and whitewashed villages.
DON’T MISS
Superclub Amnesia, where you can cram in with 5000 other revellers and enjoy superb sound and lighting, banging beats, the odd explosion of confetti and (depending on the night) sequins, leather or feathers. See tourism.eivissa.es THE ISLAND … FOR WILD THINGS
Commune with marine iguanas on the Galapagos Islands. Photo: Shutterstock
Molokai Island, USA; South Georgia Islands; Svalbard, Norway; Sub-Antarctic Islands, New Zealand.
AND THE WINNER IS …
Isla Espanola in Ecuador’s Galapagos Islands. If you’ve ever fantasised about the mating dance of the blue-footed booby (and who hasn’t) you’ll be rewarded. You can also commune with marine iguanas, giant tortoises and sea lions.
WHY GO
One of the Galapagos’ most southern islands, Isla Espanola isn’t as frequented as some others, yet has spectacular bird life that includes an indigenous mockingbird, swallow-tailed gulls and spectacular waved albatrosses with long, bright-yellow bills. You can hike, kayak, snorkel and hit the beach at lovely Gardner Bay.
DON’T MISS
The walk – or rather scramble – over volcanic boulders at Punta Suarez, accompanied by lava lizards and red crabs, and watched by grumbling sea lions with bristling whiskers. See ecuador.travel THE ISLAND … FOR COLD BEAUTY
Kilt Rock waterfall on the Isle of Skye. Photo: Shutterstock
Prince Edward Island, Canada; Skelligs, Ireland; Nantucket, USA; Chiloe, Chile.
AND THE WINNER IS …
Skye, largest of the Scottish Hebrides islands. If you like your islands haunting, windswept and invigoratingly chilly then look no further. Skye’s name is Old Norse for “cloud island” and, when the wind howls, waterfalls are blown back up cliffs. The tempestuous moods of the weather are dramatically beautiful and entirely suit the brooding landscape.
WHY GO
Valleys covered in purple heather and huddled sheep, great cliffs and jagged mountains provide a wild, haunting Highlands landscape. There are prehistoric sites, castles, a rich Gaelic history of rebellion and emigration, and magnificent walks in the Cuillin Hills.
DON’T MISS
The drive on the A855 around the Trotternish Peninsula beneath the jagged rock pinnacles of the Quiraing, where the landscape reaches its crescendo. See visitscotland.com THE ISLAND … FOR TROPICAL FANTASIES
THE NOMINEES
Biyadhoo, Maldives; Isla de Margarita, Venezuela; Palawan, Philippines; San Blas, Panama.
AND THE WINNER IS …
Huahine. Bora Bora and Moorea might be more famous, but this French Polynesian island is flamboyantly beautiful and yet scarcely visited. Troubles peel away and, by the time you get to your bungalow, the TV will seem like a strange artefact from an alien civilisation.
WHY GO
Everything moves to an island rhythm. There’s barely a car, bridges are made of wooden planking and dusty dogs doze on verandahs. You can eat papayas straight from the tree, and mahi-mahi pulled fresh out of the ocean. Maroe Bay is magnificent, ringed by lush peaks and dotted with archaeological remains.
DON’T MISS
A boat excursion accompanied by ukulele-playing locals onto the island’s fringing lagoon, filled with tropical fish and coral. See tahititourisme.com.au THE ISLAND … FOR HISTORY
Malta; Zanzibar, Tanzania; Sicily, Italy; Shikoku, Japan.
AND THE WINNER IS …
Cuba, a time-warp country only just catching up with the 21st century, with a rollicking history that runs from colonists and buccaneers through to communist revolutionaries. Its culture combines Spanish, American, African and Caribbean influences.
WHY GO
A wonderfully dishevelled atmosphere, fantastic colonial fortifications, handsome churches and lively, gossipy, music-filled street life in cities such as Havana, Cienfuegos and Santiago de Cuba. Former wealthy sugar-trading town Trinidad de Cuba is one of the Americas’ best-preserved historical towns.
DON’T MISS
Isla de la Juventud, once a buccaneer base, and reputedly Robert Louis Stevenson’s inspiration for Treasure Island . The string of gorgeous islets that runs eastwards includes Cayo Largo del Sur, home to flamingos, iguanas and turtles, and uninhabited Cayo Rico, a castaway’s fantasy. See cubatravel.cu THE ISLAND … FOR THE HUNGRY
World Heritage-listed capital George Town. Photo: Shutterstock
Sicily, Italy; Taiwan; Vancouver Island, Canada; Sri Lanka.
AND THE WINNER IS …
Penang in Malaysia, where Chinese, Indian and Malay ethnic groups – with a dash of British colonial and neighbourly Thai influence – have created a fabulously rich, spicy and eclectic cuisine sure to tingle your tastebuds and swell your waistline.
WHY GO
For noodles 50 ways, whether flat or thin, stir-fried or boiled, Chinese or Malay, or in a surprising Penang-style laksa with a sour fish soup. For spicy rojak salad, fresh roti with curry, beef rendang, skewered satay, fresh popiah spring rolls, oyster omelette … oh, forget it. Just try everything.
DON’T MISS
World Heritage-listed capital George Town, with its handsome colonial buildings, colour-splattered Hindu temples, mosques, magnificent Khoo Kongsi Chinese clan house and outstanding street food – and street art. See tourismpenang.net.my THE ISLAND … FOR DIVING
St Lucia; Bonaire, Caribbean Netherlands; Darwin Island, Ecuador; Fakarava, French Polynesia.
AND THE WINNER IS …
Guadalcanal, or indeed many other locations in the Solomon Islands such as Ghizo, which also have the requisite above-water tropical beauty. Stay at a dive resort or on a live-aboard dive boat.
WHY GO
Dozens of eerie World War II navy ships and fighter planes lie on the seabed and have become encrusted with enormous sea fans, sponges and bright coral. You’ll see dozens of species of tropical fish, as well as manta rays and sharks. You might even spot dugongs and turtles.
DON’T MISS
The two Japanese transport ships that lie on the seabed near Mbonegi Beach outside Honiara – snorkellers can visit them, too. You can still see their anti-aircraft guns, and the trucks and heavy machinery stored in their holds. See visitsolomons.com.sb THE ISLAND … FOR WINTER
Hokkaido, Japan’s second-largest but least-populated island. Photo: Shutterstock
South Island, New Zealand; Vancouver Island, Canada; Iceland; Lofoten Islands, Norway.
AND THE WINNER IS …
Hokkaido, Japan’s second-largest but least-populated island. Few people think of islands as winter destinations, but Hokkaido has ski-fields, national parks, snowy mountains, and volcanoes that produce thermally heated waterfalls. Endure Jack Frost and you’re amply rewarded.
WHY GO
Niseko and Furano are among notable ski resorts that feature Japan’s legendary champagne powder snow. When Lake Shikaribetsu freezes over, a temporary village of bars, with concert hall and onsen bath, appears. Cities such as Hakodate, Kushiro and Otaru provide urban pleasures – the combination of snow and illuminations at Goryokaku Fortress in Hakodate is wonderful.
DON’T MISS
Sapporo Snow Festival in February features hundreds of ice sculptures and snow statues illuminated at night. Visitors warm themselves by eating, drinking and dancing under frosty skies. See visit-hokkaido.jp THE ISLAND … FOR THE BEEN-THERE BRIGADE
THE NOMINEES
Anjouan, Comoros Islands; Timor Leste; Tongatapu, Tonga; Eil Malk Island, Palau.
AND THE WINNER IS …
Sao Tome & Principe, a tiny, two-island West African nation that popped up on Lonely Planet’s list of top 10 countries this year. If you can find it on a map, let alone visit, you’re already ahead of the crowd.
WHY GO
This Portuguese-speaking nation is safe, it’s eco-friendly, it has natural attractions and a fascinating history – plus some of the world’s best coffee. It produces cocoa and has a great chocolate factory. Sao Tome town has decaying charm – think Havana without the crowds.
DON’T MISS
Principe, which has everything you want from island escapism, including a tiny population, great snorkelling, fishing, rainforest alive with birds, and fang-like rock pinnacles like something from a Lost World. See turismo.gov.st THE ISLAND … FOR A LITTLE OF EVERYTHING
Delicious Mauritius.

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I Tried L.A.’s Trendiest Golden Lattes to See If They Taste Like My Mother’s Haldar Doodh

Food Los Angeles
W henever I was sick growing up, my mother forced me to drink haldar doodh , a traditional Indian drink she made with honey-turmeric paste and hot milk. As soon as I woke up and got ready for school, she’d hand me a warm mug of the beverage, after microwaving for one minute.
If my mom wasn’t looking, I’d pour what I could down the drain. But if I absolutely had to drink the haldar doodh, I’d chug it, standing up in our tiny kitchen before letting myself out the back door and walking to elementary school. I hated it, and not just because the turmeric tasted too bitter and flat for my palate. My bigger impetus for resisting the beverage alongside my morning bowl of cereal was that I knew it’d stain my tongue yellow, and that the kids at school would inevitably notice.
As I’ve gotten older though, I’ve come to embrace the turmeric. Haldar doodh, which translates from Gujarati directly to “turmeric milk,” is a traditional treatment with coughs and colds, due to turmeric’s anti-inflammatory properties. It wasn’t until I moved to Los Angeles that I began drinking haldar doodh or haldar paani (“turmeric water”) to help me with allergies. And while turmeric wasn’t always as trendy as it is today, turmeric lattes or golden milks are now available at places all throughout the city.
When seasonal allergies hit me this year, I went back to the basics in some of L.A.’s popular cafés by trying local versions of haldar doodh. June Gloom is lingering, and I hadn’t had a sip in over a decade, but in recent weeks I decided to try a few different places in the city to see how they’d compare to my mother’s, and whether or not I liked them.
Here are four places where I tried the turmeric latte, either iced or hot. Photos by Virali Dave.
Roo – Silver Lake
1523 Griffith Park Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90026
I started with a trip to Roo in Silver Lake, where golden milk lattes come with cardamom, cinnamon, black pepper, ginger, and agave along with the standard turmeric blended into milk. According to my barista Cerissa, Roo sells many of these — as many as their iced tea — but rarely do customers ask for their golden lattes with standard dairy milk. I opted for coconut milk in mine, which I also ordered iced, and sipped it while walking around Silver Lake.
Did it taste like my mother’s? Not at all. It was barely yellow, and while ginger, cardamom, cinnamon, and black pepper are all ingredients she adds to her cups of cha, they’ve never been part of her haldar doodh. Was it good? Honestly, yes. It wasn’t too sweet or too turmeric-y, and coconut milk worked really well with the well-spiced beverage.
Nearby, Intelligentsia and La Colombe offered turmeric teas and tisanes, served with hot water — essentially haldar paani. I have a great-aunt who swears by this for colds and recommends avoiding milk but adding ghee to soothe the throat. In search of an experience closer to drinking proper haldar doodh, I passed them up.
Black Elephant – Atwater Village
3195 Glendale Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90039
I paid a visit to Black Elephant in Atwater Village, where a friend recommended the golden milk lattes. This was the closest I got to my mother’s version of the drink. Co-owner Heidy Fu gave me a barely-sweet latte made with turmeric ginger extract syrup, served hot with coconut milk as per my request.
She added black pepper on top, which she explained was to “activate” the turmeric. Did it taste like my mom’s? Yes. Was it good? My mother might say yes. But I think I’ll stick to their coffee beverages when I visit again.
Go Get Em Tiger – Larchmont Village
230 N Larchmont Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90004
T he turmeric milk at Go Get Em Tiger in Larchmont was very similar in taste to the one at Black Elephant. Both included generous amounts of turmeric and not too much sweetener. GGET’s was made with their house macadamia almond milk, which made it nuttier, thicker, and less milk-y, and touches of ginger, and honey. This latte and that served at Roo were tied for my favorites.
Woodcat – Echo Park
1532 Sunset Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90026
I also stopped by Woodcat in Echo Park, where the iced turmeric latte with oat milk set me back seven dollars, costing at least two bucks more than every other latte I tried.
RELATED: Fruzion: These Fruit Cocktails Are From Lebanon and Taste Like California on a Sunny Day
Turmeric is ubiquitous in Indian cuisine, used in a wide variety of savory dishes for the added color and for its anti-inflammatory properties. The same can be said for milk. For my mother, making me a cup of haldar doodh was as simple as using two ingredients she always had at home, a third if she wanted to add a sweetener.
But despite its ubiquity, I couldn’t find haldar doodh at any Indian restaurants I visited. In fact, I don’t think I’ve ever seen an Indian restaurant make them, nor could I imagine an Indian person going into a restaurant and paying five or more dollars to purchase something they could easily mix together at home.
I wouldn’t be surprised to see Indian restaurants begin offering turmeric milk in the next few years. If they know people will order something off the menu, why wouldn’t restaurant owners include the item, especially when it can be sold for such a high markup?
But until then, it’s an off-putting experience seeing something you were once bullied or teased for — i.e. drinking haldar doodh and going to school with a yellow tongue — become a trend, especially a trend that costs between $7 per cup to buy into. Share the taco:

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Cinnamon Club Indian Cuisine Reinvented – Doridro.com

Type : epub | Size : 5.75 MB
Descirption : Here is food that is refined, inventive, and full of startling flavours: sandalwood infused tandoori chicken breast, king prawns with saffron almond sauce, clove smoked roast rump of lamb with corn, asparagus, curried avocado and beetroot salad, Hyderabadi style aubergine steaks with coconut rice, roganjosh pie, pan seared Kolkata betki with bottle gourd stir fry and fenugreek sauce, steamed mango idlis with wild berry sorbet, saffron poached pear with cinnamon ice cream.A fresh, glamourous, and utterly creative approach, Cinnamon Club blends western techniques and presentation with the best of traditional Indian cuisine. Beautifully designed and photographed, it will become an instant classic and a book that will inspire many extraordinary meals.
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You Should Know…Carter Wise

Born in Jackson, Mississippi, Baltimore resident Carter Wise has lived all over the U.S., and even spent some time in Europe. Wise, 35, began his professional life as a pastry chef, training in France at Centre de Formation D’apprenti. Wise ended up working at multiple restaurants in New York City before moving to Colorado where he got into his current occupation: selling real estate.
Now in Baltimore, Wise runs a property management company called CENMAR that helps renters become buyers, owners who want to invest into real estate long term, and help guide property portfolios. Wise also buys and sells real estate as an agent for RE/MAX Sales in Baltimore. Although he’s willing to travel for clients, Wise sells mostly in downtown neighborhoods such as Canton, Fells Point, Harbor East and Federal Hill.
So you trained in France as a pastry chef. What was that like?
I lived in France for almost five years. I trained in Michelin Star restaurants. I received a culinary arts diploma and degree in patisserie, chocolaterie, venoiserie and glacier. I was then able to move to New York and practice my craft.
Is there a specific reason that you became a chef?
As a kid I had a knack for cooking. Cooking in my home was something everyone did. I signed up when I was in high school for a job interview and I got the job. I discovered when I was working there, “oh this is something I take pleasure in,” and then I decided to pursue studies to better understand working in a kitchen and then I turned it into a profession.
Is there a food that you like to make the most?
I am classically French trained but you get to a point to where you want to just start cooking other types of cuisine and using different spices and different ways of cooking. So I have a habit now of when I cook, I’ll travel from continent to continent or different countries. Since I don’t do it as a profession anymore, I’ll do it at home. So one week it may be Moroccan or one week it may be Asian or South American. It just depends on what challenge I want to set myself for. Sometimes the cooking was Ethiopian food or Indian food. The spices are so strong. It can take a while to adapt to the flavor. I kind of push myself to start working with different spices so I can master those types of cooking.
Did you change to real estate when you moved to Baltimore?
No, I actually changed when I was in Colorado. I have a passion for cooking and I know I will cook in my home, but I wanted to do something else as a career. I ended up looking into jobs and some friends of mine were in real estate, and suggested I get into that. I took some time off, and studied to get my real estate license in Colorado, then passed those exams, and started working out there in property management.
Do you attend synagogue or celebrate any holidays?
Yes, I am an Orthodox Jew. I attend services regularly – every Shabbat and for holidays.
Is there a holiday that you like most?
That’s a great question. Probably Shabbat is my most favorite holiday out of all of them. But I get a lot out of every single holiday and enjoy them for their own reason.
Do you make Shabbat dinner every weekend?
There is a very vibrant community here in downtown Baltimore. I will make a Shabbat dinner for people to come over and share it with me once to twice a month. I’ll do a traditional Shabbat lunch every Saturday afternoon. I am very lucky to live in a young community where there is typically always a Shabbat dinner to go to.
Where do you see yourself in five to 10 years?
I definitely see myself doing real estate here in Baltimore. Hopefully I’ll be settled down, married and having kids.
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29 New and Tasty Things I Ate at the 2019 Summer Fancy Food Show

From an amazing take on Chex Mix to a new competitor in the non-dairy ice cream space, here’s what I experienced. June 26, 2019 7 min read
Besides boasting of a city block’s length of booths dedicated to cheese, the Summer Fancy Food Show , held annually in New York City’s Javits Center, provides a chance for entrepreneurs to show off their new, innovative and hopefully tasty products to retailers, distributors and others.
The show takes up three levels of the convention center, with the main floor dedicated to cuisines from around the world, the bottom dedicated to growing packaged food brands and the top floor for recently created startups. I spent most of my time speaking with the entrepreneurs in that latter space, while doing quick walkthroughs of the other levels.
There’s too much food for one person to take in a single visit, but here are 29 companies (and their products) that caught my eye. Coffee soda Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner
There have been a few attempts to make a coffee soda; even Coca-Cola tried its massive hand at it with a product called Coca Cona.
Cafello is a new attempt at the initiative to combine coffee and soda, and one that’s pretty damn tasty. Snackable ricotta Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner
Greek yogurt may be suffering from stagnant sales, but that gives other dairy items a chance to shine. Snackable cottage cheese has seen some resurgence, so why not ricotta cheese?
RifRaf has both sweet and savory options. I tried the Meyer Lemon variety, and it was surprisingly good. A spread made of dates Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner Wanna Date is spreadable and tasty. It is also low in sugar and vegan, making it another good option for sandwiches or crackers. Frozen Moroccan food Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner This spread came courtesy of Foussi Foods, a new brand that wants to bring Moroccan cuisine into people’s homes by way of the freezer aisle. I tried its sweets along with its bread and dip, and I’m hopeful the company is successful in its efforts. Vegan baking kits Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner
Baking can be fun, but what if you’re vegan. SimpleVGN is a baking mix that just needs wet ingredients such as almond milk to get going. It even comes with its own proprietary egg replacement.
I tasted the company’s carrot cake, complete with frosting, and it was delicious. Falafel and plant-based tzatziki Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner One of the highlights of the show was Fabalish ‘s plant-based tzatziki (typically made with yogurt). This version was made of aquafaba, the liquid found in canned chickpeas, and tasted exactly like its dairy counterpart. The company also makes excellent falafel, which is sold frozen. It will also soon introduce chocolate chip blondies made from chickpeas. A taste of Tunisia Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner Mohamed and Tara Belouafa are the founders of Zonzon Organic , makers of Tunisian-inspired sauces, which pack a lot of flavor. They’d be great for pasta, seafood, poultry and probably lots of other things. Avocado Leaf tea Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner Who knew that you could make tea from leaves of avocado trees? Well, the people behind the company aptly called Avocado Leaf Tea . Nuts for hemp Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner
CBD was a key player at Expo West, but I didn’t see many products with ingredients derived from marijuana at the Fancy Food Show aside from these nuts by A Boring Life with hemp extract. New York heat Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner 718 Heat Factory is a hot sauce brand with a lot of New York pride. Lawyer-by-day Leilani Kali Rivers is the co-founder of the company, and the sauces are based on the recipes of her 94-year-old grandmother from Panama. A different take on bars Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner Blake’s makes bars that are free from the top-eight allergens. What also sets them apart is the inclusion of quinoa and chickpeas. Its Pineapple flavor was quite tasty, and it had a nice chewy texture, unlike most gravelly bars. Mushrooms as a snack Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner MudLrk is a company with interesting products and an interesting founder. Its line of snacks include baked jackfruit, which is naturally sweet, along with flavored shiitake mushrooms, which have a nice, crispy texture. All its packaging is compostable. The founder, Trace Ostergren, was inspired to create the snacks based off his time living in Beijing during his teenage years and beyond. A natural burger replacement Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner
Vivian Me-Hae Lee believes vegetarians and flexitarians will swap out their burgers for mung beans. The Mung Dynasty Foods product will come in bites and patties and be sold frozen. Let’s Chaat Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner I remembered this company’s Indian-inspired snacks from last year’s show. The Chaat Company is back with a new format: chickpea chips with thick dips. Bringing the heat Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner Hillside Harvest ‘s original sauce set my mouth on fire in a good way. The Caribbean-inspired sauce is made with peppers and fruits, which gives a sweet introduction with a fiery kick. A new contender in non-dairy ice cream Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner
Oat milk is the latest craze in alternative milks, and it proves to be an excellent base for ice cream. Oate ‘s vanilla was spot on for its dairy ice cream counterpart, while its coffee flavor was also amazing. African flavor Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner It’s safe to say there aren’t many African-inspired food products on the shelves. Hapi African Gourmet offers a peanut sauce and sunflower sauce that will bring the continent’s flavors to your kitchen. Empanadas in your freezer Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner These Argentinian empanadas from Cocina 54 are a major step up from Hot Pockets — or whatever you have lingering in the back of your freezer. The company will soon introduce a bite-sized version for snacking as well. Thai sauces at home Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner Thaifusions sauces are basically your favorite Thai restaurant in a jar. These incredible condiments look to be the only thing you need to make your own Southeast Asian cuisine. Sweet potato cookies Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner These delicious vegan cookies from Off Our Rocker use sweet potatoes as their base. “Chicken” salad from tempeh Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner Even Barry Schwartz says that tempeh, an Indonesia protein, can be a hard sell. But he’s proud of his new product, Chickenless Salad, which does indeed match the texture (and some of the flavor) of its poultry counterpart. A spread with attitude Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner Spread-Mmms makes an olive tapenade, orange marmalade and other spreads. But what’s most eye-catching is its cool branding, which is inspired by 1950s era pin-up girls. The cartoon woman on the label is named Sergeant Spread-Mmms, by the way. A better Chex mix Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner Loloyum created one of my favorite treats at the show: a much better version of Chex Mix. It’s inspired by a Hawaiian snack mix that uses Chex Mix as a base, but this version uses natural ingredients with flavors including Matcha and Japanese Seven Spice. Mushroom coffee that’s good? Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner
I was surprised that I actually enjoyed Mushroom Coffee from Sun Alchemy . Its Matcha Latte and Golden Latte were also quite good, and the company has many drink mixes to choose from. Better-for-you ice cream Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner Re:Think Ice Cream boasts that its products contain less calories and sugar and more protein than other brands. That’s all well and good, but I was just happy it offered Coconut Matcha and Cardamom Pistachio flavors. Creating adventurous eaters Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner
Let’s end this roundup with a look at some companies creating products for babies and kids.
First off is Lil’Gourmets , founded by Kraft Foods veteran Shibani Baluja. It offers your little ones interesting flavors such as Sweet Potato Curry, Moroccan Butternut Squash and Cinnamon Beets & Apples. And, yes, adults can eat them too. Diversifying young palettes Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner Kekoa Foods has a similar mission of introducing diverse ingredients to babies. It boasts of incorporating herbs, roots and spices into its lineup of products. Finger foods Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner Little Pickins makes chicken and turkey balls packed with vegetables for young children. It looks like a good way to introduce littles ones to ingredients they may not be used to. Peanut butter for babies Image credit: Stephen J. Bronner
MeWe aims to provide a way for parents to introduce peanuts, a top allergen, to their babies (it’s better to do so at an earlier age). The product comes in tubes and is easier for toddlers to swallow that typical peanut butter.
The company is a nonprofit and uses its funds to help treat and prevent childhood malnutrition. Kathleen, Founder and CEO of Grayce & Co, a media and marketing consultancy, can help you develop a brand strategy, build marketing campaigns and learn how to balance work and life.

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SAVOR Mango Pickle; Somerset

by Andrew Davis, Windy City Times 2019-06-26 ).
Mango Pickle, a smaller spot, features reimagined Indian dishes courtesy of Chef Marisa Paolillo—an Italian-American who fell in love with Indian cuisine while residing in Mumbai with her husband for nine years. And what she’s brought back from her trip constitutes a journey for more adventurous guests.
My friend and I were treated to the prix fixe items—she had the vegetarian menu while I took the more carnivorous route. What resulted is that both of us thoroughly enjoyed our dishes—even if our heat limits were pushed a bit.
We both started with delightful paneer pops, accompanied by apple-coriander chutney. Then, our paths div = =erged. My friend had unwrapped samosas ( tasty, but pretty spicy ), steamed idli ( a delicious rice cake with peanut chutney ), and spring vegetable khichari ( solid, but probably my dining companion’s least favorite item ).
After the pops, I had the sable fish paturi steamed in a banana leaf ( an acquired taste, but one I liked more as I progressed ), chicken chettinad ( shredded chicken leg in patty form—and probably my favorite dish ) and lamb chops ( cooked very well ).
From there, we both had a sorbet and soda—but, of course, it wasn’t the standard, as ingredients involved campari, orange and roasted meringue. The lovely pot de creme ( served on a saucer instead of a cup or pot ) featured chocolate ganache and brÃ�lee banana. But that was not all, as Paolillo’s husband, Nakul Patel, poured us Lake Effect’s chai masala barleywine—which I couldn’t stop sipping.
Did I mention that the prix fixe menu is $55 ( $45 for the vegetarian line-up )?
However, if prix fixe is not your thing, there are plenty of a la carte dishes, ranging from the spring vegetable clay pot to lamb biryani to masala shrimp salad. Whatever you pick, you’re very likely to go on a gustatory adventure—and like the trip.
Somerset
Not as exotic—but just as satisfying in many ways—is the contemporary American cuisine at the Gold Coast spot Somerset ( 1112 N. State St.; www.somersetchicago.com ).
Housed in the Hotel Viceroy, the food is impressive—even with items that may seem pretty basic. The spring-pea hummus, with seeded crackers and feta, is absolutely delightful; and I underestimated the sweet corn-and-salt cod fritters, which I could’ve eaten all day. Other lunchtime items—ranging from grilled asparagus tartine to the wood-grilled bass to the steak frites—will have you feeling sated. Also, regarding dessert, the chocolate cake and budino are must-haves.
Also, here’s another reason to check out Somerset: Throughout the summer, people can stop by there for Somer Socials each Sunday at 5-7 p.m. Chef Meg Galus serves flavors from her ice-cream cart like Brown Sugar Cookie Dough, Toasted Marshmallow, Mint Chocolate Fudge, Rainbow Sherbet, and Peaches & Cream. Items are $4-$6 each.
Note: Restaurant profiles/events are based on invitations arranged from restaurants and/or firms. DINING Pride events, The Dearborn chef’s win, Fourth of July items 2019-06-25 – —Revival Food Hall’s TOMI Sushi, 125 S. Clark St., created a spicy rainbow roll ( aqua blue rice, tuna, cucumber, jalapeño, pickled radish … SAVOR Cebu; Rooh 2019-06-19 – The restaurants profiled this week are considered two of the hottest new spots in the city—but do they live up to the hype? … DINING Pride events, Beatnik on the River, crawfish boil 2019-06-18 – —For Pride Month, Big Gay Ice Cream is teaming with pastry chef Leigh Omilinsky—this time from her new home, Cold Storage, 1000 W. … Five Worth Finding: Pride, Carol’s Cookies, Kimpton Gray and more 2019-06-18 – —The Queeriodic Table: A Celebration of LGBTQ+ Culture: Harriet Dyer’s book ( a take on the periodic table, of course ) contains a … Sweets & Snacks Expo: Celebrities, innovation 2019-06-16 – Recently, the Sweets & Snacks Expo took place at McCormick Place. This year’s event was more about innovation than ever, but also exhibited … SAVOR Wines, Mezcalito, silent discos and more… 2019-06-11 – Lounging at Mezcalito Mercadito Chicago, 108 W. Kinzie St., recently opened a downstairs lounge called Mezcalito—and the colorful basement spot definitely has … DINING Father’s Day items, drag-queen brunch, Ribfest 2019-06-11 – —There will be a specialty Father’s Day menu at The Claridge Hotel’s Juniper Spirits & Oysters, 1244 N. Dearborn Pkwy., on June 15-16, … SAVOR Lunch at The Albert, Walton Street Kitchen 2019-06-04 – Maybe it’s the scientist in me ( having majored in biology as an undergrad ), but I found The Albert ( 228 E. … DINING Food-truck social, Ina Mae’s Sno-Balls, JoJo’s brunch 2019-06-04 – —The Pilsen Food Truck Social will take place June 8-9 at 1200-1300 W. 18th St., 12-10 p.m. A few of the food trucks … DINING Pride Bowl, OPALGA’s donuts, Band of Bohemia mocktails 2019-05-28 – —All June, Furious Spoon will offer its Pride ramen bowl. For each $16.95 bowl ( with veggie broth, chili-infused noodles, spicy miso, napa such, subject

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Best Indian Restaurant in Southall

Best Indian Restaurant in Southall Toggle navigation Description Best Indian Restaurant in Southall – London, united kingdom, United Kingdom
Come and experience delightful Indian food at Sukhdev’s Restaurant. No denying that we are best Indian Restaurant in Southall because of the food quality and huge variation in the menu. We have healthy food options for diet conscious people and also a lot of other cuisines like Indian, Punjabi, and Chinese along with a variation of cocktails, drinks, and sweetish delicacies. so what are you waiting for? Whether you came to London for a vacation or you live here, you should visit Sukhdev’s Restaurant to enjoy the finest traditional Indian spices and superior cuisine.
Contact us:

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INTERVIEW | Maria Micallef: ‘I believe in putting passion into anything I do’

Maria Micallef, CEO of General Soft Drinks, The Waterfront Hotel, Is-Suq tal-Belt, Arkadia and IELS, opens up to Business Today about being a successful woman in business 27 June 2019, 9:31am SHARE TWEET
You occupy the role of CEO for a number of companies which operate in diverse sectors – The General Soft Drinks, The Waterfront Hotel, IELS, Arkadia and Is-Suq tal -Belt. How did you start out, and how did you eventually get involved in this broad sphere of business?
By profession and training, I am a chemist. Back in 1992, I accidentally landed myself a job at The General Soft Drinks Co. Ltd (GSD). At that point in time Malta was facing an issue related to nitrates in the water table. GSD had contacted the university asking for a chemist who could help with the analysis of the water. My tutor recommended that I join GSD for the summer months, and when I completed my university studies, obtaining a BSc. degree, I remained with the company. In the following year I was promoted to Quality Assurance Manager and I held that role for three years, before taking on the role of production manager.
After two years I was appointed General Manager and quickly started introducing new measures to improve our business. One of the first major challenges I faced as general manager was related to Malta’s accession into the European Union.
One of the important issues during the negotiations period before membership had to do with the fact that, locally, soft drinks were bottled in returnable glass bottles whilst other products, such as water, were bottled in plastic bottles. This was due to an anomaly in our legislation. At the time, I formed part of a lobby group, which also involved Farsons, that had worked very hard to try and convince the EU that Malta should keep its returnable glass bottles. This is ironic considering the current shift in trend against plastic containers.
The EU, however, felt that allowing Malta to retain its returnable glass bottles would amount to a barrier to the free movement of goods, as it would be considered protectionism of the local manufacturing industry. Therefore, the economic principle won over the environmental one at the time and we were forced to shift to plastic packaging, subject to a four-year derogation period.
At that junction, the Mizzi Organisation had to decide between building a new factory to cater for the new requirements, or to be limited to only importing Coca-Cola products. Following discussions with Coca-Cola, the family was convinced to invest €28 million in a new soft drink production factory. I was given the task of overseeing the construction of the factory, and, against all odds, we managed to build it in 18 months. Coca-Cola themselves were a bit sceptical that we would manage to accomplish the task within the required timeframe, but thanks to the team I had, we completed the building on time.
The fact that I successfully saw the new factory finished on time and within budget, boosted my career, and subsequently, in 2008, my managing director asked me to assume responsibility for the whole portfolio of companies that fell under this remit. This is how Arkadia and The Waterfront Hotel fell under my responsibility. I was also appointed executive director of the IELS English language school, in which the Mizzi Organisation has a shareholding interest.
When 2018 came around, I was made CEO of the entire operation. Moreover, I currently also sit on the board of First United Insurance Brokers.
Which of these areas presents the most challenges?
I feel that all businesses have the same knobs , so to speak. With all businesses, the starting point has to be gaining a close familiarity with their respective numbers – the operational figures. Whether its Coca-Cola, Arkadia or The Waterfront Hotel, you need to know your numbers and your customers. After that, you need to build a team of people who can run the business and manage those numbers.
All the businesses under my remit are exciting to me. I love dynamic business models and having contact with people. Funnily enough, although chemistry brought me where I am, today I would not wish to be based in a laboratory without having contact with people. Work for me is a passion and I spend a lot of my time at work. I believe in putting passion into anything I do and I wouldn’t do it if I didn’t have the passion for it.
Regarding which area is the most challenging, I would say that every business model has its own particular challenges. Take Arkadia’s business model – here we are managing a combination of food and fashion. Fashion has its cycles, and, over the years, internet shopping has also presented a challenge. The food store market is growing, but the number of players has also increased, making it very competitive. In connection with running Arkadia’s commercial centre in Gozo, a challenge here is that, while we operate all year round, the summer months and the December period represent the peaks in terms of sales and getting the business model to continuously maximise its returns is challenging. Furthermore, the labour market in Gozo faces its own share of challenges.
In terms of Is-Suq tal-Belt – which is our latest major project – the first year was very exciting because its business model was a first on the Maltese market. We got some things right, and others wrong, as often happens in life. What’s important is to learn from the wrong decisions and to go on and improve.
In the case of GSD, we constantly monitor every little number – it’s a volumes business with extremely low margins, making it necessary to be very careful about the cost of goods, production, energy usage and labour costs, and to deliver the product on time. At the moment, my biggest headache is our capability to serve all our customers in the face of the traffic issues our truck drivers face on the roads. We’ve tried to improve the situation by setting up a logistics hub in the north of Malta, but this isn’t enough. Malta’s rising population, tourism and traffic bring with it these types of challenges.
But, at the end of the day, when the financials are in the positive, they are good challenges to have.
Turning to The Waterfront Hotel, we last year expanded the establishment from a 116-bedroom estate to one with 164 bedrooms, which was a challenge to get done on time. We had a record first year and such good results can sometimes be difficult to maintain. Regarding the English language school, the number of students coming from Germany are down throughout the whole market. However, we are successfully attracting students from other markets, such as South America.
One common challenge across all business models is the availability of human resources. The issue is not limited only to finding people with the right skills , but also to engage people with the passion and self-discipline to really be the best in their respective positions. In relation to this, I feel that although the economy is doing so well, employees have become somewhat spoilt for choice. I have worked hard throughout my life, and I find that trying to instil the passion I have into people is one of the biggest challenges across the board.
How are you able to juggle the various duties which come with the role of being CEO for several large ventures?
I consider myself to be very disciplined. I normally arrive at the office by 9am and go back home at around 10pm. But between 7am and 8.30am, I’d have already gone through my emails and the businesses’ figures for that particular day, which are sent to me by an assistant. I make sure to reply to all my emails daily, although I receive around 300 of them each day. I have the luxury of having a driver, and this is allows me to utilise the time I spend travelling to answer my emails and make my phone calls. My driver is worth his weight in gold, because through him I can utilise my time in the best way possible when I’m at work.
Having a very supportive partner and good staff around me in my office also goes a long way towards helping me perform my duties. As an aside, I should remark that the reality in Malta is that if you want to grow professionally, at my level, you have to go sideways not upwards. Getting involved in other businesses has kept me remain motivated.
The elimination of plastic waste is one of the most topical subjects when it comes to safeguarding the environment. What is GSD doing to help address the problem of the waste created by the disposal of single use plastics, such as of the type used to bottle soft drinks and mineral water?
This is a topic which is very close to my heart. And single-use plastic isn’t the only issue here – waste needs to be tackled holistically. In 2016, Prime Minister Joseph Muscat announced during the United Nations’ Ocean Conference that he wanted to tackle the issue of plastic waste in Malta. From this, I took the cue and set out to discuss with The Coca-Cola Company about the possibility of having a bottle deposit system. While The Coca-Cola Company (TCCC) initially had their reservations about a deposit system in Malta, my team successfully presented a case and obtained TCCC’s support. Subsequently, I drew up a deposit system for returning containers and we started discussion with the government and stakeholders on the prospect of implementing it.
During the initial stages, the government was considering issuing a tender and selecting a private operator to run the scheme. However, I worked hard to bring together practically all major stakeholders with the aim to drive the message that the scheme should be the beverage producers’ responsibility. Furthermore, I also highlighted that it was in the producers’ interest to operate this system on a non-profit basis, to minimise the impact on consumers
Discussions among stakeholders also included the major beverage producers and importers as well large retailers to ensure that any system put in place would not create a barrier to free movement of goods, having learnt my lessons from the events surrounding glass bottles and Malta’s path to EU membership. We also brought in the GRTU, because it is also essential to work hand in hand with smaller retailers. To this extent, the various stakeholders proceeded to establish three associations, namely a beverage producers’ association, a beverage importers’ association and a beverage retailers’ association.
These three associations will be the equal shareholders of the Beverage Container Refund System (BCRS) company, with the aim to be responsible for handling the deposits once the scheme comes into effect. The company will be installing reverse vending machines, will be responsible for registering all bottles placed on the market and will ensure that any retailers selling the products are registered with the company. It will then be up to the consumer to return the beverage containers – be they glass, cans or PET – by depositing them in one of the many reverse vending machines which will be located around the island to get ones’ deposit back.
We have provided substantial feedback to Government during the Consultation period in respect to the relevant legislation, which should soon be published. Last December we’ve signed a memorandum of understanding which will soon be turned into an agreement. Once the agreement comes to be, the scheme will start operating within 14 months.
There are currently around a dozen countries in the EU which operate such a scheme, but Malta will be the first country in which The Coca-Cola Company gave its full support. In fact, I am particularly proud that TCCC will likely apply Malta’s approach as a best practice in other markets.
In 2018 The Coca-Cola Company announced a bold, ambitious goal: to help collect and recycle a bottle or can for every one we sell by 2030. This will be done within its framework of the World Without Waste. Another initiative within this framework is to have primary packaging that contains at least 50% recycled material by 2030. We’re also upgrading our machines to incorporate a certain element of recycled PET within our bottles We will soon be launching a Zero Waste Initiative through funds acquired from The Coca-Cola Foundation where we will work to create the first zero waste campus and also a zero-waste city.
There are several eateries at is-Suq tal -Belt, but these all face competition from the hundreds of other restaurants operating in Valletta. What does the Suq offer which the other restaurants don’t?
Different cuisines under one roof – that’s what makes us unique. The market is indeed crowded, but we offer a unique venue where we give our clients the option of enjoying different types of food in a single venue. Is-Suq tal-Belt required a €16 million investment, and through it we’ve restored a bustling market in Merchants Street.
We’ve brought life into Valletta, but I believe we must also be very considerate to the community within which we’re operating, and we’ve organised various initiatives with a view towards integrating Valletta’s community with our Suq establishment, while also striving to cater for the local community’s needs.
There were reports last year that inspections by Jobsplus carried out at is-Suq tal -Belt found a number of workers at the food court’s various outlets working who didn’t have a valid work permit. Have better measures been put in place since then to ensure the outlets abide by the relevant employment rules?
When the Suq was newly opened, we encountered some elements of negative publicity, such as when it came to the placing of tables and chairs outside. Regarding the Jobsplus matter, in reality the numbers of workers without permits which were cited related not only to the Suq, but to the whole of Merchants Street. And while we did have some people working at the Suq who weren’t regularised, these were actually ITS students who were receiving training, and their paperwork wasn’t 100% in place.
Following the media reports, the Suq was not found to be in breach of the rules and no action was taken. We’ve moved on from there, and we’re now more sensitive to the issue.
Are there challenges when it comes to employing foreign workers?
GSD employs around 14 nationalities, including South Africans, Venezuelans, Mexicans, Filipinos, Eritreans and various Europeans. In the catering industry, we have several Nepalese and Indian staff, amongst other nationalities. These all represent different cultures, and it’s important to adapt to this variety through understanding the respective cultures and being inclusive. At the same time, we have to strive to retain the local touch in everything we do. Tourists who come to Malta still want to understand what Maltese culture is all about. I believe that this is the challenge of the moment.
There has been significant discussion on a local level recently about the gender pay gap, and the relative lack of women in Malta who occupy decision-making positions. Do you feel there are obstacles in Malta for women who want to advance to senior positions in their professions?
My opinion here might not be the typical one. I have been heading GSD’s operation for 21 years, and I started out at a time when it was very difficult for women to occupy such roles. The issue of gender equality is one which exists worldwide. Multinationals have been very conscious of this. At 28, I was Coca-Cola’s only female general manager. Today, however, the situation is different. The president of Coca-Cola’s central and south east Europe arm is a woman, for instance, and the person driving Turkey’s Coca-Cola business is female, as is the person managing the German sector. So, even in a company like Coca-Cola, when two decades ago I was the only woman, I would say that now, in Europe, there are more females occupying senior positions than male.
On a more local level I tend to be against gender quotas. I believe that if a woman wants to make it, she has to prove herself, just as any man has to prove himself. No position should be given to someone based solely on whether they are male or female.
At the same time, a woman cannot expect to argue that she will be as good at the job as a male counterpart but then go on to say she has problems with her hours of work. I think one needs to establish certain priorities. In Malta, we now have easily accessible support for working women, such as child care facilities. This said, I feel that, when it comes to my own office for instance, I am flexible in adapting to the family life of the women working around me. A woman might for instance need to leave work to pick her children up from school, but she could then tackle something in the evening, when her children go to bed.
I do acknowledge, however, that it is still more difficult for women, as societal expectations still revolve somewhat around females carrying out certain roles, such as caring for children or elderly parents. This is where men need to pull their socks up. A lot of this, however, depends on the relationship a couple has, and no legislation will sort this out. There still needs to be a change in mindset in this respect.
Regarding gender pay gap, I’ve personally never been distinguished against when it comes to the salary offered to me, nor have I ever distinguished by gender in the pay I offer to employees.
What advice would you offer to young women who have aspirations of being successful and advancing in their careers?
If you want to achieve something, do all you can to overcome all obstacles. Many times, obstacles are created in the mind. Try to not create excuses, and, if there is a genuine obstacle, be passionate enough to work through it.
Be true to yourself and don’t be someone different from who you really are. Be proud of who you are and believe in yourself. If you do this, and add in an element of the right ambition, you will make it.
Also keep in mind that being emotional isn’t a bad thing. Women’s emotions are sometimes used against them and being emotional in a woman isn’t seen the same as in a man. But, with me, my employees know exactly where they stand and this is a good thing. When my staff come to me with a problem, I also expect that they suggest a possible solution. We can debate whether it’s good or not and ultimately the buck stops with me, but I will let them make their own decisions as that is how one learns. Massimo Costa joined MaltaToday in 2017 as a journalist. He is a graduate in European Stud…

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